Emergency Reports | News Releases | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Fri. Oct. 30 - 2:33 am
Police & Fire
Deputies Seek Whereabouts of Azalea Man Following Pursuit (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/28/20 12:56 PM
John Curtis Williams (2017 Booking Photo)
John Curtis Williams (2017 Booking Photo)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/5204/139562/thumb_Williams_John_Curtis_-_2017.jpg

GLENDALE, Ore. - An Azalea man eluded deputies on Tuesday afternoon and now the Sheriff's Office is asking the public for tips as to his whereabouts. 

On Tuesday, October 27, 2020, at 3:55 pm, a deputy attempted to stop a blue 2002 Honda Accord when the driver, 47-year-old John Curtis Williams of Azalea, accelerated and lead deputies on a seven mile pursuit. 

Curtis lost control of the vehicle and spun out on a dirt road in the 1000-block of McCullough Creek Road. After the vehicle came to rest, Curtis fled from the vehicle on foot and was able to get away. 

Deputies are now asking for tips from the public as to Curtis' whereabouts. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Douglas County Sheriff's Office at (541) 440-4471 referencing case number 20-5000.

Curtis is described as 5'10'', 218lbs, black hair and brown eyes. He has an approximate 2 inch scar below his left eye, a tattoo on his left arm of a cross with the word "FAITH" and a tattoo on the web of his left hand with the letters "JC".




Attached Media Files: John Curtis Williams (2017 Booking Photo)

FBI Working to Protect Oregon Voters & Votes Ahead of the Election: Resources available at www.fbi.gov/elections (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 10/28/20 9:40 AM
SAC Cannon statement graphic
SAC Cannon statement graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3585/139547/thumb_SAC_quote_graphic_-_Election_Security_-_Oct_2020.png

Although Election Day is November 3rd, the FBI’s work in securing the election begins well before and extends well beyond that date. In the weeks leading up to Election Day, the FBI has been particularly engaged in extensive preparations. As always, we are working closely with our federal, state, and local partners so everyone involved with safe-guarding the election has the information and resources necessary to respond in a timely manner to any violations that may arise.

“Americans can have confidence in our voting system and our election infrastructure. Although it would be extremely difficult for an adversary to meddle with vote count, the FBI remains vigilant in monitoring for threats and protecting voting infrastructure,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “We are actively engaged with our partners and are prepared to investigate any potential election-related threat, whether it is vote fraud, voter suppression, or threats from cyber or foreign influence actors.”

Our preparations for the 2020 election take into account the current climate of the country. The FBI has a responsibility to plan for a host of potential scenarios. In each field office, one special agent and one intelligence analyst are designated as highly trained election crimes coordinators (ECCs). Together, the agent and analyst ECCs lead the field office’s efforts to assess allegations of federal election crime, investigate threats, gather intelligence, and serve as the lead points of contact for all federal election-related matters.

State v. Federal Election Responsibilities

While individual states have primary responsibility for conducting fair and free elections, the FBI plays an important role in protecting federal interests. Federal election crimes fall into three broad categories: campaign finance crimes, voter/ballot fraud, and civil rights violations.  

The FBI has jurisdiction to investigate election-related crimes when: 

  • the ballot involves one or more federal candidates; 
  • the alleged crime involves official misconduct by a polling or election official; 
  • the alleged activity pertains to fraudulent voter registration; 
  • non-U.S. citizens vote; and 
  • interstate facilities are used to violate state elections laws in non-federal elections. 

The FBI does not investigate: 

  • Voter facilitation activities (e.g., giving rides to polling places, offering time off to vote, or providing items of minimal value, like stamps, for absentee ballots); 
  • Violations of state campaign finance laws—unless a misappropriation of campaign assets occurred through mail, wire, or other fraud covered by a federal statute; 
  • Distributing inaccurate campaign literature or making false claims about an opponent; 
  • Campaigning too close to the polls; or 
  • A candidate trying to convince an opponent to withdraw from a race. 

How voters can help

If you suspect federal criminal activity, we ask that you report that information to your local FBI field office. In Oregon, you can call us at (503) 224-4181 or submit information online at tips.fbi.gov.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we may not know the results of the election on November 3. We join our state, local, and federal partners in asking the American people to be patient. The FBI is committed to ensuring the security and integrity of our elections, and this commitment does not end on Election Day. We encourage everyone to seek election and voting information from reliable sources, including official state and county elections officials.

Background

For three decades, the FBI has served as the primary investigative agency responsible for safeguarding election integrity and allegations of election crimes and election-related civil rights violations. Our teams of investigators remain vigilant in detecting and investigating anyone who tries to undermine our election process. We have the investigative experience and expertise, and we're committed to supporting our election security counterparts and protecting the American people throughout the 2020 election season.

Resources

Oregon voters are encouraged to go to www.fbi.gov/elections or the FBI’s social media platforms to find more resources as well as updated information about election security.

###




Attached Media Files: SAC Cannon statement graphic

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Election Spoofing (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 10/27/20 9:00 AM
TT - Spoofing - GRAPHIC - October 27, 2020
TT - Spoofing - GRAPHIC - October 27, 2020
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3585/139429/thumb_TT_-_Election_Spoofing_-_GRAPHIC_-_October_27_2020.png

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Last week, we talked about some ways that the FBI’s Protected Voices campaign can help you spot misinformation and disinformation this election season. 

Now, we are just one week away from election day, and we have some more tips on dealing with how bad actors can use spoofing to try to impact your vote. 

Foreign actors and cybercriminals use spoofed domains and email accounts to appear legitimate. Through them, the bad actors can disseminate false information; gather valid usernames, passwords, and email addresses; collect personally identifiable information; and spread malware, leading to further compromises and potential financial losses. 

Cyber actors set up spoofed domains with slightly altered characteristics of legitimate domains. A spoofed domain may feature an alternate spelling of a word ("electon"?instead of?"election"), or use?"[.]com"?in place of?"[.] gov." 

Members of the public could unknowingly visit spoofed domains while seeking information regarding the 2020 election. Additionally, cyber actors may use a seemingly legitimate email account to entice the public into clicking on malicious files or links. 

The FBI urges all Americans to critically evaluate the websites they visit and the emails sent to their personal and business email accounts and to seek out reliable and verified information on the election. 

Here are some other recommendations: 

  • Verify the spelling of web addresses and email addresses that look trustworthy but may, in reality, just be close imitations of legitimate election websites. 

  • Seek out information from trustworthy sources, verifying who produced the content and considering their intent. One option: the Election Assistance Commission (https://www.eac.gov). That group provides a vast amount of verified information and resources. 

  • Ensure operating systems and applications are updated to the most current versions. 

  • Update anti-malware and anti-virus software and conduct regular network scans. 

  • Use strong two-factor authentication if possible, via biometrics (such as face or fingerprint scans), hardware tokens, or authentication apps. 

  • Do not open e-mails or attachments from unknown individuals. Do not communicate with unsolicited e-mail senders. 

  • Never provide personal information of any sort via e-mail.  

The FBI is responsible for investigating malign foreign influence operations and malicious cyber activity targeting election infrastructure and other U.S. democratic institutions.  

Report potential federal election crimes to the FBI. In Oregon, you can call us at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov. 

Finally – learn more about how you can protect your vote with the FBI’s Protected Voices campaign. You can find more resources at www.fbi.gov/protectedvoices or www.fbi.gov/elections.

### 




Attached Media Files: TT - Spoofing - AUDIO - October 27, 2020 , TT - Spoofing - GRAPHIC - October 27, 2020

Grants Pass Police Seeking Assistance in Weapons Offense (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 10/29/20 3:41 PM
Jon Clement
Jon Clement
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/6530/139506/thumb_Clement.jpg

Charges:

Unlawful Use of a Weapon

Recklessly Endangering Another Person

 

On October 26, 2020, at about 5:00pm, Grants Pass Police responded to reports of shots fired in the area of Tussing Park in Grants Pass, Oregon. Citizens reported two males on the Rogue River, in a pontoon boat, shooting at water fowl near the pedestrian bridge. Witnesses reported stray pellets from the shotguns went through the trees above their heads. 

The subjects were eventually located on the river near Redwood Circle. The subjects, identified as Jon Clement and Ryan Clark, were taken into custody and found in posession of two shotguns. The subjects were arrested and lodged at the Josephine County jail on the above listed charges. 

The Grants Pass Police Department is requesting anyone who had been in the area of Tussing Park or Reinhart Volunteer Park during the time of the incident to please contact the department. Anyone with information regarding this case can call 541-450-6260, and reference case number 20-49629.




Attached Media Files: Jon Clement , Ryan Clark

City of Grants Pass Open Burn Window Postponed (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 10/27/20 9:43 AM
2020-10/6530/139504/No_Fire.png
2020-10/6530/139504/No_Fire.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/6530/139504/thumb_No_Fire.png

The open burn window scheduled October 31 through November 8th for residence in the City of Grants Pass has been postponed until further notice due to unfavorable weather, dry fuels and fire season restrictions remaining in effect.

The Fire Prevention Bureau will continue coordinate with the Oregon Department of Forestry to monitor the weather and reschedule as soon as possible. Please contact the Fire Prevention Bureau at 541-450-6200 for any questions. We appreciate your understanding.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/6530/139504/No_Fire.png

Menacing with a Firearm at Home Depot (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 10/26/20 9:51 AM

Case # 20-49107

On 10/23/20 at about 1639 hours, the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety (GPDPS) received a 911 call from Home Depot, located at 111 NE Mill Street. It was reported an employee had a firearm pointed at them, while being threatened by a male customer. The suspect reportedly struck the employee with the pistol. The male suspect fled the location in a vehicle with a license plate and description obtained. The responding GPDPS police units found the vehicle a short distance away and were able to safely take the suspect into custody. He was identified as 28 year-old, Parker Lever with a listed Medford address. A GPDPS Detective responded and assisted with the investigation. After the conclusion of the investigation, Parker Lever was lodged at the Josephine County Jail on the charges listed below, with other possible charges being referred to the District Attorney's Office. 

Charges:

1. Attempted Assault in the Second Degree

2. Menacing - 2 counts

3. Unlawful use of a Weapon - 2 counts

The Grants Pass Department of Public Safety would like to ask if anyone has any information related to this case to please contact us at (541) 450-6260. We would also like to thank out citizens for their continued support. 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/6530/139473/LEVER_PARKER.bmp

Oregon State Police Requesting Assistance Locating Driver Involved in Crash - Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/28/20 12:34 PM
2020-10/1002/139561/Screensho.jpg
2020-10/1002/139561/Screensho.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1002/139561/thumb_Screensho.jpg

On Tuesday, October 27, 2020 at approximately 5:30 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle rollover crash on Hwy 62 near milepost 37. 

Responders located a badly damaged Ford Explorer with no occupants. 

It is believed the operator was Matthew Lang (33) of Bend.  

Lang has not contacted friends or family since the crash.

Jackson County Search and Rescue is currently searching the area for Lang.   

Lang is 6 feet tall 185 lbs with brown hair.

If you have seen or heard from Lang since the crash please contact the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1002/139561/Screensho.jpg , 2020-10/1002/139561/625599872.jpg , 2020-10/1002/139561/040218121.jpg

UPDATE - Oregon State Police Requesting Public's Assistance in Locating Vehicle Involved in a Serious Injury Hit and Run of a Pedestrian - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/28/20 10:35 AM
2020-10/1002/139533/Ford_Focus.PNG
2020-10/1002/139533/Ford_Focus.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1002/139533/thumb_Ford_Focus.PNG

Investigators have determined that evidence recovered at scene came from a Ford Focus - picture attached is for reference not actual photo of suspect vehicle.

On Tuesday, October 27, 2020 at approximately 4:11 A.M., an officer from the Salem Police Department came upon a male lying on the shoulder of the Interstate 5 northbound onramp from Market St. It was determined the male pedestrian had been struck by a vehicle. He was taken to the hospital and is being treated for serious injuries.

Oregon State Police responded to investigate. The vehicle that struck the pedestrian did not stay at the scene or provide medical assistance to the injured pedestrian.  

Oregon State Police is looking for a 2008 - 2011 royal/metallic blue Ford Fusion.  The Fusion should have damage to the right front bumper and the passenger side mirror.

If you have any information regarding the original incident or have any information regarding the Ford Fusion you are asked to call the Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-0776 or OSP and leave information for Trooper Don Chuhlantseff OSP case # SP20-305654.  




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1002/139533/Ford_Focus.PNG

Fatal Crash on Hwy 241 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 10/28/20 7:43 AM

On October 18, 2020 at approximately 6:41 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 241 near milepost 11.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Dodge truck, operated by Tyler Boyd (36) of Coos Bay, was eastbound when it left the road and struck a tree before entering the river and sinking.

The passengers, Lea Haigler (30) of Coos Bay and Casey Little (34) of Coos Bay, were able to escape the vehicle and make it to shore. 

Boyd was not located.   

A Coast Guard Helicopter searched the area by air.  Two boat patrols consisting of a Coos County Marine Division and the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife searched the waterway. Bandon Fire Department Dive teams searched the water.  Attempts to locate Boyd were unsuccessful.

On October 27, 2020 at approximately 4:41 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a deceased person in the river on Hwy 241 near milepost 11.  The deceased person has been identified as Tyler Boyd.

OSP was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Office, United States Coast Guard, Bandon Fire Department, and ODOT.


CORRECTION - Fatal Crash on Hwy 224 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 10/27/20 1:46 PM

Reynolds was eastbound on Hwy 224 attempting to turn left onto Folsom Rd. when the collision occurred

On Monday, October 26, 2020, at approximately 5:06 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 224 at the intersection of Folsom Rd.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Jonathan Kraemer (36) of Estacada, was  westbound on Hwy 224 when a Mitsubishi Galant, operated by Christopher Reynolds (47) of Estacada, turned left from eastbound Hwy 224 to Folsom Rd directly into the path of Kraemer and they collided.

Kraemer sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Reynolds was not injured.

OSP was assisted by Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Estacada Fire Department, and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash Hwy 569 - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 10/24/20 5:08 PM

On Saturday, October 24, 2020 at approximately 6:35 A.M., Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 569 near Goble Lane.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Honda motorcycle, operated by Nickolas White (34) from Eugene, had crashed sometime earlier.  

White sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

White had been reported to Lane County Sheriff's Office as a missing person.

Investigation is continuing.

OSP was assisted by ODOT.


Utilities
Pacific Power ends Public Safety Power Shutoff watch for Illinois Valley and northern California areas
Pacific Power - 10/25/20 6:15 PM

Contact:                                                                                      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pacific Power media line                                                         October 25, 2020

503-813-6018   

Pacific Power ends Public Safety Power Shutoff watch for Illinois Valley and northern California areas

CAVE JUNCTION, ORE. — After closely monitoring dry, windy weather conditions throughout the day, Pacific Power ended its Public Safety Power Shutoff watch early Sunday evening for high-fire risk areas in the Illinois Valley area of southern Oregon and Happy Camp, Calif. Weather conditions did not necessitate a power shutoff. The weather watch and line patrol was part of a proactive effort to provide situational awareness in the face of potentially hazardous weather conditions.

“Our top priority is the safety of our communities,” said Erik Brookhouse, vice president of system operations. “We appreciate the patience and understanding of our customers throughout this effort.”

Public Safety Power Shutoff events are part of the utility’s comprehensive wildfire prevention plan, which includes additional safety inspections, upgrades to the grid system, and weather stations to monitor for hazardous conditions.

Customers in the watch areas have been notified of the watch conclusion. For all non-emergency questions about the Public Safety Power Shutoff watch, customers and the public should call Pacific Power at 1-888-221-7070.

Visit pacificpower.net/psps for additional information on Public Safety Power Shutoffs, wildfire safety and emergency preparedness. 

Puede hablar con un agente de servicio al cliente sobre cómo prepararse y qué medidas de seguridad tomar para los incendios forestales. Llame al 888-221-7070.

????"? 888-221-7070?1/4OE??'?(R)??oe???"?'~?????(R)??--???3/4?(R)o/oo?...???~??OENLG??NLG...??,

??? 888-221-7070?1/4OE??'?(R)??oe???^?"?????(R)??--???1/2?(R)o/oo?...??^?~???"??NLG...??,

Unsere Mitarbeiter im Kundenservice beraten Sie gerne zu Waldbrandvorsorge und -bekämpfung. Sie erreichen uns unter 888-221-7070.

Lub chaw sawv cev saib xyuas tub lag luam yuav sib tham nrog koj txog ntawm kev nyab xeeb txog hluav taws hav zoov kub thiab kev npaj txhij. Thov hu rau 888-221-7070.

Ang isang ahente ng pangangalaga sa customer ay maaaring makipag-usap sa iyo tungkol sa kaligtasan at paghahanda sa mabilis na kumakalat na sunog o wildfire. Mangyaring tumawag sa 888-221-7070.

M??(TM)t ?'?i di??n ch?NLGm sóc khách hàng có th??NLG trao ?'??-i v??>i quý v??< v? an toàn cháy r?ng và cách chu?n b??< s?n sàng cho cháy r?ng. Vui lòng g?i 888-221-7070.

Whak nheo bene llun xhinlago nha nhelee, akre unha lkues nha bii llaxgenha dá ghapchi nhada kate xde yii lixhe. Nheo: 888 221 7070

Kui kan’ani xi na’I kaston’o sa’a ña kutua’ani te ña kui kidani ta kiño’o yuku yoton, kan’ani 888-221- 7070.


Illinois Valley and northern California areas remain under Public Safety Power Shutoff watch
Pacific Power - 10/25/20 6:57 AM

Contact:                                                                                      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pacific Power media line                                                            October 25, 2020

503-813-6018   

 

Illinois Valley and northern California areas remain under Public Safety Power Shutoff watch

CAVE JUNCTION, ORE. — Pacific Power continues to closely monitor weather in high-fire risk areas in the Illinois Valley area and Happy Camp, Calif. The Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) watch will remain in effect from 7 a.m. today, Sunday, October 25, until 8 p.m. The company has deployed additional line and vegetation management crews to patrol lines and address hazard trees as needed.  

The PSPS watch covers the communities of Selma, Dryden, Kerby, Cave Junction, Holland, O’Brien, Takilma and Happy Camp. Approximately 5,800 customers are in the PSPS watch area.

“With the combination of high, gusty winds, low humidity and elevated factors on key weather indexes, we want to take every precaution to protect these communities,” said Erik Brookhouse, vice president of system operations. “Our teams will continue to be on location throughout the day to monitor weather and power lines so we can respond quickly to any issues.”

Public Safety Power Shutoff events are part of the utility’s comprehensive wildfire prevention plan, which includes additional safety inspections, upgrades to the grid system, and weather stations to monitor for hazardous conditions.

Pacific Power encourages customers to be prepared making sure contact information is updated and the company has your correct phone number and email address on file.

Customers have been notified of the watch through phone calls, email and text messages. Customers under the PSPS watch area will receive an additional update once the PSPS watch concludes or if conditions warrant a PSPS. Customers can use the interactive map at www.pacificpower.net/psps to see if they are located in a PSPS area.  

For all non-emergency questions about the PSPS, customers and the public should call Pacific Power at 1-888-221-7070.

Visit pacificpower.net/psps for additional information on Public Safety Power Shutoffs, wildfire safety and emergency preparedness. 

Puede hablar con un agente de servicio al cliente sobre cómo prepararse y qué medidas de seguridad tomar para los incendios forestales. Llame al 888-221-7070.

????"? 888-221-7070?1/4OE??'?(R)??oe???"?'~?????(R)??--???3/4?(R)o/oo?...???~??OENLG??NLG...??,

??? 888-221-7070?1/4OE??'?(R)??oe???^?"?????(R)??--???1/2?(R)o/oo?...??^?~???"??NLG...??,

Unsere Mitarbeiter im Kundenservice beraten Sie gerne zu Waldbrandvorsorge und -bekämpfung. Sie erreichen uns unter 888-221-7070.

Lub chaw sawv cev saib xyuas tub lag luam yuav sib tham nrog koj txog ntawm kev nyab xeeb txog hluav taws hav zoov kub thiab kev npaj txhij. Thov hu rau 888-221-7070.

Ang isang ahente ng pangangalaga sa customer ay maaaring makipag-usap sa iyo tungkol sa kaligtasan at paghahanda sa mabilis na kumakalat na sunog o wildfire. Mangyaring tumawag sa 888-221-7070.

M??(TM)t ?'?i di??n ch?NLGm sóc khách hàng có th??NLG trao ?'??-i v??>i quý v??< v? an toàn cháy r?ng và cách chu?n b??< s?n sàng cho cháy r?ng. Vui lòng g?i 888-221-7070.

Whak nheo bene llun xhinlago nha nhelee, akre unha lkues nha bii llaxgenha dá ghapchi nhada kate xde yii lixhe. Nheo: 888 221 7070

Kui kan’ani xi na’I kaston’o sa’a ña kutua’ani te ña kui kidani ta kiño’o yuku yoton, kan’ani 888-221- 7070.


Federal
Bureau of Land Management Fall/Winter prescribed burning plan for Prineville District
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 10/26/20 8:39 AM

Prineville, Ore.  – As fall weather brings shorter days and cooler temperatures, fuels specialists with the Bureau of Land Management, Prineville District Office are preparing for the fall/winter prescribed burn program. As early as November 1—and continuing through the next few months depending on conditions—specialists will treat a variety of locations with prescribed fire across BLM-managed public lands in Central Oregon. These prescribed burns are planned in the following project areas:

  • Cline Buttes: 314 acres of hand pile burning in the Dusty Loop/Innes Market Road area.
  • Outback: 358 acres of hand pile burning eight miles southeast of La Pine and on the east side of Highway 31.
  • La Pine: 2,692 acres of machine pile burning located in the “Y” between Highway 97 and Highway 31.
  • High Desert Shrub Steppe Project: crews will burn juniper slash scattered across 10,000 acres of BLM lands south of Brothers and in the 12-Mile table area east of Paulina, Oregon.
  • Williamson Creek:  539 acres of hand pile burning near the corner of Millican Road and Reservoir Rd southwest of Prineville.

The piles are concentrations of leftover materials from previous thinning projects designed to remove hazardous fuels that can burn during wildfires. Juniper removed in the High Desert Shrub Steppe Project have the added benefit of improving Greater Sage-Grouse habitat. Where possible, material was first offered for firewood, commercial sale, or biomass use; with some remaining material scattered to rehabilitate sites and close user-created routes.

The projects are each expected to take several days, and crews will move between each project depending on site-specific weather. Main roads in the area will be signed to inform residents of the prescribed burn and no road closures or delays are expected. Piles may smolder, burn, and produce smoke for several days after ignition. Smoke may settle in overnight, and where necessary, motorists should reduce speeds and turn on headlights.

All prescribed burning is highly dependent on favorable temperature, moisture and wind conditions. Each of these prescribed burns will only be started when the conditions are right to meet the objectives of the burn, while minimizing smoke impacts to any nearby communities. All prescribed burn areas will be patrolled during and following ignitions. Prescribed burns are completed in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Forestry smoke management plan. In addition, fire and fuels managers are working closely this year with air quality and public health authorities on prescribed burns due to COVID-19.

For more information about prescribed burning, please contact the Prineville BLM at (541) 416-6700, or see a complete listing of all the upcoming prescribed burning activities in your area at  https://www.blm.gov/programs/public-safety-and-fire/fire-and-aviation/regional-info/oregon-washington/prescribed-fire, or http://www.centraloregonfire.org/

-BLM–

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.


Thirty-Five Defendants, Including Ring Leader, Prosecuted in Major Take Down of International Drug Trafficking Organization based in Lane County (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/29/20 3:03 PM
Photos
Photos
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/6325/139608/thumb_DiazPhotos.png

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that members of a major international drug trafficking organization, including one of its ringleaders and sources of supply from Mexico, have been charged with distributing methamphetamine, heroin, and fentanyl into Oregon between 2018 and 2020.

            A federal grand jury in Eugene has returned a one-count indictment charging Victor Diaz-Ramirez, 30, who was residing in Mexico, with Conspiracy to Distribute Methamphetamine. This Indictment is part of a much larger investigation into the large-scale distribution of drugs into Oregon from Mexico by the drug trafficking organization led by Diaz-Ramirez (“the Diaz DTO”).   According to court documents, the Diaz DTO has been operating at least since 2018.  The Diaz DTO imported drugs into the United States from Mexico, transported them from California to Oregon hidden inside vehicles, then distributed them throughout Oregon from its distribution cell located in Lane County. 

            The government’s investigation has resulted in the prosecution of 35 individuals (listed below) who are members or associates of the Diaz DTO.  The scheme involved shipment of drugs from Mexico into Southern California by Diaz-Ramirez and others, where they were subsequently transported in large wooden boxes by couriers to Oregon and delivered to co-conspirators operating a distribution cell.  There, the drugs were divided and prepared for distribution in large pound quantities for delivery to local distributors in Eugene, Springfield, and Salem, for eventual redistribution to their local customer base.   During its investigation, law enforcement seized from the Diaz DTO over 260 pounds of methamphetamine, 16 pounds of heroin, 6 pounds of fentanyl in the form of 4000 fentanyl pills, 76 firearms, 1 grenade, multiple vehicles, and more than $760,000 in cash used to facilitate drug transactions.

             The following people have been arrested as members and associates of the Diaz DTO and prosecuted with drug related charges: Victor Diaz-Ramirez, 30; Rodolfo Arroyo-Segoviano, 34; Jose Manuel Cabadas, 36; Nicholas A. Norton-Guerra, 30; Arturo Gonzalez Jr., 22; Jose Cruz Granados Munoz, 33; Robert Harrington, 40; Gregory Todd Daily, 57; Austin Wayne Reinke, 34; Shelby Lynn Mathews, 30; Javin Michael Loomis, 42; William Joseph Hawkins, 42; Randy Allen Hendricks, 59; Vernon Eli  Reece, 58; Alejandro Augustin Cardenas, 43; Spencer Arthur Crawford, 36; Anthony Robert Andreotti, 43; Isidro Mateo-Olivera, 32; Andres Santacruz, 40; Yasmani Diaz Iturbe, 35; Artemio Lorea Carrillo, 47; Alejandro Lara, 27; Karine Garabedian, 36; Tamara Gonzalez-Valdivia, 24;  Andres Avila Gamboa, 29; Israel Salvador Mercado-Mendoza, 33; Rigoberto Morfin-Pedroza, 36; Delfino Angel Davila-Tamayo, 27; Cristina Maria Elizabeth Fregoso, 36; Jose Leonidas Gonzalez-Castillo, 52; Felipe Antonio Rapalo, 31; Eddy Eduardo Rapalo, 24; Gustavo Arango-Moreno, 29; and Victor Ramos-Vergara, 32.

“For years, the Diaz DTO brought poison from Mexico to the streets of Oregon in the form of methamphetamine, fentanyl and heroin” said United States Attorney Billy J Williams.  “This takedown represents a major disruption of that pipeline of drugs into our community. This investigation shows that large scale drug distribution is not limited to Portland. This organization used Lane County as its base and from there sent drugs across the entire state.   This prosecution is especially important as the entire organization was targeted; from the source of supply in Mexico, to the couriers bringing the drugs north, and to those involved in the statewide distribution network.  The prosecution of those involved is a major step in law enforcement’s efforts to stop the river of drugs flowing from Mexico to Oregon.  I want to thank our federal and state partners for their work in investigating, interdicting, and arresting those involved and especially effecting the arrest of the alleged ringleader, Victor Ramirez-Diaz.”

“The dismantlement of this international drug trafficking organization centered in Eugene, Oregon, demonstrates how effective law enforcement efforts are when we work together,” said DEA Assistant Special Agent in Charge Cam Strahm. “The organization targeted and brought to justice through this case will not prey on the citizens of Lane County and residents of Oregon for a long time.”

            The Drug Enforcement Administration, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Internal Revenue Service, U.S. Marshals, Springfield Police Department, Eugene Police Department Street Crimes Unit, Lane County Sherriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, Line Task Force in Linn County, and DINT Task Force in Douglas County investigated this case.  It is being prosecuted by Joseph Huynh and Judi Harper, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

            An indictment and complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

The investigation that led to this prosecution, as described above, fall under the auspices of the Department of Justice’s Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) program, the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s drug supply reduction strategy.  OCDETF was established in 1982 to conduct comprehensive, multi-level attacks on major drug trafficking and money laundering organizations.  Today, OCDETF combines the resources and expertise of its member federal agencies in cooperation with state and local law enforcement.  The principal mission of the OCDETF program is to identify, disrupt, and dismantle the most serious drug trafficking and money laundering organizations and those primarily responsible for the nation’s drug supply.




Attached Media Files: Thirty-Five Defendants, Including Ring Leader, Prosecuted in Major Take Down of International Drug Trafficking Organization based in Lane County , Photos

Utah Resident Sentenced To Federal Prison For Absconding Supervision And Failing To Register As A Sex Offender
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/29/20 10:22 AM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Washington County, Utah, resident was sentenced to federal prison today for failing to comply with sex offender supervision and registration requirements designed to protect the community from predatory acts, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Robert John Golom, 27, was sentenced to five years in federal prison and ten years’ supervised release.

            U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams said “This case demonstrates the critical importance of law enforcement partnership and coordination and use of the National Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) as an important tool in protecting the public from those who repeatedly engage in predatory acts.”

            According to court documents, on November 5, 2019, Eugene police officers found defendant Golom in a Eugene transient encampment, sharing a tent with a 16-year old minor.  Record checks revealed Golom was required to register as a sex offender as a result of prior criminal convictions in Utah, and Golom had not registered in Oregon despite being present in the state for a month. Golom was also found in possession of a machete, a concealed hunting knife and other makeshift weapons. Eugene police coordinated with the United States Marshal’s Service and the Oregon State Police to conduct further investigation.

Golom told law enforcement he left Utah on a bus, traveled to Oregon, and did not register as required following his Utah state conviction for Sexual Exploitation of a Minor and Unlawful Sexual Contact with a 16 or 17-year old in 2019.  Golom’s failure to register in Oregon follows a history of repeated sexual acts committed against minors and poor decisions, including sharing a tent with a minor in Eugene, while fleeing from court-ordered supervision and sex offender registration requirements in Utah.

            On November 20, 2019, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned a single-count indictment charging Golom with failure to register as a sex offender. On July 28, 2020, he pleaded guilty.

            The United States Marshals Service, the Eugene Police Department, and Oregon State Police investigated this case.  It was prosecuted by William M. McLaren, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in coordination with the Hurricane, Utah City Attorney and the Washington County Attorney’s office in St. George, Utah.

The United States Marshals Service is the federal government’s primary law enforcement agency for sex offender and fugitive investigations.  The United States Marshals Service has implemented an aggressive strategy across the nation, including complex sex offender investigations and multiagency enforcement operations.  Protecting children in our communities, including unhoused juveniles, is a critical part of the multiagency sex offender mission in Oregon.

            The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) is Title I of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006. The act provides a comprehensive set of minimum standards for sex offender registration and notification in the United States. SORNA strengthens the nationwide network for the protection of the community.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Sentencing - GOLOM

Bend Resident, Sentenced For Conspiracy To Manufacture And Distribute Marijuana Under The Name "Bhoys"
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/27/20 4:44 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Bend, Oregon resident was sentenced to 36 months’ imprisonment today for running an illicit Butane Honey Oil (BHO) extraction lab on rural Bend property, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Jacob Genaro Robe, 31 years old, was sentenced to 3 years in federal prison and 3 years’ supervised release.

“BHO extraction is a highly volatile and dangerous process that has resulted in explosions injuring and killing Oregon residents. When Oregon citizens passed state laws legalizing and regulating the manufacture of marijuana products including BHO, it was meant to bring those black market operations into the light of day and create safeguards protecting the health and safety of Oregon consumers” said U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams. “Those laws are ineffective without enforcement. As this case demonstrates, there are individuals who will violate laws in pursuit of profits over consumer protections and we stand ready to hold them accountable.”

According to court documents, Robe and his brother created a vertical operation growing marijuana, manufacturing BHO and distributing it in other states for significant profit. On March 27, 2018, an Oregon State Police trooper stopped Jacob Robe for a traffic violation near Klamath Falls, Oregon.  The officer recognized signs of drug trafficking and eventually located more than $20,000 in cash, BHO, and hallucinogenic mushrooms.

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team had previously received information regarding defendant and his brothers having a BHO lab and selling BHO in other states, and detectives served a search warrant on the brothers’ rural property in Bend, Oregon.  Also found were freezers with marijuana, drying racks with sheets of BHO and jars with their logo “THE BHOys.” (Photos)

In an unattached two-story structure approximately 179 large, mature, marijuana plants were located along with around 280 starter plants.  Law enforcement located an indoor marijuana grow with hundreds of plants, a closed-loop BHO lab, 18 pounds of BHO, 200 pounds of marijuana and thirteen firearms. Police located the firearms in various places in the residence, including positioned near the front door (photo) in the kitchen (photo) and in Robe’s bedroom.

On November 25, 2019 Robe was charged by information, and on January 29, 2020 pleaded guilty to conspiracy to manufacture and distribute marijuana.

Robe forfeited $23,000 in U.S. currency.

            The Drug Enforcement Administration, Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team and Oregon State Police investigated this case. It was prosecuted by Jeffrey S. Sweet, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office.

            # # #




Attached Media Files: ROBE-photos , Sentencing - ROBE-FINAL

Hillsboro Oregon Resident Charged With Assaulting A Deputized Portland Police Officer
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/26/20 2:25 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a Hillsboro, Oregon, resident has been charged with assaulting a federally deputized Portland Police officer with the pointed end of an umbrella and interfering with law enforcement officers performing their official duties during a civil disorder event.

            A federal grand jury in Portland has returned a two-count indictment charging Skyler Roy Rider, 18, with Civil Disorder and Assaulting a Federal Officer.

            According to court documents, late on the evening of October 6, 2020 and into October 7, a crowd gathered and a march began at Elizabeth Caruthers Park located in the 3500 block of South Moody Avenue. The group walked to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) building on South Macadam Avenue. Portland Police Bureau (PPB) officers observed many in the crowd carrying shields, wearing helmets, gas masks, and body armor. As the group marched towards the ICE building, support vehicles followed them as they blocked streets.  

            As the crowd arrived at the ICE building, people in the crowd were observed flashing lights in the eyes of Federal Protection Services (FPS) officers as they stood outside the ICE building. People in the crowd were observed throwing rocks at the FPS officers and at one point, someone in the crowd threw a flaming object onto the roof of the ICE building. Due to the criminal acts, FPS officers moved the crowd back towards Elizabeth Caruthers Park.

            Later, the crowd again began marching towards the ICE building, blocking the streets. The PPB incident commander declared the event an unlawful assembly and the crowd was given multiple warnings over a loudspeaker to leave the area or face possible arrest, use of crowd control munitions to include tear gas.  The crowd did not leave the area, but remained in the middle of the street. A PPB officer assigned to the Rapid Response Team, deputized as a U.S. Marshal to protect federal personnel and property during civil disorder events, observed a subject later identified as Skyler Roy Rider, holding a distinct blue and white umbrella, in a line of others blocking the street holding shields. The PPB officer determined there was probable cause to arrest Rider for disorderly conduct and interfering with a peace officer.  As the officer approached Rider to arrest him, Rider lowered the umbrella with both hands and forcibly jabbed the officer in the chest with the pointed end of the umbrella. The force caused the officer to gasp and curl over in pain. Rider ran from the officer and other officers came to assist and placed Rider into custody for assaulting a public safety officer.

            Following the arrest of Rider, he was found to be dressed in all black wearing a gas mask and body armor. In his pockets were two water bottles. Video was later viewed by the PPB officer showing Rider throwing a water bottle at FPS officers earlier in the evening.

 Skyler Roy Rider, made an initial appearance in federal court today before a U.S. Magistrate Judge Jolie Russo, was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and ordered released pending a two-day jury trial scheduled to begin on December 29, 2020.

            The Portland Police Bureau and the FBI investigated this case. It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

            An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Indictment Initial Appearance - RIDER

State
Corrections Deputies and Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/27/20 4:10 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of Basic Corrections Local #BCL042 on Friday October 30, 2020 at 10 a.m., at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, in Salem, Oregon. 

Due to the COVID 19 pandemic and the need for social distancing the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training regret that this ceremony will be closed to the public. However, we would like to publicly congratulate Basic Corrections Local class #042 on their successful completion of basic training. 

Members of Graduating Class BCL042:

Deputy Sheriff Brett Baese

Washington County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Aidan Baltunis

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Ashley Bowman

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Dante Burgess

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Parker Castano

Washington County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Timothy Ebner

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Shyanne Fine

Harney County Sheriff's Office

 

Corrections Officer Joshua Fortner

Springfield Police Department

 

Deputy Sheriff Bryan Giblin

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Jessica Goodwin-Strom

Benton County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Autumn Halfman

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Ana Hawit

Josephine County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Morgan Holcomb

Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Jacob Holverson

Yamhill County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Jacqueline Jones

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Travis King

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Jaime Kmetic

Baker County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Marjorie Laney

Columbia County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Kodi Lavrusky

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Cole LeBlanc

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Samuel Macklin

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Vanity Massey

Washington County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Samantha Myers

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Corrections Officer Kevin Nateras

Washington County Community Corrections

 

Deputy Sheriff Anthony Nelson

Washington County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Alexis Ober

Crook County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Paxton Parazoo

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Huy Phan

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Kevin Ponce

Malheur County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Robert Reynolds

Harney County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Richard

Lane County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Dakota Schaumburg

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Jay Schmidt

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Sarah Stewart

Curry County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Kim Stidum

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Julee Tappero

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Deputy Sheriff Brittnee Taylor

Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

 

Corrections Officer Annita Tipton

Washington County Community Corrections

 

Deputy Sheriff Lindsey Ward

Harney County Sheriff's Office

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Darren Bucich, Fire Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Online benefits application system unavailable this weekend while upgrades are made
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/28/20 2:56 PM

Salem, Or. – The state’s online application systems for medical, food, cash and childcare benefits will be unavailable from 5 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 30 until Monday, Nov. 2, at 7 a.m. This downtime is to support an upgrade to the state’s new ONE eligibility determination system to add more benefit options and expand the system to more Oregonians.

 

Beginning Monday, Nov. 2, residents in central and southern Oregon counties will be able to use the upgraded ONE system to apply online for medical, food, cash and childcare benefits, renew their coverage, and update their case information.

 

Oregonians in Josephine, Jackson, and parts of Douglas counties began using the combined online application in ONE in August and September.

 

This project is a joint effort between the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to provide all Oregonians the ability to apply for cash, childcare, food and medical benefits through a single online application.

 

“With the pandemic and recent wildfires, it’s critically important that we provide people with convenient and safe options to apply for and receive these services and benefits,” said ODHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht. “We are excited to roll out the improved ONE system statewide over the next several months.”

 

The ONE system upgrade, which began in July 2020, is being done in phases. The final phase will expand the combined cash, childcare, food and medical benefits application to the Portland metro area and surrounding counties in early 2021.

 

Once the system is fully upgraded, all Oregonians will have the option to apply for medical, food, cash and childcare benefits over the phone, online or in person at any local Aging and People with Disabilities, Area Agency on Aging or Self-Sufficiency Programs office that provides those benefits.

 

Please visit the DHS Benefits and Assistance page to learn more about the programs available to qualifying Oregonians. For more information about the ONE upgrade, go to benefits.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: ODHS Media Advisory

UPDATE -- Missing infant Dennis Johnson found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/28/20 10:15 AM

(Salem, Ore.) – Dennis Johnson, an infant born Nov. 14, 2019, who went missing with his parents on Oct. 20, 2020 has been found. Dennis Johnson was found Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020. The Oregon Department of Human Services is thankful for the community support to find him.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As DHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

###


Limited indoor visits allowed at qualifying long-term care facilities as of Nov. 2
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/28/20 8:46 AM

SALEM, OR – Licensed nursing, assisted living and residential care facilities that qualify may begin allowing limited indoor visitation for residents starting Nov. 2, 2020.

“As we have throughout this pandemic, when it comes to long-term care facility visitation, we will proceed carefully, to protect the residents who are most vulnerable to COVID-19,” said Governor Kate Brown. “With case counts rising, I have instructed the Department of Human Services to proceed with caution. However, it is my hope that families can now safely begin visiting the loved ones they have not been able to see for so many months.”

Residents may have up to two visitors at a time to meet with in an approved area.

To qualify, a facility must:

  • Have no suspected or current COVID-19 cases;
  • Follow visitation requirements detailed in the policy and related guidance;
  • Be in a community with a low or medium rate of COVID-19 exposure; facilities in communities with high incidents of COVID-19 may only have visitors indoors who qualify under the compassionate care policy.

“We are grateful to everyone who collaborated to develop the safeguards to make this policy possible. Indoor visitation restrictions have been extremely painful for everyone to endure; I hope this change will provide relief to those who are suffering from being separated from family and friends,” said Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) Director Fariborz Pakseresht.

Mike McCormick, Interim Director of the ODHS Office of Aging and People with Disabilities added, “The indoor visitation policy has many layers to it that strike a balance between safety and the essential need for families and friends to connect. We will continue to monitor outbreaks closely and will modify the policy if that is warranted. The impact of the pandemic is evolving, and we must be ready to continually adapt.”

ODHS collaborated with a variety of stakeholders in developing the policy. Among the considerations:

  • Availability of COVID-19 testing, turnaround times for test results and implementation of required ongoing staff testing at facilities;
  • Long-term care facilities’ overall track record in preventing and controlling outbreaks when they occur; and,
  • Oregon’s low national ranking for COVID-19 infections.

To protect the health and well-being of residents and staff, facilities permitting indoor visitation must take precautions, including:

  • Scheduling staggered visits and limiting the number of visitors per resident to two at any given time.
  • Setting time limits, if needed, to ensure all residents can receive visitors; and, allow special considerations for those traveling for visitation.
  • Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces and designated visitation areas after each visit.
  • Ensuring visitors receive a health screening before entering, use required personal protective equipment (PPE) and proper hand hygiene during the visit and limit where they go within the facility.
  • Providing a dedicated visiting area.
  • Keeping a log of visitors (indoors and outdoors) that includes the visitor’s name, address and phone number to be used if contact tracing is needed.

Resources:

###


Last Day to Apply for Disaster SNAP (DSNAP) is Wednesday, Oct. 28
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/27/20 1:19 PM

Wednesday, Oct. 28 is the last day for residents in one of the 8 designated counties - Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion – to apply for Disaster SNAP benefits.

“Any resident who has not yet submitted an online application is encouraged to do so before it is too late,” urged Dan Haun, Self-Sufficiency Programs Director.

Due to the pandemic, the application will be completely online. If you need assistance, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the Aging and Disability Resource Connection at 1-855-ORE-ADRC.

After submitting your application, you will be contacted over the phone to complete your required interview. You will need to provide information on your household members, income, resources, and disaster-related expenses. Please note, an Oregon Department of Human Services worker will never ask for your debit or credit card number.

For more information, or to apply, visit https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/DSNAP.aspx.

Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (DSNAP) provides temporary food assistance for households affected by a natural disaster. DSNAP provides one month of benefits on an Oregon EBT card to eligible disaster survivors and can facilitate the issuance of supplemental SNAP benefits for ongoing households. To be eligible for DSNAP, a household must live or work in the disaster area, have been affected by the disaster, and meet certain DSNAP eligibility criteria.

###




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/973/139520/Last_Day_to_Apply_for_DSNAP_is_Wednesday_Oct._28.pdf

ODVA Director Veterans Day Message: A Time to Pause as a Nation (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 10/29/20 3:00 PM
2020-10/1082/139606/KellyFitzpatrick.jpg
2020-10/1082/139606/KellyFitzpatrick.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1082/139606/thumb_KellyFitzpatrick.jpg

This Veterans Day across the nation, for the first time since the holiday was conceived in November 1919, there will be no large ceremonies in big cities and small towns in observance to properly express our gratitude and appreciate of our country’s brave men and women who served in the United States Armed Forces.

Instead, 2020 will long be remembered as a year of tremendous change and challenge for our nation. Yet, this year also notably marks 75 years since the end of another historic global event that united our country: the end of World War II and the subsequent creation of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs in 1945.

One of the most poignant aspects of our Oregon veteran community is that it is as diverse and united as the nation we serve.

Whether you are one of the 300,000 Oregon veterans who served in the trenches of Europe, the mountains of Korea, the jungles of Asia, the deserts of the Middle East or anywhere in between; on (or beneath) the world’s oceans, or in the skies above; here at home or overseas, in wartime or in peace; you are part of an unbroken chain of patriots who have served this country with honor through the history of our nation.

Every day, even after their military service, our veterans ensure America remains strong. Every day, they employ their hard-earned leadership skills and continue to serve their communities.

Our veterans are moms and dads, teachers and doctors, engineers and entrepreneurs, social workers and community leaders. They are the heroes of a peaceful nation who answered the call and returned to live in the land they defended.

Heroes like World War II paratrooper Bill Wingett — though he never embraced that distinction.

Private First Class Wingett was one of the original members of Easy Company of the 101st Airborne Division’s 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, a unit made famous by the book and HBO miniseries "Band of Brothers."

On June 6, 1944, he was one of 17,000 paratroopers to perform a night jump behind enemy lines five hours before the historic beachhead assault began. Along with other paratroopers from the 101st, he fought his way through to Normandy. He also served with honor in the Battle of the Bulge, the Battle of Bastogne and other pivotal conflicts until the war ended.

He was awarded the Bronze Star for his bravery during the Battle of Brecourt Manor and earned three Purple Hearts in separate engagements.

Sadly, Bill passed away just a few weeks ago at his home in Lebanon. He was 98.

The veterans of the Greatest Generation, serving nearly eight decades ago, are vanishing at a startling rate, as are the veterans of the Korean War generation. Just five years ago, there were more than 17,000 WWII veterans living in the state of Oregon. Today, there are fewer than 6,000.  Their contribution and example must never fade from our awareness. The nation and the world they fought to protect will endure because of their service and deep sacrifices.

Today, we also remember our fellow Americans missing in action, whose fate is still undetermined. We will not rest until we have made the fullest possible accounting for every life that was given in pursuit of our freedoms and preserving democracy.

We also pause to remember the men and women who did not live to be called "veterans." Many of them rest in the hearts of our national cemeteries.

We also honor the families of the lost, who carry a burden of grief that time may lighten, but never lift, as well as all veterans’ family members. Their loved ones placed duty and country before their own lives.

America is known as the land of the free and the home of the brave, but this was never a given. This reputation was earned by the blood and sweat of patriots who, generation after generation, dedicate themselves to keeping our nation safe, strong and free.

What veterans have given our country is beyond our power to fully repay, yet, today we pause as a nation to recognize our debt.

This Veterans Day, although we must adjust how we celebrate, I encourage you to join me, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and other veterans and civic leaders as we mark this important observation with our first-ever virtual Statewide Veterans Day celebration.

The event will be streamed on the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs’ Facebook page beginning at 11 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 11. I hope you are able to join us as we honor and celebrate all of our nation’s veterans.

Finally, on behalf of the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs and a grateful state and nation, on this day and every day, we thank you for your service.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kelly Fitzpatrick is the director of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs and Governor Kate Brown’s policy advisor on veterans’ issues. She is a retired Army officer. Her military awards and decorations include multiple awards of the Meritorious Service Medal, the Southwest Asia Service Medal and the Army Parachutist Badge.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1082/139606/KellyFitzpatrick.jpg

More Oregonians eligible for financial assistance to purchase health insurance | People have until Dec. 15 to enroll in health insurance (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/28/20 6:00 AM
Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo
Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1073/139517/thumb_OHIM_logo-left_text.jpg

(Salem) – Pandemic-related job losses have increased the number of Oregonians eligible for help paying for health insurance. The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace estimates thousands of Oregonians may be newly eligible.

In recent years, Oregon had made great strides in reducing the uninsured rate. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, 94 percent of all Oregonians had health coverage. Since the pandemic, hundreds of thousands of Oregonians either have lost their job or have experienced a loss in income. As a result, these Oregonians may be newly eligible for financial help to purchase health insurance.

Insurance agents and community partner organizations throughout the state are available to help with applying for financial assistance and choosing private plans. Consumers can also browse plans and find out how much savings they are eligible for by going to OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop.

Oregonians who do not get health insurance through their job or a program such as the Oregon Health Plan or Medicare may qualify for help paying for 2021 coverage at OregonHealthCare.gov. Even if people are temporarily uninsured, they can sign up for help by the Dec. 15 deadline to get health insurance for next year.

“A pandemic is no time to go without health insurance and the essential health benefits that come with it,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “You can get help paying for health insurance based on your income. Don’t assume you make too much to be eligible.”

Individuals making $51,040 or less per year, and families of four making $104,800 or less, may get help paying for coverage. In 2020, more than seven in 10 Oregonians who chose plans through HealthCare.gov got financial help for monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs. These savings lowered the average premium to just $145 per month.

To apply, go to OregonHealthCare.gov before Dec. 15 and answer a few Oregon-specific questions to get to the right application. Or they can search the “get help” directory on the site to find an insurance agent or community partner organization who can help them complete the application and enroll. Insurance agents and community partners provide local, one-on-one assistance at no charge to the client. This help is available virtually and over the phone, and in person following safety protocols.

###

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo

Controlled burns to reduce forest fuels and lower risk of high-intensity wildfires are now underway (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/28/20 8:30 AM
Land managers use controlled burns when weather conditions will carry smoke aloft and disperse it. Such burns remove woody fuels in hopes of reducing the risk of higher intensity wildfires, which produce much more smoke and often occur when air currents a
Land managers use controlled burns when weather conditions will carry smoke aloft and disperse it. Such burns remove woody fuels in hopes of reducing the risk of higher intensity wildfires, which produce much more smoke and often occur when air currents a
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1072/139537/thumb_Spence_Fire_2.jpg

SALEM, Ore. – Oregonians in forested areas may see smoke from a number of controlled burns – known as prescribed burns – this fall and winter. Forest landowners use the burns to eliminate woody fuels that build up on their land from forest thinning and after timber harvests.

This year’s fall burning season coincides with a rise in COVID-19 cases in Oregon. Smoke may worsen symptoms for people coping with compromised health or lung function due to COVID-19. The Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) current smoke rules minimize smoke from entering certain populated cities and areas known as Smoke Sensitive Receptor Areas (SSRAs).

ODF Smoke Management Program Manager Nick Yonker says, “To protect people with impaired lung function due to COVID-19, we’ve coordinated with the Oregon Health Authority to ensure that during the pandemic we will govern prescribed burns in counties experiencing higher levels of COVID-19 under older, tighter smoke regulations. Those define any amount of smoke from a prescribed burn into an SSRA as an intrusion. We will forecast to avoid any smoke from prescribed burning from entering an SSRA in those counties.”

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and partner agencies monitor smoke levels and air quality across the state. DEQ’s Air Quality Index provides current air quality conditions categorized as good, moderate, unhealthy for sensitive groups, unhealthy, very unhealthy and hazardous.

The Oregon Department of Forestry has developed a Statewide Communication Framework for helping Oregonians: (1) understand why we burn, (2) health risks of smoke, (3) ways to avoid smoke, (4) where burning is taking place each day, and (5) where smoke is impacting communities. This communication plan is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Documents/fire/smoke-management-rules-statewide-coms-framework.pdf

Burning for healthier forests

Overcrowded forests are more prone to tree deaths from drought and insects, and typically experience greater fire intensity than woodlands where trees are more widely spaced. Prescribed burns help maintain forest health and reduce the risk of high-intensity, catastrophic wildfires and the large volume of smoke associated with such wildfires.

Yonker says fire suppression actions are more effective and lower in cost in areas with a recent history of controlled burning.

While all fires produce some smoke, the amount from burning covered slash piles is far less than from a wildfire burning an entire stand of trees. Air quality in Oregon during the September mega fires, for example, was the worst the state ever recorded.

“Wildfires often occur when the atmosphere is stable, trapping smoke close to the ground where it’s more likely to impact people,” says Yonker. “So anything we can do to reduce the amount of wildfire smoke, including doing more prescribed burning, is better for people.”

                                                                            # # #




Attached Media Files: Land managers use controlled burns when weather conditions will carry smoke aloft and disperse it. Such burns remove woody fuels in hopes of reducing the risk of higher intensity wildfires, which produce much more smoke and often occur when air currents a

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon anuncia una iniciativa enfocada a tramitar reclamos en adjudicación. 20 por ciento de reclamos en adjudicación han sido resueltos desde que la agencia comenzó a monitorear el progreso
Oregon Employment Department - 10/28/20 4:17 PM

28 de octubre de 2020 (SALEM, ORE.)— Hoy, el Departamento de Empleo de Oregon anunció el lanzamiento de Focus Adjudication, una iniciativa para procesar el 100 por ciento de los reclamos que esperan ser adjudicados. Aunque el Departamento de Empleo de Oregon ha proporcionado $5.3 mil millones en beneficios a más de 443,000 habitantes de Oregon desde marzo, muchas personas tienen una o más semanas de reclamos que los requisitos federales dicen que deben adjudicarse.

“Sabemos que demasiadas familias aún esperan ayuda. Estamos haciendo todo lo posible para acelerar el proceso para que los residentes de Oregon puedan recibir los beneficios que merecen. Sabemos que un esfuerzo dirigido como Focus Adjudication funciona porque logró eliminar los retrasos en los reclamos de desempleo regular y de la Asistencia de desempleo por la Pandemia”, dijo David Gerstenfeld, director interino del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon.

Focus Adjudication permite al Departamento de Empleo hacer un seguimiento del progreso en comparación con la cifra del 30 de septiembre de 52,000 personas con reclamos en adjudicación. De las 52.000, el número de personas con reclamos en adjudicación se redujo a 48.000 el 14 de octubre y se redujo aún más a 45.250 el 21 de octubre. Hoy, de esas 52.000, aproximadamente 41.700 personas tienen reclamos en adjudicación, una disminución de casi el 20 por ciento. Algunos residentes de Oregon pueden tener solo una semana de reclamación en adjudicación y aún reciben beneficios por todas las demás semanas reclamadas. Otros pueden tener varias semanas en adjudicación y aún reciben beneficios por otras semanas reclamadas.

Antes de que se lanzara Focus Adjudication, más de 18,000 personas recibían beneficios a través del programa Beneficios Mientras Espera.

El Departamento de Empleo tiene la obligación legal de trasladar un reclamo a adjudicación cuando no está clara la elegibilidad de una persona para los beneficios de desempleo. Se puede colocar un reclamo en adjudicación si parece que una persona ha dejado su trabajo, ha sido despedida, no aceptó un trabajo, está en un receso escolar o en otras situaciones.

La adjudicación es un proceso complejo que requiere mucho tiempo. El plazo para resolver estos reclamos depende de cuán complejo sea un caso determinado: algunos casos se pueden resolver rápidamente, mientras que otros requieren jueces más experimentados para garantizar que se tome una decisión precisa.

El objetivo de Focus Adjudication es tramitar todos los reclamos antes de fin de año. El Departamento de Empleo proporcionará actualizaciones semanales sobre el progreso de la iniciativa.

###

 

Programa de igualdad de oportunidades - ayudas y servicios auxiliares disponibles a pedido para personas con discapacidades. Contacto: (503) 947-1794. Para las personas sordas o con discapacidad auditiva, llame al 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139574/SP_10_28__Project_Focus_Adjudication_Final.pdf

Oregon Employment Department Announces Focused Initiative to Process Claims in Adjudication: 20 percent of claims in adjudication have been resolved since the agency began tracking progress
Oregon Employment Department - 10/28/20 3:05 PM

October 28, 2020 (SALEM, ORE.)—Today the Oregon Employment Department announced the launch of Focus Adjudication, an initiative to process 100 percent of claims waiting to be adjudicated. Although the Oregon Employment Department has provided $5.3 billion in benefits to more than 443,000 Oregonians since March, many people have one or more weeks of claims that federal requirements say must be adjudicated.

“We know that too many families are still waiting for relief. We are doing everything we can to speed up the process so that Oregonians can receive the benefits they deserve. We know a targeted effort like Focus Adjudication works because it succeeded in eliminating backlogs in regular unemployment and Pandemic Unemployment Assistance claims,” said David Gerstenfeld, acting director of the Oregon Employment Department.

Focus Adjudication allows the Employment Department to track progress against the Sept. 30 figure of 52,000 people with claims in adjudication. Of the 52,000, the number of people with claims in adjudication dropped to 48,000 on Oct. 14, and dropped further to 45,250 on Oct. 21. Today, of that 52,000, approximately 41,700 people have claims in adjudication, a nearly 20 percent decrease. Some Oregonians may have only one week’s claim in adjudication and still receive benefits for all other weeks claimed. Others may have several weeks in adjudication and still receive benefits for other weeks claimed.

Before Focus Adjudication was launched more than 18,000 people received benefits through the Benefits While You Wait program.

The Employment Department is legally required to move a claim into adjudication when a person’s eligibility for unemployment benefits is unclear. A claim may be placed in adjudication if it appears a person has quit their job, has been fired, didn’t accept work, is on a school recess, or in other situations.

Adjudication is a complex, time-intensive process. The timeframe for resolving these claims depends on how complex any given case is: Some cases can be resolved quickly, while others require more experienced adjudicators to ensure an accurate decision is made.

The Focus Adjudication goal is to process all claims before the end of the year.The Employment Department will provide weekly progress updates on the initiative’s progress.

###

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139568/10_28__Project_Focus_Adjudication_Final.pdf

Fecha Límite Extendida para Asistencia por Desempleo por Desastre Los trabajadores de los condados de Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, y Marion podrían ser elegibles
Oregon Employment Department - 10/28/20 12:38 PM

DISASTER FEMA DR-4562-OR- EXTENSIÓN DEL PLAZO DE PRESENTACIÓN

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon ha recibido autorización para extender la fecha límite para presentar solicitudes de Asistencia por Desempleo por Desastre (DUA). La nueva fecha límite para presentar solicitudes de DUA es el viernes 27 de noviembre de 2020. Las personas pueden calificar para DUA si quedaron desempleadas, si sus horas de trabajo se redujeron sustancialmente o son personas desempleadas por cuenta propia como resultado directo de los incendios forestales y los vientos que tuvieron lugar desde el 7 de septiembre de 2020. Estas personas tampoco deben calificar para el desempleo estatal regular, para la compensación de Desempleo de Emergencia por la Pandemia (PEUC), otros programas de extensión, o para beneficios de la Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA) u otros programas de beneficio.

La Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre (DUA) es un programa federal que brinda beneficios de asistencia por desempleo temporal a las personas cuyo empleo o trabajo por cuenta propia se ha perdido, reducido o interrumpido como resultado directo de un desastre mayor. El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon administra el programa DUA para el Departamento de Trabajo, Administración de Empleo y Capacitación de los Estados Unidos, en nombre de la Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias (FEMA). Las personas elegibles para beneficios de desempleo regulares o Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA) no son elegibles para DUA.

El DUA está disponible para personas elegibles durante semanas de desempleo a partir del 13 de septiembre de 2020. Los beneficios para este desastre estarán disponibles hasta el 20 de marzo de 2021, siempre y cuando su desempleo continúe siendo un resultado directo del desastre mayor. La fecha límite para presentar un reclamo de DUA relacionado con estos incendios es el 27 de Noviembre del 2020

Además de las personas que perdieron sus trabajos como resultado directo del desastre mayor, DUA puede incluir personas que:

  • trabajaban por cuenta propia y se les impidió realizar dichos servicios como resultado del desastre y el trabajo o el trabajo por cuenta propia eran su principal fuente de ingresos,
  • no pudieron llegar a su trabajo debido al desastre,
  • estaban programadas y se les impidió comenzar a trabajar o trabajar por cuenta propia en el área del desastre,
  • no pudieron trabajar debido a una lesión como resultado directo del desastre, o
  • se convirtieron en jefe de familia debido a un deceso causado por el desastre,
  • Han solicitado y utilizado todos los beneficios de desempleo regulares de cualquier estado, o no califica para beneficios de desempleo regulares o programas de extensión y siguen desempleadas como resultado directo del desastre.

El desempleo es un resultado directo del desastre mayor si el desempleo se debió a cualquiera de las siguientes razones:

  • el daño físico o la destrucción del lugar de trabajo;
  • la inaccesibilidad física del lugar de trabajo debido a su cierre por parte del gobierno federal, estatal o local en respuesta inmediata al desastre; o
  • la falta de trabajo o pérdida de ingresos, si, antes del desastre, el empleador o el negocio autónomo recibió la mayoría de sus ingresos de un negocio en el área que resultó dañado o destruido en el desastre o de una entidad en el área del desastre mayor cerrada por el gobierno federal, estatal o local.

Para recibir los beneficios del DUA, toda la documentación requerida debe entregarse al momento de presentar la solicitud, o dentro de los 21 días posteriores a la fecha en que se presentó su solicitud del DUA. Los solicitantes deberán proporcionar documentación adicional, que incluya, entre otros, prueba de empleo en el momento del desastre e información de ingresos del año fiscal 2019. La documentación adicional requerida incluye el número de Seguro Social del solicitante y una copia de su formulario de impuesto federales más reciente o talones de cheques, o documentación que demuestre que trabajaba como empleado o trabajaba por cuenta propia cuando ocurrió el desastre. Las personas que trabajan por cuenta propia pueden obtener documentos para verificar su empleo en su banco, entidades gubernamentales como el Servicio de Impuestos Internos o personas que tengan conocimiento de su negocio.

Se recomienda a las personas afectadas a solicitar DUA a través del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon (OED), que primero verificará si los solicitantes llenan los requisitos para los beneficios estatales de desempleo, PEUC, otros programas de extensión o beneficios del PUA.

 

Las solicitudes para el DUA están disponibles en inglés, español, ruso, vietnamita y chino simplificado en línea en www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. Puede enviar su solicitud a la dirección a continuación o en línea en

unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Incluya las semanas que le gustaría reclamar en su solicitud inicial. Más información está disponible en nuestro sitio web público y páginas de redes sociales. Si tiene preguntas adicionales o para solicitar una solicitud inicial, llame al: 503-570-5000.

 

Información de contacto:

 

Dirección:      Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit

875 Union Street NE

Salem, OR 97311

 

Teléfono:      

503-570-5000

 

Información adicional:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

 

Presente su solicitud en línea:    unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139560/10.28.20_THIRD_Press_Release_DUA_Wildfires_2020_SPANISH.pdf

Deadline Extended for Disaster Unemployment Assistance: Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion Counties Workers May Be Eligible
Oregon Employment Department - 10/28/20 12:37 PM

DISASTER FEMA DR-4562-OR – FILING DEADLINE EXTENSION

The Oregon Employment Department has received authorization to extend the deadline for filing Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) applications. The new deadline to file DUA applications is Friday, November 27, 2020. Individuals may qualify for DUA if they became unemployed, had their work hours substantially reduced, or are unemployed self-employed individuals as a direct result of the wildfires and straight-line winds that took place since September 7, 2020. They also must not qualify for regular state Unemployment Insurance (UI), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), or other benefit programs.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) is a federal program that provides temporary unemployment assistance benefits to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost, reduced, or interrupted as a direct result of a major disaster. The Oregon Employment Department administers the DUA program for the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, on behalf of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Individuals eligible for regular unemployment benefits or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) are not eligible for DUA.

DUA is available to eligible individuals for weeks of unemployment beginning September 13, 2020. Benefits under this program will be available until March 20, 2021, as long as their unemployment continues to be a direct result of the major disaster. The new deadline for filing a DUA claim related to these fires is November 27, 2020

In addition to people who lost their jobs as a direct result of the major disaster, DUA may include individuals who:

  • Were self-employed and prevented from performing such services as a result of the disaster and the work or self-employment was their primary source of income.
  • Were unable to reach their job because of the disaster.
  • Were scheduled to and prevented from beginning work or self-employment in the disaster area,
  • Were unable to work due to injury as a direct result of the disaster, or
  • Became head of household due a death caused by the disaster.
  • Have applied for and used all regular unemployment benefits from any state, do not qualify for regular unemployment benefits or extension programs, and remain unemployed as a direct result of the disaster.

Unemployment is a direct result of the major disaster if the unemployment resulted from any of the following:

  • Physical damage or destruction of the place of employment.
  • Physical inaccessibility of the place of employment due to its closure by the federal, state, or local government in immediate response to the disaster.
  • Lack of work or loss of revenues if, prior to the disaster, the employer or self-employed business received a majority of its income from a business in the area that was damaged or destroyed in the disaster or an entity in the major disaster area closed by the federal, state, or local government.

To receive DUA benefits, all required documentation must be turned in at the time of filing, or within 21 days from the day a DUA application is filed. Applicants will need to provide supporting documentation, including but not limited to, proof of employment or self-employment at the time of the disaster and income information for the 2019 tax year. Additional required documentation includes the applicant’s Social Security number and a copy of their most recent federal income tax form or check stubs, or documentation to support that they were working or self-employed when the disaster occurred. Self-employed individuals can get documents to verify their employment from their bank, government entities such as the Internal Revenue Service, or individuals having knowledge of their business.

Affected individuals are encouraged to apply for DUA through the Oregon Employment Department (OED), which will first check if applicants can qualify for state unemployment benefits, PEUC, other extension programs, or PUA benefits.

Applications for DUA are available in English, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, and Simplified Chinese online at www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. You may submit your application to the address below or online at unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Include the weeks you would like to claim in your initial application. More information is available on our website and social media pages. For additional questions or to request an initial application, call: 503-570-5000

Contact Information:

Address:        Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit

875 Union Street NE

Salem, OR 97311

 

Telephone:   

503-570-5000

 

Additional Information:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

 

Submit your Application Online:            unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139557/10.28.20_THIRD_Press_Release_DUA_Wildfires_2020_ENGLISH.pdf

Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 10/27/20 12:00 PM

 

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wed., Oct. 28, 2020 at 1:00 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on unemployment claims processing, adjudication, and UI payroll taxes on Wed. Oct. 28 at 1:00 p.m. PT.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference; Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12:00 p.m. PT on Wed., Oct. 28. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for week-day updates. A recording of the video conference will be email after the media briefing concludes.

###

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139514/10.28.20_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

Health Care Workforce Committee meets November 4
Oregon Health Authority - 10/29/20 3:03 PM

October 29, 2020

Contact: Jaime Taylor, 503-689-7926, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee.

When: November 4, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 pm. Public Comment will be heard at 12:20 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom or telephone conference. Join via Zoom. To dial in on a mobile device (audio only), call +16692545252,,1604235717#,,,,,,0#,,438921#.

Agenda:

  • Approval of September meeting summary.
  • Updates: OHPB and Primary Care Office.
  • Discussion: Health Equity Framework.
  • Update and discussion: Diversity of the Health Care Workforce report.
  • Review and approve: Health Care Provider Incentive Program Evaluation.
  • Update: Health Care Workforce Needs Assessment.
  • Future Activity: Dec. 3 meeting, Dec 15 OHPB info session.
  • Committee membership.
  • Public comment.

For more information, please visit the committee’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP-HCW/Pages/Meetings.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503-689-7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 575 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/29/20 2:59 PM

Oct. 29, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 575 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 673, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 575 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 43,793.

Note: Today’s daily case count is the highest since the beginning of the pandemic. Preliminary data show this increase reflects continued widespread community transmission resulting in small clusters and outbreaks statewide.

It is also a reminder of the importance of staying vigilant in practicing the protective measures to slow the spread of the illness. OHA published face covering guidance last week that requires that people consistently wear face coverings while indoors at their workplace or all other places where they will be in contact with people from outside their household.

OHA has also asked Oregonians to change their Halloween plans. This means avoid traditional door-to-door trick-or-treating and costume parties with people outside their own households.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (15), Clackamas (62), Clatsop (2), Columbia (1), Coos (2), Crook (1), Deschutes (25), Douglas (4), Grant (1), Harney (1), Hood River (5), Jackson (54), Jefferson (2), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Lake (2), Lane (17), Linn (18), Malheur (7), Marion (62), Morrow (5), Multnomah (102), Polk (7), Sherman (1), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (42), Union (7), Wallowa (3), Washington (107) and Yamhill (9).

Oregon’s 672nd COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 24 and died on Oct. 28 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 673rd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Oct. 27 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


*Corrected* OHA sees 70% increase in Oregon drug overdose deaths during April, May
Oregon Health Authority - 10/29/20 1:34 PM

Correction: The headline in a press release OHA issued Oct. 22 incorrectly stated that analysts had seen a 70% increase in opioid overdose deaths between 2019 and 2020. The increase was in overdose deaths from all drugs, not just opioids. OHA regrets the error and is issuing a corrected press release.

October 29, 2020

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA sees 70% increase in Oregon drug overdose deaths during April, May

Illicit fentanyl appears to be driving spike; connection to pandemic unclear

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority saw an alarming spike in drug overdose deaths in Oregon this past spring compared to last year, and public health experts believe use of illicit fentanyl and methamphetamine is driving the increase.

Analysts in the Injury and Violence Prevention Section at the OHA Public Health Division found that Oregon saw a nearly 70% increase in the number of overdose deaths during April and May 2020 compared to the same time in 2019. There also was a nearly 8% increase in the number of overdose deaths during the first quarter of 2020 compared to the same period in 2019.

The preliminary data come from the State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System (SUDORS), which includes combined and abstracted data from medical examiners and death certificates.

Additionally, the analysis found, between April and May 2020 there was a 28% increase in overdose deaths, and a more than 15% increase in overdose deaths between March and April. Opioid-involved deaths increased nearly 70% in April and May compared to the previous two months. And opioid-involved deaths accounted for almost 73% of total overdose deaths in May 2020.

Of opioid-involved deaths, the data show, fentanyl and heroin continue to be the drugs most frequently involved, and fentanyl-involved deaths accounted for almost 40% of total overdose deaths in May 2020.

The analysis also uncovered a continuing alarming trend in methamphetamine use: Methamphetamine/amphetamine-involved deaths accounted for more than 40% of all overdose deaths in May 2020.

What’s unclear is what effect the COVID-19 pandemic may have had on opioid misuse in Oregon.

“Until more data become available, it is premature to say how much of the spike in overdose deaths is attributable to the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Tom Jeanne, M.D., MPH, deputy state health officer and deputy state epidemiologist at the Public Health Division. “However, the realization that we will be dealing with COVID-19 for some time, and other stressors related to jobs, school and social isolation, may increase feelings of anxiety and depression, and that can lead to a harmful level of alcohol or other drug use.”

OHA continues to monitor and post finalized opioid data on its Prescribing and Drug Overdose Data Dashboard at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/preventionwellness/substanceuse/opioids/pages/data.aspx.

Health officials are reminding people that opioid use disorder can be successfully treated. Those who need help to stop using opioids can talk to their health care providers or view OHA’s list of resources. In addition, Oregon law allows lay people to carry and use naloxone, a medication that can be used to reverse an opioid overdose, on other people. Learn more about naloxone.

Oregon-based nonprofit Lines for Life and OHA recently launched the Safe + Strong Helpline at 1-800-923-4357 (800-923-HELP). The line offers free, 24-7 emotional support and resource referral to anyone who needs it—not only those experiencing a mental health crisis. The Safe + Strong Helpline is a response to needs for emotional support around disasters like COVID-19 and wildfires and was funded by the CARES Act. Callers are routed to a counselor who can provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, crisis counseling or just connection.


Make safety part of your holiday celebrations (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 10/29/20 1:07 PM
Holiday safety during COVID-19
Holiday safety during COVID-19
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3687/139598/thumb_Holiday_Safety_-_English.png

Oct. 29, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Make safety part of your holiday celebrations

Portland, Ore.– With COVID-19 cases recently surging and the weather getting cooler, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) urges Oregonians to rethink holiday traditions to celebrate safely and still enjoy the season.

Along with the “three w’s” —wear a face covering, wash your hands frequently and watch your distance—OHA encourages everyone to participate in lower-risk activities to keep all Oregonians safe during the pandemic.

“Celebrating outside is safer than inside; just remember to dress in cold-weather gear and gather with fewer than 10 people,” said Shimi Sharief, one of the senior health advisors at OHA.

Other low-risk activities include making seasonal dishes with the people you live with, shopping locally or online and attending a virtual faith service.

It is safest to stay home and celebrate. If you decide to travel, go with members of your household and drive to your destination instead of flying, if possible. It’s a good idea to get a COVID-19 test before going anywhere, but it’s important to note that a negative test result is NOT a free pass. Some COVID-19 tests produce a high percentage of false negatives, so even if you test negative, follow stringent safety protocols if you travel.

While a COVID-19 vaccine is not yet available, getting a flu shot ahead of the holidays is especially important and can help avoid a “twindemic.” A flu vaccine will not protect against COVID-19, but vaccination has many other benefits. It’s safe and effective and part of a comprehensive public health strategy to reduce the burden of flu.

For more tips to stay safe all through the holiday season, check out these infographics and share them with your friends and family on your Facebook and Instagram accounts.

For television and radio media: Please note that short clips of OHA Senior Health Advisors Shimi Sharief and Claire Poche discussing OHA’s holiday recommendations in English and Spanish are available for you to download and use on our media resources page.



Attached Media Files: Holiday safety during COVID-19 , Holiday safety during COVID-19

Health Evidence Review Commission's Value-based Benefits Subcommittee meets November 12
Oregon Health Authority - 10/29/20 8:00 AM

October 29, 2020

Contact: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Value-based Benefits Subcommittee.

When: November 12, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1606106579?pwd=b3N5N2R5OEtCTlhDaWdYdXY4OVQvZz09. Or by telephone at +1 669 254 5252, meeting ID 160 610 6579, passcode 533773.

Members of the public who want to testify must sign up in advance at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/herc-public-comment by noon, November 10. Written public comment will be accepted until noon, November 10.

Agenda: Items scheduled for discussion could include:

  • Various straightforward coding and guideline changes.
  • COVID-related changes.
  • Oral health advisory panel report: 2021 CDT code placement, straightforward code changes, dental implant removal guideline, cone beam computed tomography, mercury containing amalgam.
  • Genetics advisory panel report: genetic 2021 CPT code placement, non-prenatal, non-cancer genetic testing guideline, whole exome sequencing.
  • Prenatal genetic testing guideline: non-invasive prenatal screening for aneuploidies (NIPS), expanded carrier screening to detect gene mutations that could affect offspring, which does not require knowledge of ancestry or ethnic background.
  • Hereditary cancer genetic testing guideline: Straightforward NCCN reference updates.
  • Behavioral health advisory panel: straightforward code change recommendations, neurobehavioral status exam and neuropsychological testing guideline, cognitive rehabilitation guideline, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, telehealth and MH/SUD.
  • 2021 CPT and HCPCS code review: medical physics dose evaluation, 2021 HCPCS code placement.
  • Home intraocular pressure monitoring.
  • Developmental motor delay update.
  • Opioids for conditions of the back and spine guideline.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting. 

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us.


Health Evidence Review Commission meets November 12
Oregon Health Authority - 10/29/20 8:00 AM

October 29, 2020

Contact: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission.

When: November 12, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1606106579?pwd=b3N5N2R5OEtCTlhDaWdYdXY4OVQvZz09. Or by telephone at +1 669 254 5252, meeting ID 160 610 6579, passcode 533773.

Members of the public who want to testify must sign up in advance at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/herc-public-comment by noon November 10. Written public comment will be accepted until noon November 10.

Agenda: The commission will consider topics from the report by the Value-based Benefits Subcommittee, which meets earlier in the day. Topics that remain unresolved at the conclusion of the subcommittee's meeting will not be heard by HERC until a later date. Public notice of tabled topics will be announced 28 days before their next scheduled discussion.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us.

 


OHA releases weekly report
Oregon Health Authority - 10/28/20 4:13 PM

October 28, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA releases weekly report

The Oregon Health Authority released its COVID-19 Weekly Report today. During the week of Monday, October 19, through Sunday, October 25, OHA recorded 2,642 new cases of COVID-19. That is a 14% increase from the previous week and a record-high for the pandemic.

The number of newly tested Oregonians rose to 31,448 and the percentage of positive tests held steady at 6.5%. Twenty-seven Oregonians were reported to have died in association with COVID-19—compared to 25 the previous week and 143 were hospitalized.

People aged 20 to 49 accounted for the largest percentage of infection at 56%, despite accounting for 39% of the total population. Persons under 30 accounted for 37 percent of the cases.

People over 80 accounted for 51% of COVID-19 associated deaths and people over 70 accounted for 75% of deaths associated with the illness.

As COVID-19 cases continue to surge, OHA reminds people to:

  • Wear a face covering.
  • Keep physically distant.
  • Avoid large gatherings and restrict gatherings with people outside of your household.
  • Maintain good hand hygiene.

Oregon reports 424 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/28/20 1:03 PM

October 28, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 424 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed seven more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 671, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 424 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 43,228.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (8), Benton (3), Clackamas (35), Clatsop (2), Columbia (1), Coos (7), Crook (2), Deschutes (26), Douglas (4), Hood River (2), Jackson (35), Klamath (3), Lake (3), Lane (34), Lincoln (1), Linn (11), Malheur (16), Marion (34), Morrow (1), Multnomah (110), Polk (6), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (17), Union (9), Wasco (1), Washington (48), and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 665th COVID-19 death is a 55-year-old man in Jefferson County who tested positive on July 18 and died on Sept. 13 at St. Charles Medical Center Madras. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 666th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 11 and died on Oct. 24 at Adventist Health Portland. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 667th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Oct. 24 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 668th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on Oct. 15 and died on Oct. 22 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 669th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 13 and died on Oct. 26 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 670th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Oct. 24 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He did not have underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 671st COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 16 and died on Oct. 23 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

NOTE: Updated information is available about Oregon’s 447th COVID-19 death, a man in Multnomah County. His age was incorrectly reported as 29. He was 34. OHA regrets this error.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


OHA releases COVID-19 Wastewater monitoring data
Oregon Health Authority - 10/27/20 4:08 PM

October 27, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA releases COVID-19 Wastewater monitoring data

Today, OHA is beginning to display data related to its statewide COVID-19 wastewater monitoring project. The data shows where the virus is detected in small- to medium-sized communities around the state.

Currently there are 29 communities participating on the project. A map shows if COVID-19 is “detected” or “not detected” in a community. It is important to note that if the virus was “not detected”, it does not mean that the community is free of COVID-19. Instead, it means that the virus may still be present in the area but below detection levels.

The monitoring serves as an “early warning” system to tell us if COVID-19 is spreading silently in communities. It is meant to help public officials try to prevent potential outbreaks or, if necessary, move resources to a community. OHA launched the project in the early fall with funding from the CDC.


Oregon Health Policy Board meets November 3
Oregon Health Authority - 10/27/20 3:09 PM

October 27, 2020

Contact:Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: November 3, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. Join via Zoom at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1603370005?pwd=MFJyeDEwRXFVejBnS2pkUWEwWDNrUT09 or call in to the meeting on a mobile device at +16692545252,,1603370005#,,,,0#,,807163#.

Agenda:

  • Welcome, roll call and minutes approval.
  • Director’s update.
  • COVID-19 stakeholder Presentation: Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.
  • Committee updates.
  • Public comment.
  • Discussion: Health Equity Committee recommendations.

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 391 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/27/20 12:00 PM

October 27, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 391 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed nine more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 664, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 391 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 42,808.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (5), Benton (3), Clackamas (35), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (5), Crook (2), Curry (1), Deschutes (5), Douglas (9), Harney (11), Jackson (25), Jefferson (1), Josephine (2), Klamath (5), Lake (1), Lane (31), Linn (6), Malheur (10), Marion (72), Multnomah (72), Polk (3), Umatilla (22), Union (1), Wallowa (2), Wasco (1), Washington (50), Wheeler (1), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 656th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on July 8 and died on Oct. 4 in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 657th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Wasco County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Oct. 24 in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 658th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 14 and died on Oct. 24 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 659th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Oct. 23 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 660th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Oct. 4 and died on Oct. 21 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Richland, Washington. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 661st COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 8 and died on Oct. 25 at Adventist Health Portland. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 662nd COVID-19 death is a 52-year-old man in Morrow County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Oct. 24 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 663rd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 25 and died on Oct. 25 at OHSU. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 664th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Oct. 18 and died on Oct. 24 at Mercy Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon Social Determinants of Health Measurement Workgroup meets November 2
Oregon Health Authority - 10/26/20 4:20 PM

October 26, 2020

Contact: Adrienne Mullock, 971-673-3384, IENNE.P.MULLOCK@dhsoha.state.or.us">adrienne.p.mullock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Social Determinants of Health Measurement Workgroup. The workgroup's purpose is to recommend a measure related to the social determinants of health for consideration by the Metrics and Scoring Committee and the Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee.

When: November 2, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: By Zoom at https://us02web.zoom.us/j/4311711742 and listen-only conference line at 669-900-9128, meeting ID 431 171 1742.

Agenda: Welcome, introductions, agenda; environmental scan presentation; small group breakouts; break; large group discussion of measure concepts; public comment period (12:45-12:55 p.m.), wrap up and next steps.

For more information, please visit the committee's webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/sdoh-measure.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Adrienne Mullock at 971-673-3384, or IENNE.P.MULLOCK@dhsoha.state.or.us">adrienne.p.mullock@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 339 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/26/20 12:08 PM

October 26, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 655, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 339 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 42,436.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (41), Clatsop (1), Columbia (7), Coos (8), Crook (2), Deschutes (10), Douglas (1), Jackson (15), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Lake (2), Lane (37), Linn (7), Malheur (2), Marion (40), Multnomah (90), Polk (4), Sherman (1), Umatilla (5), Union (1), Washington (56), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 654th COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Oct. 19 and died on Oct. 25 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 655th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 9 and died on Oct. 23 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

 


System of Care Advisory Council meets November 3
Oregon Health Authority - 10/26/20 9:47 AM

October 26, 2020

Program contact: Hilary Harrison, 503-209-1949, y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council.

When: November 3, 12:30-4:30 p.m.

Where: By webinar at https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/706039269 or by teleconference at 872-240-3212, access code 706-039-269. Please note only council members may speak until the public comment time.

Agenda: The full agenda can be found on the advisory council's webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspx. The meeting will include time for public comment.

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults. The council's immediate work is to develop and maintain a state System of Care and a comprehensive long-range plan for a coordinated state system.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Hilary Harrison at 503-209-1949, 711 TTY, or y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.


Oregon reports 366 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/25/20 12:00 PM

October 25, 2020

Oregon reports 366 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 653, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 366 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 42,101.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (5), Clackamas (17), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (2), Crook (4), Deschutes (13), Douglas (4), Jackson (20), Jefferson (1), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (30), Lincoln (2), Linn (5), Malheur (6), Marion (88), Morrow (2), Multnomah (82), Polk (1), Umatilla (5), Union (1), Wallowa (2), Washington (57), and Yamhill (3).

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

120

3

2190

Benton

441

6

17922

Clackamas

3097

65

74155

Clatsop

242

0

6657

Columbia

259

1

8469

Coos

238

0

8675

Crook

107

2

3059

Curry

57

1

2325

Deschutes

1123

13

37810

Douglas

349

5

15204

Gilliam

11

0

358

Grant

11

0

1030

Harney

23

0

935

Hood River

277

1

5807

Jackson

1669

6

40772

Jefferson

604

9

5564

Josephine

267

3

14366

Klamath

410

3

11716

Lake

35

0

1051

Lane

2354

27

80284

Lincoln

517

13

9765

Linn

803

15

20497

Malheur

1915

38

6241

Marion

5819

108

58845

Morrow

545

6

2029

Multnomah

9137

160

172797

Polk

650

15

11628

Sherman

18

0

385

Tillamook

70

0

3575

Umatilla

3349

44

15271

Union

466

2

5082

Wallowa

44

2

1194

Wasco

347

15

5874

Washington

5739

75

110514

Wheeler

1

0

184

Yamhill

987

15

20919

Total

42101

653

783149

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Oregon reports 399 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/24/20 12:00 PM

October 24, 2020

Oregon reports 399 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 653, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 399 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 41,739.

The new cases  are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (25), Clatsop (4), Columbia (3), Crook (3), Deschutes (13), Douglas (3), Harney (2), Jackson (33), Jefferson (4), Josephine (1), Klamath (3), Lane (32), Lincoln (4), Linn (10), Malheur (12), Marion (48), Multnomah (99), Polk (5), Umatilla (17), Wallowa (2), Washington (71), and Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 650th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. and died on Oct. 17, at Grand Strand Medical Center in South Carolina. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 651st COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Oct. 7 and died on Oct. 19. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 652nd COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 3 and died on Oct. 17, at Tuality Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 653rd COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 28 and died on Oct. 22, at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

114

3

2176

Benton

436

6

17873

Clackamas

3081

65

73862

Clatsop

241

0

6636

Columbia

256

1

8428

Coos

236

0

8614

Crook

103

2

3033

Curry

57

1

2313

Deschutes

1110

13

37522

Douglas

345

5

15127

Gilliam

11

0

358

Grant

11

0

1019

Harney

23

0

926

Hood River

277

1

5790

Jackson

1650

6

40651

Jefferson

603

9

5540

Josephine

263

3

14322

Klamath

408

3

11688

Lake

34

0

1051

Lane

2326

27

79928

Lincoln

515

13

9725

Linn

798

15

20339

Malheur

1909

38

6215

Marion

5733

108

58403

Morrow

543

6

2026

Multnomah

9055

160

172097

Polk

648

15

11516

Sherman

18

0

384

Tillamook

70

0

3560

Umatilla

3344

44

15223

Union

465

2

5073

Wallowa

42

2

1192

Wasco

347

15

5834

Washington

5681

75

109971

Wheeler

1

0

183

Yamhill

985

15

20805

Total

41,739

653

779,403

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


$20 Million of Coronavirus Relief Funds Available to Stabilize Affordable Housing
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 10/29/20 10:07 AM

$20 Million of Coronavirus Relief Funds Available to Stabilize Affordable Housing

Applicants must own affordable housing regulated by Oregon Housing and Community Services and apply by November 6th.

 

SALEM, OR – Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) is excited to announce the application for the Affordable Rental Housing Portfolio Stabilization COVID-19 Response Funds is now open. These funds will be loaned to regulated affordable housing providers to provide operational support needed due to missed rent due to the COVID pandemic and recession. Loans will be forgiven if property owners forgive their tenants’ past due rent.

“We are so grateful to Governor Kate Brown and the Oregon Legislature for allocating these resources,” said OHCS Executive Director Margaret Salazar. “Protecting affordable rental housing is important especially at a time when public health officials are asking Oregonians to stay home and stay safe. This funding helps maintain the affordable housing stock across the state and in doing so, helps protect Oregon families from housing instability.”

Recent data released by National Housing Lender Freddie Mac reported that Oregon has the largest deficit of housing supply when accounting for contributing factors such as job scarcity and high housing costs. Ensuring the affordable housing stock is maintained during economic downturns helps families who live in publicly funded housing keep stability. When children and families maintain safe and stable housing, they are able to decrease the risks of COVID-19 exposure, improve child safety and well-being and keep kids connected to their schools and community supports.

Economic downturns frequently threaten affordable housing stock. Affordable properties can be lost when the properties are sold to new investors. By offering subsidized loans to current owners to continue operations in exchange for extending existing affordability requirements of preserving existing affordable housing, the loan can be satisfied for the settlement of outstanding rental arrearages, these funds ensure the ability for an affordable rental housing property to continue to operate.

Funds are available by the OHCS Affordable Rental Housing Division and only available to OHCS regulated affordable housing providers. However separate funding assistance is available to the public. OHCS distributed more than $85 million in rental and energy assistance to local Community Action Agencies across the state. Mortgage assistance for struggling homeowners is also available through the Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative and foreclosure avoidance counseling is available from state approved Homeownership Centers. Oregonians in need should visit 211info.org or call 2-1-1 for assistance.

Interested applicants should H.HCS@oregon.gov">notify the Department by November 3 at 4:00pm. The application deadline for property owners to request Affordable Rental Housing Portfolio Stabilization COVID-19 Response Funds is November 6, 2020. Application requirements and scoring criteria are outlined in the Notice of Funding Availability.

                                                                                                  

###




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1810/139586/10-29-2020-Press-Relsease-ARH-Portfolio-Stabilization.pdf

Oregon Lottery Games now Available in Walmart Supercenters (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 10/28/20 10:31 AM
New Lottery self-serve terminals now in Walmart Supercenters
New Lottery self-serve terminals now in Walmart Supercenters
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/4939/139552/thumb_10-28-GT20.jpg

Oct. 28, 2020 - Salem, Ore. The Oregon Lottery has just finished installation of new self-serve terminals in 34 Walmart Supercenters across Oregon.

Walmart locations across the country have been selling lottery tickets since 2011. This marks the first time Oregon Lottery tickets will be available in Oregon Walmart Supercenters. The Oregon Lottery projects annual gross sales at over $10 million from ticket sales at the participating Walmart locations.

“Just in time for holiday shopping, Lottery customers now have 34 convenient new places to buy Lottery games with our newest retail partner, Walmart,” said Lottery Products Portfolio Manager Tina Erickson. “For the first time, Walmart Supercenter shoppers all over the state can get everything from Scratch-its to Oregon’s Game Megabucks, safely and quickly at these new self-serve Lottery vending machines.”

The new terminal offers Walmart customers 20 different Scratch-it games as well as the ability to buy tickets for Powerball, Mega Millions, Oregon’s Game Megabucks, Keno and other Oregon Lottery draw games.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, veteran services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###




Attached Media Files: New Lottery self-serve terminals now in Walmart Supercenters

Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Oct. 28, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/28/20 4:30 PM
2020-10/3986/139576/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2418.jpg
2020-10/3986/139576/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2418.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3986/139576/thumb_2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2418.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Oct. 28, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Phoenix, Ore. - October 9, 2020 - A sign of hope in the aftermath of the Almeda wildfire. Photo by David Yost/FEMA
2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2418.jpg

Gates, Ore. - September 27 2020 - After a fire raced through the town of Gates, Oregon in early September, huge amounts of twisted steel and burned out cars can be seen. Photo Patsy Lynch/FEMA
2020-27-09_4562_ORFires_Gates_PL_08.jpg

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3986/139576/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2418.jpg , 2020-10/3986/139576/2020-27-09_4562_ORFires_Gates_PL_08.jpg

Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Oct. 26, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/26/20 4:39 PM
2020-10/3986/139500/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5790.jpg
2020-10/3986/139500/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5790.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3986/139500/thumb_2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5790.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Oct. 26, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Glide, Ore. - October 22, 2020 - Damage from the Archie Creek Fire in the Umpqua National Forest. Photo by David Yost/FEMA

File: DLY_2501.jpg

Lincoln County, Ore. - September 21, 2020 - A lone mailbox sits on the groud after its post was destroyed by the Echo Mountain Complex fire near Lincoln City Oregon. Photo by Jeff Markham/FEMA

File: 2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5790.jpg




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3986/139500/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5790.jpg , 2020-10/3986/139500/DLY_2501.jpg

Banks & Credit Unions
Umpqua Bank Provides Additional Relief to Homeowners Impacted by Wildfires
Umpqua Bank - 10/29/20 12:36 PM

Bank waives up to $10,000 in financing costs for home rebuilding, renovation

PORTLAND, Ore., (October 29, 2020) – Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, announced today it will provide additional financial relief to homeowners impacted by wildfires seeking to rebuild, renovate or purchase a new home.

In West Coast Communities declared federal disaster areas by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Umpqua is waiving the loan origination fee up to $10,000 for impacted homeowners renovating or rebuilding their home. The bank estimates that most eligible homeowners will save between $2,000 and $5,000, depending on their home’s total cost. For impacted homeowners with loans serviced by Umpqua in designated areas, the bank will also waive any bank fees associated with purchasing another home.

“The devastation in some of our communities is staggering and almost unimaginable. As the hard work of recovery continues, we want our friends, neighbors and associates to know that we’re committed for the long haul,” said Umpqua Bank CEO Cort O’Haver. “Every little bit of support, financial or otherwise, is needed and helps those struggling to rebuild what was lost.”

Today’s announcement marks an expansion of Umpqua’s Wildfire Relief Program as wildfires in California have forced thousands of people to evacuate their homes this week. The program was initially launched last month to help communities across Oregon, Washington and California recover from devastating wildfires that consumed more than 5 million acres and resulted in more than 30 deaths across the region.

As part of that launch, the bank announced $750,000 in funding to support impacted communities and small businesses. Umpqua also activated a Mortgage Relief program, as well as its Disaster Relief Loan Program to provide households access to cash quickly and help them recover financially.

For more information on relief for homeowners impacted by the wildfires, visit: https://www.umpquabank.com/blog/disaster-relief-loans-fires/

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank, headquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, and has locations across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the fifteenth consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank also owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to businesses.