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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Tue. May. 21 - 1:28 pm
Police & Fire
Detectives Investigating Shots Fired Call in Green
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/19 5:40 PM

ROSEBURG, Ore. - Detectives are following up on leads after a vehicle was struck by gunfire in Green Sunday night. 

At about 10:22 pm, deputies were dispatched to investigate a report of shots fired in the area of Ladd Lane, but were unable to locate any witnesses or the source of the gunfire. 

At approximately 11:00 pm, dispatchers received a report from an individual who stated their vehicle had been struck by gunfire earlier in the evening near Taco Bell. No one was injured in the incident. 

Detectives were notified and are currently investigating the incident. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Investigations Division at 541-440-4458 or the non-emergency dispatch center at 541-440-4471.


FREE Boat Safety Inspections This Weekend (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/15/19 8:27 AM
Marine Deputies conduct a safety inspection at the Roseburg Bi-Mart on May 5th. Two additional inspection clinics will be held this weekend.
Marine Deputies conduct a safety inspection at the Roseburg Bi-Mart on May 5th. Two additional inspection clinics will be held this weekend.
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DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. – Marine Deputies will hold two Boat Safety Inspection Clinics this weekend. A previous inspection clinic was held on Sunday, May 5th at the Roseburg Bi-Mart.

Inspections will begin at 9:00 am and end at 2:00 pm each day. The dates and locations are as follows: 

  • Saturday, May 18 - Winston Bi-Mart (391 NW Douglas Blvd., Winston)
  • Sunday, May 19 - Sutherlin Bi-Mart (388 E. Central Ave., Sutherlin)

The purpose of the event is to provide boaters the opportunity to have their pre-season safety inspections completed. The inspection process will include checking for: 

  • Approved Life Jackets
  • Working fire extinguishers 
  • Approved type IV floatation devices
  • Approved sound producing equipment 
  • Working engine blower fan
  • Assistance with the proper placement of registration numbers and stickers. 

Upon passing the inspection, boaters will be provided with a 2019 inspection sticker. 

Deputies will also be available to answer questions and provide boater and water safety information. 




Attached Media Files: Marine Deputies conduct a safety inspection at the Roseburg Bi-Mart on May 5th. Two additional inspection clinics will be held this weekend.

Man Dies After Falling At Toketee Falls (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/14/19 9:11 PM
Douglas County Fire District #2 personnel recovering the victim from Toketee Falls
Douglas County Fire District #2 personnel recovering the victim from Toketee Falls
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TOKETEE FALLS, Ore. – On Sunday, May 12, 2019, at approximately 6:30 pm, dispatchers received a report of a male subject who had fallen into the water at Toketee Falls.

Search and Rescue personnel as well as emergency crews from Douglas County Fire District #2 responded on Sunday night and resumed efforts Monday morning. The subject’s body was successfully recovered on Monday at approximately 11:30 hours by Douglas County Fire District #2 Technical Rescue Team.  

The male victim was identified as 59 year-old Brian Paul Nelson, formerly of Bandon, Oregon.

Next of kin has been notified.




Attached Media Files: Douglas County Fire District #2 personnel recovering the victim from Toketee Falls

Meth seizure and arrest (Photo)
Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) - 05/20/19 10:28 AM
2019-05/6255/124670/House.jpeg
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The Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) has been investigating the activities of 58 year old Ron House.  House has been alleged to be using and selling controlled substances from his residence in the 600 block of Parrott Street in Roseburg.  

The ongoing investigation led to the seizure of a substantial amount of methamphetamine in recent weeks.  

On Friday, May 17th, DINT detectives, with help from the Roseburg Police Department, conducted a traffic stop on a vehicle in the 1300 block of NE Stephens Street in Roseburg.  Ron House was an occupant of the vehicle and he was detained without incident.  A search of the vehicle revealed approximately a half pound of methamphetamine.

A search of House's residence in the 600 block of Parrott Street revealed approximately another half pound of methamphetamine, a small amount of cocaine, and other drug paraphernalia such as scales used to weigh drugs, and packaging materials.  

House was lodged at the Douglas County Jail on the following charges:

  • 2 counts of Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine.
  • 2 counts of Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine.
  • 1 count of Unlawful Possession of Cocaine.



Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6255/124670/House.jpeg

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Vacation Rental Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/21/19 10:00 AM
TT - Vacation Rentals - GRAPHIC - May 21, 2019
TT - Vacation Rentals - GRAPHIC - May 21, 2019
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against vacation scams. 

The kids are almost out of school, and the weather is warming up… definitely a good time to start planning your next escape out of town. It seems like it has never been easier to find the perfect space in the perfect place to take your family. Want to rent a condo for a few nights in the big city? A cottage in the woods? Or a bungalow by the beach? There are tons of options for every kind of possible vacation, and you can find them all with a few quick clicks on the keyboard. 

Our friends at the Federal Trade Commission, though, have some advice to help make sure that your quest for rest and relaxation doesn’t lead you to a rental scam. 

Here’s how it can work: you find a great house or apartment listed for rent on the internet. The photos look great, and the rates are somewhere between very low and reasonable. You make contact with the person you think is the owner, book a date and pre-pay some or all of your fee. In some cases, a fraudster may have just lifted the info and pictures from a real listing and re-posted them elsewhere. He changes the contact info so you come to him, not the owner, and now he’s making money. 

In other cases, the fraudster posts a phantom listing… the rental doesn’t really exist. He promises all kinds of amenities, and you think you’ve just snagged a great option at a low price. All he has to do is get you to pay up before you figure things out. 

Here’s how to protect yourself: 

  • Be wary if the owner asks you to pay by wire transfer. This is like sending cash – you likely will never get your money back if there’s a problem. Use a credit card. 

  • Watch out if the owner says he is overseas and wants you to send a deposit to a foreign bank. If you are traveling overseas, again, your best bet is to use a credit card. 

  • Consider only using a reputable travel website to book your stay. Look for sites that use secure payment portals and/or those that don’t release the payment to the owner until you’ve checked in. 

  • Use mapping apps – like Google maps or similar – to confirm that the property really exists. 

Remember - if you have been victimized by an online scam, you can report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office. 

###




Attached Media Files: TT - Vacation Rental Scams - AUDIO - May 21, 2019 , TT - Vacation Rentals - GRAPHIC - May 21, 2019

FBI Profiles Oregon Fugitive as Part of National Police Week Remembrance Events: Reward of up to $10,000 Still Available
FBI - Oregon - 05/16/19 4:01 PM

The FBI has chosen eight cases - including one from Oregon - to highlight during the national Police Week events honoring those officers killed and injured in the line of duty. The Oregon case focuses on fugitive David Anthony Durham who is wanted in connection with the 2011 attempted murder of a Lincoln City Police officer.

On Thursday, May 16th, the FBI highlighted the Durham case on its website (www.fbi.gov) and will showcase Durham across its national social media platforms including www.Facebook.com/FBI and @FBIMostWanted on Twitter.

Background Information 

At approximately 11:00 p.m. on January 23, 2011, a Lincoln City Police officer pulled over an SUV for a traffic violation. During the traffic stop, the driver of the vehicle, later identified as Durham, shot the officer multiple times and critically wounded him. Durham then fled the area. A police chase ensued, and Durham exchanged gunfire with officers before abandoning his vehicle in Waldport, Oregon. Durham disappeared, and there have been no confirmed sightings since. 

"This was a well-known, outstanding, veteran police officer who was ambushed during a traffic stop,” said Lincoln City Police Chief Jerry Palmer of the injured officer. “He will never be the same.” Palmer stressed that it remains a priority of the department to find Durham.

Local authorities obtained an arrest warrant for Durham in Lincoln County on January 27, 2011, charging him with dozens of counts - including four counts of attempted aggravated murder. The FBI obtained a federal arrest warrant on January 29, 2011, charging Durham with unlawful flight to avoid prosecution (a federal fugitive warrant.) Since that time, the FBI has assisted the Lincoln City in the fugtive hunt - providing resources, following up on potential leads and assisting with publicity efforts. 

Durham is known to possess survival skills. He was wearing full green camouflage at the time of his disappearance, as well as tan or dark boots, and a dark-colored beret. In the past, he has expressed a desire to travel or is believed to have traveled to California, the Caribbean, and Thailand. 

The FBI continues to offer a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the location and arrest of Durham. Anyone with information is encouraged to contact the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI, by submitting a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov or calling the nearest FBI office.

###

 




Attached Media Files: Durham Wanted Poster

Grants Pass Fire and Police Respond to RV Fire (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 05/20/19 3:56 PM
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Grants Pass Department of Public Safety Fire and Police along with Rural Metro Fire and AMR responded to a reported  RV fire at 1275 Rogue River Hwy. The fire was reportedly located in an RV used as a residence. Crews arrived to find heave smoke and flame coming from an RV located in close proximity to two mobile homes in the Fruitdale Trailer Park.

Fire crews were able to deploy hose lines to the fire while police officers assisted with traffic control and connecting to a fire hydrant. Police officers routinely train with firefighters to assist on the fire ground, freeing firefighters to concentrate on the fire. The fire was quickly extinguished with minor damage to two adjacent mobile homes. Unfortunately, the RV and all of its contents were a total loss.

Rogue Valley Chaplains and American Red Cross were on scene assisting the occupants with housing and personal needs.

There were no injuries to civilians or firefighters. The cause of the fire was undetermined after investigation.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6530/124696/Fire.jpg

Citizen Alert Test Scheduled for Wednesday (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/19 2:39 PM
Citizen Alert image
Citizen Alert image
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The following release is sent on behalf of Jackson County Emergency Management:

Rogue Valley Citizen Alert Test Scheduled For Wednesday, May 22

If you get a phone call, text message or email from Citizen Alert on May 22, don’t be concerned – it’s an annual test of our Emergency Notification System. The test is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m.

Jackson and Josephine County Emergency Management conduct annual tests of the Citizen Alert Emergency Notification System. Citizen Alert is used to notify residents of important public safety information, such as wildfire evacuations, hazardous materials incidents, or even a fugitive or missing person in your area. Testing the system allows emergency management staff and citizens to practice using the system, as if a real emergency has occurred.

All landline telephones in both Jackson and Josephine Counties will be alerted during this test. Other forms of communication (such as cell phones and email) will be sent to those who have signed up in Citizen Alert.  Landline phone numbers (both published and non-published) are automatically provided to the emergency notification system by the phone company; however, many people don’t have a landline phone anymore. Cellular companies do not provide telephone numbers to the system. If you do not have a landline telephone at your home or business, we do not have your information and therefore, we cannot alert you about potentially dangerous situations.

Signing up for Citizen Alert enables you to receive timely notifications wherever you are.  Jackson and Josephine County Emergency Management will not share your information with anyone. Your information is only used to send you emergency information, and (if you choose) important community alerts.

To sign up for Citizen Alert, visit Rogue Valley Emergency Management at www.RVEM.org.

###




Attached Media Files: Citizen Alert image

Deputies Begin "Click It or Ticket" Patrols (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/19 2:28 PM
Click It or Ticket image
Click It or Ticket image
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JACKSON COUNTY, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies are kicking off two weeks of focused enforcement aimed at saving lives on the road.  JCSO joins law enforcement agencies across the nation for the “Click It or Ticket” enforcement campaign. 

Deputies will be adding patrols from May 20 to June 2, 2019, to ensure that drivers and passengers are wearing their seat belts.  Grant funding allows JCSO to add the enforcement patrols without reducing the number of deputies available for regular calls for service.

“Oregon has a relatively high usage rate for seat belts,” said Sgt. Julie Denney. “But we still see deaths and injuries that could have been prevented if people had buckled up.”

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there were more than 10,000 unbuckled vehicle occupants killed in crashes in the United States in 2017.  Fifty-one percent of men killed in crashes were not buckled up, compared to 39 percent of women.  Many crash fatalities involving unrestrained passengers also involve impairment or distractions.

The bottom line, according to NHTSA:  wear your seat belt every time—no matter how uncomfortable it feels or how far you're going.  It could save your life.

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Attached Media Files: Click It or Ticket image

Two People Survive Small Plane Crash (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/14/19 9:14 PM
Scene 1
Scene 1
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WHITE CITY, Ore. – Two people were injured in a small plane crash in the Sams Valley area Tuesday evening.  The plane went down while approaching Beagle Sky Ranch Airport. 

On May 14, 2019, at 7:23 p.m., dispatch received a 911 call from a resident in the 4900-block of Dodge Road reporting a small plane had crash landed in their yard.  The caller reported at least one person was injured.

Jackson County Sheriff’s Office deputies and personnel from Fire District #3 responded to the scene to render aid.  A Mercy Flights helicopter transported the plane’s passenger to Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center.  The pilot went to the hospital by private vehicle.  A dog riding in the plane was uninjured.

The aircraft was identified as a 1976 Cessna T210L. The circumstances of the crash will be investigated by federal authorities.  The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) have been advised of the incident.

Further information may be released at a later time by federal authorities. 

Case #19-9472

###




Attached Media Files: Scene 1 , Scene 2

Fatal Crash Highway 126W near Veneta -- Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/20/19 11:58 AM
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Saturday afternoon’s multi-vehicle fatal crash on 126W near Veneta. 

On May 18, 2019 at about 3:30 PM, OSP and first responders were dispatched to a multi-vehicle crash on Highway 126W near milepost 50.

Preliminary investigation revealed that several eastbound vehicles were stopped on 126W near the intersection of Lake Side Drive waiting for a vehicle to make a turn.  A Chevrolet pickup operated by Thomas HILL, age 39, from Eugene, was eastbound and failed to observe traffic coming to a stop.  The Chevrolet pickup rear ended a Dodge pickup, operated by Christopher STUART, age 29 from Florence.  The impact caused the Dodge pickup to go into the westbound lane where it crashed into a  Ford Focus operated by Jennifer STEPHENSON, age 37, from Noti. 

STEPHENSON suffered fatal injuries from the impact.  STEPHENSON’s passenger, Matthew MARCUERQIAGA, age 39, from Noti, sustained serious injuries and was transported to Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend.  STUART sustained critical injuries and was also transported to Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. 

Highway 126W was closed for about two hours during the investigation.

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT and Veneta Fire. 

Photograph provided by OSP. 

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1002/124677/SP19-174466_Fatal_(21).JPG

Fatal Crash Territorial Highway & High Pass Road near Junction City -- Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/20/19 10:11 AM
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Friday morning’s two vehicle fatal crash on Territorial Highway and High Pass Road near Junction City. 

On May 17, 2019 at about 10:20 AM, OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a two vehicle fatal crash at the intersection of Territorial Highway and Highway Pass Road. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevy Cavalier, operated by Russell Lee NICKERSON, age 81, from Eugene was traveling westbound on High Pass Road when for unknown reasons he failed to stop at the intersection.  NICKERSON’s vehicle was struck by a  Ford Econoline Van, operated by Cary Allen RAMSAY (male), age 55, from Eugene. 

NICKERSON suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  RAMSAY was transported to Riverbend Hospital with serious injuries. 

Territorial Highway was closed for approximately four hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sheriff's Office, ODOT, Junction City Fire and Lane Fire Authority.

Photograph provided by OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ### 
Twitter: @ORStatePolice 
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1002/124668/DSC00946.JPG

Death Investigation Highway 38 near Elkton -- Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 05/15/19 4:14 PM

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Wednesday morning’s accident that lead to the death of a North Bend man on Highway 38 near Elkton. 

On May 15, 2019 at about 11:10 AM, OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a log truck that had gone into a ditch on Highway 38 near milepost 37. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a loaded Kenworth log truck operated by John DICKENS, age 63, from North Bend, was eastbound on Highway 38.  DICKENS stopped at a wide spot along the highway and exited the log truck.  The log truck started rolling and struck DICKENS while he was outside of it causing fatal injuries. 

OSP is continuing the investigation into what caused the log truck to roll while it was unattended.  Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) investigators responded to the scene to assist with the investigation. 

OSP was assisted at the scene by Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, Elkton Fire Department , OSHA, and Mast Brothers Towing. 

No photographs for release.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial


Military
[PHOTO RELEASE]- 23rd Annual Living History Day at Camp Withycombe (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/18/19 4:35 PM
190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste
190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste
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190518-Z-PL933-0008-Visitors, current service members and military Veterans spend time interacting during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. This event is co-sponsored by the Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon and hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, Oregon's official military history repository and an award-winning museum located at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0012-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0058-A restored WWI Ford Model-T Ambulance on display from the Vancouver Barracks Military Association is presented to the public at the 23rd annual Living History day at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore. May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0070-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0086-Rory Jensen, from Camas, Wash, displays his WWII-era camera again this year during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. His camera from last year has been sold in order to buy this more historically accurate model used by the United States Army throughout WWII. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0101-Visitors and military Veterans spend time interacting during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

Hi-res photos available on our Flickr account at:

https://www.flickr.com/gp/oregonmildep/1hE1MX

 

 




Attached Media Files: 190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste , 190518-Z-PL933-0101-Visitors and military Veterans spend time interacting during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day , 190518-Z-PL933-0086-Rory Jensen, from Camas, Wash, displays his WWII-era camera again this year during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. His camera from last year has been sold in order to buy , 190518-Z-PL933-0070-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays s , 190518-Z-PL933-0058-A restored WWI Ford Model-T Ambulance on display from the Vancouver Barracks Military Association is presented to the public at the 23rd annual Living History day at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore. May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day , 190518-Z-PL933-0012-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays s , 190518-Z-PL933-0008-Visitors, current service members and military Veterans spend time interacting during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. This event is co-sponsored by the Military Vehicle Co

Armed Forces Day Event Honors Veterans, History (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/17/19 8:30 AM
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Armed Forces Day Event Honors Veterans, History  

23rd Annual Living History Day Honors All Service Men and Women

CLACKAMAS, Oregon – The 23rd Annual Living History Day is scheduled for Saturday, May 18th, at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore., from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

The event celebrates Armed Forces Day, a nationally recognized holiday held on the third Saturday each May.  Visitors of all ages can explore military displays, vehicles, and historic buildings.  This free event is co-sponsored by the Oregon Military Museum and the Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon (MVCCO).

The Armed Forces Day celebration pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military’s role in our communities, our nation, and the world.  

“This annual event helps us fulfill our mission to inspire and educate visitors about Oregon's military heritage and legacy, to include the National Guard, the early militia, and all branches of the Armed Forces,” explains Tracy Thoennes, curator of the museum. “We showcase military equipment and capabilities throughout the past two hundred years.  Visitors have the opportunity to see, touch, and experience first-hand our military past and learn more about today’s military.” 

Displays include multi-era historical artifacts as well as current operational military equipment.  A few examples include:  U.S. field artillery from 1841 through today, exhibits in two circa 1911 rescued and relocated historic buildings, and many military vehicles from ambulances, trucks, and tanks to amphibious, tactical, and utility vehicles.  Food and beverage for purchase or by donation will be available.

Drivers will be required to show a valid driver’s license to enter Camp Withycombe.  The address is 15300 SE Minuteman Way, just off Interstate 205 and Highway 212, near SE 102nd Avenue.  

For more information about Living History Day, please call the Oregon Military Museum at (503) 683-5359. 

The Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon is dedicated to the preservation and enjoyment of military vehicles and related equipment.  Monthly meetings are held at Camp Withycombe, and members participate in parades and community events throughout each year. 

The Oregon Military Museum is Oregon’s official military history repository and an award-winning museum located at Camp Withycombe.  The museum is currently undergoing major renovations.  

 

Photo Caption:

Rory Jensen from Camas, Washington, dressed in his vintage WWII-era uniform, holds a WWII-era Speed Graphic camera during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 19, 2018. The Oregon Military Museum will once again host the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country on May 18, 2019. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/962/124610/180519-Z-CH590-001.jpg

Oregon National Guard 'Run 2 Remember' 5K Run/Walk event (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/15/19 6:00 PM
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SALEM, Oregon – The 3rd Annual Oregon National Guard ‘Run 2 Remember’ 5K Run/Walk is scheduled for May 18, 2019 at the Salem Riverfront Park, 200 Water Street, NE, Salem, Oregon. A brief registration period will be open beginning at 8:00 AM, as participants are highly encouraged to register before the day of the event at:

https://www.oregonarmyguard.com/ausa5k

Oregon Army National Guard Brig. Gen. William J. Edwards, Assistant Adjutant General Army, is scheduled to deliver remarks to those in attendance at 8:30 AM. The Kids Fun Run (1/2 mile run) will take place at 8:40 with the featured event 5K Run/Walk starting at 9:00 AM.

The route for the race is a 2.5K out-and-back course with an aid station at the turn-around point. There will also be an aid station at the Start/Finish line.

The remembrance run/walk is in honor of Fallen Service Members from all branches of the Armed Forces. In addition to the run/walk events, a resource fair will be open for surviving family and Service Members. Food cart vendors have been invited and service provider booths will be open onsite throughout the event. The day’s activities will conclude at 11:00 AM.

Helping host the event is the Oregon National Guard Service Member Family Support Branch along with The Association of the United States Army and The United States Army Survivor Outreach. Resource Fair participants include the Polk County Veteran Services Office, Team Red, White and Blue, Military One Source, The Returning Veterans Project and other veteran service organizations. Additional information can be found at the link provided above.

PHOTO Caption:

Participants walk through Salem Riverfront Park during the 'Run to Remember' 5K Run/Walk, May 19, 2018, in Salem, Oregon. The Oregon National Guard’s Service Member & Family Support Branch hosted the event in honor of Fallen Service Members and Gold Star Families. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/962/124585/180519-Z-OT568-041.jpg

Federal
Interior Announces $30.1 Million in Payments to Rural Schools in Western Oregon Counties
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 05/15/19 9:26 AM

WASHINGTON – U .S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt announced today the issuance of $30.1 million to 18 counties in western Oregon as a part of the Secure Rural Schools (SRS) and Community Self-Determination Act extension. The funding will go directly to the counties, supporting investments in education, infrastructure, public safety, health services, and other critical expenditures made by these jurisdictions.

“The money appropriated to these communities through the Secure Rural Schools Act is critical to their continued prosperity and the vibrancy of our public lands,” said Secretary Bernhardt. “At the Department of the Interior, we are committed to being a good federal partner and neighbor, and this program is one way we help these local economies.”
 
“This announcement is welcome news for Oregon counties that rely on this program,” said U.S. Rep. Greg Walden (OR-02). “I worked closely with the last two Republican Speakers of the House to secure SRS funding for our schools and counties. I applaud the Trump Administration for prioritizing rural Oregon and promptly issuing these payments. While we are all pleased the checks are getting written, what we really need is reform of forest management so we can reduce the size and severity of wildfires and produce good paying jobs and tax revenues in our forest counties. I look forward to continuing to work with President Trump and his team to achieve that goal.”

Background
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) manages the SRS program in Oregon and California Railroad Revested Lands, known as the O&C Lands, in concert with the U.S. Forest Service. The O&C Lands lie in a checkerboard pattern through 18 counties of western Oregon. These lands contain more than 2.4 million acres of forests with a diversity of plant and animal species, recreation areas, mining claims, grazing lands, cultural and historical resources, scenic areas, wild and scenic rivers, and wilderness. SRS payments are made to over 700 counties across the United States, including the 18 counties containing O&C Lands, according to a formula set by Congress.

The O&C Lands Act and Coos Bay Wagon Road (CBWR) Act require 50 percent of receipts collected from the sale of timber on O&C lands to be distributed among 18 counties in western Oregon. The payments follow a formula established by these laws, both of which authorize timber receipt-based payments to western Oregon counties, and both of which remain in effect following the expiration of the SRS and Community Self-Determination Act. 


State
Linda Maddy at DPSST Recognized by Port of Portland Police (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/21/19 10:27 AM
Linda Maddy DPSST and Lt. Scott Creager of Port of Portland Police
Linda Maddy DPSST and Lt. Scott Creager of Port of Portland Police
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1187/124722/thumb_Linda_Maddy_PDX_5-16-2019.jpg

Linda Maddy of the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) was honored recently by the Port of Portland Police Department with a Community Partner Award.

Linda, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with more than a decade of service, is one of two Coordinators assigned to DPSST's Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) / Mental Health Program which provide training to first responders around the state through Oregon's Crisis Intervention Team Center of Excellence (CITCOE).

The Community Partner Award is given by the Port of Portland Police Department to individuals and organizations who work with the police department to support the safety and security of those who work and travel through Portland International Airport (PDX).   

Over the past year, Linda has spent countless hours, and has delivered dozens of classes at PDX, in the area of mental health first aid, working with people in crisis, and other mental health topics for law enforcement officers and 9-1-1 telecommunicators at the airport.  In addition she has worked with Port of Portland Police to deliver a variety of classes to employees who work at the airport ranging from PDX staff, airline ticket and gate agents, and even rental car company staff who encounter people in crisis on a daily basis as PDX serves more than 19 million travelers each year.

DPSST's Director Eriks Gabliks said "Linda’s commitment to training excellence is appreciated and is one example of the great work done by the men and women at DPSST on a daily basis.  Linda's work with veterans, and public safety professionals, around the state is making a difference in how we respond to incidents involving people in crisis."

 ## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, OLCC regulatory specialists, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 




Attached Media Files: Linda Maddy DPSST and Lt. Scott Creager of Port of Portland Police

DPSST Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/20/19 11:02 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

May 16, 2019

Contact:    Staci Yutzie
                 503-378-2426

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel for Phase 3 will hold a regular meeting on June 6, 2019 from 10:00a-2:00p.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

I.   Welcome- Ryan Keck

II.  Basic Police Revision Overview- Ryan Keck and Staci Yutzie

  1. Phase 1 & 2 Product
  2. Phase 3 Goal
  3. Phase 4 Plan

III.  Metrics- Dr. Stephen James

IV.  Advisory Panel Tasks

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Construction Contractors Board Takes Steps to Stop Data and Security Breach, Inform Contractors
Oregon Construction Contractors Board - 05/17/19 10:47 AM

The Oregon Construction Contractors Board (CCB) has discovered a security breach involving 8,013 online contractor accounts. Unauthorized individuals gained access to some contractors’ usernames and related password information. The incident occurred between October 27, 2018 and October 29, 2018, and was discovered on April 12, 2019, during a routine audit conducted by the Enterprise Security Office of the agency’s information technology databases.

Unfortunately, personally identifying information in 466 of these accounts was accessible, and the CCB determined this constitutes a data breach for that subset of accounts.

Upon detection of the issue, the CCB took immediate steps to determine the scope of the problem and then to remediate the problem. This work included closing the pathways used by the unauthorized individuals to gain access to the contractor accounts. The CCB is also enhancing its password protection security and is requesting that each affected account holder reset his or her password.

The compromised information included the email, name, address, and password hash (the code that protects the password) of the affected individuals. Of those compromised accounts, 466 also included an ID number such as state ID or driver license. At this time, there is no evidence that the information has been misused.

In addition to asking that all affected account holders reset their passwords, the CCB is sending letters to all affected account holders. These letters advise account holders that CCB is offering identity theft protection and fully managed ID theft recovery services to each of them for one year. Information on how to access these free services is included in the letters being mailed.

The Construction Contractors Board is committed to protecting the privacy and security of its licensees, and its systems are frequently reviewed and audited. 

###

About the CCB

The Construction Contractors Board regulates more than 40,000 licensed contractors. The agency also promotes contractor education and protects consumers by preventing and resolving construction contracting problems. Learn more about the CCB at www.oregon.gov/ccb.


Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services committee holds town hall in Medford
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/20/19 6:48 PM

Salem, Ore .– The Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS) Advisory Committee will hold a town hall in the large meeting room of the Medford Library, 205 S. Central Ave. in Medford, Oregon, from 6 to 8 p.m. on May 21.

The ODHHS Advisory Committee will also hold its full advisory committee meeting prior to the town hall from 2 to 4 p.m., May 21. The executive committee meeting will follow from 9 to 11 a.m., May 22, in the Carpenter Room at the Medford Library, 205 S. Central Ave., Medford, Oregon.

All three meetings are open to the public.

Agenda items for the full advisory committee and executive committee meetings will include: public comment, announcements, an update on the Office of Aging and People with Disabilities, brochures for the Advisory Committee and the ODHHS program, new membership discussion, retreat planning and discussion about bylaws.

Sign language interpreters, FM assistive listening devices and live captioning will be provided for each meeting. Those who are unable to attend in person may view real-time captioning at https://zoom.us/j/416452805 for the Advisory Committee meeting, https://zoom.us/j/795840168 for the Town Hall, and https://zoom.us/j/321918652 for the executive committee meeting.

For questions about these meetings, please contact: Barbara Robertson at 503-509-9550 or the ODHHS program at odhhs.info@state.or.us.

About the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee

The committee assists the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS) program by providing  issues affecting individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and those with additional disabilities.

# # #


Memorial Day reminds us of our highest ideals -- and the price we must sometimes pay for them (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 05/16/19 3:42 PM
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1082/124620/thumb_KellyFitzpatrick.jpg

The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs welcomes our news and media partners to consider sharing with your audiences the following Memorial Day message from Director Kelly Fitzpatrick:

Every year, I’m struck by the powerful — and often, opposing — emotions that Memorial Day stirs.

We celebrate our freedoms, and yet, we mourn the cost that they required. We look ahead to a bright future, while we remember the trials and challenges of the past. We honor those who served, but we grieve their loss.

Celebration, and sadness. Gratitude, and remorse. Hope, and helplessness. Memorial Day is unique in evoking such a broad spectrum of feeling, because it is this holiday that speaks most keenly to our highest ideals, as well as the steep price we are willing to pay for them.

Sadly, it is also a day that, for many, has lost its significance. President George W. Bush would often tell the story of asking schoolchildren what the meaning of Memorial Day is, only to have them respond, “That’s the day the pool opens!”

For many Oregonians, Memorial Day is primarily the unofficial start of the summer recreation season, a chance to enjoy our amazing forests and beaches, rivers and lakes and mountain trails.

We should enjoy all that our state has to offer, but we should also keep in mind the words of another president, John F. Kennedy: “A nation reveals itself not only by the citizens it produces but also by the citizens it honors, the citizens it remembers.”

We must remember the fallen because the courage, the strength, the selflessness and the sacrifice of each one of these brave warriors is the ideal to which we all should aspire.

On this Memorial Day, I think of Bob Maxwell, a great American and Oregonian whom we lost earlier this month. Bob was a World War II combat soldier, and until his death, the only Medal of Honor recipient still living in our state. While he did not die fighting for our country he fearlessly faced death in a way few Americans ever have.

He earned that medal — the U.S. military’s highest decoration for valor — for the courage he showed during a battle in September 1944, when a live German hand grenade was tossed in the midst of his squad. Without a second thought, he hurled himself upon it, shielding his comrades from the blast with nothing but a blanket and his unprotected body.

Maxwell cheated death that day, though he carried shrapnel in his body for the rest of his life.  It was a life he dedicated in humble service to the veteran community, and to the memories of his brothers in arms, who never got the chance to come home.

We must never forget the true cost of war. It is a price paid not in dollars and cents, but with the blood of our heroes. They were nothing less than the best America had to offer, those who answered the call when their nation needed them, who paid the ultimate price to protect us and our way of life.

The stories of their sacrifice are forever woven into the fabric of our nation and its history. They gave their lives on the foreign soils of Europe, the black sands of the South Pacific, the frozen reaches of Korea, in the sweltering jungles of Vietnam, the scorching deserts of Afghanistan and Iraq, and in many other places across the globe.

The United States lost more than 400,000 of its sons and daughters in World War II — 2,826 from Oregon. 54,246 American service members gave their lives in Korea (287 Oregonians); 58,209 in Vietnam (791 from our state).

In Iraq and Afghanistan, we lost 6,713 American service members — 142 Oregonians. Each one of their names is etched on slabs of granite that form the heart of the Afghan/Iraqi Freedom Memorial, located just a few steps from the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs office building. Each one of their names is read aloud each year at our Memorial Day ceremony, as we seek to honor and remember their sacrifice.

Each one represents the loss of a bright and shining light in the lives of their families, a pain that they feel each and every day — not just on Memorial Day. We remember and honor their sacrifice as well. They, too, paid a great price for the freedoms we now enjoy.

On behalf of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, I urge all Oregonians to take a moment this Memorial Day, to remember our fallen heroes who gave their lives in service to our nation, and say, “Thank you.”

Kelly Fitzpatrick is a U.S. Army veterans and the director of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs.




Attached Media Files: Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick

Oregon State Penitentiary reports two in-custody deaths (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 05/20/19 2:41 PM
Nickolas Kasemehas
Nickolas Kasemehas
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1070/124691/thumb_Kasemehas_N.jpg

Two Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adults in custody died recently. Both were incarcerated at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) in Salem and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, Oregon State Police have been notified.

Ovid John Teixeira died May 18, 2019. He entered DOC custody on January 9, 2018, from Linn County with an earliest release date of October 13, 2020. Teixeira was 55 years old.

Nickolas John Kasemehas died May 20, 2019. He entered DOC custody on November 13, 2014, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of May 20, 2022. Kasemehas was 78 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

 

####

 

 




Attached Media Files: Nickolas Kasemehas , Ovid Teixeira

Department of Revenue Medford office closing for training
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 05/17/19 11:13 AM

SALEM, Oregon—The Oregon Department of Revenue’s Medford district office will be closing for training at various times May 20 through May 22, 2019. Please call the office at 541-858-6500 before visiting to ensure they are open.

The office will return to normal business hours, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., on May 23, 2019.

Taxpayers needing immediate assistance during this time can call the Tax Services Unit at (503) 378-4988.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax information, check the status of your refund, or make payments. You can also email questions.dor@oregon.gov or call (503) 378-4988 or (800) 356-4222 (toll-free). 


Early results show fewer youth started smoking since Tobacco 21 took effect
Oregon Health Authority - 05/21/19 11:20 AM

March 21, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Early results show fewer youth started smoking since Tobacco 21 took effect

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority announced promising short-term outcomes of Senate Bill 754, which raised the age of purchase for tobacco and vaping products in Oregon from 18 to 21 years.

OHA found a significant decrease in youth (aged 13-17) and young adults (aged 18–20) who have started using tobacco since the law took effect Jan. 1, 2018. The evaluation also shows a decrease in young adults’ perceived ease of access to tobacco and vaping products.

"Tobacco 21 was enacted to help prevent young people from starting to use tobacco, and it’s working," said Tom Jeanne, MD, deputy state health officer and epidemiologist. "With this and our strong Indoor Clean Air Act, Oregon is a national leader in protecting youth from tobacco use."

In August 2017 Governor Kate Brown signed Senate Bill 754, making Oregon the fifth state to increase the age to purchase tobacco. To ensure compliance with the law, businesses that sell tobacco products and inhalant delivery systems such as e-cigarettes must post signs prohibiting sales of these products to persons under the age of 21.

Ending youth access to tobacco is only a minor cost for retailers but a huge gain for reducing tobacco-related deaths and diseases in Oregon’s next generation, Jeanne says.

Fewer current youth tobacco users reported purchasing tobacco products from convenience stores, grocery stores, or tobacco or vape shops after the legislation went into effect. However, statewide requests for proof of age by retailers did not change significantly, especially outside the Portland metro area. This is, in part, because Oregon is one of only nine states that does not have tobacco retail licensure.

"Nicotine is a poison and tobacco is sweet, cheap and easy to get in Oregon," Jeanne said. "Enforcing Tobacco 21 is vital, and there are other actions we can take to keep our momentum going. For example, we know that raising the price of tobacco keeps kids from starting and encourages people to quit. Our Legislature is considering several bills this session to increase the price of tobacco, e-cigarettes and other flavored tobacco products."

The evaluation of Tobacco 21 assessed short-term outcomes of the law in communities throughout Oregon. OHA contracted with RMC Research, an independent evaluator, to conduct the evaluation through online surveys with youth and young adult tobacco users before and nine months after the law took effect.

The report is available as a PDF at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/TOBACCOPREVENTION/Documents/Oregon-Tobacco-21-Impact-Evaluation-Report.pdf.

# # #

https://bit.ly/2WXeGSV


Updated: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet May 23 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/19 12:59 PM

Updated with call-in information

May 20, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet May 23 in Portland

What: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the Taskforce, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary

When: Thursday May 23, 2019 from 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building (PSOB), 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland Oregon Conference Line: 1-888-278-0296 Public Meeting ID: 843163.

.For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website.

Program contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, or ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Keep your family safe from the West Nile Virus this summer
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/19 12:11 PM

Update for news stations: Raw sound on tape and B-roll https://youtu.be/YRWZfA3iEF4

Spanish / Español

May 20, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Keep your family safe from the West Nile Virus this summer

As the weather continues to warm up, health officials say it’s important for people to protect themselves from disease-carrying mosquitoes. One of the illnesses to avoid is the potentially deadly West Nile virus.

About one in five infected people may show signs of West Nile virus. People at risk of serious illness include individuals 50 and older, and people with immune-compromising conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

West Nile symptoms may include fever above 100 degrees and severe headache, stiff neck, mental confusion, muscle weakness, shaking, paralysis or rash. People should contact their health care provider if experiencing any of these symptoms.

Health officials are advising people to take precautions against mosquitoes to avoid the risk of infection, including preventing mosquito bites. West Nile is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito.

"It’s very easy for people to prevent bites from mosquitoes that may carry West Nile virus," said Dr. Emilio DeBess, public health veterinarian at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division. "Although the risk of contracting West Nile virus is low, people can take simple precautions to keep these insects at bay if they’re headed outdoors."

To prevent the spread of West Nile virus:

  • Eliminate sources of standing water that are a breeding ground for mosquitoes. This includes watering troughs, bird baths, clogged gutters and old tires.
  • When engaged in outdoor activities at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active, protect yourself by using mosquito repellants containing DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus or Picardin, and follow the directions on the container.
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants in mosquito-infested areas.
  • Make sure screen doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly.

In 2018, there were two human cases of West Nile virus in two Oregon counties: Harney and Clackamas. The virus was found in one bird, 58 mosquito pools — samples of about 50 mosquitoes each — and two horses. In 2017, seven humans, 92 mosquito pools, five horses and one bird tested positive for West Nile. The virus also can be found in chickens, squirrels and dogs.

Climate change, particularly effects such as increased temperature and changes in rainfall, have led to longer mosquito seasons and are contributing to the spread of West Nile virus, health officials say. They agree these and other climate change indicators must be considered to help people better prepare for future transmission of the disease.

Additional information about West Nile virus is available on the Oregon Health Authority website, and from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

# # #

https://bit.ly/2wbuwxv

West Nile virus overview from Dr. Emilio DeBess, OHA Public Health Veterinarian


HERC removes OHP opioid tapering requirement for neck and back pain
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/19 4:51 PM

May 16, 2019

Commission votes on two proposals regarding chronic pain coverage

The Health Evidence Review Commission (HERC) today voted unanimously to update Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage for neck and back pain, by removing requirements for opioid tapering. The change will be effective October 1.

Meanwhile, the HERC unanimously declined to cover treatments for the five chronic pain conditions that had been under consideration since 2017, citing a lack of evidence of clinical effectiveness for both non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for those conditions.

The five conditions under consideration were: chronic pain due to trauma, post-procedural chronic pain, chronic pain syndrome, other chronic pain, and fibromyalgia.

In 2017 OHA convened the Chronic Pain Task Force to explore whether OHP should cover these five chronic pain conditions. Currently, they are not intended to be covered by OHP. The proposal that was informed by the task force garnered considerable concern and attention from advocates, providers and experts across the country, prompting deeper dives into the evidence and revisions to the proposal. Most recently, OHA commissioned a third-party review by Washington-based Aggregate Analytics Inc. (AAI) to appraise the evidence under consideration for these chronic pain conditions.

"The HERC is often faced with important decisions with limited clinical evidence available," said Dana Hargunani, M.D., chief medical officer at OHA. "We want to thank the members for their thoughtful deliberations. We are committed to reviewing new forthcoming evidence ahead."

Previously in 2016 the HERC expanded OHP coverage for neck and back pain, newly approving non-pharmacological services such as physical and occupational therapy, chiropractic care, cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture and yoga. The benefit package had also required opioid tapering neck and back pain patients from long-term opioid therapy.

Today the HERC voted to remove the tapering requirement if not clinically indicated. The neck and back pain coverage will be further revisited this winter, with a focus on opioid coverage.

"Pain is complicated and different for everyone," said Kevin Olson, M.D., HERC chairman. "We heard loud and clear that pain treatment and opioid tapering should be individualized based on the patient-clinician relationship. I am pleased that we were able to align the neck and back coverage with these principles."

About the HERC

The Health Evidence Review Commission reviews medical evidence to prioritize health spending in the Oregon Health Plan and to promote evidence-based medical practice statewide through comparative effectiveness reports, including coverage guidances and multisector interventions, health technology assessments and evidence-based practice guidelines.

The commission consists of 13 governor-appointed and senate-confirmed volunteer members, including five physician representatives (one of whom must be a doctor of osteopathy and another a hospital representative), a dentist, a public health nurse, a behavioral health representative, a provider of complementary and alternative medicine, a retail pharmacist, an insurance industry representative and two consumer representatives.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2w54BY4

 


Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets May 22
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/19 2:10 PM

May 16, 2019

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets May 22

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review of minutes from Feb. 27 meeting; status updates on surveys, complaints and waivers; committee updates, overtime documentation discussion; nurse staffing complaint discussion; emerging issues in nurse staffing; and public comment. The agenda is available on the OHA’s nurse staffing website.

When: May 22, 1-5 p.m. There will be a public comment period at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. By conference call at 877-336-1829, access code 2075141.

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the basis of those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

For more information, see the agency nurse staffing website at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

Program contact: Matt Gilman, 971-673-2317, matt.s.gilman@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Matt Gilman at 971-673-2317, 711 TTY or matt.s.gilman@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2EeQUuh


Eugene man's first Oregon's Game Megabucks win is $3.2 million (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 05/20/19 1:26 PM
2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/4939/124684/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

May 20, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – Mark Bennett of Eugene hadn’t even won so much as free ticket while playing Oregon’s Game Megabucks – until last week when his monthly ticket purchase was worth $3.2 million.
“I like the game, but I had never won anything,” Bennett said. “I always get the 26 draws, then put the ticket away until it is up and get another one.” Players can purchase Oregon’s Game Megabucks tickets for up to 26 draw dates.
Bennett said he purchased a ticket in April from the Jasper’s on Coburg Road in Eugene, and put it away, until recently when he couldn’t sleep. Officials from Jasper’s said it was their first big win at that location.
"To hear one of our guests won the Megabucks jackpot was incredible news!” said Tezra Kong, Director of Operations for Jasper’s. “This will be something our team will be talking about for years to come.  We are very excited for our lucky guest, and his good fortune.  We look forward to sharing some of the seller's bonus with the team that provided the exceptional guest service at Sheldon Jasper's."
For selling the winning ticket Jasper’s will receive a 1-percent selling bonus, $32,000.
Bennett took the opportunity to bring the ticket to the Oregon Lottery for validation before he claimed his prize. A little-used option allows players to bring in a winning jackpot ticket to Lottery headquarters to have the ticket validated. The Oregon Lottery will then hold the winning ticket up to 60 days while the winner determines to the best option for them to claim the jackpot.
A few days later Bennett came back to the Lottery office after talking with his accountant. He took the bulk sum payment of $1.6 million. After taxes he took home $1.08 million.
“I am going to use the money to set up education funds for my grandchildren,” Bennett said.
During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $50 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Lane County, where Bennett lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.
The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Commissions to meet in June for grant approvals
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/21/19 9:05 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via teleconference at 10 a.m. on June 3. A public listening room will be provided in Room 146 of the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. Its agenda includes approval of Oregon Museum Grants and approval of minutes. Call +1 (646) 749-3122 and use access code 725-625-509.

 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet via teleconference at 1 p.m. on June 7. Its agenda includes approval of Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grants. A public listening room will be provided in Room 146 of the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. Call +1 (224) 501-3412 and use access code 549-452-845.

 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov.

 

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

 

For more information about the commissions, visit www.oregonheritage.org


Campfire safety tips for your summer camping trip (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/20/19 3:30 PM
S'more at The Cove Palisades State Park
S'more at The Cove Palisades State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1303/124694/thumb_SMORE.jpg

Memorial Day is nearly here and for many Oregonians the holiday weekend is the start of their camping season in Oregon’s natural places. However, dry conditions are already present in many areas and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) reminds visitors to enjoy their campfires responsibly.

“Regularly reviewing campfire safety practices, even if you’re a seasoned camper, is a good habit to get in to,” said Chris Havel, OPRD associate director. “It’s especially important if you’re camping with children or folks that are learning about responsible outdoor recreation.”

Follow these tips for a safe and enjoyable campfire:

  • Know before you go: research conditions for the area surrounding your campground. Fire restrictions may be in place at the park, county or state level.
  • Maintain campfire flames at knee height, or roughly two feet high. This helps prevent ash or embers from becoming airborne, especially during the dry summer months. If you see wind stirring up embers from your fire, play it safe and extinguish it.
  • Only build campfires in the existing fire ring in your campsite. Fire ring locations are carefully picked and park rangers clear vegetation around rings to create a safe buffer zone.
  • Always keep plenty of water nearby to extinguish your campfire. To put out your fire, drown the flames with water and stir the embers to make sure everything is wet. The stirring step is important: ash and wood debris often maintain heat and embers unless they are drowned out.
  • Beach campfires should be started on open sand, away from driftwood or vegetation. Use water to extinguish your beach fire, not sand. Covering the fire with sand will insulate the coals, keeping them hot enough to burn unsuspecting beachgoers hours or even days later.
  • For propane fire rings, follow the same safety precautions you would with a log-based campfire. Propane fire rings should be placed in, on or directly next to installed park fire rings.
  • Make sure everyone in your campsite, even children, is familiar with campfire safety. Always keep an eye on your campfire; many accidental fires are started because campers left their fire unattended for “just a minute.”

To reserve your stay at an Oregon state park, head to oregonstateparks.org.

###

May is Wildfire Awareness Month. During May, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal, the Office of Emergency Management, Keep Oregon Green, the U.S. Forest Service, OPRD and other federal, state and local emergency and response agencies are promoting programs and messages encouraging the public to work together in their local communities to prevent the risk of wildfire.




Attached Media Files: S'more at The Cove Palisades State Park , Family and campfire at L.L. Stub Stewart State Park

Committee to review historic building grant applications
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/20/19 2:45 PM

Two separate committees will meet to score and rank applications for the Preserving Oregon and Diamonds in the Rough Grant programs. The recommendations from the committees will be forwarded to the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation for final review and approval on June 21 in Cottage Grove. Both meetings will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, and can also be accessed by phone.

The Diamonds in the Rough Grant committee will meet June 5, 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. in room 124A. Call in information is 1-877-402-9757, access code 4605348.

The Preserving Oregon Grant committee will meet June 10, 9:00 a.m. -12:30 p.m. in room 124A. Call in information is 1-877-402-9757, access code 4605348.

For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov . The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.


Cleanup finished on small shipwreck ashore on southern Oregon coast (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/17/19 1:45 PM
Debris from the Ann Kathleen shipwreck being loaded on a flatbed for disposal
Debris from the Ann Kathleen shipwreck being loaded on a flatbed for disposal
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1303/124645/thumb_ann-kathleen-32-loading-debris-after-airlift.jpg

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // May 17, 2019

Media Contact: Chris Havel, Director’s Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // Cell: 503-931-2590

Cleanup finished on small shipwreck ashore on southern Oregon coast

Bandon, Ore. Friday, May 17, 2019 – Crews finished cleanup of major debris left by the wreck of the Ann Kathleen, a 64-foot fishing vessel. The boat came ashore Thursday, May 2 on a beach south of Bandon, Oregon after catching fire. No one was injured. The vast majority of the wreckage was removed by helicopter over the last week. A portion of the heavy keel was left to sink into the sand.

The cleanup was organized by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and funded by the boat’s insurer. It involved excavators, helicopters, a salvage crew from Global Dive and Salvage, Inc. out of Seattle, with monitoring and support from the Coquille Indian Tribe, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Bureau of Land Management. The wreck site is several miles from a developed beach access and home to sensitive resources like the western snowy plover, a threatened shorebird in the middle of its nesting season.

The initial cleanup response, led by a unified command that included the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Coast Guard, began May 3 and recovered more than 1,000 gallons of diesel fuel. Some residual fuel was recovered during final demolition. No hazardous fluids from the shipwreck were detected on the beach or in the ocean.

Bait fish were removed from the wreck and temporarily buried in containers at the site for later removal from the beach; burying and removing the bait is necessary to avoid attracting predators to the nesting area. After excavating sand from around the boat, a helicopter carried a dozen loads of heavy debris to the Cape Blanco Airport eight miles south. Smaller, lighter debris was removed using ATVs. The keel was deemed too heavy to fly out. The crews excavated around it and allowed it to sink naturally into the sand, where it now rests several feet beneath the surface. The keel does not contain hazardous material. Staff monitoring the cleanup reported plovers were not disturbed by the work.

More information on sharing the beach with plovers is online at http://bit.ly/wsplover.

# # #

Photos are available online at https://drive.google.com/open?id=17nMl8PqSYOvoQ3-6eRuIFRtJabN7igss




Attached Media Files: Debris from the Ann Kathleen shipwreck being loaded on a flatbed for disposal , Excavator demolishing the Ann Kathleen shipwreck

Celebrate State Parks Day June 1 with free camping, parking and special events (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/17/19 9:30 AM
Wallowa Lake State Park
Wallowa Lake State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1303/124628/thumb_Lake_view_spring.jpg

Saturday June 1 is State Parks Day and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians outdoors for a day of free camping, free parking and special events at Oregon’s state parks.

Several state parks are holding free events that day, and camping is free at all tent, RV and individual horse campsites. Day-use parking will be free June 1 and 2 at the 25 parks that charge a day-use fee.

“State Parks Day is our way each year of thanking Oregonians for their commitment to our state parks,” said Lisa Sumption, OPRD director. “We invite people to discover a new park or revisit an old favorite.”

State Parks Day is organized by OPRD and has been held annually since 1997.

Oregon Lottery returns as an event sponsor this year and they’re providing support for events at six state parks: Champoeg State Heritage Area, Fort Stevens State Park, Tumalo State Park, The Cove Palisades State Park, Wallowa Lake State Park and Silver Falls State Park.

Oregon Lottery is also sponsoring a new addition to State Parks Day: commemorative State Parks Day pins. The limited-edition pins will be available for free at more than two dozen state parks on June 1. See the full list of parks distributing the pins at the end of this release. Note: parks have a limited supply of pins and they will be given away first come, first served.

In total, 11 state parks will host free events June 1:

Willamette Valley

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
  • Silver Falls State Park

Coast

  • Fort Stevens State Park
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint

Cascade Range and Central Oregon

  • The Cove Palisades State Park
  • Prineville Reservoir State Park
  • Tumalo State Park

Portland Metro Area

  • Tryon Creek State Natural Area

Southern and Eastern Oregon

  • Collier Memorial State Park
  • Wallowa Lake State Park

Events include disc golf, living history, outdoor concerts, ranger-led programs and more. Full details about events at each park are on the official State Parks Day webpage

To guarantee a campsite for State Parks Day, reserve online at oregonstateparks.org or call (800) 452-5687 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday. While campsite rental is free, an $8 non-refundable transaction fee is required at the time of the reservation. Reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance of your stay. Approximately half of state park campgrounds accept reservations.

List of state parks giving away State Parks Day pins on June 1

Coast

  • Bullards Beach State Park
  • Cape Arago State Park
  • Cape Lookout State Park
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint
  • Crissey Field State Recreation Site
  • Fort Stevens State Park
  • Humbug Mountain State Park
  • Shore Acres State Park
  • Sunset Bay State Park
  • William M. Tugman State Park

Columbia River Gorge

  • Ainsworth State Park
  • Guy W. Talbot State Park

Willamette Valley

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area
  • Dexter State Recreation Area
  • Elijah Bristow State Park
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area
  • Silver Falls State Park
  • Thompson's Mills State Heritage Area

Cascade Range and Central Oregon

  • LaPine State Park
  • Prineville Reservoir State Park
  • The Cove Palisades State Park
  • Tumalo State Park

Southern and Eastern Oregon

  • Clyde Holliday State Park
  • Cottonwood Canyon State Park
  • Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area
  • Farewell Bend State Recreation Area
  • Hat Rock State Park
  • Lake Owyhee State Park
  • Minam State Recreation Area
  • Sumpter Valley Dredge State Heritage Site
  • Wallowa Lake State Park



Attached Media Files: Wallowa Lake State Park , Tryon Creek State Natural Area , Silver Falls State Park , Milo McIver State Park , The Cove Palisades State Park , Peter Iredale wreck at Fort Stevens State Park , State Parks Day pin

Governor's Task Force on the Outdoors holds inaugural meeting May 22 at Silver Falls (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/15/19 12:56 PM
Logo RGB horizontal
Logo RGB horizontal
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1303/124569/thumb_OREC_ID2_RGB_Blue_2color.png

SALEM, Ore. – Gov. Kate Brown has established a task force to explore long-term strategies for elevating outdoor recreation in the state. Task force members were appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. 

Task force members will work over the next year to produce a report recommending policies, legislation and initiatives to support economic development in both rural and urban areas, balance improved outdoor recreation access with resource protection, and increase outdoor recreation participation, especially among youth and traditionally underserved communities.

The governor tapped the Office of Outdoor Recreation, established in 2017 within the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), to guide the task force.

The task force will meet for the first time 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. May 22 at the Silver Falls Conference Center, Silver Falls State Park, 20024 Silver Falls Highway SE, Sublimity. The meeting is open to the public.

The meeting will encompass the current state of affairs, including past and ongoing efforts to improve outdoor recreation and business opportunities. View the full meeting agenda online: oregon.gov/orec/Documents/052019ORECTaskForceMeeting.pdf

The meeting is the first in a planned series; the group will hold subsequent meetings on the coast, the Portland area, and in southern and eastern Oregon.

The task force is composed of private and public sector representatives and will be chaired by Commissioner Jon Blasher of the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. Cailin O'Brien-Feeney, Director of the Office of Outdoor Recreation, will manage the task force. A full list of task force members is included at the end of this release. More detail about each member is online: oregon.gov/orec/Pages/Governors-Task-Force.aspx.

Building on and uniting other statewide outdoor recreation efforts, the task force will deliver its final report in April 2020 on recommendations for legislation, investment of existing public and private resources, future funding, and high-level management strategies. Top recommendations will be presented to the governor, state legislature and the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Carrie Lovellette, OPRD executive assistant, at 503-986-0733 or rie.Lovellette@oregon.gov">Carrie.Lovellette@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.

More information about Silver Falls State Park, including maps and driving directions, is on the park’s webpage.

Task force members

  • Jonathan Blasher (Chair), Director - Parks and Nature, Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission
  • Asha Aiello, Communications Director; Secretary/Treasurer, American Forest Resource Council; Oregon Outdoor Council
  • Kelley Minty Morris, Klamath County Commissioner, Association of Oregon Counties; Klamath County
  • Chris Hager, NW Regional Director, Backcountry Hunters & Anglers
  • Amanda Welker, Global Trade & Recruitment Manager, Business Oregon
  • Queta Gonzalez, Director, Center for Diversity and the Environment
  • Esmeralda Horn, Development & Recreation Manager, City of Umatilla
  • Chuck Sams, Communications Director, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
  • Ed Morgan, General Manager, Guaranty RV, Inc.
  • Mike Wallenfells, VP Sales; President, Hydro Flask; Oregon Outdoor Alliance
  • Matthew Drake, CEO, Mount Hood Meadows
  • Jennifer Magby, Interim Tillamook District Recreation Manager, Oregon Department of Forestry
  • Roger Fuhrman, Information and Education Division Administrator, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
  • Susan Peithman, Active Transportation Policy Lead, Oregon Department of Transportation
  • Lillian Shirley, BSN, MPH, MPA, Director, Public Health Division, Oregon Health Authority
  • Mary Jo Evers, CPA, Finance Director; Chairperson, Ontario School District; Ontario Recreation District
  • Chris Havel, Associate Director, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
  • Senator Chuck Thomsen, District 26 (R), Oregon Legislative Assembly
  • Representative Ken Helm, District 34 (D), Oregon Legislative Assembly
  • Matthew Weintraub, Founding Member; Member, Oregon Mountain Biking Coalition; Clatsop County Parks and Recreational Lands Advisory Committee
  • Hugh Morrison, Network Coordinator, Oregon Outdoors
  • Steph Noll, Coalition Director, Oregon Trails Coalition
  • Randy Henry, Boating Safety and Education Manager, Oregon State Marine Board
  • Lindsey Shirley, University Outreach & Engagement Associate Provost, Oregon State University
  • Sue Bal, Business Development Manager, Athletic & Outdoor Industry, Prosper Portland
  • Sara Morrissey, Public Affairs Manager, Strategy, Travel Oregon
  • John Omlin, Owner; Several Statewide ATV Committees, Valley Powersports
  • Dan Little (ex-officio), First Gentleman, State of Oregon
  • Cailin O'Brien-Feeney (ex-officio), Director, Oregon Office of Outdoor Recreation
  • Tracy Tophooven (ex-officio), Director for Recreation, WWSR, Lands, and Minerals, USFS Region 6
  • Aaron Curtis (ex-officio), Section Chief for Social Sciences, Bureau of Land Management OR/WA

# # #

The mission of the Office of Outdoor Recreation is to elevate the personal, community, and economic benefits of outdoor recreation for all Oregonians. The Office of Outdoor Recreation is a resource to businesses and nonprofit organizations, a partner to agencies and communities, and an advocate for the outdoors.




Attached Media Files: Logo RGB horizontal , Logo RGB vertical

ADDRESS CORRECTION - State Interoperability Executive Council to meet
State of Oregon - 05/16/19 1:22 PM

The original release included an incorrect address for the meeting location. The address is now updated (DPSST - 4190 Aumsville Highway SE).

--------------------

The State Interoperability Executive Council (SIEC) will meet Tuesday, May 21, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. The meeting will take place in the Hall of Heroes (Room A) at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE in Salem. The meeting is open to the public and comments will be taken from those attending in person and via audioconference.

The SIEC was created under the State Chief Information Officer to be the statewide interoperability governing body and serve as the primary steering group for the Oregon Statewide Interoperability Communications Plan (SCIP). The SIEC’s mission is to develop and maintain the SCIP, develop recommendations and guidelines for policy, identify technology and standards, and coordinate intergovernmental resources to facilitate statewide public safety communications interoperability.

The meeting agenda and handouts are posted on the council’s website. Instructions for those who wish to attend over the phone are outlined in the meeting agenda.


Courts/District Attorneys
Jury Convicts Portland Drug Trafficker
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/15/19 4:21 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal jury in Portland returned guilty verdicts today against a Portland man who was accused of distributing large quantities of methamphetamine throughout Multnomah County, Oregon.

Amadeo Lupercio-Quezada, 39, was convicted after a two-day trial of conspiring to possess within intent to distribute methamphetamine; possessing with intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin and cocaine; and possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

According to court documents and information entered at trial, in October 2017, a Gresham Police detective learned that Lupercio-Quezada and co-defendant Maribel Sebastian-Evangelista were distributing large amounts of methamphetamine throughout Multnomah County. Lupercio-Quezada would physically complete the sales after Sebastian-Evangelista would arrange deals by phone. Thereafter, the detective and other members of the Gresham Police Department Special Enforcement Team initiated four controlled purchases of methamphetamine from Lupercio-Quezada and Sebastian-Evangelista between October and December 2017.

All four controlled purchases took place at Lupercio-Quezada’s residence on E. Burnside Street in Portland and resulted in the officers successfully purchasing ounce quantities of methamphetamine. Officers later searched the residence pursuant to a state search warrant and found distribution quantities of methamphetamine, heroin and cocaine, an ID card with Lupercio-Quezada’s photo, $14,500 in cash as well as a .380 caliber Glock model 42 semi-automatic pistol located near the drugs.

Lupercio-Quezada faces a maximum sentence of life in prison with consecutive mandatory minimum sentences of 10 and 5 years for the drug and gun charges, respectively; a $250,000 fine and a life term of supervised release. He will be sentenced on August 21, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

This case was investigated by the Gresham Police Department Special Enforcement Team and was prosecuted by Kemp L. Strickland and Sarah Barr, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6325/124582/VERDICT-Lupercio-Quezada-Final.pdf

Jury Convicts Beaverton Man for Assaulting Federal Task Force Officers with Explosive Device
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/15/19 3:29 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal jury in Portland returned guilty verdicts today against a Beaverton, Oregon man who detonated an improvised explosive device containing triacetone triperoxide (TATP), assaulting two members of the Portland Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) on October 11, 2017.

Jason Paul Schaefer, 27, was convicted after a six-day trial of two counts of assaulting a federal officer and one count each of carrying and using a destructive device during and in relation to a crime of violence, carrying and using an explosive during the commission of a federal felony, unlawful transport of explosive materials, possession of an unregistered destructive device and being a felon in possession of explosives.

“Without the hard work and dedication of the JTTF agents and partners who pursued and investigated Mr. Schaefer, he might still be on the street furthering his deadly pursuits. We are extremely fortunate that Mr. Schaefer did not succeed in his attempt to take the lives of two JTTF officers in October 2017,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “This case affirms the critical work of our law enforcement partners on the JTTF in keeping Oregon communities safe.”

“Our JTTF agents and task force partners put their lives on the line every day for the people of Oregon,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “Mr. Schaefer made a series of choices that led to his encounter with law enforcement on that day. He alone is responsible for the physical harm that both he and the responding task force officer suffered. Today's verdict is just and will help ensure the safety of the community in the future.”

“The Oregon State Police is proud of the collaboration among our local and federal partners on the JTTF, with our mutual goal to keep Oregon safe. We are grateful that our troopers and taskforce officers were not seriously injured during this rapidly developing event. OSP is also appreciative of the time and attention of the U.S. Attorney's Office to seek justice in this case,” said Travis Hampton, Superintendent of the Oregon State Police.

“The Washington County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the JTTF and partnering agencies for their hard work in this investigation. We value these important public safety partnerships that work tirelessly to keep our communities safe,” said Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff.

According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, on or about September 21, 2017, FBI Portland determined that Schaefer had purchased several items that could be used to make a bomb. Schaefer was known to federal investigators after an April 2017 incident where he threatened to kill his landlords and used mercury to deter people from entering an apartment garage he rented in Beaverton. The incident led to Schaefer being arrested and prosecuted for illegally possessing body armor.

On October 11, 2017, federal agents and task force officers executed a search warrant on Schaefer’s Beaverton apartment. Schaefer arrived that morning at a meeting with his probation officer to find two federal agents there to meet him. They notified Schaefer of the warrant and asked if his property was booby trapped. Schaeffer told the agents that it was not and the search commenced.

After a brief conversation with the agents, Schaefer departed in a white sport utility vehicle. The agents followed Schaefer, but lost him. Meanwhile, agents searching Schaefer’s apartment found several explosive precursors and electronic matches. While the search was ongoing, Schaefer returned to the apartment and threatened a task force officer before fleeing.

Two task force officers pursued Schaefer who soon got stuck in traffic. The officers approached Schaefer on foot and ordered him out of the vehicle. Schaefer did not comply, threatened to kill the officers and ignited an explosive device concealed in a cigarette pack. The blast caused significant injury to Schaefer’s hand and sent debris flying into one of the officers, who suffered bodily injury. Following the explosion, Schaefer was arrested and officers found a second cigarette pack containing explosives in his vehicle.

Schaefer faces a maximum sentence of life in prison with a 30-year mandatory minimum. He will be sentenced on August 13, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Marco A. Hernandez.

This case was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon. It was investigated by the Portland JTTF. The Portland JTTF includes FBI special agents and more than a dozen state and local law enforcement officers.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6325/124580/VERDICT-Schaefer-Final.pdf

Convicted Felon Sentenced to Over 13 Years in Prison After Bend Police Seize Large Quantity of Methamphetamine and Firearm
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/15/19 11:29 AM

EUGENE, Ore.—Christopher Michael Soares, 35, of Southern Oregon, was sentenced today to 160 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for possessing with the intent to distribute methamphetamine in Bend, Oregon.

According to court documents, on June 28, 2016, police officers in Bend stopped Soares while he was driving a vehicle with two other occupants. When officers searched Soares’ person, they found 99 grams of methamphetamine, 56 grams of heroin and a 9mm firearm. Soares was later arrested on three separate occasions in Jackson County for additional drug and firearms offenses.

In September 2016, Soares was charged by federal criminal complaint for the June 2016 incident in Bend. He later pleaded guilty to one count of possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. Facing state and federal charges, the parties, including state prosecutors in Jackson County, agreed to a global resolution to resolve all of Soares’ pending criminal cases.

This case was jointly investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Bend Police Department, Medford Police Department and Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. It was prosecuted by Nathan J. Lichvarcik, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6325/124563/SENTENCING-Soares-Final-Updated.pdf

Organizations & Associations
Red Cross to Install Free Smoke Alarms in Homes that Need Them in Medford
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 05/15/19 1:27 PM

On May 18, the Red Cross and community volunteers will install free smoke alarms in homes that need them in Medford

MEDFORD, Ore., May 15, 2019 — The local American Red Cross Cascades Region and community volunteers are partnering to save lives by installing smoke alarms in homes that need them in Medford. On Saturday, May 18, starting at 9 a.m., Red Cross volunteers will go door-to-door in Medford to install free smoke alarms and deliver fire safety information.

The Red Cross installs free smoke alarms in homes that need them and has installed more than 28,000 smoke alarms in Oregon and Southwest Washington since 2014. Seven lives have been saved in our area as a result of Red Cross installed smoke alarms.

People interested in volunteering to install free smoke alarms in Medford on Saturday, May 18, should contact Red Cross Disaster Preparedness Coordinator Christi MacLaren at (541) 779-3773.

WHAT: Red Cross Smoke Alarm Installation Event
WHERE: Medford Fire Station 4, 2208 Table Rock Rd., Medford, OR 97501
WHEN: Saturday, May 18, 2019, starting at 9 a.m.

MEDIA AVAILABILITY: Red Cross Disaster Preparedness Coordinator Christi MacLaren will be available for media interviews at 9 a.m. at Medford Fire Station 4.

GET AN ALARM The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (541) 749-4144 or complete an online form at http://www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.

MAKE A PLAN You may only have two minutes to escape when a fire occurs, but most people mistakenly believe they have more than twice as long to get out. The Red Cross recommends that households develop a fire escape plan and practice it at least twice a year with everyone who lives in the home. People should know two ways to escape from every room and designate a safe place to meet outside the home in case of a fire. Discuss the plan with everyone in the household and practice until every member of your household – including children – can escape in less than two minutes

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc.

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Attached Media Files: News Release - Red Cross to Install Free Smoke Alarms in Homes that Need Them in Medford

Find farm stands & u-picks with Oregon's Bounty (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/17/19 2:59 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/5507/124649/thumb_oregonsbounty.png


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 17, 2019

Find farm stands & u-picks with Oregon’s Bounty

Use a smartphone to easily find farm stands, u-pick fields, on-farm events with Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org

Strawberries, asparagus, rhubarb, mushrooms, salad greens — along with bedding plants, flowering baskets, and fresh-cut flowers — are just a few favorites of Oregon’s agricultural bounty in spring.

But outside of the local farmers market, where can you buy these things directly from a farm or ranch?

“Everyone knows where their local farmers market is. But what about roadside farm stands, u-pick fields, and on-farm events out in rural areas? That’s where Oregon’s Bounty comes in,” said Anne Marie Moss, Oregon Farm Bureau communications director.

Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org is a searchable directory of nearly 300 family farms and ranches that sell food and foliage directly to the public.

Oregon’s Bounty allows visitors to do keyword searches for specific agriculture products — such as blueberries, cucumbers, honey, or eggs — and/or search for farms within a specific region of the state. Visitors can also do a keyword search for “u-pick” or “events” to find farms that offer those activities.

“Oregonians love farm-fresh food. Thanks to the diversity of agriculture in this great state, we can buy an enormous variety of seasonal fruits, vegetables, flowers, foliage, meat, and nuts directly from the families who grew it,” said Moss.

“Each of the farms listed in Oregon’s Bounty are owned and operated by Farm Bureau members who are proud to share what they’ve raised with the public,” said Moss. “Spring is a great time to take a trip into the beautiful countryside and experience Oregon agriculture firsthand.”

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Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5507/124649/oregonsbounty.png