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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Sat. Jul. 31 - 12:45 am
Police & Fire
Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Rental Car Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 07/27/21 9:00 AM
TT - Rental Car Scams - GRAPHIC
TT - Rental Car Scams - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/3585/146380/thumb_TT_-_Rental_Car_Scams_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against rental car scams.

The summer of 2021 is a much different – and hopefully better – place for you and your family than the summer of 2020. States are lifting restrictions, and you are finally able to travel again!

That tropical beach – or the mountains – or even that big city across the country is calling, and there is nothing more that you want to do than hop on a plane and go. What you may find when you get there, though, is that renting a car is very difficult and expensive.

According to our friends at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), rental car availability is at an all-time low and prices are sky high. That, of course, gives scammers a prime opportunity.

The FTC says scammers are posing as rental car companies, setting up their own websites, and advertising fake customer service phone numbers. The goal is to convince you that they’re legit. 

You should consider it a big red flag if you are asked to pay with a gift card or prepaid debit card. Other ways to protect yourself include: 

  • Research the rental car company by searching for the name of the company and words like “scam,” “complaint,” or “review” to check if other people have had a bad experience.
  • Verify deals with the company directly. If you need customer support, look for contact info on the company’s official website. Don’t use a search engine result. Scammers can pay to place sponsored ads in search results, so they show up at the top or in the sponsored ad section.
  • Pay with a credit card if possible. You can dispute credit card charges, but gift cards and prepaid debit cards can disappear like cash. Once you give the number and PIN to a scammer, the money is gone.

If you are the victim of any online fraud, you should also report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

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Attached Media Files: TT - Rental Car Scams - AUDIO , TT - Rental Car Scams - GRAPHIC

Seeking Information - Shooting Investigation (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 07/26/21 4:15 PM
Suspect Vehicle
Suspect Vehicle
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/6530/147091/thumb_car.png

On June 10, 2021 at 9:41pm, the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety (GPDPS) received a report of a drive-by shooting occurring in the 2000 block of NW Hawthorne Ave. Two female occupants yelled at five males before firing several rounds from the vehicle. After shooting at the males, the vehicle continued northbound on Hawthorne Ave while firing additional shots at two more people. No one was injured, and the suspect vehicle fled outbound on NW Vine St. We are asking for the public's assistance in identifying and/or locating the vehicle and suspects.

Suspect 1: Female – no further description

Suspect 2: Female, 20s, medium complexion, heavyset, average height, long dark hair in a ponytail

Suspect Vehicle: Dark four-door sedan, possibly a 2010-2015 model, with tinted windows and quiet exhaust

If you have any information about this incident, please contact GPDPS at 541-450-6260 and refer to case number 21-25667.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Suspect Vehicle , Suspect Vehicle.2

Task Force Raid on Black-Market Marijuana Grow finds Illegal Weed, Guns, Unsafe Living Conditions (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/26/21 2:44 PM
JCSO
JCSO
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/6186/147082/thumb_4.IMG_0512.jpg

JCSO Case #21-3832

CENTRAL POINT, Ore – A task force raid on a black-market marijuana grow near Central Point uncovered illegal marijuana, guns, and unsafe living conditions. Authorities from multiple federal, state and local agencies discovered nearly 7,400 marijuana plants in 35 non-permitted greenhouses, more than 1,800 lbs. of processed marijuana, 71 vials of marijuana extract, 10 ½ grams of cocaine, six guns, a large amount of ammunition, and more than $9 thousand cash. During the investigation 35 people were detained and interviewed.

At around 7 a.m. Thursday, July 22nd, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO), Medford Police Department (MPD), and the Illegal Marijuana Enforcement Team (IMET), along with Medford Area Drug and Gang Enforcement (MADGE), US Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), and US Marshals served a warrant at a black-market marijuana grow on the 2000 block of Vilas Rd. near Central Point. The property did not have any permits to grow or process marijuana for recreational, commercial, or medical purposes.

Various firearms were seized from the site including three AR-style rifles, an AK-47, and a 9mm handgun with a high-capacity drum magazine. One of the rifles was reported stolen out of Los Angeles, Calif.

Living conditions for migrant workers at the grow site were uninhabitable. Living and working areas were filthy, cramped, and otherwise unsafe with many sleeping on cardboard inside shipping containers with little or no access to bathing and bathroom facilities. Multiple electrical and building code violations were also discovered. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was summoned, sending two inspectors with sanctions forthcoming.

While regulatory agencies investigate permitted cannabis operations, IMET is focusing on the black-market marijuana trade in the Rogue Valley.  IMET is a multi-agency task force funded by a grant from the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission.  The task force includes personnel from JCSO, MPD, and the Jackson County District Attorney’s Office.  

The investigation is ongoing.  No further information is currently available for release.

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Attached Media Files: JCSO , multi agency effort , permit violations , shower , kitchen area , 2021-07/6186/147082/14.IMG_0588.jpg , 2021-07/6186/147082/13.5A8A1010.jpg , living conditions , living conditions , Vials, ammo, cocaine , Guns , Processed MJ , Plants , Greenhouses , Property Flyover

Office of State Fire Marshal Temporarily Suspends Enforcement of Gas Station Self-Service
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/29/21 8:39 PM

With the current and forecasted heat in Oregon, the Office of the State Fire Marshal is suspending their enforcement of the regulations that prohibit the self-serve of gasoline at retail gasoline service stations. Governor Brown’s Office approved the suspension of the regulations. The suspension is in place for 24 hours, until 11:59 pm on Friday, July 30th, 2021.

With the hot incoming weather, the Oregon Office of the State Fire Marshal acknowledges employees working outside. For businesses who choose to continue to provide full service, our Office encourages them to provide water and cool areas to keep employees safe. 

This suspension of the self-service regulations does not affect areas of the state or timeframes that are already authorized for self-service refueling under Oregon law. Information about the rules suspension for self-service gasoline can be found on the OSFM website.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 99E - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 07/30/21 8:19 AM

On Thursday, July 29, 2021 at approximately 10:43 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle collision on Hwy 99E at Boones Ferry Rd.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Hyundai Santa Fe, operated by Jose Sandoval Flores (40) of Woodburn, was northbound on Hwy 99E and turned left, onto Boones Ferry Rd, into the path of a southbound Harley Davidson motorcycle operated by Jerald Stewart (64) of Salem. 

Stewart sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Flores was not injured.

OSP was assisted by Woodburn Fire Department, Woodburn Ambulance, and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 97 - Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - 07/30/21 7:52 AM

On Thursday, July 29, 2021 at approximately 12:45 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near mile post 104.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Chevrolet Impala, operated by Charles Carroll (51) of Madras, was northbound when it left the roadway, lost control, and entered the southbound lane colliding with a Mazda CX-5 operated by Greg Rockwell (70) of Bothell, WA.

Carroll was transported by air ambulance to the hospital.

Passenger in the Chevrolet, Donna Reynaga (52) of Ontario, CA. sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Rockwell and passenger, Colleen Donahue (62) of Bothell, WA. were both transported to the hospital with injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, Jefferson County EMS, and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 6 - Tillamook County
Oregon State Police - 07/29/21 5:51 PM

On Thursday, July 29, 2021 at approximately 2:19 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 6 near mile post 5.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Saturn Ion, operated by Richard Rose (41) of Portland, was westbound when it crossed into the eastbound lane and collided with a Kenworth semi-truck operated by Robert Kiser (51) of Tillamook.

Rose was transported to Tillamook Hospital where he was pronounced deceased. 

Kiser was not transported for injuries.

OSP was assisted by Tillamook Ambulance, Tillamook Fire Department, Tillamook County Sheriff's Office, Tillamook Police Department, and ODOT. 

 


Officer Involved Shooting Investigation Keizer Police Department - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 07/29/21 11:25 AM

On Wednesday, July 28, 2021 at approximately 8:40 P.M., Keizer Police Department Officers responded to a suspicious vehicle call behind a business at the corner of River Rd. and Dearborn Rd.  

Officers contacted two adult males near the vehicle, which was determined to be stolen.   One of the males exchanged gunfire with officers and then fled in the vehicle. The other male stayed at the scene and was cooperative.  

The male that fled went southbound on River Rd.  The vehicle struck a pedestrian which was crossing the street near the intersection of River Rd. and Cummings Lane.  The pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Keizer Officers, with the assistance of Salem Police Department Officers, were able to get the vehicle stopped near the intersection of Cherry Ave. and Salem Parkway.  After a short standoff the suspect surrendered and was taken into custody.  

He was transported to Salem Hospital with several gunshot wounds.

Six Keizer Police Officers have been determined to be involved officers and per standard procedure have been placed on administrative leave.

Per Senate Bill 111 protocol the Marion County District Attorney’s Office has requested Oregon State Police to lead the investigation into the officer involved shooting and the pedestrian fatality.

No further information is available for release at this time and names will be released when appropriate.

Refer to original release from Keizer Police Department below.

OFFICER INVOLVED SHOOTING

News Release from Keizer Police Dept.
Posted on FlashAlert: July 28th, 2021 11:28 PM

On July 28, 2021, at approximately 2042 hours, Keizer police officers responded to a call of a suspicious vehicle in the area of River Rd N and Dearborn Ave N.  During the contact, there was an officer involved shooting, pursuit and hit and run crash.  The suspect is in custody and there is no danger to the public.  We will be providing further details as we are able.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 101 - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 07/28/21 5:39 PM

On Wednesday, July 28, 2021 at approximately 7:20 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 196. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Contour, operated by Rhonda Wild (51) of Fresno, CA. was northbound in the southbound lane when it collided with a southbound Nissan Titan, pulling a boat, operated by Jason Smith (46) of Prineville.

Wild and Smith sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

Two passengers from the Nissan, Heidi Smith (47) of Prineville and a juvenile, were transported to the Florence Hospital with injuries.  

OSP was assisted by the Lane County Sheriff's Office, EMS, and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 240 - Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 07/27/21 2:19 PM

On Tuesday, July 27, 2021 at approximately 5:20 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 240 near milepost 9.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota pickup, operated by Jeffrey Brown (36) of Yamhill, was eastbound when it crossed into the westbound lane and collided with a Nissan Sentra operated by Irene Gomez (34) of Woodburn.

Brown sustained serious injuries and was transported to OHSU by Life Flight. 

Gomez sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Hwy 240 was closed for approximately 4 hours.

OSP was assisted by Yamhill County Sheriff's Office, TVF&R, and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 6 - Washington County
Oregon State Police - 07/26/21 3:46 PM

On July 26, 2021, at approximately 6:48 AM, Oregon State Police along with Washington Co. Sheriff's Office, Banks Fire, and Oregon Department of Transportation responded to the report of a two-vehicle collision on HWY 6 near milepost 33 west of Banks. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a green 2007 Honda CRV operated by Monico BARAJAS-ROJAS (70), of The Dalles, was traveling eastbound on Hwy 6 negotiating a curve when his vehicle crossed into the westbound lane and struck a blue 2018 Dodge pick-up. The right-front passenger of the Honda CRV, Emilia Barajas (61) of The Dalles, suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. The driver of the 2018 Dodge pick-up, Vernon MINCEMOYER (51), of Gaston, was uninjured. 

HWY 6 was closed for approximately five hours. 

 

 


Serious Injury Crash on I-84 - Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/26/21 7:14 AM
2021-07/1002/147061/20210725_083013_resized_1_(002).jpg
2021-07/1002/147061/20210725_083013_resized_1_(002).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/1002/147061/thumb_20210725_083013_resized_1_(002).jpg

On July 25, 2021, at approximately 7:38 A.M. OSP responded to a single-vehicle crash on I-84 near milepost 256.  A silver Mazda CX-9 was traveling westbound on Interstate 84 when the driver fell asleep and left the roadway. The vehicle went around a guardrail and then down an embankment for approximately 200 feet until coming to a rest on the driver’s side on the banks of the Grande Ronde River. A witness to the crash was able to remove the two juvenile passengers from the vehicle, which was on fire. The witness told the Trooper that the vehicle was on fire when he arrived, but he was able to put the fire out with water from the river.

Firefighters and medical personnel arrived on the scene and had to extricate the driver and front passenger. The two adults were taken by life flight with serious injuries. The 2 juvenile passengers were taken to Grande Ronde Hospital. The Trooper on scene stated that Union County Deputy Hamilton went above and beyond carrying the injured little girl across the Grande Ronde River to get medical attention.

OSP was assisted by Union County Sheriff’s Office, Union County Search & Rescue, La Grande Police Department, La Grande Fire Department, Island City Fire.  Union Pacific Railroad personnel also responded to the scene to assist because OSP used the railroad right of way to extract the vehicle from the river.

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-07/1002/147061/20210725_083013_resized_1_(002).jpg , I-84 Union County

Fatal Crash on Hwy 238 - Jackson County
Oregon State Police - 07/25/21 7:22 AM

On Saturday, July 24, 2021 at approximately 8:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash Hwy 238 near North Applegate Road.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Thunderbird, operated by Dona Powers (62) of Central Point, was eastbound when it left the roadway and crashed. 

Powers sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Applegate Fire and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 20W - Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - 07/24/21 8:04 PM

On Saturday, July 24, 2021 at approximately 9:10 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 20W near milepost 88.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Richard Cissna (65) of Bend, was westbound when it attempted to avoid traffic that had slowed, lost control and crashed.

Cissna sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Black Butte Police Department, Black Butte Fire Department, and ODOT.


Roseburg Fire Department Receives New Haz Mat Vehicles Thru Partnership With State Fire Marshal's Office (Photo)
Roseburg Fire Dept. - 07/26/21 4:16 PM
2021-07/5568/147095/Image_1.jpg
2021-07/5568/147095/Image_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/5568/147095/thumb_Image_1.jpg

The City of Roseburg Fire Department is excited to welcome two, brand new, state of the art Haz Mat vehicles into the department fleet.  Both vehicles, which are owned by the Oregon Office of the State Fire Marshal (OSFM) were provided as part of an agreement and partnership that OSFM has with the City of Roseburg Fire Department.  Within the partnership, OSFM provides training, equipment, and emergency response vehicles for hazardous material incident response.  In exchange, the City of Roseburg Fire Department provides personnel for incident response and maintenance of equipment as part of the OSFM Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team #1.  The OSFM also has agreements and partnerships with twelve other Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Teams.

Of the two new vehicles, one vehicle is a custom built 2021 Pierce Enforcer rescue response vehicle.  The design of this vehicle was a team effort with input from several of the Regional Hazardous Materials Response teams including Roseburg’s Team #1.  In addition, representatives from Hughes Fire Equipment, Inc. assisted with the design process.  The vehicle was built by Pierce Manufacturing in Appleton, Wisconsin. The Pierce Enforcer provides additional seating, increased storage, an onboard generator and weather station, wireless and satellite communications, and the ability to be utilized for incident command.  This vehicle is a third generation of response vehicles that OSFM has provided to teams throughout the State of Oregon since inception of the OSFM Haz Mat teams in 1989.

The second vehicle received into the City of Roseburg Fire Department fleet is a 2021 Ford F-550 with custom chassis built for use as a quick response vehicle.  This vehicle was built in Sarasota, Florida with the custom chassis designed and outfitted by Pierce Manufacturing.  Both vehicles were inspected by Roseburg Battalion Chief Drew Fairbairn to ensure specifications met the purchase request and to verify the function of all required options before the vehicles were transferred to the State of Oregon and eventually to the City of Roseburg Fire Department.

The State of Oregon Petroleum Load fee provides funding for these vehicles.  This fee, implemented in 1989 provides funding for hazardous materials incident response across the State of Oregon.  The new response vehicles, personnel, and equipment will continue to be utilized for incident response within Douglas County for hazardous materials incidents, ranging from fuel spills to chemical releases.  Both of the new response vehicles will be housed at the Roseburg Public Safety Center.  The City of Roseburg Fire Department is grateful for the new vehicles, partnership, and opportunity to work with OSFM as part of the State of Oregon Regional Hazardous Materials Response teams.




Attached Media Files: 2021-07/5568/147095/Image_1.jpg , Image 2 , Image 3 , Image 4

Utilities
Be prepared as more heat headed to Northwest
Pacific Power - 07/30/21 10:24 AM

Pacific Power media hotline:                               

503-813-6018                                                      

Be prepared as more heat headed to Northwest

Temperatures are forecast to reach triple digits again, but you can stay cool, use less energy and save money with these tips from Pacific Power

 

PORTLAND, Ore. –July 30, 2021—With  a new heat wave hitting the region, Pacific Power wants to remind customers how to beat the heat, use less energy and save money. 

 

Be air conditioner smart

  • Set your thermostat at 78 degrees. Cooling your house below that temperature can increase your air conditioning bill as much as 8 percent. 
  • Don’t turn off the air conditioner when you’re gone; instead set it at 85 degrees. That setting allows your air conditioner to use less electricity to cool the house than if the air conditioning has been off all day.
  • Use a smart or programmable thermostat to automatically adjust the temperature around your schedule. Set it to start bringing your home’s temperature from 85 degrees down to 78 degrees no more than 30 minutes before you get home. 

 

Don’t let the sun shine in

  • On warm days, close blinds and drapes, especially in south-facing windows which allow in the most heat.

 

Open windows and circulate cool air

  • Open windows in evening and early morning to let in cool air. 
  • Use fans to bring in and circulate cool air. Ceiling and window fans use much less electricity than air conditioning. Running an air conditioner in fan-only mode can also be effective as outside temperatures drop. 

 

Reduce the heat inside

  • Use heat-producing appliances like ovens, dishwashers and dryers in the early morning or late evening when temperatures are cooler. 
  • Use a microwave, slow cooker or toaster oven. A toaster oven uses one-third to one-half as much energy as a regular oven and releases less heat into the home. 
  • Turn off heat-generating devices when not in use, including lamps, televisions and computers. 

 

Be safe. With sweltering temperatures, you need to protect yourself. Drink plenty of water and stay out of the sun as much as possible. Also check on any neighbors who may have limited contact with others and may need a fan or other assistance.

 

                       

Heat waves are something the region experiences each year. From a power supply perspective, we do not anticipate heat-related service interruptions during this current heat wave. In addition to regular maintenance and equipment upgrades, Pacific Power, as part of PacifiCorp, can access a diverse mix of available energy resources – solar, wind, hydro and thermal – which is key to fulfilling our promise of reliability and stability. 

 

The company owns and operates over 16,500 miles of high-voltage transmission across 10 states. That reach is essential in accessing available energy and delivering it to our customers. Still, extreme weather--either summer heat or winter storms--has the potential to produce localized outages. So we’re closely monitoring the system and will respond promptly if an outage of any nature occurs. 

 

If you are concerned about your power bill, call us now. We can set up a payment plan or refer you to local agencies for bill assistance. Call us any time at 1-888-221-7070.

 

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ABOUT PACIFIC POWER

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 783,000 customers in 
243 communities across Oregon, Washington and California. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, serving nearly two million customers in six western states as the largest regulated utility owner of wind power in the West. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.


Oregon Public Utility Commission approves transfer of Klamath River dams
Pacific Power - 07/27/21 2:03 PM

Contact: Bob Gravely                                                                                                   July 27, 2021

503-813-7282                                                                                     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 

Oregon Public Utility Commission approves transfer of Klamath River dams

State regulatory reviews complete for key component of dam removal deal

 

SalemOre. — The Oregon Public Utility Commission Tuesday approved an order granting transfer of four dams on the Klamath River and associated property from PacifiCorp to the Klamath River Renewal Corporation.

 

The action by the Oregon PUC follows similar approvals from utility commissions in California, Idaho, and Wyoming, and means that all needed state regulatory reviews are complete for the Klamath dams to be transferred consistent with the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement.  State approvals of the transfer also affirm that dam removal under the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement remains a good outcome for the company’s electricity customers.  

 

“This is an important milestone toward full implementation of the Klamath settlement, and one that reflects the dedicated effort of our company, the states of Oregon and California, Klamath Basin Tribes, the KRRC and many other stakeholders to reach today’s outcome,” said Stefan Bird, President and CEO of Pacific Power, the unit of PacifiCorp that serves electricity customers in Oregon, California, and Washington. “It has been a difficult summer in the Klamath Basin due to drought and extreme weather. We hope the successful implementation of the dam removal agreement will help communities in the Basin move toward a broader solution of water-related natural resource conflicts in addition to protecting electricity customers.”

 

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in June 2021 approved the transfer of PacifiCorp’s operating license for the dams to the KRRC and the states of Oregon and California. The transfer of the license, and ultimate conveyance of the dams and associated property, will occur when FERC finishes a pending environmental review and approves a separate application from the KRRC to surrender the operating license in order to decommission and remove the dams. Parties to the Klamath dam removal agreement are planning for dam removal to begin in 2023.

 

 

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Federal
BPA lowers average power rates for fiscal years 2022-2023
Bonneville Power Administration - 07/28/21 1:03 PM

PR 11-21                                                                     

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Wednesday, July 28, 2021
CONTACT: Doug Johnson, 503-713-7658, or Maryam Habibi, 971-226-6073
or 503-230-5131

 

BPA lowers average power rates for fiscal years 2022-2023
BPA sets rates for power and transmission and makes changes to its tariff 
that will enable a future decision on potentially joining an energy imbalance market 

 

Portland, Oregon – The Bonneville Power Administration will decrease power rates by an average of 2.5% and slashed its proposed transmission rate increase in half to an average of 6.1%. The new rates were announced as BPA released the final record of decision for its BP-22 power and transmission rate case as well as the TC-22 tariff proceeding.

The TC-22 tariff proceeding adopted new language in BPA’s open access transmission tariff that will enable the power marketer to participate in the Western Energy Imbalance Market if BPA chooses to do so. The decision of whether to join the Western EIM is a separate process outside of the TC-22 proceeding and is anticipated to be made by the end of the fiscal year.

Under the settlement adopted by the BP-22 Record of Decision, the firm power tier 1 rates will decrease by 2.5% for fiscal years 2022 and 2023. Looking back over the previous decade, BP-22 will cap a 10-year period during which BPA’s power rate trajectory increased by less than 2 percent annually, which is in line with historical inflation rates. 

“Rates that have matched inflation – not just in a single rate case, but over a sustained period – is proof of BPA’s commitment to bending the cost curve and driving down rate pressures on our power rates,” said BPA Administrator John Hairston. “Today’s announcement demonstrates we are financially strong, competitive and responsive to our customers’ needs.” 

With Transmission, the settlement provided for a 6.1% average effective rate increase across the rate period – a number roughly half of what was proposed in the BP-22 Initial Proposal.

“We’ve landed in a spot where BPA will be able to continue to keep its transmission commitments and re-invest in the value of BPA’s transmission infrastructure in a fiscally sound and responsible manner,” Hairston said.

Beyond rates, the BP-22 Record of Decision also establishes revenue financing for up to $40 million for both the Power and Transmission business lines. This financing will allow BPA to issue less debt and decrease upward rate pressures in subsequent rate cases. The ROD also established the implementation of the Short-Distance Discount in the point-to-point Transmission rate and addressed the equitable treatment of fish and wildlife costs.

As part of the settlement, BPA has committed to holding workshops on various topics of interest to customers, including revenue financing, EIM costs and benefits, balancing services, the Eastern Intertie, and transmission losses.

TC-22 changes to tariff enable potential EIM participation

The TC-22 tariff proceeding updated language in BPA’s tariff, including addressing the terms and conditions that will apply to transmission service if BPA decides to participate in the Western Energy Imbalance Market. The adoption of this language enables the potential participation of BPA in the Western EIM without committing BPA to that path.  

The TC-22 proceeding also addressed Southern Intertie studies, transmission planning process, real power loss return, the removal of an exception for designation of Seller’s Choice agreements, ministerial edits to service agreement templates, generator interconnection procedures and requirements, and credit standards.

“We appreciate the work customers and stakeholders did with us during the tariff case,” said Hairston. “Confronting and solving these issues demonstrates that BPA, its customers and the region benefit from a tariff designed by the Northwest for the Northwest.”

The changes captured by the final RODs for BP-22 and TC-22 will be effective October 1. Specific to rates, BPA will file the case with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, requesting interim approval to start on that date while awaiting final FERC approval. 

BPA initiated both the BP-22 power and transmission rate case and the TC-22 proceeding in December 2020. The final RODs as well as Information on meetings and publications are available on the BP-22 rate case website and the TC-22 proceeding website.

 

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov 

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Lane County Drug Dealer Sentenced to 10 Years in Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/29/21 10:51 AM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Lane County, Oregon man was sentenced to federal prison today for distributing large quantities of methamphetamine in Springfield, Oregon.

Delfino Angel Davila-Tamayo, 27, was sentenced to 120 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, in April 2018, Davila-Tamayo was identified as a supplier of methamphetamine in the Springfield area. The next month, Davila-Tamayo sold an informant four pounds of methamphetamine. He was arrested the following day when he went to collect payment from the informant.

Investigators searched Davila-Tamayo’s residence and located a .45 caliber pistol, ammunition, drug packaging materials, and scales. He admitted to selling methamphetamine and carrying the pistol for protection.

After his arrest, Davila-Tamayo was granted pre-trial release and fled. After being on the run for more than a year, he was located and arrested a second time.

On October 16, 2019, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned a three-count indictment charging Davila-Tamayo with distribution of methamphetamine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

On April 28, 2021, Davila-Tamayo pleaded guilty to distribution of methamphetamine. As part of his plea agreement, Davila-Tamayo agreed to voluntarily abandon the .45 caliber pistol and ammunition seized by law enforcement.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and the Springfield Police Department. It was prosecuted by Jeffrey S. Sweet, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Money Launderer for Mexican Drug Trafficking Organization Sentenced to Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/28/21 2:00 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Mexican National who jointly operated Tienda Mexicana González Bros., a small convenience store and market in Southeast Portland, was sentenced to federal prison today for using the business and its money transmission licenses to launder millions of dollars in drug proceeds on behalf of a Mexico-based drug trafficking organization operating in the Portland Metropolitan Area.

Jesus González Vazquez, 37, of Jalisco, Mexico, was sentenced to 132 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release.

“Money launderers who help drug trafficking organizations transfer their illegal proceeds are equally culpable for the path of destruction caused by illegal drugs. While drug trafficking organizations can quickly replace low-level couriers and dealers when they are arrested by law enforcement, it’s much harder for these organizations to quickly replace savvy, large volume money launderers like Mr. González Vazquez and his brother Mr. Romo. Mr. González Vazquez’s prosecution and lengthy prison sentence will challenge this organization’s ability to profit from their crimes and sends a strong message that money laundering is a serious crime with significant consequences,” said Scott Erik Asphaug, Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“Drug cartels thrive on their lust for money and power,” said Special Agent in Charge Robert Hammer, who oversees HSI operations in the Pacific Northwest. “Operating under the guise of a small convenience store, Vazquez funneled millions of drug profits back to Mexico. This sentence is a successful step towards removing the ability of the cartels to collect their profits from the poison they inject into our communities.”

“This case highlights the importance of teaming with our federal and local partners in order to address these and other related large-scale issues,” said Interim Chief Claudio Grandjean of the Gresham Police Department. “The opioid crisis is ravaging so many in our communities across the region and across the country. I’m proud of the part the Gresham Police Department was able to play in holding those accountable who seek to profit from others’ misery.”

According to court documents, beginning in 2018, two men, Samuel Diaz and Faustino Monroy, organized, led, and ran a drug trafficking organization, based in Mexico, responsible for trafficking hundreds of pounds of methamphetamine and heroin into Oregon for distribution. Diaz and Monroy worked closely with two associates, Edgar Omar Quiroz and Gerson Fernando Martinez-Cruz, who ran a Portland distribution cell. At its peak, Quiroz and Martinez-Cruz’s cell was responsible for distributing as much as 77 pounds of methamphetamine and 55 pounds of heroin weekly in and around Portland.

The organization’s numerous sources of supply would import large quantities of illegal drugs that were taken to stash houses throughout the metro area where they were processed and prepared for sale. A large network of local drug dealers would then distribute user quantities of each drug. The organization would routinely change stash locations, rotate vehicles and phones, and pay individual couriers to take time off to avoid detection by law enforcement.

In approximately 2011, González Vazquez moved to Oregon and began working with his co-defendant and brother, Juan Antonio Romo, 46, also of Jalisco, at the González Bros. market. During this time, the market was an authorized agent for Sigue Corporation; Servicio UniTeller, Inc.; and Continental Exchange Solutions/Ria Financial, three large money services businesses known primarily for international money wires. Between January 2015 and October 2019, the majority of money transfers initiated at the market were conducted by González Vazquez and Romo.

On a continuing basis, González Vazquez and Romo would receive the proceeds of the Diaz-Monroy organization’s illegal drug sales in the form of bulk cash delivered by couriers to the González Bros. market. González Vazquez and Romo would wire the money to various DTO contacts throughout Mexico, structuring the transfers into multiple smaller transactions to avoid detection by the money services businesses or financial regulators. According to the government’s evidence, between January 2015 and October 2019, González Vazquez and Romo laundered at least $19 million dollars in drug proceeds from the market.

In addition to laundering the DTO’s proceeds, González Vazquez also performed other illegal functions for the organization, including facilitating the purchase of weapons in the U.S. to smuggle to Mexico, facilitating large drug transactions, assisting the escape of a fugitive to Mexico, assisting various drug dealers obtain false driver’s licenses, and helping DTO associates illegally enter the U.S.

In October 2019, González Vazquez and many of his co-defendants were arrested as part of a coordinated, multi-agency law enforcement operation. Investigators executed federal search warrants at more than a dozen locations throughout the Portland area, seizing 22 pounds of methamphetamine, quantities of heroin and cocaine, and seven firearms. González Vazquez and his co-defendants arrested as part of the takedown joined several others already in state custody on related charges. In total, law enforcement seized 51 firearms, including assault rifles, shotguns, and handguns, from defendants affiliated with the Diaz-Monroy drug trafficking organization.

On October 24, 2019, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a 61-count superseding indictment charging González Vazquez and 41 others for their roles in the drug trafficking and money laundering conspiracy.

On March 24, 2021, González Vazquez pleaded guilty to conspiring to commit money laundering.

During his sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael H. Simon ordered González Vazquez to forfeit all assets seized by law enforcement during the investigation, including body armor, firearms, magazines, several dozen cell phones, and more than $250,000 in criminally-derived proceeds seized by law enforcement.

González Vazquez is the twentieth defendant sentenced for his role in the conspiracy. Defendants have been sentenced to as much as 235 months in prison. 24 defendants are awaiting sentencing and one is pending trial. Diaz, Monroy, and several other defendants are fugitives believed to be in Mexico.

Acting U.S. Attorney Asphaug, Special Agent in Charge Hammer, and Interim Chief Grandjean made the announcement.

This case was investigated by HSI Portland and the Gresham Police Department with assistance from the FBI; U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration; Oregon State Police; Portland Police Bureau; and the Multnomah, Clackamas, and Clark County Sheriff’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon prosecuted the case.

This case was brought as part of the Justice Department’s Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) program, the centerpiece of the department’s strategy for reducing the availability of drugs in the U.S. OCDETF was established in 1982 to mount a comprehensive attack on drug trafficking by disrupting and dismantling major drug trafficking and money laundering organizations. Today, OCDETF combines the resources and expertise of its member federal agencies in coordination with state and local law enforcement.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

State
New work by Damien Gilley installed at Oregon Institute of Technology's Student Recreation Center (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 07/27/21 11:07 AM
Damien Gilley, “Arena,” 2021, acrylic polymer and aerosol. Photos by Damien Gilley.
Damien Gilley, “Arena,” 2021, acrylic polymer and aerosol. Photos by Damien Gilley.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/1418/147116/thumb_DamienGilley_Arena_3.jpg

Salem, Oregon -- A geometric mural by Portland artist Damien Gilley, commissioned through Oregon’s Percent for Art in Public Places Program, has been installed in Oregon Institute for Technology’s Student Recreation Center (TechRec).

Titled “Arena,” one immersive site-specific mural designed by Gilley extends the full length of a 75-foot walking corridor along both walls and the ceiling. A second related mural is located at the check-in area of TechRec. The mural design of geometric shapes and lines – painted primarily in a custom-mixed blue – communicates a visual representation of technology while responding directly to the Rec Center site and surrounding environment. The mural transforms the Recreation Center lower-level entrance into a kinetic experience as a person travels through the corridor. The viewer enters through a design reminiscent of a sports arena overhead and progresses through an increasingly energetic visual space that refers to speed and movement. Linear markings of the Rec Center court floor are used to playfully lead the viewer into the arena of athletic experience.

In 2020, Oregon Tech’s three-story 15,800 square foot Student Recreation Center was completely remodeled. The renovations provide a new wood multi-purpose sports court, aerobics/cardio and weight areas, a fitness studio and new locker rooms, an updated main floor lobby and a new coaches’ office area. The Recreation Center facilities are designed as bright and welcoming spaces for students to use independently or for intramural sports.

Guided by Oregon’s Percent for Art Statute, an art selection committee considered the most appropriate artwork for the building. Through a competitive process, the selection committee -- comprised of Oregon Tech faculty, staff, the project architects and local arts professionals and chaired by Renee Couture of the Arts Commission -- selected Gilley to create a site-specific mural for the corridor that connects the check-in area for the Recreation Center to the exterior of the building. Gilley’s artwork proposal aligned with the selection committee’s goals of commissioning an artwork that adds to the innovative and dynamic environment of OIT and the Rec Center, encourages engagement and curiosity, creates a sense of transition and relates to the local setting.

Gilley is a multi-disciplinary artist, educator and art director who makes artwork that creates perceptual moments that transform sites. He has exhibited nationally and internationally, including at Sharjah Art Museum (United Arab Emirates), Suyama Space (Seattle) and Bemis Center for Contemporary Art (Omaha, Nebraska). His work has been reviewed by Artform, Juxtapoz Art & Culture Magazine, and New York Times Art Beat, among other journals.

The mural is located on the lower level of the Recreation Center on Oregon Tech’s Klamath Falls campus (3201 Campus Drive).

Oregon's Percent for Art in Public Places Program

Oregon was one of the first states in the nation to pass Percent for Art legislation, placing works of art in public spaces throughout the state. Since then, the Percent for Art in Public Places program has maintained a commitment to the placement of permanent art of the highest quality in public places. Committees of local residents across Oregon make selections. The overall collection enhances the state’s public spaces and contributes to our well-recognized quality of life. 

Oregon Arts Commission

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.

More information about the Oregon Arts Commission: www.oregonartscommission.org 

Oregon Institute of Technology
Oregon Institute of Technology (Oregon Tech) is a public university based in Klamath Falls and the Portland metropolitan area. Oregon Tech was originally founded in 1947 as a vocational facility for World War II veterans. Over the years, it changed to a community college, then a four-year technical school, and is now a four-year university with graduate programs. As Oregon’s only polytechnic university, Oregon Tech specializes in engineering, technology, healthcare, business, communication and applied sciences.




Attached Media Files: Damien Gilley, “Arena,” 2021, acrylic polymer and aerosol. Photos by Damien Gilley. , Damien Gilley, “Arena,” 2021, acrylic polymer and aerosol. Photos by Damien Gilley. , Damien Gilley, “Arena,” 2021, acrylic polymer and aerosol. Photos by Damien Gilley.

Increased emergency SNAP benefits continue in August
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/26/21 10:48 AM

Need to know

(Salem) – Most Oregonians who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits will receive emergency allotments in August. 

The federal government has approved emergency allotments every month since March 2020, to give SNAP recipients additional support during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

In August, approximately 417,000 SNAP households will receive approximately $66 million in emergency allotments in addition to their regular SNAP benefits.

“We are grateful to have the opportunity to provide emergency benefits to most SNAP households in Oregon,” said Dan Haun, director of the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Self-Sufficiency Program. “We also know that many Oregonians are still struggling to meet their basic needs due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and we encourage them contact our partners at 211 and the Oregon Food Bank for support during this difficult time.”

Emergency allotments will be available on Aug. 11 for current SNAP households. New SNAP households will receive the emergency allotments Aug. 31 or Sept. 2.

SNAP recipients do not have to take any action to receive these supplemental benefits as they will be issued directly on their EBT cards. 

More information about emergency allotments is available at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/About-SNAP.aspx.

Questions about your SNAP benefits should be directed to local ODHS offices or by calling the ONE Customer Service Center at 1-800-699-9075.

If you are a SNAP household and your income or the number of people in your household has changed that could impact your benefits. It is important to make sure we have the most up-to-date information. 

You can report any changes to your income or household in many ways: 

  • Online at: ONE.Oregon.gov
  • By mail at: ONE Customer Service Center, PO Box 14015, Salem, OR 97309
  • By fax at: 503-378-5628
  • By phone at: 1-800-699-9075 or TTY 711

Resources to help meet basic needs

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.

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Oregon OSHA insta a los empleadores a cumplir con las nuevas obligaciones para proteger a los trabajadores de las enfermedades causadas por el calor a medida que aumentan las temperaturas (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/28/21 3:23 PM
DCBS logo
DCBS logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/1073/147167/thumb_DCBS-Spanish-logo-blue.jpg

(Salem) – A medida que aumentan las temperaturas en los próximos días, Oregon OSHA les recuerda a los empleadores sus nuevas obligaciones bajo una regla de prevención de enfermedades de emergencia por calor. Al mismo tiempo, los trabajadores tienen derecho a un lugar de trabajo seguro y saludable, incluido el derecho a plantear preocupaciones de seguridad a sus empleadores sin temor a represalias.

Oregon OSHA ofrece asesoría gratuita y recursos educativos para ayudar a los empleadores a cumplir con la regla, que entró en vigor inmediatamente cuando fue adoptada el 8 de julio. Si los empleadores se niegan a abordar las preocupaciones planteadas por los trabajadores, los trabajadores pueden presentar una queja ante Oregon OSHA. Es contra la ley castigar a un trabajador por plantear problemas de salud y seguridad en el trabajo.

La regla temporal de emergencia de Oregon OSHA permanecerá en vigencia hasta el 3 de enero del 2022, o hasta que sea reemplazada por una regla permanente de prevención de enfermedades causadas por el calor, que se espera ocurra a finales de este año. La regla de emergencia temporal se aplica a cualquier lugar de trabajo, al aire libre y en interiores, donde los peligros del calor son causados por el clima. Los requisitos incluyen acceso ampliado a sombra y agua fría; descansos regulares para refrescarse; capacitación; comunicación; y planificación de emergencias.
La división ofrece hojas de datos en inglés y español que describen los requisitos clave de la regla. Además, la división ha publicado un nuevo documento de preguntas y respuestas, en inglés y español, para ayudar a comprender la regla.
Bajo un nuevo programa de énfasis, Oregon OSHA ha aumentado su presencia de vigilancia en temas de enfermedades causadas por el calor con más inspectores en el campo durante los días calurosos.
Se alienta a los empleadores a usar recursos gratuitos, ahora disponibles en Oregon OSHA y que involucran no culpa, sin citaciones y sin sanciones, para ayudar con el cumplimiento de los requisitos:

Servicios de asesoría: brinda ayuda gratuita con programas de seguridad y salud, que incluyen cómo controlar y eliminar peligros, y capacitación práctica.
• Teléfono (gratuito en Oregon):): 800-922-2689
• Oficinas de campo
• En línea
• Correo electrónico: consult.web@oregon.gov
Personal técnico: ayuda a los empleadores a comprender los requisitos y cómo aplicarlos en sus lugares de trabajo
• Teléfono (gratuito en Oregon):): 800-922-2689
• En línea
• Correo electrónico: tech.web@oregon.gov

Además, una lista de recursos educativos estatales y nacionales sobre la prevención de enfermedades causadas por el calor está disponible como parte de comunicaciones anteriores emitidas por Oregon OSHA, tanto en inglés como en español.

Además, el Departamento de Servicios para Consumidores y Negocios de Oregon, que incluye Oregon OSHA, mantiene el Programa de Comunicaciones Multiculturales que brinda alcance a las comunidades con dominio limitado del inglés. Ese alcance abarca información sobre la seguridad y la salud en el trabajo. El programa incluye un número de teléfono gratuito para los oregonianos de habla hispana: 800-843-8086.

Los trabajadores pueden presentar una queja ante Oregon OSHA utilizando el formulario de notificación de peligros en línea de la división, disponible en español e inglés. La lista de oficinas de campo está disponible en la página "Presentar una queja" de la división. La división anima a los trabajadores a aprender sobre sus derechos para plantear preocupaciones de seguridad y para protegerse contra represalias.

Según los requisitos de emergencia temporal, los empleadores deben tomar medidas específicas cuando el índice de calor alcanza o excede los 80 grados Fahrenheit, lo que incluye proporcionar suficiente sombra y un suministro adecuado de agua potable. Cuando el índice de calor excede los 90 grados Fahrenheit, los empleadores deben seguir todas las reglas en el umbral de 80 grados y tomar más medidas. Esas medidas incluyen comunicación y observación, descansos regulares para enfriarse, planificación de emergencias y adaptación gradual de los empleados al calor.
Los documentos de las reglas de emergencia están disponibles para su revisión de las siguientes maneras:

• Página de reglas adoptadas por Oregon OSHA: Seguridad y salud ocupacional de Oregón: Reglas adoptadas: Elaboración de reglas: Estado de Oregón

• Reglas temporales para abordar la exposición de los empleados a altas temperaturas ambientales: Reglas temporales para abordar la exposición de los empleados a altas temperaturas ambientales (oregon.gov)

• Texto de las reglas adoptadas: Texto de las reglas temporales para abordar la exposición de los empleados a altas temperaturas ambientales (oregon.gov)

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Oregon OSHA, es una división del Departamento de Servicios para Consumidores y Negocios, hace cumplir las reglas de salud y seguridad en el lugar de trabajo del estado y trabaja para mejorar la seguridad y salud en el lugar de trabajo para todos los trabajadores de Oregon. Para obtener más información, visite osha.oregon.gov.

El Departamento de Servicios para Consumidores y Negocios es la agencia reguladora y de protección al consumidor más grande de Oregon. Para obtener más información, visite www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Oregon OSHA urges employers to meet new obligations to protect workers from heat illness as temperatures rise (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/28/21 9:36 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/1073/147148/thumb_Oregon-OSHA-logo-green.jpg

(Salem) – As temperatures rise in the days ahead, Oregon OSHA is reminding employers of their new obligations under an emergency heat illness prevention rule. At the same time, workers have a right to a safe and healthy workplace, including the right to raise safety concerns with their employers free from retaliation.

Oregon OSHA offers free consultation and educational resources to help employers comply with the rule, which took effect immediately when it was adopted July 8. If employers refuse to address concerns raised by workers, then workers may file a complaint with Oregon OSHA. It is against the law to punish a worker for raising on-the-job health and safety concerns.

Oregon OSHA’s emergency temporary rule remains in effect until Jan. 3, 2022, or until it is replaced sooner by a permanent heat illness prevention rule, which is expected to occur later this year. The temporary emergency rule applies to any workplace – outdoors and indoors – where heat dangers are caused by the weather. The requirements include expanded access to shade and cool water; regular cool-down breaks; training; communication; and emergency planning. 

The division offers fact sheets in English and Spanish that outline the rule’s key requirements. Also, the division has published a new question-and-answer document – in English and Spanish – to help with understanding the rule.

Under a new emphasis program, Oregon OSHA has boosted its enforcement presence around heat illness issues with more inspectors in the field during hot days. 

Employers are encouraged to use free resources – available now from Oregon OSHA and involving no fault, no citations, and no penalties – for help with meeting requirements:

Consultation services – Provides free help with safety and health programs, including how to control and eliminate hazards, and hands-on training

Technical staff – Helps employers understand requirements and how to apply them to their worksites

Moreover, a list of state and national educational resources about preventing heat illness is available as part of previous communications issued by Oregon OSHA, in both English and Spanish

Also, the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, which includes Oregon OSHA, maintains the Multicultural Communications Program that provides outreach to communities with limited English proficiency. That outreach encompasses information about on-the-job safety and health. The program includes a toll-free phone number for Spanish-speaking Oregonians: 800-843-8086.

Workers may file a complaint with Oregon OSHA using the division’s online hazard reporting form, available in Spanish and English. A list of field offices is available on the division’s “File a complaint” page. The division encourages workers to learn about their rights to raise safety concerns and to protect against retaliation

Under the temporary emergency requirements, employers are required to take specific steps when the heat index reaches or exceeds 80 degrees Fahrenheit, including providing sufficient shade and an adequate supply of drinking water. When the heat index exceeds 90 degrees Fahrenheit, employers are required to follow all of the rules at the 80-degree threshold and to take more measures. Those measures include communication and observation, regular cool-down breaks, emergency planning, and gradual adaptation of employees to the heat.

The emergency rule documents are available for review in the following ways:

 

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.  

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Soak It Week reminds Oregonians to water their trees (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/29/21 7:30 AM
Drought is stressing street and yard trees across Oregon, prompting groups like Trees for Life Oregon and Oregon Community Trees to declare the last week in the dry months of July and August as Soak It Week. This is a time for deeply watering trees.
Drought is stressing street and yard trees across Oregon, prompting groups like Trees for Life Oregon and Oregon Community Trees to declare the last week in the dry months of July and August as Soak It Week. This is a time for deeply watering trees.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/1072/147171/thumb_IMG_9827.JPG

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon is in the grip of a deepening drought ranked as severe to exceptional in more than half the state. Our yard and street trees are particularly hard hit by the prolonged dryness. That’s why Trees for Life Oregon and Oregon Community Trees have again declared the last week in July and the last week in August as Soak It Week. Oregonians are reminded that to keep their street and yard trees healthy, give them a good, slow soaking in their root zone.

“Unlike a lawn, trees are a long-term investment well worth the water needed to get them through our dry summers,” according to Kristin Ramstad, ODF’s Urban and Community Forestry Assistance Program Manager. “People enjoy multiple benefits from healthy, mature trees. They not only clean the air and reduce noise pollution, they also keep things cooler through shade and releasing water from their leaves into the air.  There are also mental health and social benefits, such as improved focus and less stress.”

Deciduous trees under three years need weekly watering in Oregon from the time they leaf out until they’re leaves turn in the fall. The recommended amount is about 15 gallons. Young evergreens need watering once winter rains end and until fall rains return. 

If you’re lucky enough to have a drought-tolerant Oregon white oak that may be all the watering you need to do. But most other species of trees still benefit after they are three years old from a good soaking every other week until they are established (typically at about 10 years). After a tree is established, it benefits from deep watering once a month during the dry months of July and August (hence Soak It Week). 

Oregon Community Trees President Samantha Wolf says, “Well-watered trees grow faster and are less likely to suffer scorching of their leaves and premature leaf drop. So watering gives you a better-looking tree over time than ones that struggle through our increasingly dry summers.” 

Learn more about tree watering at https://arbordayblog.org/treecare/how-to-properly-water-your-trees/




Attached Media Files: Drought is stressing street and yard trees across Oregon, prompting groups like Trees for Life Oregon and Oregon Community Trees to declare the last week in the dry months of July and August as Soak It Week. This is a time for deeply watering trees.

Las empresas afectadas por la pandemia ahora son elegibles para reducción de impuestos sobre nómina de UI: Se deben cumplir ciertos requisitos para que la obligación tributaria del UI de Oregon 2021 sea diferida o condonada
Oregon Employment Department - 07/28/21 3:01 PM

July 28, 2021 (Salem, OR)-- Ayer, la Gobernadora Kate Brown firmó el Proyecto de Ley 3389 de la Cámara de Representantes, que proporciona reducción y aplazamiento de impuestos del seguro de desempleo (UI) de 2021 para las empresas que califiquen. El programa de reducción fiscal fue desarrollado en colaboración por el Departamento de Empleo de Oregon, la gobernadora Brown y la Legislatura del Estado de Oregon como respuesta a la pandemia de COVID-19, que ha tenido un impacto significativo en muchas empresas.

"No hay duda de que el pilar económico de Oregon, nuestras pequeñas empresas, así como los trabajadores de Oregon empleados en esas empresas, se vieron profundamente afectados por la pandemia", dijo la gobernadora Brown. “Pero a través de estos tiempos difíciles, hemos visto a los habitantes de Oregon responder con creatividad y fortaleza. Ahora que abrimos el siguiente capítulo de la pandemia y buscamos la recuperación económica, el proyecto de ley HB 3389 brindará cierto alivio a las empresas y, al mismo tiempo, garantizará que podamos continuar brindando beneficios de desempleo a todos los habitantes de Oregon que los necesiten."

El Plan de alivio de impuestos sobre la nómina de UI proporciona tres cosas:

  1. Para el año tributario de UI 2021, los empleadores elegibles pueden diferir un tercio de su obligación tributaria de UI hasta el 30 de junio de 2022 y evitar los intereses y multas asociados
  2. Se puede perdonar hasta el 100% de los impuestos de UI diferibles de 2021, en función de cuánto aumentó la tasa de UI de un empleador de 2020 a 2021
  3. La calificación de experiencia fiscal de un empleador desde 2022 hasta 2024 se reducirá a la tasa de experiencia de UI de 2020 que tenía el empleador antes de la pandemia. Las tasas impositivas pueden fluctuar de 2022 a 2024 debido a cambios en el programa de impuestos; sin embargo, la tasa del empleador se basará en su calificación de experiencia antes de la pandemia

La cantidad de impuestos de UI de 2021 que los empleadores pueden aplazar o perdonar depende de cuánto aumentó su tasa de UI de 2020 a 2021.

  • Un aumento de 0.5% a 1% en las tasas de impuestos del UI solo será elegible para aplazamiento
  • Si la tasa de impuestos aumentó más de 1% punto porcentual y no más de 1.5% puntos porcentuales serán elegibles para la condonación del 50% de sus impuestos diferibles del UI
  • La tasa impositiva aumentó más de 1.5 puntos porcentuales y no más de 2.0 puntos porcentuales serán elegibles para la condonación del 75% de sus impuestos diferibles del UI 
  • La tasa impositiva aumentada en más de 2.0 puntos de porcentuales será elegible para la condonación del 100% de sus impuestos de UI diferibles

Los empleadores deben cumplir con todas las condiciones siguientes para ser elegibles para el aplazamiento y la condonación de impuestos del UI:

  1. A partir del 1 de enero de 2021, haya pagado todas las contribuciones tributarias de UI pendientes y las responsabilidades relacionadas, incluidas las determinadas en un plan de pago aceptado por el director del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon
  2. Presente todos los informes de nómina requeridos para 2021 a tiempo,
  3. Pague todas las obligaciones tributarias a tiempo para 2021 que no se difieran ni condonen

No existe una solicitud para el Plan de alivio de impuestos sobre la nómina del seguro de desempleo. El Departamento de Empleo inscribirá automáticamente a los empleadores elegibles en el plan y se comunicará con los empleadores durante el año fiscal del UI 2021 con actualizaciones o cambios en el estado o los requisitos de elegibilidad.

La participación en la parte de aplazamiento de este plan de ayuda podría afectar negativamente el crédito del impuesto federal por desempleo de un empleador. Es posible que algunos empleadores no puedan acceder al crédito completo para el impuesto estatal por desempleo pagado en su Formulario 940 del IRS (Declaración federal de impuestos por desempleo) si pagan los impuestos estatales por desempleo después de la fecha de vencimiento del Formulario federal 940. Para información adicional por favor visite irs.gov/instructions/i940.

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Programa de igualdad de oportunidades: ayudas y servicios auxiliares disponibles a pedido para personas con discapacidades. Contacto: (503) 947-1794. Para las personas sordas o con problemas de audición, llame al 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-07/930/147147/HB3389_PR_SP_final.pdf

Businesses Impacted by Pandemic Now Eligible for UI Payroll Tax Relief: Certain requirements must be met to have 2021 Oregon UI tax liability deferred or forgiven
Oregon Employment Department - 07/28/21 10:00 AM

July 28, 2021 (Salem, OR)-- Yesterday Governor Kate Brown signed into law House Bill 3389, which provides UI tax relief and deferral for 2021 unemployment insurance (UI) payroll taxes to qualifying businesses. The tax relief program was collaboratively developed by the Oregon Employment Department, Gov. Brown, and the Oregon State Legislature as a response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, which has had a significant impact on many businesses. 

“There is no question that Oregon’s economic backbone, our small businesses—as well as the hardworking Oregonians employed at those businesses—were deeply impacted by the pandemic,” said Governor Brown. “But through these challenging times, we’ve seen Oregonians respond with creativity and resilience. As we’ve entered the next chapter of the pandemic and look to economic recovery, HB 3389 should provide some relief for businesses, while at the same time ensuring we can continue to provide unemployment insurance benefits to all Oregonians who need them.”

The UI Payroll Tax Relief Plan provide three things:

  1. For UI tax year 2021, eligible employers can defer one-third of their UI tax liability until June 30, 2022, and avoid any associated interest and penalties
  2. Up to 100% of deferrable 2021 UI taxes may be forgiven, based on how much an employer’s UI tax rate increased from 2020 to 2021
  3. An employer’s tax experience rating from 2022 through 2024 will be rolled back to the employer’s pre-pandemic 2020 UI experience rate. Tax rates may fluctuate from 2022 to 2024 due to tax schedule changes, however, the employer’s rate will be based on their experience rating prior to the pandemic

The amount of 2021 UI taxes that employers are eligible to defer or have forgiven depends on how much their UI tax rate increased from 2020 to 2021:

  • 0.5% to 1% increase in UI tax rates will be eligible for deferral only
  • Tax rate increased more than 1.0 percentage point and not more than 1.5 percentage points will be eligible for 50% of their deferrable UI taxes forgiven
  • Tax rate increased more than 1.5 percentage points and not more than 2.0 percentage points will be eligible for 75% of their deferrable UI taxes forgiven
  • Tax rate increased more than 2.0 parentage points will be eligible for 100% of their deferrable UI taxes forgiven

Employers must meet all of the following conditions to be eligible for UI tax deferral and forgiveness:

  1. As of Jan. 1, 2021, have paid all outstanding UI tax contributions and related liabilities, including those determined in a payment plan accepted by the director of the Oregon Employment Department
  2. File all required payroll reports for 2021 on time, AND
  3. Pay all tax liabilities on time for 2021 that are not deferred or forgiven

There is no application for the UI Payroll Tax Relief Plan. The Employment Department will automatically enroll eligible employers into the plan and will contact employers throughout the 2021 UI tax year with updates or changes to eligibility status or requirements. 

Participation in the deferral portion of this relief plan could negatively affect an employers’ Federal Unemployment Tax credit. Some employers may be unable to access the full credit for state unemployment tax paid on their IRS Form 940 (Federal Unemployment Tax Return) if they pay state unemployment taxes after the Federal Form 940 due date. For additional information, please visit irs.gov/instructions/i940.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-07/930/147146/HB3389_PR_FINAL.pdf

Oregon Employment Department to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 07/27/21 12:00 PM

WHO:               David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department and Gail Krumenauer, State Employment Economist

WHEN:             Wednesday, July 28, 2021 at 1 p.m. PT

WHAT:           The Oregon Employment Department is hosting a video conference media briefing to share updates on economic and workforce-related trends, employment services, unemployment claims processing, claimant resources and more on July 28 at 1 p.m. PT.

WHERE:          Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PT on July 28. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:           The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for weekday updates. A recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters attending the briefing after the briefing concludes. 


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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services




Attached Media Files: 2021-07/930/147101/07.28.21_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

Recreational use advisory issued for Eagle Ridge Park on Upper Klamath Lake July 30
Oregon Health Authority - 07/30/21 5:18 PM

July 30, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Recreational use advisory issued for Eagle Ridge Park on Upper Klamath Lake July 30

PORTLAND, Ore. Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a recreational use health advisory today for Eagle Ridge Park on Upper Klamath Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacteria bloom and cyanotoxins above recreational use values for human exposure. The lake is in Klamath County. 

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are as the major route of exposure in ingestion of water. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin. However, if you have skin sensitivities you may get a puffy red rash. 

You are encouraged to visit Eagle Ridge Park and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Sprays could lead to the risk of inhaling cyanotoxins.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas. 

Not all private treatment systems are effective at removing cyanotoxins. If you do not use a well or public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area you are advised to use an alternative water source. 

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur, or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place. 

Be aware that dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods of time. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention. Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite and more. If your dog exhibits symptoms veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks. Fat, skin and organs should be removed before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here


Be aware of cyanobacteria blooms as extreme heat continues
Oregon Health Authority - 07/30/21 5:05 PM

July 30, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Be aware of cyanobacteria blooms as extreme heat continues

High temperatures create potential for cyanotoxins in water 

PORTLAND, Ore.—With the extreme heat continuing in the Northwest and more people seeking relief in the many waterbodies around the state, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reminds people heading outdoors to be on the look-out for cyanobacteria blooms that can produce toxins when recreating in Oregon lakes, rivers and reservoirs.

Cyanobacteria are beneficial bacteria found in all freshwater worldwide. Under the right conditions—when sunlight, heat, water temperature, nutrients and water chemistry are ideal—cyanobacteria can multiply into blooms in any water body. Many blooms are harmless, but some can produce cyanotoxins that make people and animals sick.

People should avoid swimming, high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, and other water activities where incidental ingestion may occur in areas where you believe a cyanobacteria bloom is present. Ingestion is the major route of exposure. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin. However, if you have skin sensitivities you may get a puffy red rash. 

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas. 

Not all private treatment systems are effective at removing cyanotoxins. If you do not use a well or public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area you are advised to use an alternative water source. 

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur, or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place. 

Be aware that dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods of time. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention. Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite and more. If your dog exhibits symptoms veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks. Fat, skin and organs should be removed before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here


Oregon reports 1,076 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/30/21 2:40 PM

July 30, 2021

Oregon reports 1,076 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are three new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,858, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,076 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 219,755.

Dr. Sidelinger available to discuss COVID-19 modeling today at 3:30 p.m.

State Public Health Officer and Epidemiologist Dr. Dean Sidelinger will be available to answer questions about today’s COVID-10 modeling report today at 3:30 p.m.

Interested media can join via this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1610683029?pwd=cEZyeUMzOVZYMmpMTmRIVzVzekFnUT09

Newest COVID-19 modeling report shows sharply higher increases in daily cases and hospitalizations

Today, OHA released its latest COVID-19 forecast, which projects sharply higher COVID-19 associated hospitalizations and daily cases through Aug. 17.

According to the model, the effective reproduction rate – the expected number of secondary cases that a single case generates – was estimated at 1.58 through July 14, more than double the 0.74 reported through mid-June.

At that same level of transmission, over the next two weeks, daily cases would continue to rapidly increase to 390 cases per 100,000 people, or an estimated 1,170 daily cases and 95 new hospitalizations per day. 

According to the report, “Vaccine immunity is helping prevent further spread of COVID-19.” By removing people with immunity from the model calculations, the rate of average rate of infection projects to 3.18 over the same time period. 

Also, according to the report, even if the Delta variant grew to comprise 95% of new cases, the adoption of protective measures such as wearing masks and avoiding large gatherings, would curb the projected increase in hospitalizations and daily cases. 

“Today’s modeling report, although sobering, confirms the importance of protecting ourselves and others by getting vaccinated against COVID-19,” Sidelinger said. 

“By vaccinating more people, we can more quickly drive down hospitalizations and new cases,” he said.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 6,702 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 3,404 doses were administered on July 29 and 3,298 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on July 29.

The seven-day running average is now 4,697 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,656,887 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,784,178 first and second doses of Moderna and 181,017 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,486,197 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,308,566 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 3,019,095 doses of Pfizer, 2,299,680 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 298, which is 13 more than yesterday. There are 97 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 13 more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

OHA working with county, state and Tribal public officials on outbreak linked to recent music festival

OHA is investigating a COVID-19 outbreak associated with the Pendleton Whisky Music Fest held in Pendleton on July 10. 

Cases have been identified among residents of Umatilla, Morrow, Union and Wallowa counties, and Washington state. 

OHA is working with local, state and Tribal public health partners to identify other cases in people who may have attended the music festival. As of today, OHA is aware of 58 COVID-19 cases in people who attended the event. 

This outbreak is the first one of its size and scope to be traced to an outdoor entertainment event since the lifting of statewide COVID-19 prevention measures at the end of June. 

The outbreak highlights the importance of protective actions Oregonians can take to limit the spread of and their potential exposure to COVID-19, including wearing masks and getting vaccinated with any of the authorized vaccines that are widely available in every Oregon county.

In Oregon this month, OHA has recorded a large increase in COVID-19 cases. That rise is linked to the spread of the Delta variant, which now accounts for 80% of Oregon’s of new cases.

In response to the resurgence of COVID-19 in Oregon, OHA recommended this week that all persons, regardless of their vaccination status, wear a mask indoors in public spaces. OHA also encourages all Oregonians to consider masking if they plan to attend crowded outdoor events like fairs, sporting events, outdoor theater performances, rodeos or concerts, especially if they are at higher risk for complications from COVID-19 or live with individuals who are unvaccinated or at higher risk for complications from COVID-19.

To learn more about the rise of cases throughout Oregon, driven by the prevalence of the Delta variant identified among new infections, see a rebroadcast of OHA’s Facebook Live conversation yesterday with two of our senior health advisors, Drs. Paul Cieslak and Tom Jeanne.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (22), Benton (21), Clackamas (77), Clatsop (13), Columbia (6), Coos (15), Crook (7), Curry (12), Deschutes (40), Douglas (57), Grant (1),  Harney (2), Hood River (9), Jackson (188), Jefferson (6), Josephine (33), Klamath (3), Lane (81), Lincoln (9), Linn (29), Malheur (5), Marion (46), Morrow (7), Multnomah (134), Polk (20), Sherman (1), Tillamook (13), Umatilla (82), Union (22), Wallowa (10), Wasco (15), Washington (76), Wheeler (2) and Yamhill (12). 

Oregon’s 2,856th COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on July 11 and died on July 21 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,857th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on July 12 and died on July 28 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,858th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on July 19 and died on July 20 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

OHA does not report the vaccination status of people in our daily update of COVID-19 related deaths. However, statewide data show that people who remain unvaccinated are at much greater risk of infection and severe illness.

In June, 92% of the 7,241 COVID-19 cases and 94% of the 63 COVID-19-associated deaths occurred in unvaccinated Oregonians. On the first Thursday of each month, OHA publishes an update on vaccine breakthrough cases identified in Oregon. The findings shared in our last report, from July 1, indicate that this number remains very small when compared to the more than 2.3 million people who have completed a COVID-19 vaccination series.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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Dr. Sidelinger available to discuss COVID-19 modeling today at 3:30 p.m.
Oregon Health Authority - 07/30/21 12:44 PM

Dr. Sidelinger available to discuss COVID-19 modeling today at 3:30 p.m.

Oregon State Public Health Officer and Epidemiologist Dr. Dean Sidelinger will be available to answer questions about today’s COVID-10 modeling report today at 3:30 p.m.

Interested media can join via this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1610683029?pwd=cEZyeUMzOVZYMmpMTmRIVzVzekFnUT09


Psilocybin shows promise as mental health therapy, report finds
Oregon Health Authority - 07/30/21 11:27 AM

July 30, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Psilocybin shows promise as mental health therapy, report finds

Advisory board’s comprehensive review of literature an important step

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board have reached a milestone in the effort to build the nation’s first state psilocybin therapy program.

The Board, a governor-appointed advisory body created by the passage of Ballot Measure 109 in November 2020, completed the report summary and findings showing that the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms holds promise as an option to address mental health issues.

OHA published the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board Rapid Evidence Review and Recommendations today. Among the findings: that high-quality phase 1 and 2 clinical trials suggest that “psilocybin is efficacious in reducing depression and anxiety.”

Tom Eckert, who chairs the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, said the board is “laser-focused” on developing recommendations to inform the eventual launch of the country's first statewide psilocybin therapy and wellness program. 

“Science is fundamental, so organizing the scientific literature relating to psilocybin was a first priority,” he said. “This comprehensive review will put us on solid ground moving forward."

The report explains that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has designated psilocybin a breakthrough therapy for treatment of depression, indicating that preliminary clinical evidence suggests it may represent a significant improvement over existing therapies.

“Initial research also suggests that psilocybin may be efficacious in reducing problematic alcohol and tobacco use,” the report continues. “Across studies, psilocybin increases spiritual well-being which may mediate other observed benefits. Study participants also commonly rate their psilocybin experiences as highly meaningful.”

Angie Allbee, manager of the Psilocybin Services Section at the OHA Public Health Division, thanked the board for its “tremendous work in delivering findings and recommendations to OHA for this review.” 

“Making this information available to the public is a significant step forward, as the findings and recommendations will help OHA implement a comprehensive regulatory framework that will provide safe and effective psilocybin services,” she said. 

The Oregon Psilocybin Services Section will eventually license and regulate the manufacturing, transportation, delivery, sale and purchase of psilocybin products, as well as the provision of psilocybin services.

OHA will continue to work with the advisory board on recommendations for draft rulemaking throughout the remainder of the development period, which concludes on Dec. 31, 2022. 

For more information about the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board and the Oregon Psilocybin Services Act, visit http://healthoregon.org/psilocybin.

# # #


Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Research Subcommittee meets Aug. 26
Oregon Health Authority - 07/30/21 9:48 AM

July 30, 2021

ContactOHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Research Subcommittee meets Aug. 26

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Research Subcommittee.

Agenda: TBD 

When: Thursday, Aug. 26, 1-2:30 p.m. 

WhereVia Zoom Meeting: 

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 1,026 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/29/21 1:58 PM

July 29, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,026 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are six new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,855, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,026 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 218,689.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 7,180 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 3,292 doses were administered on July 28 and 3,888 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on July 28.

The seven-day running average is now 4,635 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,652,653 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,782,367 first and second doses of Moderna and 180,441 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,482,028 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,305,579 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 3,013,695 doses of Pfizer, 2,298,280 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 285, which is 11 more than yesterday. There are 84 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Scholarship winner Laney: ‘It’s a pretty big deal to me’

Take Your Shot, Oregon incentive winner Laney got vaccinated to be better protected against COVID-19 and to protect her friends and the community.

She plans to use her $100,000 Oregon College Savings Plan scholarship to make a lifelong dream come true.

Watch Laney’s story here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (11), Benton (17), Clackamas (69), Clatsop (18), Columbia (5), Coos (20), Crook (7), Curry (11), Deschutes (36), Douglas (54), Gilliam (2), Grant (3),  Harney (3), Hood River (4), Jackson (111), Jefferson (4), Josephine (35), Klamath (17), Lane (93), Lincoln (4), Linn (46), Malheur (7), Marion (66), Morrow (6), Multnomah (95), Polk (24), Sherman (5), Tillamook (8), Umatilla (110), Union (21), Wallowa (3), Wasco (27), Washington (60), Wheeler (4) and Yamhill (20).

Oregon’s 2,850th death is an 80-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on July 21 and died on July 27 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,851st death is an 83-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on July 16 and died on July 28 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,852nd death is a 63-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on July 15 and died on July 27 at Peacehealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,853rd death is a 48-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 14, 2020 and died on Sept. 21, 2020 at Integris Baptist Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,854th death is a 67-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on July 11 and died on July 25 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,855th death is an 85-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive on July 12 and died on July 24 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #

 


Public Health Advisory Board meets Aug. 19
Oregon Health Authority - 07/29/21 10:20 AM

July 29, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets Aug. 19

What: The Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Approve July meeting minutes; discuss PHAB subcommittees; discuss equity training; PHAB member discussion.

When: Thursday, Aug. 19, 2-3:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting. 

Where: Zoom conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code 1609889971#. 

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. 

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council continues meeting weekly in August
Oregon Health Authority - 07/29/21 10:00 AM

July 29, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council continues meeting weekly in August

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council. 

When: Wednesdays from 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. 

Where: Virtual. YouTube link with live captions (English and Spanish). 

Aug. 4 – https://youtu.be/fRmBb6Rdeyo

Aug. 11 – https://youtu.be/ZFLzeWEkQgA

Aug. 18 – https://youtu.be/qekoDyI9jAI

Aug. 25 - https://youtu.be/snU-HPBJOb4

Agenda: The council will continue its discussion on rules and implementation processes.

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks (formerly Addiction Recovery Centers) throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the centers. 

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brandy L. Hemsley at 971-239-2942, 711 TTY or RANDY.L.HEMSLEY@dhsoha.state.or.us">brandy.l.hemsley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


PartnerSHIP meets Aug. 2 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 07/29/21 8:40 AM

July 29, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

PartnerSHIP meets Aug. 2 via Zoom

What: The PartnerSHIP, tasked with steering implementation of the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP), is meeting.

Agenda: The committee will finalize their charter, learn about Healthier Together Oregon priority areas and strategies, and plan for their first in-person meeting happening in September.

When: Monday, Aug. 2, 1-3 p.m. This meeting is open to the public. 

Where: Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1609047098?pwd=UGd2aGcyNXBSblZRejc5ZktUNFpvUT09

Dial by your location

        +1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose)

        +1 646 828 7666 US (New York)

Meeting ID: 160 904 7098

Passcode: 806191

Background: Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP), Healthier Together Oregon (HTO), identifies interventions and strategies to address health related priorities in our state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to advance health equity.  The SHIP will be based off of findings from the State Health Assessment. 

  • Health departments develop and implement a health improvement plan at least once every five years. 
  • The Public Health Division is using the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) framework, widely used by CCOs and local health departments. The MAPP framework uses six phases. The SHA is developed over the first three phases, while the SHIP is developed and implemented over the second three phases. 
  • Information about the PartnerSHIP can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ABOUT/Pages/partnership-committee.aspx

Program contact: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">Christy.j.hudson@state.or.us

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are: 

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Owens at 971-291-2568, .r.owens@dhsoha.state.or.us">Heather.r.owens@dhsoha.state.or.us.


29 de Julio de 2021

Contacto para medios: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us.

PartnerSHIP se reúne el 2 de agosto vía Zoom

Asunto: El reformado equipo de Socios Comunitarios, encargado de dirigir la aplicación del Plan Estatal de Mejora de la Salud (SHIP) 2020-2024, se reunirá.

Agenda: El comité finalizará su carta, aprenderá sobre las áreas y estrategias de prioridad de Healthier Together Oregon, y planeará su primera reunión en persona en septiembre.

Cuándo: Lunes, 2 de Augusto de 1:00pm a 3:00pm. Esta reunión estará disponible al público en general. 

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1609047098?pwd=UGd2aGcyNXBSblZRejc5ZktUNFpvUT09

Números por ubicación:

        +1 669 254 5252 US (San José)

        +1 646 828 7666 US (New York)

ID de la reunión: 160 904 7098

Contraseña: 806191

Antecedentes: El Plan Estatal de Mejora de la Salud de Oregon (SHIP, por sus siglas en inglés), Healthier Together Oregon (HTO, por sus siglas en inglés),  identifica intervenciones y estrategias para abordar las prioridades relacionadas con la salud en el estado. El SHIP sirve como base para emprender acciones colectivas con socios intersectoriales para mejorar la salud de las personas en Oregón. El SHIP se basa en los resultados de la Evaluación de Salud del Estado.

  • Los departamentos de salud desarrollan e implementan un plan de mejoramiento de la salud al menos una vez cada cinco años.
  • La División de Salud Pública está utilizando el marco de movilización para la acción a través de la planificación y las asociaciones (MAPP), ampliamente utilizado por la CCO's y los departamentos locales de salud. El marco MAPP utiliza seis fases. El SHA se desarrolla en las tres primeras fases, mientras que el SHIP se desarrolla e implementa en las segundas tres fases. 
  • Puede encontrar más información sobre PartnerSHIP en: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ABOUT/Pages/partnership-committee.aspx

Contacto del programa: Christy Hudson, teléfono: 971-678-4347, isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us

###

Todos tienen derecho a conocer y utilizar los programas y servicios de Oregon Health Authority (OHA, por sus siglas en inglés). OHA brinda ayuda gratuita. Algunos ejemplos de la ayuda gratuita que puede proporcionar la OHA son: 

  • Intérpretes de lenguaje de señas y lenguaje hablado

•          Materiales escritos en otros idiomas.

•          Braille

•          Letra grande

•          Audio y otros formatos

Si necesita ayuda o tiene preguntas, comuníquese con Heather Owens al 971-291-2568, .r.owens@dhsoha.state.or.us">Heather.r.owens@dhsoha.state.or.us.


Weekly COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations rise, deaths fall
Oregon Health Authority - 07/28/21 3:30 PM

Weekly COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations rise, deaths fall

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows an increase in daily cases and hospitalizations and a decline in COVID-19 related deaths. 

OHA reported 3,098 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, July 19, through Sunday, July 25. That represents a 53% rise over the previous week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations rose to 146, up from 123 the previous week.

There were 12 reported COVID-19 related deaths, down from 29 reported the previous week.

There were 54,566 tests for COVID-19 for the week of July 18 through July 24. Reported cases increased despite a 12% decrease in testing, while test positivity rose from 4.2% to 5.0%.

As of July 27, 2,477,608 Oregonians — 58.1% of the state’s total population — had received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

Case rates have generally been higher in counties with lower COVID-19 vaccination rates. During the week of July 18–25, the 10 counties with case rates in excess of 100 per 100,000 had population vaccination rates below 50%.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 28 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

###


CORRECTION: Oregon reports 804 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/28/21 3:01 PM

CORRECTION: This press release is revised to correct todays’ reported number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon. The correct number is 274.

July 28, 2021

Oregon reports 804 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are six new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,849, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 804 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 217,690.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 5,499 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 2,981 doses were administered on July 27 and 2,518 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on July 27.

The seven-day running average is now 4,610 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,647,798 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,780,671 first and second doses of Moderna and 179,885 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,477,608 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,302,395 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 3,010,095 doses of Pfizer, 2,288,400 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 274, which is 15 more than yesterday. There are 86 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is nine more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (19), Benton (13), Clackamas (44), Clatsop (8), Columbia (10), Coos (8), Crook (6), Curry (5), Deschutes (43), Douglas (50), Grant (1),  Harney (2), Hood River (2), Jackson (91), Jefferson (7), Josephine (54), Lane (67), Lincoln (5), Linn (38), Malheur (7), Marion (59), Morrow (4), Multnomah (80), Polk (12), Sherman (4), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (55), Union (19), Wallowa (7), Wasco (5), Washington (59), Wheeler (1), Yamhill (16).

Oregon’s 2,844th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on June 26 and died on July 25 at Peacehealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,845th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on June 5 and died on June 18 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,846th COVID-19 death is a 99-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on May 7 and died on July 6 at her residence. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,847th COVID-19 death is a 37-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on July 25 and died on July 25 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed. 

Oregon’s 2,848th COVID-19 death is a 33-year-old man from Umatilla County who tested positive on July 24 and died on July 24 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,849th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman from Umatilla county who tested positive on July 23 and died on July 27. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed. 

 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Oregon reports 804 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/28/21 1:44 PM

July 28, 2021

Oregon reports 804 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are six new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,849, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 804 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 217,690.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 5,499 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 2,981 doses were administered on July 27 and 2,518 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on July 27.

The seven-day running average is now 4,610 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,647,798 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,780,671 first and second doses of Moderna and 179,885 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,477,608 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,302,395 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 3,010,095 doses of Pfizer, 2,288,400 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 274, which is 15 more than yesterday. There are 86 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is nine more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (19), Benton (13), Clackamas (44), Clatsop (8), Columbia (10), Coos (8), Crook (6), Curry (5), Deschutes (43), Douglas (50), Grant (1),  Harney (2), Hood River (2), Jackson (91), Jefferson (7), Josephine (54), Lane (67), Lincoln (5), Linn (38), Malheur (7), Marion (59), Morrow (4), Multnomah (80), Polk (12), Sherman (4), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (55), Union (19), Wallowa (7), Wasco (5), Washington (59), Wheeler (1), Yamhill (16).

Oregon’s 2,844th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on June 26 and died on July 25 at Peacehealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,845th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on June 5 and died on June 18 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,846th COVID-19 death is a 99-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on May 7 and died on July 6 at her residence. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,847th COVID-19 death is a 37-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on July 25 and died on July 25 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed. 

Oregon’s 2,848th COVID-19 death is a 33-year-old man from Umatilla County who tested positive on July 24 and died on July 24 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,849th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman from Umatilla county who tested positive on July 23 and died on July 27. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed. 

 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


OHA recommends universal mask use for all public indoor settings
Oregon Health Authority - 07/27/21 4:55 PM

July 27, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA recommends universal mask use for all public indoor settings

In response to a large jump in cases and hospitalizations and new national guidance calling for masking measures to prevent the spread of the highly transmissible Delta variant, the Oregon Health Authority today is recommending universal mask use in public indoor settings throughout the state to protect Oregonians from COVID-19.

“Today’s reported sharp rise in cases and hospitalizations in Oregon are sobering reminders that the pandemic is not over, especially for Oregonians who remain unvaccinated,” said Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state epidemiologist and state health officer.

“The highly contagious Delta variant has increased tenfold in the past two weeks in Oregon, and it is now estimated to be associated with 80% of the new cases in Oregon. The use of face masks provides significant protection for individuals who are unvaccinated as well as an additional level protection from a small but known risk of infection by the virus for persons who have already been vaccinated.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people who are vaccinated with currently available vaccines are protected from the virus and the circulating variants, including the Delta variant that is now seen in the majority of Oregon’s new cases.

OHA’s recommendation aligns with the CDC’s new guidance issued today that everyone, including fully vaccinated persons, wear a mask in public indoor settings. OHA’s recommendation applies statewide, and not just areas with higher infections and high transmission, as cases have increased across the state in recent weeks due to the Delta variant.

OHA is continuing to call on local community and public health leaders, and businesses, to encourage vaccination and masking to prevent new outbreaks in areas of substantial and high transmission.

 


Oregon Health Policy Board meets August 3 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 07/27/21 2:31 PM

July 27, 2021

ContactsPhilip Schmidt, 503-383-6079philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board meets August 3 via Zoom 

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: August 3, 8:30 a.m. to noon. 

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1602657497?pwd=emhzUnJsK1EzWk5rV0VpYTdjU3VrQT09

To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number: 

+16692545252,,1602657497#,,,,,,0#,,306554#

Proposed Agenda Topics:

  1. Welcome, Roll Call, Minutes Approval & Updates
  2. Committee Membership Workgroup: Draft Findings and Recommendations
  3. Cost Growth Target Program: New Advisory Committee Charter & Membership
  4. Public Comment (please register at least 48 hours before meeting)
  5. OHA Director’s Update 
  6. 1115 Medicaid Waiver Update

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-Meetings.aspx 

To provide public comment, please complete the public comment request template at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OHPB-Public-Comment 

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (live captions)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 1,032 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/27/21 2:01 PM

July 27, 2021

Oregon reports 1,032 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are five new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,843, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,032 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 216,875.

“Today’s reported sharp rise in confirmed and presumptive cases and in hospitalizations in Oregon are sobering reminders that the pandemic is not over, especially for Oregonians who remain unvaccinated,” said Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state epidemiologist and state health officer. 

“The highly contagious Delta variant has increased tenfold in the past two weeks in Oregon, and it is now estimated to be associated with 80% of the new cases in Oregon. OHA continues to encourage all Oregonians who are eligible to make a plan to get vaccinated as soon as possible. We are also reviewing updated guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to assess opportunities for alignment in Oregon based on the increased cases and hospitalizations we are facing here in Oregon.”

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 5,018 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 2,672 doses were administered on July 26 and 2,346 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on July 26.

The seven-day running average is now 4,594 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,644,312 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,779,091 first and second doses of Moderna and 179,508 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,474,186 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,300,081 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 3,009,645 doses of Pfizer, 2,287,600 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 259, which is 52 more than yesterday. There are 77 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 19 more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (14), Clackamas (72), Clatsop (13), Columbia (13), Coos (4), Crook (8), Curry (5), Deschutes (35), Douglas (63), Gilliam (1), Grant (1),  Harney (2), Hood River (4), Jackson (107), Jefferson (19), Josephine (19), Klamath (18), Lake (2), Lane (92), Lincoln (13), Linn (27), Malheur (9), Marion (112), Morrow (4), Multnomah (74), Polk (24), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (112), Union (19), Wallowa (3), Wasco (9), Washington (98) and Yamhill (30). 

Oregon’s 2,839th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on July 22 and died on July 24 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed. 

Oregon’s 2,840th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on July 12 and died on July 23 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,841st COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on July 16 and died on July 25 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,842nd COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man from Polk County who tested positive on July 15 and died on July 24 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed. 

Oregon’s 2,843rd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on July 15 and died on July 25 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

OHA does not report the vaccination status of people in our daily update of COVID-19 related deaths. However, statewide data show that people who remain unvaccinated are at much greater risk of infection and severe illness.

In June, 92% of the 7,241 COVID-19 cases and 94% of the 63 COVID-19-associated deaths occurred in unvaccinated Oregonians. On the first Thursday of each month, OHA publishes an update on vaccine breakthrough cases identified in Oregon. The findings shared in our last report, from July 1, indicate that this number remains very small when compared to the more than 2.2 million people who have completed a COVID-19 vaccination series.

Oregon updates non-viable vaccine disclosure1,2,3

OHA’s non-viable vaccine table has been moved to the Tableau dashboard. You can find that link to the weekly tab here. OHA reports updates on vaccines not being used each Tuesday in our daily media release.

Vaccine type

Doses recalled

Non-viable, spoiled or expired

Grand total

Janssen COVID-19 vaccine 

10,495

10,495

Moderna COVID-19 vaccine 

58,360

58,360

Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine 

23,940

23,940

Grand Total

0

92,795

92,795

1Updated: 07/27/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS)

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday August 3, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 07/27/21 10:32 AM

July 27, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Hilary Harrison, 503-209-1949, y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us  

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday August 3, 2021

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council

When: Tuesday August 3, 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Where: By webinar at ZoomGov

Meeting ID: 160 347 3675, Passcode: 123456

Dial by your location +1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose)

Agenda: The full agenda can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspxThe meeting will include time for public comment.

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults

The council's primary focus for this meeting is on the strategic work to develop a comprehensive long-range plan for a coordinated state system. 

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Hilary Harrison at 503-209-1949, 711 TTY, or y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.


Oregon reports 993 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/26/21 12:22 PM

July 26, 2021

Oregon reports 993 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are two new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,838, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 993 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 215,853.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 2,517 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 1,846 doses were administered on July 25 and 671 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on July 25.

The seven-day running average is now 4,557 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,641,101 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,777,797 first and second doses of Moderna and 179,091 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,471,106 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,297,955 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 3,009,195 doses of Pfizer, 2,286,740 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 207, which is 14 more than yesterday. There are 58 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (20), Clackamas (102), Clatsop (6), Columbia (7), Coos (4), Crook (3), Curry (4), Deschutes (65), Douglas (59), Hood River (3), Jackson (24), Jefferson (7), Josephine (67), Klamath (4), Lake (1), Lane (93), Lincoln (3), Linn (67), Malheur (3), Marion (28), Morrow (3), Multnomah (197), Polk (18), Tillamook (7), Umatilla (53), Union (20), Wallowa (7), Wasco (8), Washington (79), Wheeler (1), Yamhill (27). 

OHA reported 368 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Friday, July 23, 437 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Saturday, July 24, and 188 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sunday, July 25.

Oregon’s 2,837th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on July 8 and died on July 23 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had no underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 2,838th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man from Multnomah county who tested positive on July 12 and died on July 23 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed. 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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Housing Stability Council Monthly Meeting - August 6, 2021
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/30/21 4:28 PM

July 30, 2021

The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be on Friday, August 6, 2021 from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM. The meeting will be held electronically due to the current COVID-19 health crisis. Please register for access link.

 

Webinar Meeting Only

Public register in advance for this webinar:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8w0JnFqlReaMDA7P6D3FdQ

 

AGENDA:

9:00: Meeting Called to Order - Roll Call 

9:05: Public Comment

9:15: Homeownership Division (pg. 01)

Emese Perfecto, Director, Homeownership

  • Oregon Bond Loan Approvals: Kim Freeman, Single Family Program Manager
  • Housing Assistance Fund (HAF): Ryan Vanden-Brink, Operations Policy Analyst

10:00: Affordable Rental Housing Division (pg. 49)

Julie Cody, Director, Affordable Rental Housing

 

  • MF Housing Transactions:
  1. St. Helens Affordable Housing: Brad Lawrence, Production Analyst & Casey Baumann, Production Manager  
  2. 53rd Flats: Tai Dunson-Strane, Production Analyst & Casey Baumann, Production Manager
  3. Ontario Affordable Housing: Andrea Matthiessen, Senior HOME Program Analyst & Casey Baumann, Production Manager

 

  • LIFT Multifamily Supplemental Funding Reservations: Becky Isom, Senior LIFT Program Analyst

 

  •  Funding Gap Approval Delegation of Authority: Roberto Franco, Assistant Director of Development Resources & Production

11:15: Break

11:20: Housing Stabilization Division (pg.82)

Andrea Bell, Director, Housing Stabilization

  • ERA Update:  Andrea Bell, Director of Housing Stabilization, Laura Lien, Assistant Director of Homeless Services, Sam Kenney, Senior Operations & Policy Analyst, Lauren Dressen, Rental Assistance Program Coordinator

11:50: Wildfire Update (pg. 87)

 

  • Wildfire Recovery Funding and Programs: Julie Cody, Director, Affordable Rental Housing

12:10: Report of the Director (pg. 96)

  • Quarterly SWHP update:  Sup Thanasombat, Senior Policy Advisor

12:20: Report of the Chair

12:30: Meeting Adjourned

Please click here to access the meeting materials packet.

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-07/1810/147240/2021-AUG-06-HSC-Meeting-Agenda.pdf

State Agencies Join Forces to Raise Awareness for Veterans, Persons with Disabilities, on Benefits of Outdoor Recreation (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/28/21 2:00 PM
Infographic with agency logos with the message of
Infographic with agency logos with the message of
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/4139/147149/thumb_ODVAPartnershipTile.png

Ask anyone about communing in the outdoors, whether hiking, biking, fishing, boating, camping or just “being,” and many will share a long list of benefits to their mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing. But what many people may not be aware of are the wide range of recreational benefits offered through state agency programs and organizations that serve veterans, active military, and persons with physical limitations.

The Oregon State Marine Board (OSMB), in partnership with the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs Oregon (ODVA), Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), are joining forces to raise awareness for veterans and persons with disabilities around different outdoor adventures in the state to uncover some of the lesser-known water recreation opportunities in the outdoors that aid in the healing process. These agencies are committed to working together to help remove barriers and improve information sharing to better connect people to the water so healing can happen.

Through the end of the year, the agencies will highlight various opportunities to get out on the water to boat, fish, and enjoy other forms of outdoor recreation. Additional outreach will include blogs/vlogs highlighting personal stories, agency license/pass discounts, grant opportunities, interactive maps of ADA facilities, and trip planning tips. Information is shared on ODVA’s Recreation page. People are invited to also subscribe to ODVA’s email distribution list for benefit and program information.

“We are excited about this partnership to build awareness of the many recreation benefits and opportunities available to Oregon veterans to enjoy our beautiful state,” said ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “The mental and physical healing that is experienced by being in the outdoors, is so important to the overall recovery and well-being of so many of our state’s veterans who have served our nation.”

Visit ODVA’s recreation page to learn more about programs and benefits.

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#H2O4Heroes




Attached Media Files: Infographic with agency logos with the message of

"Operation Ship Shape" Targets Lapsed Motorboat Registrations (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/28/21 10:30 AM
Infographic of proper decal and OR Number placement on the bow of a boat
Infographic of proper decal and OR Number placement on the bow of a boat
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/4139/147144/thumb_BoatORNumbersGray21FB.png

The Oregon State Marine Board will be partnering with 32 county sheriff’s offices and the Oregon State Police, looking for expired motorboat boat registrations as part of a targeted annual “Operation Ship Shape” exercise, August 7 and 8. 

If you own a motorboat in Oregon, it’s time to check your “OR” numbers on the front of your boat (bow) and make sure you’ve applied your current registration decals. The OR numbers are a boat’s license plate and registration decals are the tags that tell marine officers if your boat is legally registered and to whom it belongs, similar to motor vehicles. Registrations are valid for two calendar years.

“Oregon’s recreational boating infrastructure is funded entirely by boaters, so it’s really important for every boater out there to be currently registered,” says Randy Henry, Boating Safety Program Manager for the Marine Board. “On August 7 and 8, we’re checking everyone whose decals are expired or numbers are unreadable.”

The Marine Board is funded by registration, title fees, and marine fuel taxes paid by motorized boaters. No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees are used to fund agency programs. These fees go back to boaters in the form of boat ramps, docks, trailered parking spaces, restrooms, construction and maintenance, and for boating safety -marine law enforcement services.

“Any boat that is powered by a motor – electric, gas, diesel or steam, and all sailboats 12 feet and longer -must be currently registered when on the water, even when docked or moored,” said Henry. This includes drift boats, inflatable rafts, stand up paddleboards or float tubes with an electric motor. Henry added, “Each boat registration brings in additional funds from motorboat fuel tax and federal boating dollars. Registering a 16-foot boat provides $100.20 of funding, but results in additional matching funds of nearly $190, so this registration fee results in $267 of revenue available to fund facilities and marine enforcement.”

Henry reminds boaters that if they’ve just purchased their boat or are in the process of registering it, be sure to carry the temporary registration and present it to marine officers, just like vehicle registration.

Boaters can renew their motorboat registration online or by visiting their local registration agent. Boaters can print a temporary permit after successfully completing their transaction online. A registration agent will issue a temporary permit for an additional fee. If you need assistance renewing online, please contact the Marine Board at ine.board@oregon.gov">marine.board@oregon.gov or 503-378-8587.

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Attached Media Files: Infographic of proper decal and OR Number placement on the bow of a boat

State of Oregon Releases Expedited After-Action Review of June Heatwave, Recommendations for Future Extreme Weather Events
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 07/28/21 3:32 PM

Oregonians advised to prepare for potential triple-digit temperatures through the weekend

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM) today submitted to the Governor’s Office an After-Action Review of the June 2021 excessive heat event. The AAR assesses government efforts to prevent and prepare for extreme weather events and outlines recommendations for immediate and future implementation. 

Governor Kate Brown directed OEM to lead the expedited review following the excessive heat that occurred June 25 to June 30, 2021, in which at least 83 Oregonians tragically lost their lives to heat-related illness. With potential triple-digit temperatures expected again this weekend, OEM is working with local emergency management partners and fellow state agencies to immediately implement recommendations from the report to help ensure Oregonians are prepared for the extreme heat.

The AAR analyzed collaborative actions by federal, state, tribal, local agencies and non-profit organizations to respond to the unprecedented heat event. Topline results found that partners moved quickly to assess regional needs and align outreach to provide information and resources to their communities on how to stay safe.

“While these efforts undoubtedly saved lives, it is unacceptable that so many were unable to access the available resources,” said OEM Director Andrew Phelps. “Oregon lives were lost to the heat, highlighting gaps where improvements are needed to reduce the impact of future extreme weather events. We’re calling on state, local and regional governments, community organizations and the public to pull together and prepare for the hot summer months ahead -- and the inevitable effects of our changing climate.”

The review presents 16 recommendations for immediate and long-term implementation. The state is working swiftly with partners to implement immediate recommendations; four of which have already been put into action. Those include:

  • Increased and earlier health information sharing with local leadership.
  • Ensuring 211 is resourced to provide 24/7 coverage to respond to inquiries and requests for assistance.
  • Ongoing conversations with local partners to waive public transit fares during extreme heat events.
  • Prioritizing the importance of readiness for Oregonians and communicating the importance of checking on neighbors, relatives and coworkers.

Long-term recommendations advise governments to prepare for future climate-driven events by identifying communities in need, enhancing early communication around the risks of extreme weather and implementing infrastructure-level policy changes to mitigate the effects of climate change.

Rachael Banks, Oregon’s Public Health Director, said OHA is looking at innovative approaches to help Oregonians protect themselves during extreme weather conditions like excessive heat, including working on new strategies that will make existing housing healthier and safer.

“Simple steps such as weatherizing a home can help keep cool temperatures in and hot temperatures out. Such improvements can also help people avoid wildfire smoke that has become a common part of our summers.”

The Excessive Heat After-Action Review can be found by following this link.

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You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711. 


Oregon Office of Emergency Management to Hold Press Conference on Excessive Heat
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 07/28/21 11:58 AM

Salem, Ore.— The Office of Emergency Management (OEM) will hold a press conference at 4 p.m. today, July 28, to discuss the forecasted heat for this weekend and actions Oregonians can take now to stay safe. Findings and recommendations from the expedited After Action Review (AAR) from the June 2021 excessive heat event will also be addressed. 

OEM will be joined by subject matter experts from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS).

OEM is using a Zoom-based platform for the press conference. Members of the media who are interested in attending should email public.info@mil.state.or.us>">Public.Info@mil.state.or.us no later than 3:00 p.m. today. Members of the media will then be sent a link to register for the press conference; upon registering, a meeting ID will be provided. 

The press conference will also be live streamed on the OEM YouTube channel and recorded. Members of the media are asked to log in a few minutes early to allow time to individually grant permissions to record.

Contact Info: Public.Info@mil.state.or.us


Recreation grant programs topic of Aug. 5 meeting
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/30/21 3:30 PM

Scoring criteria for two recreation grant programs that fund local park development projects is the topic of an upcoming public meeting hosted by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). 

Past and current members of the grant advisory committees for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) and the Local Government Grant Program (LGGP) will meet with OPRD staff 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Aug. 5 via web conference. The meeting is being held to discuss adjustments to LWCF and LGGP project scoring criteria and clarify existing scoring criteria.

The meeting is open to the public, but there will not be time for public comments. Register online to watch the meeting live: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8OfOD-q5TFyF3AQNGgdxMA  

OPRD administers both grant programs. An assistance program of the National Park Service, the LWCF program provides matching funds to state and local governments for acquiring and developing public outdoor recreation areas and facilities. Since 1964, this national grant has awarded more than $75 million for Oregon recreational areas and facilities.

LGGP has provides grant assistance for public park and outdoor recreation areas and facilities. The program was established in 1998 under the Parks and Natural Resources Fund and is funded by a portion of Oregon Lottery dollars. The program has awarded more than $96 million in grant funding. 

For more information. contact Nohemi Enciso, LWCF Program Coordinator, at 503-480-9092 or Nohemi.enciso@oregon.gov, or visit the LWCF web page and the LGGP web page on the OPRD website. 


Oregon Heritage Commission to meet August 9
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/27/21 7:21 AM

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via online meeting on August 9 at 9am. The agenda includes nominations for Chair and Vice Chair of the Commission, recommendations for this fiscal year’s Oregon Cultural Trust Partner Funds, and a presentation by Nonprofit Association of Oregon. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment. 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Katie Henry at 503-877-8834 or katie.henry@oregon.gov.

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986‐0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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Oregon PUC Approves Ownership Transfer of Four Klamath River Dams
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 07/27/21 2:54 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) approved PacifiCorp’s application to transfer ownership of four hydroelectric dams located on the Klamath River to the Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC). The ownership transfer, which was approved with conditions to keep the PUC informed through the transfer process, includes approximately 8,000 acres of property associated with the dams. 

This decision was required as part of a larger negotiated agreement to decommission and remove the J.C. Boyle, Copco No. 1, Copco No. 2, and Iron Gate dams, known as the Lower Klamath Project, as part of the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA). The Lower Klamath Project dams were built solely for power generation and are not used for irrigation, flood control, or the safe passage of fish. The Keno and Link River dams, located to the north and not targeted for demolition as part of this agreement, have fish passages and are part of massive irrigation system that straddles the Oregon-California border and provides water to more than 300 square miles of farmland.

The KHSA finalized a settlement under the framework of the 2008 Agreement in Principle, supported by Oregon Senate Bill 76 (2009) and was signed in 2010 by 48 parties, including PacifiCorp, the states of Oregon and California, the U.S. Department of Interior, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Marine Fisheries Service, several Native American tribes, among others, and was part of a broader initiative to address resource issues in the Klamath Basin. The KHSA was amended in April 2016 and requires PacifiCorp and the KRRC to seek approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to transfer ownership to KRRC and decommission the four dams. On November 17, 2020, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was announced by PacifiCorp, the States of California and Oregon, the Karuk and Yurok Tribes, and the KRRC that describes how the parties will proceed with implementation of the Amended KHSA and, ultimately, dam removal.

“Our decision to approve the transfer is one step on a long and winding path that will continue through the next phases,” said PUC Chair Megan Decker. “It keeps in motion efforts to restore the Klamath Basin and improve the health of a river vital to indigenous communities and others that depend on it.”

Earlier this month, the California, Idaho and Wyoming utility commissions also approved the transfer of ownership of the Lower Klamath Project from PacifiCorp to KRCC. 

“Given the high expected cost to relicense and continue operating these dams, the likelihood that the dams would generate less energy after relicensing, and the declining cost of alternative power sources, dam removal remains the least costly and risky option for PacifiCorp customers,” added Chair Decker.

PacifiCorp submitted the original application for transfer of ownership of these dams to the PUC in 2010, but the Commission at that time concluded that the decision to transfer the property was premature and should be deferred until closer to the date of the actual transfer.

The PUC Staff report voted on by the Commission can be found at: https://oregonpuc.granicus.com/MetaViewer.php?view_id=2&event_id=597&meta_id=30037. The official order memorializing this decision will be filed later this week and posted online at: https://apps.puc.state.or.us/edockets/DocketNoLayout.asp?DocketID=16113

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The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities, as well as select water companies. The PUC mission is to ensure Oregon utility customers have access to safe, reliable, and high quality utility services at just and reasonable rates, which is accomplished through thorough analysis and independent decision-making conducted in an open and fair process. 


Banks & Credit Unions
Umpqua Bank's 2021 Business Barometer: Surging Optimism and Transformational Shifts Position Middle Market Companies for Growth Amid Continued Disruption (Photo)
Umpqua Bank - 07/29/21 8:25 AM
Richard Cabrera, EVP and Head of Middle Market Banking at Umpqua Bank
Richard Cabrera, EVP and Head of Middle Market Banking at Umpqua Bank
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-07/6798/147188/thumb_1200x1106_Richard_Cabrera_Umpqua_Bank_Headshot.jpg

Middle Market optimism surges +24 points over pre-pandemic levels: more than 70% of companies embrace continued adaptation with “significant” changes to strategy and operations anticipated

 

Roughly 50% plan to invest in real estate, acquisitions or other expansion in year ahead 

PORTLAND, Ore., July 29, 2021 – Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), today released its annual 2021 Business Barometer, an in-depth study into the mood, mindset, and strategic priorities of nearly 1,200 leaders at small and middle market companies across the United States. Despite the heavy toll businesses nationwide faced last year, optimism has now surged past pre-pandemic levels, and many companies report being well positioned for growth in the year ahead.

In addition to reporting transformational shifts in operations and strategy over the last year, middle market companies, in particular, are embracing the expectation of continued challenges and the need for ongoing adaptation. And while growth is expected among both small and middle market companies, intense disruptions related to supply chains and competition for workplace talent pose considerable challenges.

“Businesses of all sizes made significant changes over the past year in response to the pandemic. As a result of increased efficiencies and diversification, many have emerged more optimistic and poised for growth as the economic recovery continues,” said Richard Cabrera, EVP and Head of Middle Market Banking at Umpqua Bank. “Leaders have realized their organizations’ capacity to pivot and adapt, and the pandemic has challenged them to think more strategically and in greater detail about their larger purpose and value to the marketplace. This bodes well for the immediate future and will also make them better prepared to adapt to the next disruption.”

Together, small and middle market companies serve as bellwethers for the economy. Middle market businesses alone account for $6 trillion of the U.S. private-sector GDP and provide 44 million jobs. The strength and resiliency of these businesses are critical to economic well being and recovery. 

 

Key findings and highlights from Umpqua Bank’s fourth annual survey include:

 

“Significant Changes” Made in 2020 Represent Transformational Shifts

Not surprisingly, most businesses have made major strategic adjustments in response to the pandemic. Nearly all middle market companies (96%) and most small businesses (65%) say they’ve made “significant changes” to multiple areas, including supply chains, staffing models, company culture and vision, brick-and-mortar operations, and products and services. These changes, however, reflect more than temporary pivots to survive. According to the report, about half of those surveyed, including 71% of middle market companies, expect to keep most or all of the changes made. 

Surging Optimism Paves Way for Growth

Positivity around the current state of the economy has roughly doubled since last year, with expectations for overall economic improvement and business growth accelerating past levels recorded in previous Umpqua middle market research. A majority of middle market (55%) and small (52%) businesses expect economic conditions to improve and for revenue to increase (62% of middle market and 53% of small businesses). 

A renewed sense of optimism, and most likely delayed plans from 2020, have middle market companies thinking about growth and expansion in the year ahead. More than half (52%) are considering acquiring another business, up from roughly one-third reporting such interest in 2019 and 2020. Another 56% expect to finance expansion plans. 

The state of the commercial real estate sector may also be less dire than commonly assumed, as 47% of middle market companies are looking to expand their real estate footprint. That figure is most pronounced within the manufacturing, and finance and insurance industries.

Leaders Embrace a Mindset of Continuous Change & Evolution
Despite reporting massive strategic shifts in response to the pandemic a year ago, more changes are coming in a competitive, dynamic post-pandemic economy. Roughly three-quarters or more of middle market businesses expect to continue making significant changes to products and services (75%). They also anticipate substantial changes to their pricing models (75%); another 81% are likely to digitize new areas of their business to become more efficient, while 79% will continue automating repetitive manual tasks.

“Over the past several years, disruptions—whether macro-economic, geopolitical, or technological—have become a constant reality, and none has been more impactful than the pandemic,” said Cabrera. “The data mirrors what we see on the ground with our customers—businesses are starting to accept this reality. While the last year has been difficult, many businesses have tapped into strategic and creative energy that’s changing their mindset from one of resistance to embracing the need for continual change.”

Despite accelerating optimism and plans for growth, businesses face economic headwinds that will continue to challenge their capabilities and need for strategic support from various partners. These include:

Talent Dislocation and Lack of Skilled Workers 

Most middle market businesses (55%) and 41% of small businesses are having trouble finding qualified employees. Companies cite the inability to engage qualified talent and a shortage of skilled candidates as the top staffing challenges; respondents from construction, retail and manufacturing businesses are most likely to have trouble finding qualified employees.

While businesses are offering enhanced incentives, including finding creative ways to support working parents (71% of middle market companies), operating short-handed has a ripple effect across their bottom line and the economy. Higher labor costs, increased delays with goods and costly workforce inefficiencies are cited as the most significant impacts. The inability to pursue new opportunities also ranks exceptionally high for small businesses. 

Supply Chain Disruptions

As companies are working to adapt and grow to meet increasing consumer demand for goods, many are still feeling the effects of the pandemic on the global supply chain, with 88% of businesses citing difficulty sourcing goods in the past 12 months. The most common supply chain difficulties companies have faced include:

  • Being unable to purchase the goods in a timely manner needed to run their business (23% of small businesses and 29% of middle market companies)
  • Facing longer delays to receive goods (59%)
  • Experiencing an increase in the price of goods (76%)

To read the survey in full, visit www.umpquabank.com/business-barometer-survey-report.

Survey Methodology 

The Umpqua Bank 2021 Business Baramoter, conducted annually, surveyed 1,196 owners, executives, and financial decision-makers from U.S. small and middle market companies. The online survey was conducted in partnership with DHM Research, a public policy and business research firm, and targeted leaders at companies with $500,000 to $500 million in annual revenue. The survey has a 2.8% margin of error and was fielded from May 24 – June 4, 2021. 

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank, headquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, and has locations across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the sixteenth consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank also owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to businesses. 




Attached Media Files: Richard Cabrera, EVP and Head of Middle Market Banking at Umpqua Bank

Organizations & Associations
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities' Members Pump $1.58 Billion into Oregon's Economy
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 07/28/21 4:30 PM

TUALATIN – The annual economic impact to the State of Oregon from fourteen of its nonprofit, independent colleges and universities is $1.58 billion, according to a just completed study that used FY18 data. 

“The nonprofit, independent higher education sector is a key driver in Oregon’s economy,” said Brent Wilder, President of the Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (The Alliance). “Collectively, our member institutions are economic engines in this state, serving as magnets attracting students and their families, alumni and tourists who spend money locally yet use minimal municipal services. Our members are large employers in their communities and collectively employ over 7,000 people statewide.” 

Among the findings, fourteen independent nonprofit colleges and universities in Oregon: 

  • generated a total impact on the Oregon economy of $1.58 billion representing a direct economic impact of $1.04 billion in direct institutional spending for employee spending, university purchases, capital expenditures, student, visitor, and alumni spending, as well as another nearly $543 million in induced spending.
  • created 13,637 jobs in Oregon in 2018 because of the economic activity generated by the sector.
  • contributed over $1.2 billion in alumni earnings to Oregon’s economy, which generated significant taxes and spending on the local level.
  • are magnets for students and visitors who spent nearly $304 million.
  • resulted in a cost savings of over $207 million to the state of Oregon in 2019.

“Oregon’s independent, nonprofit colleges and universities are hubs of commerce for the communities and regions that we call home. We offer world-class education to students from across the nation and globe, preparing our students to meet the needs of employers and our state’s economy,” said President Miles K. Davis of Linfield University and chair of The Alliance. “Our campuses are talent centers where knowledge is produced, where science is advanced, and where the arts contribute to the vibrancy of our cultural communities.” 

The study was conducted by Mark Gius, Ph.D., Professor of Economics at Quinnipiac University and The Alliance member institutions that are included in the study are as follows: Bushnell University, Corban University, George Fox University, Lewis & Clark College, Linfield University, Multnomah University, National University of Natural Medicine, Pacific Northwest College of Art (now a part of Willamette University), Pacific University, University of Portland, University of Western States, Warner Pacific University, Western Seminary, and Willamette University. For detailed information on the data and an explanation of Dr. Gius’s process, please visit OAICU’s 2018-2019 Economic Impact Report.

The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (“The Alliance”) is comprised of 13 private, nonprofit, independent colleges and universities in the state of Oregon. These institutions deliver high-quality experiential learning with high-impact teaching strategies. The Alliance is the collective voice of Oregon's independent, nonprofit higher education sector. For more information, visit www.oaicu.org