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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Fri. Aug. 14 - 5:56 pm
Police & Fire
MADIU Investigation
Ashland Police Dept. - 08/14/20 12:31 PM

The county’s Major Assault/Death Investigation Unit (MADIU) is investigating an apparent suicide that happened this morning at approximately 1:40 a.m. Officers from the Ashland Police Department were given information about a reportedly intoxicated driver in the area of S. Valley View Rd and Hwy 99. APD officers attempted to stop the driver (sole occupant), who refused to yield, fleeing northbound on Hwy 99 while driving extremely recklessly. APD Officers did not pursue the vehicle but continued to keep it in view as it continued toward Talent. Deputies from the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office and officers from the Talent and Phoenix Police Departments, as well as officers from APD contacted the driver and vehicle again after it stalled and came to a stop alongside Hwy 99 just south of the Talent city limits. Officers and deputies attempted to order the driver from the vehicle. The driver refused to comply and physically resisted attempts to remove him from the vehicle. During the struggle to remove the driver from the vehicle a conducted energy weapon (Taser) was deployed at the driver. After the driver was removed, he was found to have sustained several self-inflicted stab wounds to his neck. Medics from Fire District 5 and Ashland Fire & Rescue were immediately brought in to render aid. The man did not survive and was pronounced dead at the scene.

 

Though the driver died from self-inflicted wounds, his death is considered to have happened while in the custody of police officers given the circumstances. The MADIU team is responsible for investigating all in custody deaths. The Medford Police Department has been designated as the lead agency on this case. The driver’s identity is being withheld at this time pending notification to his family.

Several body worn cameras and in-car cameras recorded the entire event. All recording are being made part of this investigation.

This incident caused Hwy 99 between Arnos and Creel to be closed to traffic until approximately 8:00 a.m.


Search Underway for Missing 5 Year Old Child (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/09/20 5:13 PM
The Douglas County Sheriff's Office is Searching for Missing 5 Year Old Charity Smith
The Douglas County Sheriff's Office is Searching for Missing 5 Year Old Charity Smith
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/5204/136819/thumb_Charity_Smith.JPG

UPDATE 08/09/2020 5:15 PM

DAYS CREEK, Ore. - Search crews have located Charity Smith and she is uninjured and safe. The Douglas County Sheriff's Office will reunite the child with her family. 

The Sheriff's Office would like to thank the public for their assistance and vigilance. Assisting agencies include: 

  • Douglas County Search and Rescue
  • Myrtle Creek Police Department
  • REACH Air Medical Services

ORIGINAL RELEASE 08/09/2020 3:00 PM

DAYS CREEK, Ore. - The Douglas County Sheriff's Office is actively searching for missing 5 year-old Charity Smith. Charity is missing from a home in the 400-block of Stouts Creek Road in Days Creek. She has been missing for approximately 3 hours as of 3:00 pm on Sunday, August 9, 2020.

Charity is described as 3' tall, 40 lbs, having bright purple hair. She was last known to be wearing pink shorts with white flowers.

If you see Charity, call 9-1-1.

Search and Rescue Crews and Fire Personnel are assisting the Sheriff's Office at this time.

 




Attached Media Files: The Douglas County Sheriff's Office is Searching for Missing 5 Year Old Charity Smith

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against New Online Shopping Frauds (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 08/11/20 9:00 AM
TT - New Online Shopping Frauds - GRAPHIC - August 11, 2020
TT - New Online Shopping Frauds - GRAPHIC - August 11, 2020
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against new online shopping frauds. 

The FBI is seeing an increasing number of victims who are not receiving items they purchased online. Typically, the buyer is finding items such as gym equipment, small appliances, tools and furniture listed at prices lower than what is available elsewhere. Victims reported they were led to these websites via ads on social media or while searching for specific items through online search engines. 

Common factors that tend to tie these victims together: 

  • The shipment included face masks shipped from China, regardless of what was ordered. 

  • Victims made payment using an online money transfer service. 

  • The retail websites provided valid U.S. addresses and telephone numbers under a “Contact Us” link, but the contact info was misleading. The victims thought the retailer was located within the U.S. when it was not. 

  • Many of the websites used content copied from legitimate sites; in addition, the same unassociated addresses and telephone numbers were listed for multiple retailers. 

Some victims who complained to the vendor about their shipments were offered partial refunds and told to keep the face masks as compensation. Others were told to return the items to China – at their own expense – in order to be reimbursed. All attempts made by the victims to be fully reimbursed, or to receive the actual items ordered, were unsuccessful. 

Here are some warning signs for shoppers to watch for: 

  • Instead of a website ending in .com, the fraudulent websites used the domains “.club” and “.top.” 

  • Websites offered merchandise at significantly discounted prices. 

  • Uniform Resource Locator (URL) or web addresses were registered recently (within the last six months). 

  • Websites used content copied from legitimate sites and often shared the same contact information. 

Here are some ways to stay safe: 

  • Do your homework on the retailer to ensure it is legitimate. Search for reviews and include the words “scam” or “fraud”. 

  • Check the vendor on the Better Business Bureau’s website (www.bbb.org).

  • Confirm the contact details of the vendor’s website prior to purchase –  specifically the address, email, and phone number. 

  • Be wary of online retailers who use a free email service instead of a company email address. 

  • Don’t judge a company by its website; flashy websites can be set up and taken down quickly. 

If you become a target of this scam, make sure to notify your bank immediately and ask to have the transaction stopped or reversed. As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, you can report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.IC3.gov or call your local FBI office. 

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Attached Media Files: TT - New Online Shopping Frauds - AUDIO - August 11, 2020 , TT - New Online Shopping Frauds - GRAPHIC - August 11, 2020

Suicidal Man Arrested After Firing a Weapon in the Presence of Police (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 08/09/20 3:05 PM
Kenneth Sumner
Kenneth Sumner
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Case #20-36834

Arrestee: 

Sumner, Kenneth Charles   41 YOA   Resident of Grants Pass

Charges:

1 Felony county of Unlawful Use of a Weapon

Details:

On the listed date and time, Officers from the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety received a request for a welfare check on a possible suicidal male subject in the area of SW Humanity Way.  The caller advised 41-year-old Kenneth Charles Sumner was intoxicated and trying to break into a gun safe, all the while  threatening to commit suicide. 

The other occupants in the residence left due to Summers intoxication and threats to harm himself. Officers arrived on scene and attempted to contact Sumner to offer assistance.  Sumner refused any assistance and threatened to harm the officers should they approach his residence.  At the time of the contact, officers believed Sumner was not a direct threat to anyone but himself.  Due to Sumners threats, and belief he had access to weapons, officers attempted to ensure the public was safe and backed away from the residence. 

As the officers were starting to leave the area, they heard a large caliber rifle fired from the residence where Sumner was located.  Multiple 911 calls were received regarding the weapon being fired and Sumner was seen by neighbors walking around the residence with a firearm. It was not known at that time if Sumner was aiming for the officers, other residents located in that area, or shooting randomly.  At that time officers requested additional assistance to include SWAT and Critical Incident Negotiation Team (CINT).

Several personnel responded to the scene and secured a perimeter around the residence.  Neighbors were also contacted and advised to remain inside their houses. At that time, the concern was for the safety of residents in the area.  Sumners’ conduct continued to be hostile and confrontational.  He was also believed to be intoxicated, which further complicated any communication or reasoning with him for a peaceful resolution.

Sumner was contacted by phone and continued to threaten to harm himself as well as the officers.  SWAT arrived and secured the area around the residence.  Sumner was seen outside of his residence on multiple occasions, once with a pistol, later with a rifle.  Sumner spoke with negotiators and continued to threaten officers with harm and to shoot should they approach him. 

Multiple requests for Sumner to exit the residence peacefully so we could work with mental health professionals to assist him during this crisis were unsuccessful.  The residence was still surrounded and Sumner stayed within his property.  Due to the fact that there were shots fired, the threat to the public was of major concern.  Negotiations continued and eventually broke down when Sumner turned off his phone and refused to talk. 

Multiple attempts were made to have Sumner exit the residence via PA announcements from vehicles at the scene.  Sumner refused all contact and would not respond.  After an extended period of time with no contact, along with recommendations from mental health professionals from Options who were working with our negotiations team, it was determined the best course of action would be to deescalate and move back from the area.  During negotiations, Sumner had stated he did not want to harm anyone and wanted to be left alone.  His suicidal intentions had also changed, and it was believed he was planning on forcing officers to shoot him if they attempted to arrest him.

The decision was made to not confront Sumner to avoid a deadly force encounter.  Officers chose to deescalate the incident and attempt to ensure the safety of the public and Sumner.  Safety plans were put in place to monitor the residence and ensure Sumner would not exit the residence and attempt harm to anyone else.  After observing the residence after leaving the area, it was believed Sumner had fallen asleep inside. 

Officers remained in the area as a safety precaution and for the safety of the public. Later in the morning on 08-09-2020, officers were able to make contact with Sumner and he was taken into custody without incident on the listed charges.  Sumner was lodged at the Josephine County Jail.  Options of Southern Oregon has also been involved in this incident at multiple levels. 

The Grants Pass Department of Public Safety would like to thank the residents in the area of this incident for their patience and cooperation while our officers worked to ensure the safety of all involved.  These incidents are extremely sensitive, complex and difficult to resolve safely.  Thanks to the training, tactics and special equipment available to our officers, this incident was resolved with no loss of life or harm to anyone involved. 

Anyone with questions or information on this case is asked to call the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety at 541-450-6260.

 




Attached Media Files: Kenneth Sumner

** LOCATED** Attempt to locate missing 77 year old woman (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 08/08/20 8:05 AM
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UPDATE BETH WAS LOCATED.   Thanks to all who helped look.  She is safe and with family.  

GPDPS is actively looking for 77 year old female, Beth Montgomery.   Beth suffers from dementia and walked away from her residence on NW D Street.   Beth was last observed wearing a white night gown without shoes.  Beth frequents NW Blossom Dr, Walmart and Riverside park.   If anyone sees Beth they are encouraged to call 911 or GPDPS at 541-450-6260




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/6530/136803/1241.jpeg

State Fire Marshal Mobilizes Oregon Fire Service Resources to Mosier Creek Fire
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/13/20 9:23 AM

Gov. Kate Brown has declared the Mosier Creek Fire a Conflagration. The Mosier Creek Fire is active outside of the city of The Dalles. It has burned more than 800 acres as of this morning and is 5 percent contained.

The declaration made by Gov. Brown cleared the way for the State Fire Marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

The Office of State Marshal’s Blue Incident Management Team has been mobilized. Eight structural task forces from Clackamas, Washington, Marion, Yamhill, Deschutes, Columbia, Polk/Lincoln, and Multnomah counties, and personnel from the OSFM, are arriving this morning and this afternoon at staggered intervals using COVID-19 mitigation measures at the staging area in The Dalles. Crews will be working to protect threatened structures.

A COVID Module assigned to the team, consisting of a Health Liaison and two Responders certified as EMT or higher, will be at the incident to ensure COVID-19 mitigation measures are in place to ensure the safety of all personnel. Wasco County Public Health officials also were present today at the incident in-briefing.

The OSFM will be assuming command of the response through a unified command structure in conjunction with the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Additional updates for the incident may be accessed at:

• Oregon State Fire Marshal Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/OregonStateFireMarshal/

• Oregon Department of Forestry Central Oregon District Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/pg/ODFCentralOregon/


Office of State Fire Marshal Programs Promote Hazardous Materials Safety for Oregonians
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/11/20 3:28 PM

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal, along with countries and organizations around the world, offers condolences to the people of Beirut, Lebanon following the deadly blast in the city’s port on Aug. 4 that claimed more than 220 lives and injured thousands. At least 10 Beirut firefighters are among the missing.

As Lebanese authorities conduct their investigation, it is widely reported the incident involved the explosion of a large quantity of ammonium nitrate stored in a port warehouse. The United States uses millions of tons of the substance annually in products like fertilizer. While the commonly used material is stable at ambient temperature and pressure, it may explode when exposed to a strong shock or when subjected to sustained high temperatures in confinement.

While accidental explosions of ammonium nitrate are rare in the United States, an accident in 1947 at Galveston Bay, Texas, claimed 581 lives when a ship carrying the material ignited in the harbor. In 2013 in West, Texas, an explosion at a facility killed 15 people — 12 who were first responders — and injured more than 260 others, which the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board determined was caused by the inadequate storage and handling of ammonium nitrate.

Some Oregonians may remember the Roseburg Blast of 1959 when a building fire ignited a truck carrying ammonium nitrate and dynamite, resulting in a blast that destroyed eight city blocks.

“The explosion in Beirut was a horrible event, harming thousands of civilians, first responders and the entire nation,” said State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. “The event also serves as a reminder that the state and our local responders prioritize the safety of all Oregonians and have programs that mitigate risk, respond to incidents and work with communities to protect residents from hazardous materials.”

The OSFM administers several programs as part of its mission to protect people, their property and the environment from fire and hazardous materials.

  • Community Right to Know (CR2K): The CR2K program maintains a public database of reportable hazardous materials statewide. This provides emergency planners, first responders, health professionals and the public information on hazardous materials so measures can be taken to protect all residents and plan for potential accidents. Information is managed through an online system that can be accessed 24/7, with current technical information on more than 13,000 facilities in Oregon. In addition, CR2K compliance staff also conducted nearly 900 onsite inspections in 2019, to help ensure correct reporting and compliance with reporting rules.  
  • State Emergency Response Commission (SERC): Under state law, OSFM is designated as Oregon’s SERC, which coordinates hazardous emergency response planning with industry, law enforcement, health, tribal and other local and county stakeholders.
  • Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs): As the SERC, the OSFM facilitates local community planning and public engagement around a community’s right to know about hazardous materials in their communities through LEPCs. There are numerous LEPCs across Oregon who work to improve chemical release preparedness to help protect the public, the environment and emergency responders.
  • Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Teams (RHMERT): The OSFM funds and supports 13 teams to respond to hazardous materials emergency incidents that exceed the resources of local jurisdictions. Teams are comprised of local firefighters, law enforcement officials and public works personnel who receive 160 hours of specialized training to provide different levels of hazardous materials response to incidents such as petrochemical highway spills, as well as supporting response partners at biological, radiological and explosive incidents. The teams also provide training to local responders and industry to ensure communities are prepared to respond to a hazardous materials incident.
  • HazMat by Rail Program: The program is a partnership with the railroad industry to assist local communities with training and planning for transportation by rail incidents involving hazardous materials. Program funding supports rail response plans, training exercises and response equipment across Oregon.
  • Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness (HMEP) Grant: The OSFM receives and disburses federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration grant funds — approximately $250,000 to $300,000 each year — to Oregon communities for local hazardous materials transportation planning, training and exercise projects. During the last three years, the funding has supported the creation of 12 local emergency response plans, 10 tabletop exercises and other exercises.

Additional information about the OSFM’s hazardous response, planning and preparedness programs can be found on the OSFM website. Highlights of the programs’ activities for 2019 are available in the OSFM’s annual report for 2019.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 38 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 08/12/20 2:48 PM

On Wednesday, August 12, 2020 at approximately 10:48 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 38 near milepost 51.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Ford Explorer, operated by Alec Beutler (28) of Eugene, was westbound when it left the roadway and struck a tree.

Beutler sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by North Douglas Fire District, Douglas County Sheriff's Office, and ODOT


Fatal Crash on Hwy 101 - Clatsop County
Oregon State Police - 08/11/20 5:16 PM

On Tuesday, August 11, 2020 at approximately 10:15 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 32.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Van Nordquist (70) of Cannon Beach, was southbound when it failed to negotiate a curve, crossed into the northbound lane, and collided with a Freightliner semi truck (towing two empty trailers) operated by Joshua Mullins (24) of Vancouver.

Nordquist sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Hwy 101 was closed for nearly five hours. ODOT established a detour around the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Cannon Beach Police Department, Clatsop County Sheriff's Office, Cannon Beach Fire Department and ODOT.  


Fatal Crash on Hwy 26 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 08/11/20 1:17 PM

On Monday, August 10, 2020 at approximately 8:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a pedestrian hit by a car on Hwy 26 near milepost 19.

Preliminary investigation revealed that Troy Harrison (55) of Seaside was attempting to cross Hwy 26 when he was struck by an eastbound Honda Accord operated by Thomas Le Pley (56) of Brightwood.

Harrison sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

OSP was assisted by the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office.


UPDATE - Oregon State Police Requesting Public's Assistance with Shooting Incidents - Josephine / Douglas Counties
Oregon State Police - 08/11/20 10:19 AM

The Oregon State Police is again requesting the public's assistance in identifying the person (s) responsible for shooting at vehicles on Interstate 5 in Douglas, Josephine and Jackson Counties.

From the time of the first request for assistance on July 14, 2020 several additional vehicles have been confirmed to have been struck by bullets.

Previously only Douglas and Josephine Counties had confirmed bullet strikes. The geographic location has been expanded to include Jackson County.

No injuries have been reported.

If you are traveling on Interstate 5 and believe your vehicle has been struck with a bullet please call 911. Note the time, location and if possible continue out of the area.

If you have information regarding the shootings or if you believe your vehicle has been struck please contact the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP- Reference OSP Case #SP20-173444.

The Oregon State Police is requesting the public's assistance in identifying the person(s) responsible for shooting at several vehicles on Interstate 5 between Roseburg and Grants Pass. 

In the last several weeks OSP has investigated 5 vehicles that have been struck by bullets on Interstate 5 between milepost 67 and 100. 

No injuries have been reported.

If you are traveling in the area and believe your vehicle has been struck with a bullet please call 911, note the time, location and if possible continue out of the area.  

If you have information regarding the shootings or if you believe your vehicle has been struck please contact the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP - Reference OSP Case #SP20-173444.

 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 37 - Umatilla County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/11/20 10:09 AM
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On Monday, August 10, 2020 at approximately 11:11 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a vehicle crash on Hwy 37 near milepost 7.5. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2005 Dodge 2500 pickup, operated by Lester Estes (60) of Wallowa, was traveling north when for an unknown reasons crossed into the southbound lane and collided with a 1989 Kenworth operated by Harold Buell (48) of Moses Lake, Washington. 

Estes sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

OSP was assisted by the Umatilla County Sheriff's Office, Umatilla County Fire District 1 and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/1002/136856/20200810_121649.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 197 - Wasco County
Oregon State Police - 08/09/20 8:07 PM

On Sunday, August 9, 2020 at approximately 2:25 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 197 near milepost 61.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota Camry, operated by Eugene Hernandez (68) of Portland, was northbound at a high rate of speed when it left the roadway, rolled numerous times, and hit a power pole.

Hernandez was not wearing a safety belt, sustained fatal injuries, and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by South Wasco Fire Department, Wasco County Sheriff's Office, and ODOT.


Oregon State Police Requesting Public's Assistance with Identification of Motorcyle Rider or Witnesses to Fatal Crash on Hwy 213 - Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/09/20 7:44 PM
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On Sunday, August 2, 2020 at 6:20 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a crash on Hwy 213 and SE Luther Rd. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that an Easy Motion electric bicycle, operated by Nolan Heine (67) of Portland, was riding northbound and attempted to cross Hwy 213.   As Heine was attempting to cross the roadway, a witness believes he was struck by a white moped/motorcycle, who was also traveling northbound. The moped/motorcycle rider paused briefly before continuing northbound on Hwy 213.

The rider is described as a male wearing a black helmet and white t-shirt.

Heine was transported to Oregon Health Sciences University where he later succumbed to his injuries and died.

Oregon State Police is requesting any witnesses to the crash, have any information regarding the crash, or know the identity of the moped/motorcycle rider to contact the Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP and refer to case # SP20-217251.

Oregon State Police was assisted by Clackamas County Fire Department, AMR Ambulance and Oregon Department of Transportation.




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/1002/136821/20200808_162753.jpg

Commercial Structure Fire - Tom Thumb Mini Storage - 3221 NW Edenbower Boulevard - 8/9/20 (Photo)
Roseburg Fire Dept. - 08/10/20 8:47 AM
Image 1
Image 1
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At 6:55 p.m. on August 9, 2020, Roseburg Fire Department personnel responded to a reported commercial structure fire at 3221 NW Edenbower Boulevard.  Dispatched received reports of a fire with explosions heard in the storage units at Tom Thumb Mini Storage. 

Firefighters arrived on scene to find several storage units on fire within the commercial structures.  Firefighters worked throughout the evening to extinguish the fire and conduct extensive overhaul. 

At 7:09 a.m. on August 10, 2020, firefighters were dispatched to a possible rekindle at 3221 NW Edenbower Boulevard with a report of smoke and flames seen by the reporting party.  Firefighters arrived on scene and quickly extinguished the fire.  Firefighters remain on scene to conduct overhaul.

A fire investigator is on scene and the cause of the fire is unknown at this time.  The investigator will remain on scene for most of the day to process several storage units.  The commercial structures suffered substantial damage. The total loss to the structures and contents is undetermined at this time.

Numerous firefighters assisted with the firefighting operations. Other agencies assisting with the fire included Douglas County Fire District #2, Umpqua Valley Ambulance, Roseburg Police Department Pacific Power, and Avista Utilities.

 




Attached Media Files: Image 1 , Image 2 , Image 3 , Image 4

Utilities
Customers can prepare for heat wave with common sense tips
Pacific Power - 08/14/20 11:53 AM

Pacific Power media hotline:                              Aug. 14, 2020

503-813-6018                                                      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

 

Customers can prepare for heat wave with common sense tips

Pacific Power urges you to stay cool, use less energy, save money and minimize wildfire risk

 

MEDFORD, Ore. —With a stifling heat wave crashing into southern Oregon and parts of northern California this weekend, Pacific Power wants to remind customers how to beat the heat, minimize wildfire risk and use less energy.

 

Beat the heat:

  • Get some fresh air. Open your windows during the early morning and evening, and use fans to circulate the fresh air.
  • Keep clear of the sun. Close blinds and drapes during the warmest parts of the day. Keeping the sunlight out of your home will keep it cooler.

Wildfire safety:

Use less energy:

  • Be AC savvy. Set your air conditioner to 78 degrees when you’re home, and 85 when you’re away. Running your AC at temperatures lower than 78 degrees can increase your electricity bill by up to 8 percent. Also, keep inside air vents clear from furniture and other objects. Make sure the outside unit is free of obstructions.
  • Reduce indoor heat. Push the use of heat-producing appliances such as ovens, dishwashers and clothes dryers to cooler parts of the day. Grilling outside, washing dishes by hand and air-drying clothes are great alternatives.
  • If you have questions about your power bill, call us now. We can set up a payment plan or refer you to local agencies for bill assistance. Call us any time at 1-888-221-7070.

 

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ABOUT PACIFIC POWER

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 773,000 customers in 243 communities across Oregon, Washington and California. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, serving nearly two million customers in six western states as the largest regulated utility owner of wind power in the West. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.

 


Transportation
Oregon 38 limited to single lane throughout the night due to fire east of Scottsburg (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 08/11/20 7:49 PM
Fire along Oregon 38 east of Scottsburg
Fire along Oregon 38 east of Scottsburg
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Oregon 38 (Umpqua Highway) will be limited to a single lane of traffic throughout the night between Scottsburg and Wells Creek due to a roadside fire at milepost 17. The highway had been closed for about four hours this afternoon. Motorists should drive with caution and expect delays. Traffic control will be provided by flaggers and pilot cars.




Attached Media Files: Fire along Oregon 38 east of Scottsburg , Fire along Oregon 38 east of Scottsburg , Fire along Oregon 38 east of Scottsburg

Military
Oregon Army National Citizen-Soldiers Return From Deployment (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 08/13/20 5:47 PM
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Portland, Ore. - Oregon Governor Kate Brown together with U.S. Senator Ron Wyden, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, the Adjutant General, Oregon, greet the initial return of Oregon Army National Citizen-Soldiers from Bravo Battery, 2nd Battalion, 218th Field Artillery and Alpha Company, 141st Brigade Support Battalion arriving to Oregon from a yearlong mobilization overseas, at the Portland International Airport, Aug. 13.  

This is the first arrival of two groups who mobilized to Qatar in September 2019.  Known as Task Force Arrow these Oregon National Guard members were charged with securing critical infrastructure and personnel, and acted as a quick reactionary force throughout the region. Returning Guard members come from Portland, Forest Grove, McMinnville and Salem communities.  The Task Force demobilized at Ft. Bliss, Texas where they completed an additional 14-day quarantine prior to their departure for Oregon. The second group is scheduled to arrive later in the week.

“This team of nearly 500 Oregonians supported overseas operations while being separated from their loved ones back home.  Thank you and a big Welcome Home!” said Stephen Bomar, Director of Public Affairs, Oregon Military Department.

Photo Captions:

200813-Z-CM403-129 & 283: Oregon Governor Kate Brown together with U.S. Senator Ron Wyden, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, the Adjutant General, Oregon, greet the initial return of Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers from Bravo Battery, 2nd Battalion, 218th Field Artillery and Alpha Company, 141st Brigade Support Battalion as they return to Oregon from a yearlong mobilization overseas, Portland, Ore., Aug. 13. (Oregon National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs) 

200813-Z-CM403-305: Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, the Adjutant General, Oregon, greets a soldier with an elbow bump upon his safe return to Oregon after a yearlong mobilization overseas, Portland, Ore., Aug. 13. (Oregon National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

200813-Z-CM403-335 & 420: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers from Bravo Battery, 2nd Battalion, 218th Field Artillery, are greeted by their families at Jackson Armory, after returning from a yearlong mobilization overseas, Portland, Ore., Aug. 13. (Oregon National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/962/136942/200813-Z-CM403-420.JPG , 2020-08/962/136942/200813-Z-CM403-335.JPG , 2020-08/962/136942/200813-Z-CM403-283.JPG , 2020-08/962/136942/200813-Z-CM403-129.JPG , 2020-08/962/136942/200813-Z-CM403-305.JPG

Media Advisory - Oregon Army National Citizen-Soldiers Return From Deployment
Oregon Military Department - 08/13/20 9:00 AM

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, the Adjutant General, Oregon, are scheduled to greet the initial return of Oregon Army National Citizen-Soldiers from Bravo Battery, 2nd Battalion, 218th Field Artillery and Alpha Company, 141st Brigade Support Battalion arriving to Oregon from a yearlong mobilization at the Portland International Airport, today at 2:30 p.m.  

This is the first arrival of two groups who mobilized to Qatar in September 2019.  Known as Task Force Arrow, these Oregon National Guard members were charged with securing critical infrastructure and personnel, and acted as a quick reactionary force throughout the region. Returning Guard members come from Portland, Forest Grove, McMinnville and Salem communities.  The Task Force demobilized at Ft. Bliss, Texas where they completed an additional 14-day quarantine prior to their departure for Oregon. The second group is scheduled to arrive later in the week.

“This team of nearly 500 Oregonians supported overseas operations while being separated from their loved ones back home.  Thank you and a big Welcome Home!” said Stephen Bomar, Director of Public Affairs, Oregon Military Department.

The initial greeting is scheduled to be on the Portland International Airport flight line at 5510 NE Courier Court, in the vicinity of Hanjin Global Logistics and Airtrans Way at 2:30 p.m.  Soldiers will then depart via bus to the Jackson and Kliever armories where they will be greeted by their families, friends and loved ones.

The public and media are welcome to attend receptions at the armory locations respecting social distancing and wearing face covers accordingly.

Armory Locations:

Kliever Armory - 10000 NE 33rd Dr #1751, Portland, OR 97211

Jackson Armory - 6255 NE Cornfoot Rd, Portland, OR 97218


Federal
Former Portland Nurse Sentenced to Federal Prison for Heroin Trafficking
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/11/20 4:28 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A former nurse from Vancouver, Washington was sentenced to federal prison today for conspiring to possess with the intent to distribute controlled substances, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Rene Elene Griffin Nunn, 60, was sentenced to eight months in prison and 3 years’ supervised release. At the time of the offense, Nunn was a registered nurse at Adventist Medical Center in Portland.

According to court documents, in February 2018, Nunn and co-conspirator Darlene Michelle Sturdevant, 62, also of Vancouver, drove from Vancouver to Portland with approximately 87 grams of heroin in Nunn’s purse. Based on a joint investigation conducted by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the Clackamas County Interagency Task Force (CCITF), Nunn was located and arrested driving into Portland.

On November 27, 2018, a federal grand jury in Portland indicted Nunn with conspiring to possess with intent to distribute controlled substances. On October 31, 2019, she pleaded guilty to the same charge.

On January 22, 2020, Sturdevant was sentenced to 14 years in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for conspiring to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine and heroin throughout the Portland Metropolitan Area, possessing with intent to distribute heroin, and committing an offense while on release pending sentencing.

This case was investigated by the DEA and CCITF and is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice. Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Former Aequitas CEO and Senior Executives Indicted in Fraud and Money Laundering Conspiracy
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/11/20 4:06 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Robert J. Jesenik, 61, a former chief executive officer of Aequitas Management, LLC and several other Aequitas-owned entities, has been indicted along with three other former company executives for their roles in a fraud and money laundering conspiracy.

Jesenik, a former resident of West Linn, Oregon, is charged in a 32-count indictment with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, wire fraud, bank fraud, and money laundering. Also charged are Nelson Scott Gillis, 67, of Lake Oswego, Oregon; Brian K. Rice, 54, of Portland; and Andrew N. MacRitchie, 56, formerly of Palm Harbor, Florida.

According to court documents, Jesenik, Gillis, MacRitchie, Rice, and others used the Lake Oswego company to solicit investments in a variety of notes and funds, many of which were purportedly backed by trade receivables in education, health care, transportation, and other consumer credit areas.

From June 2014 through February 2016, the former executives solicited investors by misrepresenting the company’s use of investor money, the financial health and strength of Aequitas and its related companies, and the risks associated with its investments and investment strategies. Collectively, the defendants also failed to disclose other critical facts about the company, including its near-constant liquidity and cash-flow crises, the use of investor money to repay other investors and to defray operating expenses, and the lack of collateral to secure funds.

Jesenik founded the Aequitas group of companies, and, as chief executive officer, controlled the organization’s structure and had ultimate decision-making authority over company activities.      

Gillis, who was previously indicted for conspiring to submit false statements to a federally insured creditor, was the company’s chief operating officer and chief financial officer. In these roles, he was responsible for directing Aequitas’s overall financial policies and accounting functions. He established and maintained the company’s accounting principles, practices, procedures and initiatives, prepared financial reports and presented findings and recommendations to the executive teams, and oversaw all financial functions.

MacRitchie was the company’s executive vice president and chief compliance officer. As such, he was responsible for the development and implementation of risk management and compliance processes and procedures. MacRitchie oversaw all Aequitas accounting, legal, and audit functions, and participated in fundraising. He also established Aequitas’s New York Office and directed Aequitas’s “Lux Fund,” a Luxembourg-based fund used to solicit international investors.

Rice served as Aequitas’s executive vice president and president of wealth management. Among his responsibilities, Rice oversaw the solicitation of investments through registered investment advisors (RIA) and managed Aequitas’s affiliated RIAs.

If convicted on all charges, each of the defendants could face decades in prison and millions of dollars in fines and restitution, as well as five years’ supervised release following their prison terms.

Former Aequitas executives and co-conspirators Brian A. Oliver and Olaf Janke previously pleaded guilty to conspiring to commit mail and wire fraud and money laundering on April 19, 2019, and June 10, 2019, respectively. As part of their plea agreements, they have both agreed to pay restitution in full to their victims as determined and ordered by the court.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case is being investigated by the FBI, IRS-Criminal Investigation, and the U.S. Department of Labor Employee Benefits Security Administration. It is being prosecuted by Scott E. Bradford and Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Klamath Falls Man Accused of Cashing More Than 40 Years' Worth of Deceased Relative's Social Security Checks
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/11/20 3:36 PM

Defendant perpetrated one of the largest deceased beneficiary frauds in Social Security Administration history

MEDFORD, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a Klamath Falls, Oregon man is facing federal criminal charges for cashing more than $458,000 worth of social security checks issued in the name of his deceased aunt. George Doumar, 76, has been charged by complaint with theft of public funds and mail theft.

According to court documents, in February 2020, the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) Office of Anti-Fraud Programs identified a 114-year-old supercentenarian who appeared to be the second-oldest living person in the U.S. receiving Social Security retirement benefits. SSA systems indicated that no updates had been made to the person’s benefit record in more than 30 years, leading SSA staff to believe that the person may be deceased. The matter was referred to the SSA Office of the Inspector General (SSA-OIG).

SSA records indicated that the benefit recipient was born on August 7, 1905 in New York City and had first applied for retirement benefits in August 1970. The person did not receive any payments until September 1977 after she reached her delayed retirement computation age. SSA records further showed that from 1977 until present day, the benefit recipient received monthly Social Security retirement checks disbursed by the U.S. Treasury and delivered by the U.S. Postal Service. The last known update to the recipient’s SSA benefit record was in July 1989, when the recipient’s address was updated to Frontier Parcel & Fax Service on S. 6th Street in Klamath Falls, a commercial mail receiving agency that accepts mail from the Postal Service on behalf of third parties.

In March 2020, an investigator with SSA-OIG interviewed two of the benefit recipient’s nieces. Both nieces claimed that their aunt died in the 1960s or 1970s and recalled attending her funeral in Brooklyn, New York, where she had reportedly lived her entire life. According to one niece, their aunt did not have any children and was not married. She recalled that Doumar, her Aunt’s nephew, was close with her aunt near the time of her death and was named the sole beneficiary of her life insurance payout.

Investigators soon discovered that Doumar himself was an active Social Security beneficiary and received his checks at the same address on S. 6th Street in Klamath Falls. State of Oregon Employment Department records showed that Doumar had owned Frontier Parcel & Fax Service since 1990. He owned the property on which the business was located and a residence approximately 20 miles southwest of Klamath Falls city limits. According to SSA records, Doumar purchased the property on S. 6th Street seven days prior to the address on his aunt’s benefit record being changed to the same address.

On April 1, 2020, a U.S. Postal Inspection Service (USPIS) Postal Inspector obtained the most recent commercial mail receiving agency report for Frontier Parcel, which showed the names of current postal box owners. The list did not contain anyone with the first or last name of Doumar’s aunt. On May 1, 2020, an Economic Impact Payment of $1,200 was issued to Doumar’s aunt by the U.S. Treasury, as authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, also known as the CARES Act. Two weeks later, the check was deposited at a nearby bank after being endorsed with the aunt’s purported signature.

On June 16, 2020, SSA-OIG investigators obtained a copy of the aunt’s death certificate from the New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, confirming that she had died on March 7, 1971 in Brooklyn. Investigators determined that Doumar had added his aunt to he and his wife’s shared checking account in 1989. His aunt’s Social Security checks were often bundled in deposits with other checks made payable to Doumar. Doumar’s account was used to pay for various living expenses including mortgage, car loan, medical, and utility payments.

Investigators obtained bank surveillance footage from February 2020 that showed a man, who appeared to match Doumar’s physical description, depositing one of his aunt’s retirement checks. On July 14, 2020, investigators from SSA-OIG and USPIS interviewed Doumar at his Klamath Falls residence. When asked about his aunt, Doumar sighed, slumped his head, and stated, “that’s a long story…what happened was, well she’s passed and yes, I’ve been collecting her Social Security.”

Doumar will make his first appearance in federal court on August 24, 2020. If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, a $25,000 fine, and 3 years’ supervised release. The U.S. Attorney’s Office will also seek restitution on behalf of SSA.

This case was jointly investigated by SSA-OIG and USPIS. It is being prosecuted by Rachel Sowray, Special Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice. Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

State
DPSST Executive Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/11/20 2:02 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

August 11, 2020

Contact:    Mona Riesterer
                 (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Executive Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a WebEx meeting on August 14, 2020 at 11:00 a.m. at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer (503) 378-2431

Administrative Announcement

“This is a public meeting subject to the public meeting laws and will be recorded.”

Agenda Items:

1. Approve Minutes from March 31, 2020

2. Approval of Temporary and Proposed Rule Changes to Establish Procurement

    Processes for Goods and Services through Federal Programs

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

3. Edward Sharpe – Representing Health Care Industry, Re-Appointment to the

    Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee, 2nd term effective 8/14/2020.

4. Gert Zoutendijk to fill vacant position representing Oregon Fire Marshall;

    Appointment to the Fire Policy Committee, 1st term effective 8/14/2020.

5. Department Update

6.  Next Meeting – TBD

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Executive Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Cultural Trust awards more than $2.7 million to 128 Oregon cultural organizations (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 08/14/20 12:26 PM
A 1953 photo of the historic Bear-Sleds Ranger Station, to become the new home of the Wallowa History Center, supported by a FY2021 Cultural Trust grant award.
A 1953 photo of the historic Bear-Sleds Ranger Station, to become the new home of the Wallowa History Center, supported by a FY2021 Cultural Trust grant award.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/1171/136961/thumb_Wallowa_History_Center_Bear-Sleds_Ranger_Station_1953.jpg

Salem, Ore. – Cultural organizations across Oregon will receive more than $2.7 million in funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust in FY2021 thanks to the generosity of citizens who invested in the state’s cultural tax credit.

The awards include a total of $676,760 to the Cultural Trust’s five statewide partners (Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Humanities, Oregon Historical Society and the State Historic Preservation Office); $676,760 to 45 County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions – for regranting in their communities; and $1,353,520 in competitive Cultural Development Program awards to 78 cultural organizations serving most geographic regions of the state.

“We are incredibly grateful to the loyalty of our donors for their steadfast support of culture during very challenging times,” said Chuck Sams III, chair of the Cultural Trust board. “Our collective culture is the glue that binds us together as Oregonians, especially during difficult times. Arts and culture cross all boundaries and inspire us to celebrate our diversity and resilience as a people.” 

The amount of overall grant awards is virtually even with FY2020, he added, due to a slight increase in fiscal year donations coupled with a slight decrease in interest earnings on the permanent fund.

“Although the value of the permanent fund has increased to $31 million, market fluctuations during the health crisis led to a small decrease in interest earnings,” said Brian Rogers, the Cultural Trust’s executive director. “Thankfully our donors rallied this spring prior to the end of the fiscal year to ensure our support of Oregon’s cultural community remained strong at a time when they need it the most due to losses suffered during the COVID-19 health crisis.”

Many of the funded projects support engagement efforts during social distancing. Highlights of grant projects funded include:

  • The preservation and sharing of Hawaiian traditional cultural practices online and in person by Kapi Oanuenue in Ashland;
  • The development of an interactive digital media channel for nonprofits and independent mediamakers by Open Signal in Portland;
  • A series of cultural programs to reengage the community after months of COVID shutdown by the Tower Theatre Foundation in Bend;
  • The production of “From the Streets to the Symphony,” a documentary about the collaborative composition of new music by houseless young filmmakers and Oregon Symphony creative chair Gabriel Kahane by Outside the Frame in Portland;
  • The restoration of Native American access to First Foods and other cultural plants of significance in Southwestern Oregon by the Indigenous Gardens Network at Southern Oregon University in Ashland;
  • The development of the first Oregon Online African American Museum by Oregon Black Pioneers in Salem; and
  • Access to media arts for historically underserved Black students to exercise their imaginations, develop a voice and prepare stories for public dissemination through the Journalistic Learning Initiative in Eugene.

The 78 Cultural Development Grants include 44 grant awards outside of Portland and first-time awards (marked with ) to 14 organizations, 57 percent of which are also located outside the Portland Metro area. The grant awards range from $5,000 to $36,201 with an average grant award of $16,849. Sixty-three percent of the eligible applications were funded.

Cultural Development Program awards fund projects that address access, capacity, creativity and preservation. Applications were reviewed and scored by peer panels; final award amounts were determined and approved by the Cultural Trust Board of Directors at its Aug. 6 meeting. Close to half of the grants in this program were awarded to organizations outside of the Portland Metro area; overall more than 60 percent of Cultural Trust funding (including awards to County and Tribal Coalitions) is awarded outside of the Portland Metro area.

Cultural Development Grants, organized alphabetically by geographic region (see end of release for region key), were awarded to:

Central Region

Deschutes Public Library Foundation, Bend: $12,032    

To support the “A Novel Idea” community read program in its mission to broaden culture and dialogue and ensure free and open access to all residents.         

Friends of Santiam Pass Ski Lodge, Sisters: $22,684     

To support the restoration of historic Santiam Pass Ski Lodge as a multipurpose community center through the repair and restoration of the lodge's external shell (foundation, siding, windows and roof.), and thereby complete Phase One.

The High Desert Museum, Bend: $10,370 

To support the exhibition “Dam It! Beavers and Us,” which will raise awareness of the significant role of the beaver and natural landscape in shaping our history and help preserve a lesser known and often misunderstood aspect of Oregon’s heritage.

Tower Theatre Foundation, Inc., Bend: $15,587  

To support the “Local at the Tower” programs: a series of seven cultural programs created/presented collaboratively with community partners to reengage the community after months of COVID shutdown while still operating under stricter standards.      

Greater Eastern South Region

Four Rivers Cultural Center, Ontario: $7,945

To support the Center’s efforts to serve at-risk kids, underwriting programming so targeted children (particularly those in poverty, of color, with special challenges, in trauma or who have entered juvenile justice or foster care) have access to the arts.         

Portland Metro Region

All Classical Portland, Portland: $34,376

To support the recording of classical music by composers from underrepresented communities with the N M BODECKER FOUNDATION for broadcast and distribution, and a nationwide challenge for public radio stations to do the same in their communities.      

Bag & Baggage Productions, Inc., Hillsboro: $8,287

To support the commission and world premiere performance of “TROY, USA,” an original adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Troilus and Cressida,” and the third show of Bag&Baggage’s Problem Play Project.      

Bosco-Milligan Foundation, Portland: $6,994

To support the second phase of the organization’s three-year communications/outreach strategy with a redesign of the website to engage a broader population through participatory, inclusive experiences and to strengthen internal capacity.          

Broadway Rose Theatre Company, Tigard: $33,195

To support a building expansion to enable Broadway Rose to effectively respond to increased demand for our services and community programs.           

Caldera, Portland: $13,529

To support artist stipends for, and administration of, Caldera’s Residency Program, which annually provides approximately 40 artists an opportunity to build skills, relationships and creative projects at the Arts Center in Central Oregon.           

Cascadia Chapter of National Association of Composers, Portland: $5,000

To support Cascadia Composers, the Northwest chapter of the National Association of Composers USA, in bringing NACUSA's biennial conference to Portland in March of 2021. The conference will include six concerts and five presentations.        

Chamber Music Northwest, Portland: $12,790

To support the production of “The Anchoress,” a creative production highlighting the inaugural season of new artistic directors and the future of Chamber Music Northwest.

CoHo Productions Ltd, Portland: $8,173

To support the installation and implementation of a three-camera live streaming set-up in the CoHo theatre to allow for the continuation of CoHo's season and artistic offerings throughout the pandemic and beyond.

Confluences, Portland: $5,000

To support a series of online community gatherings that provide an Indigenous cultural context for current events, and draw visitors to Confluence’s digital library and art landscapes along the Columbia River.    

Corrib Theatre, Portland: $9,907

To support the relaunch of Corrib’s live performance season within the context of the new COVID-19 reality, with a season including three shows with community talkbacks focusing on marginalized communities.  

Disjecta Contemporary Art Center Inc, Portland: $13,371

To support the 10th Curator in Residence Season curated by Lucy Cotter to include multiple solo and group exhibitions as well as talks, performances and more.

Imago the Theatre Mask Ensemble, Portland: $8,394

To support the writing and composition of an original music-theatre/new opera work, “The Velvet Gentleman,” inspired by the life and music of Erik Satie. The work provides insight into Asperger’s syndrome.

Japanese Garden Society of Oregon, Portland: $26,248

To support access to perspectives on the Japanese-American experience during WWII through works by world-renowned photographers Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange and Toyo Miyatake for the exhibition “Art and Gardens: Healing Nature at Manzanar.”           

MetroEast Community Media, Gresham: $20,755

To support a revamp of the long-running MetroEast talk show “Community Hotline” in order to create a more engaging experience for viewers and provide better marketing and promotion opportunities for the many nonprofits that appear on the show.

Miracle Theatre Group, Portland: $16,260

To support the production of the play “Veronica Princesa,” Milagro’s first mainstage children's musical play. “Veronica Princesa,” by Alicia Dogliotti and Federico Roca, will be an Oregon Premiere and an opportunity to work with colleagues from Uruguay.           

Montavilla Jazz Festival, Portland: $12,057

To support Portland jazz artists at the highest level of their craft in performance of new works performed and filmed at unique locations within the Montavilla neighborhood, and presented as a series of concert films for 2021 screenings.

My Voice Music, Portland: $16,195

To support My Voice Music's Outreach Programs to bring trauma-informed music classes to youth living in residential detention and treatment centers and support youth with ongoing music mentorship as they transition out of such facilities.          

Northwest Children's Theater & School Inc, Portland: $35,577

To support development of online programming, including broadcasting Mainstage plays and the creation of classes and outreach that can be disseminated through interactive frameworks. New equipment ensures clear communication and broad participation.   

Northwest Film Center, Portland: $24,056

To support expanding into a pioneering media arts and storytelling incubator sharing NW stories with the world by growing NWFC’s Artist Services to reach more people, bring in new voices and connect artists and audiences (virtually and in-person).  

Northwest Professional Dance Project, Portland: $13,846

To support the development and launch of a dynamic new website with enhanced visibility, accessibility and navigation that strongly features multiple streaming portals for classes, in-studio and remote activities, and performances (archival + new).       

Open Signal, Portland: $32,929

To support the development of an interactive digital media channel for nonprofits and independent mediamakers in the Portland area to share videos, livestream events and classes, and raise funds.           

Oregon Arts Watch, Portland: $7,113

To support stories about Indigenous history and resilience in Oregon that will explore the shift from the intended erasure of tribal culture in the past to groups that are claiming, fostering and celebrating Indigenous identity in the present.

Oregon Ballet Theatre, Portland: $18,807

To support the work of OBT’s Education Department through the creation process of "OBT Moves," a digital dance resource to sustain and enhance OBT’s education services to school and community partners across the 2020-21 year and beyond.

Oregon Public Broadcasting, Portland: $20,984

To support the production of OPB's award-winning historical documentary series, “Oregon Experience.”

Outside the Frame, Portland: $22,805

To support the production of “From the Streets to the Symphony,” a documentary about the collaborative composition of new music by houseless young filmmakers at Outside the Frame and Oregon Symphony creative chair Gabriel Kahane.          

Pacific Railroad Preservation Association, Portland: $12,869

To complete the federally mandated 15-year repair of the boiler of the SP&S 700 steam locomotive. This project would return the SP&S 700 to steam for full operating condition for public education and enjoyment including the annual Holiday Express.

Phame Academy, Portland: $19,316

To support the creation and performance of a new musical written and designed by adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), which will tour rural areas after its Portland premiere.        

Play It Forward, Beaverton: $15,001

To support the expansion of Play It Forward’s music education and piano gifting program to include an inclusive and equitable on-line, interactive, virtual learning component for the 2020-2021 School Year.

Portland 5 Centers for the Arts Foundation, Portland: $15,101

To support seven culturally relevant performances, along with educational materials, focused on serving 8,900 youth in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties, a majority of whom will identify with a traditionally marginalized community.       

Portland Playhouse, Portland: $36,201

To support the six-week production of Black playwright Robert O’Hara's “Barbecue,” and the community engagement activities associated with the project, in the spring of 2021.

Red Door Project, Portland: $26,158

To support a new development manager position and related hiring activities. The position will grow the development department, continue successful grant activities and build major donor contributions, increasing organizational stability.

Rediscover the Falls, Portland: $31,737

To support the development of a Native/Non-Native collaborative engagement model to inform hardscape design, landscape and programming plans at the Willamette Falls Riverwalk.

Regional Arts & Culture Council, Portland: $34,910

To support the research, growth and development of RACC's financial and capacity building support to arts organizations serving under-represented populations and whose leadership is majority under-represented individuals.           

Risk-Reward, Portland: $7,714

To support the 13th Annual Festival of New Performance and creation of supporting “virtual” performances.           

Shaking the Tree Theatre, Portland: $8,687        

To support the development of an installation and immersive performance designed to help ease audiences and theatre makers back into public life in order to collectively process the pandemic.           

SMART Reading, Portland: $11,673

To support increased access to “Mirror and Window” literature, meaning children’s books that represent diverse cultural perspectives. Children receive 14 books a year as part of the SMART Reading programs around the state of Oregon.           

Tualatin Valley Creates, Beaverton: $14,384

To support the Arts & Culture Leadership Incubator, a professional development intensive for mid-career and historically underrepresented individuals working to advance their creative practice and impact within Washington County.

Vanport Placemarking Project, Portland: $23,501

To support design and installation of signage and the development of an Augmented Reality app which will enhance the signage. This project will preserve the history and heritage of Vanport, once Oregon's second largest city and destroyed in a 1948 flood.           

Write Around Portland, Portland: $5,677

To support the hiring of a staff position to support fundraising needs during COVID-19, sustain organizational growth and support 2021-2024 strategic initiatives.

Young Audiences of Oregon Inc, Portland: $33,993

To support Young Audiences of Oregon and SW Washington’s suite of responsive professional development activities for teaching artists and classroom educators in order to increase young peoples’ (K-12) access to the arts.           

Mid-Valley Region

Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, Grand Ronde: $34,660

To support the development of two Chinuk preschool immersion classrooms for 24 students.  The Tribe currently has a rented trailer for one classroom but always has to turn away children.  In 2019, there was room for only six of 16 enrollments requested.

Huitzilopochtli, Woodburn: $5,000

To support access to the Aztec Dance Circle’s cultural programming for underserved Latino students and their families and strengthen the organizations’ mission to teach indigenous Aztec culture and traditions throughout Oregon.

Jefferson Historical Society and Museum, Jefferson: $11,465

To support the restoration of the historic 1854 Jacob Conser House for the purpose of expanding the local Museum and providing events for the community of Jefferson and to ensure the building reaches a safe and habitable standard.           

Oregon Black Pioneers, Salem: $17,151

To support the development of the first Oregon Online African American Museum. This new vehicle will be a dedicated space for sharing stories of African American culture and history across Oregon.           

Willamette University, Salem: $5,058

To support the Hallie Ford Museum of Art’s museum quality storage solutions and digital access for 577 artworks that comprise Rick Bartow’s print archive. Bartow was a nationally recognized Native American artist and Oregonian. 

Willamette University, Salem: $5,000

To support the Willamette Pro Musica production of and access to a professional recording of a new orchestral work,  “Birds in this Woman,” featuring the Native American poetry of Elizabeth Woody, former poet laureate of Oregon, and music by composer Robert Nelson.

North Coast Region

Astoria Scandinavian Heritage Association, Astoria: $27,034

To support research, design, fabrication and installation of interpretive panels at Astoria Nordic Heritage Park (ANHP), a $1.2 million project in Astoria’s Downtown Historic District on the RiverWalk celebrating Astoria's Nordic roots.          

Northeast Region

Josephy Center for Arts and Culture, Joseph: $22,733

To support planning costs related to the purchase, safety and expansion of the Center. The project will enhance the stability of programs, increase capacity to carry out the mission and secure the organization’s future.           

Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center, Joseph: $17,640

To support expanded capacity by hiring a part time development director to support the success and growth of MHIC, which works to highlight the African American contribution to Oregon’s logging industry.

Wallowa History Center, Wallowa: $12,725

To support the preservation of the historical Bear-Sleds Ranger Station, the new home for Wallowa History Center. The grant award will support the preservation of the ranger’s office for the visitor’s center and the purchase of PastPerfect.           

South Central Region

PLAYA, Summer Lake: $5,238

To support increased stability and improved sustainability by increasing organizational capacity in presenting virtual programming, developing new investments in online resources to promote and provide access to PLAYA's programming to a wider audience. 

Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls: $31,456

To replace the theater’s leaking roof to maintain a safe, functional and welcoming performing arts center, assure the ongoing function and integrity of the historic building, and continue to deliver arts and education programs.       

South Coast Region

Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians, Coos Bay: $36,124

To support the recovery, preservation and sharing of artifacts and documents celebrating and documenting the Tribe’s heritage and history.          

Little Theatre on the Bay, North Bend: $14,820

To support the expansion and enhancement of North Bend’s historic Liberty Theatre to allow for a greater range of performances and audience experience.           

South Valley/Mid Coast Region

Corvallis Arts Center Inc, Corvallis: $21,349

To support a smooth succession plan for incoming and outgoing Curators that embeds equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) goals and activities into the organization’s Exhibition Program Plan for outreach and community-building activities.           

Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center, Corvallis: $6,472

To support building an organization-wide planning process that will increase the capacity and sustainability of CMLC’s activities and programs to be implemented in a hybrid in-house/remote format, thus increasing access and expanding community.  

Creswell Heritage Foundation, Creswell: $7,899

To support the creation of architectural plans for the interior restoration of Creswell's old schoolhouse and the architecture consultation during the restoration.       

Delgani String Quartet, Eugene: $5,000

To support the first recording by an American quartet of the string quartets of Portland-based composer Tomas Svoboda and to help promote his music through a statewide CD release tour.

Joint Forces Dance Company, Eugene: $21,283

To support the collaboration of DanceAbility International with Eugene's Orchestra Next to create an evening-length concert featuring  musicians and dancers with and without disabilities, also to allow low cost or free admission to the performances.           

Journalistic Learning Initiative, Eugene: $7,044

To support Lane ESD in providing access to the media arts for historically underserved Black students who will exercise their imaginations, develop a voice and prepare stories for public dissemination during an eight-week after school program.

Lane Arts Council, Eugene: $11,607

To support Lane Arts Council as it grows and diversifies income through community-led fundraising strategies and fundraising training for board, staff and community champions to sustain programming while responding to growing community need.           

Lincoln City Cultural Center, Inc, Lincoln City: $30,951

To support expanded service and program capacity of the Lincoln City Cultural Center, the underutilized grounds around the historic building will be converted into a cultural plaza celebrating the arts, culture and community.           

Pacific International Choral Festivals, Eugene: $5,245

To support a Commissions Project to be launched at the TURN THE MUSIC UP and LIFT EVERY VOICE festivals in 2021.           

Siletz Tribal Arts and Heritage Society, Siletz: $35,222

To support development of a traveling VR exhibit on the culture of the Siletz Indians to build support for, and to eventually become a part of, the permanent collection at the Siletz Tribe’s future cultural heritage center, Ghii Dee-Ne Dvn.           

University of Oregon Foundation, Eugene: $25,172

To support the Oregon Folklife Network’s sixth annual “Culture Fest” celebration of folklife by publicly showcasing Oregon’s diverse cultural arts in six counties, while helping organizations reach diverse artists and engage the public in exploring Oregon’s evolving traditions.

Southern Region

Anima Mundi Productions, Phoenix: $15,880

To support the creation of "Corona: Stories of Resilience," an exploration of Oregonians’ responses to COVID-19 with music by Ethan Gans-Morse, poetry collected/composed by Tiziana DellaRovere, and two premiere performances by the Resonance Ensemble.

Josephine Community Library Foundation, Grants Pass: $29,727

To support the preparation, planning and launch of the first phase of a library building campaign for library stakeholders to raise $2 million to purchase downtown property for a future Grants Pass library and community commons.           

Kapi Oanuenue, Ashland: $5,000

To support the preservation and sharing of Hawaiian traditional cultural practices: music, dance, arts and values. Activities will be online via digital gatherings and in person via classes and in the Ashland Aloha Festival.           

Rogue World Music, Ashland: $9,622

To support the cultural liaison responsibilities of a new program director who will conduct a focused outreach project to increase the organization’s cultural competency through building relationships of mutual understanding, trust and benefit.           

Southern Oregon Historical Society, Medford: $10,377

To support the re-housing, cataloging and digitization of 3,000 glass plate negatives for the purposes of preserving and making them accessible to the public.           

Southern Oregon Repertory Singers, Ashland: $6,493

To support the commissioning of a major new choral work by renowned British composer Will Todd and its performance by Southern Oregon Repertory Singers as the centerpiece of the fourth annual First Light Festival of New Choral Music in March 2021.           

Southern Oregon University, Ashland: $35,483

To support the restoration of Native American access to First Foods and other cultural plants of significance in Southwestern Oregon by the Indigenous Gardens Network in a place-based Indigenous-led partnership.

The Hearth, Ashland: $22,601

To support the development and expansion of creative online settings accessible to a diversity of people where through the practice of personal storytelling local participants can deepen their appreciation, compassion and commitment to one another.

First time grant recipient

Region key:

Central (Jefferson, Deschutes and Crook Counties)

Greater Eastern South (Grant, Harney and Malheur)

Portland Metro (Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas Counties)   

Mid-Valley (Yamhill, Polk and Marion Counties) 

North Coast (Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook Counties) 

Northeast (Wallowa, Union and Baker Counties)

South Central (Klamath and Lake Counties)

South Coast (Douglas, Coos and Curry Counties)

South Valley/Mid-Coast (Lincoln, Benton, Linn and Lane Counties)

Southern (Josephine and Jackson Counties) 

# # #

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testimony to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was established 18 years ago by the Oregon Legislature as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, rappers, acrobats and dreamers who make Oregon, Oregon. In 2017 Oregonians gave $4.9 million to the Cultural Trust, our all-time record. Sixty percent of that went straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent helped grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners, 45 County and Tribal Coalitions and qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.

 




Attached Media Files: A 1953 photo of the historic Bear-Sleds Ranger Station, to become the new home of the Wallowa History Center, supported by a FY2021 Cultural Trust grant award. , A past Montavilla Jazz Festival performance. Their FY2021 Cultural Trust grant award supports recording a series of concert films for 2021 screenings. , First-time Cultural Trust grant award recipient Kapi Oanuenue of Ashland. , Broadway Rose Theatre’s 2019 production of “Footloose.” Their FY2021 Cultural Trust grant award will support a building expansion. , A parade celebrating the new Astoria Scandinavian Heritage Park, supported by a FY2021 Cultural Trust grant award.

Oregon's Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support application now live! (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 08/12/20 12:20 PM
The Portland Gay Men’s Chorus, one of many Oregon performance groups that has cancelled events due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The Chorus, recently announced as one of the 2020 Governor’s Arts Awards recipients, is currently celebrating its 40th annive
The Portland Gay Men’s Chorus, one of many Oregon performance groups that has cancelled events due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The Chorus, recently announced as one of the 2020 Governor’s Arts Awards recipients, is currently celebrating its 40th annive
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/1171/136894/thumb_Portland_Gay_Mens_Chorus.jpg

Salem, Ore. – Applications are now live and open for Oregon’s Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) Cultural Support program. Funds allocated to the Oregon Cultural Trust will be available to Oregon cultural organizations facing losses due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The $25.9 million in funding was made available through a $50 million relief package for Oregon culture recently approved by the Emergency Board of the Oregon Legislature.

The distribution plan for the CRF Cultural Support program was approved at the Aug. 6 Cultural Trust Board of Directors meeting. Applications are due by noon on Monday, Aug. 24, and approved funds must be distributed by Sept. 15.

“We are grateful to the members of our Board for authorizing us to move forward with the distribution plan as soon as possible,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Cultural Trust. “We have worked hard to develop a statewide, equitable distribution plan and look forward to supporting our cultural community in surviving this unprecedented crisis.”

All Oregon cultural nonprofits and community venues are welcome to apply. Eligible grant recipients include, but are not limited to, cultural institutions, county fairgrounds, cultural entities within federally recognized Indian Tribes based in Oregon, and festivals and community event organizations. Funds will be distributed through the Cultural Trust statewide network of County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions. Funding will be determined based on eligible request amounts, an award allocation formula that establishes a base amount of funds per county or tribe and the organization’s fiscal size. COVID-19 expenses previously reimbursed by other federal CARES Act programs are not eligible. Complete guidelines are posted on the Cultural Trust website.

The intended use of the CRF Cultural Support funds is to provide financial assistance to cultural nonprofit organizations and community venues that have canceled or postponed public programming because of public health executive orders associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Guidelines for the funding are in accordance with the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

The federal CARES Act requires that CRF funding only be used to cover expenses that: are necessary expenditures incurred due to the public health emergency; were not accounted for in the budget most recently approved as of March 27, 2020 (the date of enactment of the CARES Act); and were incurred during the period that begins on March 1, 2020, and ends on Dec. 30, 2020.

The Cultural Trust is committed to serving Oregon’s culturally diverse and traditionally underserved communities.

_________________

About the Oregon Cultural Trust

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testament to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was designed as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, poets, acrobats and dreamers who define our famous quality of life.

In 2019 Oregonians gave $4.5 million to the Cultural Trust. Sixty percent of that went straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent helped grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners, 45 County and Tribal Coalitions and 1,450+ qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.

More information at culturaltrust.org.

 

 




Attached Media Files: The Portland Gay Men’s Chorus, one of many Oregon performance groups that has cancelled events due to the COVID-19 health crisis. The Chorus, recently announced as one of the 2020 Governor’s Arts Awards recipients, is currently celebrating its 40th annive

Oregon continues sending families pandemic school meal benefits: More than 230,000 students have received benefits in six weeks
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/13/20 7:45 AM

SALEM, OR – Six weeks ago, Oregon received approval to implement Pandemic-EBT (P-EBT) benefits, which provides food benefits for students who lost access to free meals through a school participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) when they suddenly closed due to COVID-19. Families may receive up to $384 per eligible child and the actual food benefit amount is based on the date the child became eligible for free or reduced meals at school.

In order to receive the benefits, Oregon school districts must provide the eligibility information to the Department of Education – most have done this. Now, additional data collection efforts are underway for families who applied for free or reduced lunch after schools closed, moved or were not included on initial lists. This work is expected to continue through August and into September.

Will my child receive these additional food benefits?

Where is my school in the process?

How will my family get these benefits?

  • If families currently receive SNAP benefits, they will see the P-EBT benefits on their Oregon Trail Card.
  • Families with an active Oregon Trail Card, including families who previously received Summer EBT benefits, will have the benefits loaded onto this card.
  • Families with no active Oregon Trail card on file will receive one in the mail.
    • Eligible households will receive a letter once benefits are deposited onto the Oregon Trail Card.

What if I haven’t received my benefits or Oregon Trail Card?

“We are asking families to please wait until September 15 to contact us if they haven’t received their benefits or Oregon Trail Card,” requested Dan Haun. “After September 15, we will be able to review individual cases and help any families still waiting. We are working around the clock to make sure families get the assistance they need to help put food on the table.”

Pandemic-EBT is a partnership between the Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education, Child Nutrition Program. Bringing these additional food benefits to families struggling during this pandemic would not be possible without the dedicated work being done in school districts throughout the state to provide eligibility information. This local and statewide collaboration is crucial to making these benefits available.

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Attached Media Files: 2020-08/973/136907/Oregon_continues_sending_families_pandemic_school_meal_benefits_081320.pdf

Federal action critical to maintaining access to food benefits for Oregonians
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/20 1:29 PM

SALEM, OR – The Oregon Department of Human Services on Monday submitted a request to the United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services to continue the ability to waive eligibility interviews in order to allow the department to have flexibility to meet the needs of Oregonians receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits.

The department is seeing a surge in SNAP applications as a result of the July 25 expiration of the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation program. Nearly 5,800 Oregonians applied for benefits during the first week in August, which is 37 percent higher when compared to the weeks before the supplemental unemployment payments ended.

The department is anticipating continued increases in new applications at the same time the federal waiver expires and requires current SNAP recipients to recertify their information to keep their benefits.

Current SNAP recipients must re-apply to keep their benefits. Beginning in September, approximately 45,000 Oregonians are expected to re-apply to continue their benefits. The waiver would help the department manage this increasing workload as the increase in both new and continuing applications puts additional strain on the workforce.

“In times of crisis, no Oregonian should have to worry about where they can find food for their family. We need the federal government to take immediate action to provide us the with the flexibility we need to get Oregonians benefits to help them through these challenging times,” said Oregon Governor Kate Brown. “Inaction or delay could have an overwhelming effect on our systems for delivering benefits.”

Due to the uncertainty of whether the waiver will continue, the department is taking steps to mitigate these challenges, including redeploying staff from other areas of the agency to process applications and conducting surge hiring to bring additional staff on board.

Since the pandemic, the department has provided nearly $470 million in food benefits to over 702,000 Oregonians. Until the recent increase in applications, most Oregonians have received benefits within a few days of their application. The average processing time for applications, except for those with zero income, has increased to about 13 days over the past two weeks because of the higher number of applicants.

“While we are doing everything, we can to maintain a level of customer service that Oregonians expect and depend on, it will be increasingly more challenging absent action from the federal government,” said Fariborz Pakseresht, director of the Department of Human Services. “SNAP and other benefits are designed to help people manage through difficult times – we are committed to looking for creative solutions to ensure these benefits are readily available to Oregonians throughout the pandemic.”

Resources

Search for Oregon Department of Human Services eligibility worker jobs:

Learn how to apply for SNAP and other benefits online or by phone at https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/COVID-19/Pages/Home.aspx.

SNAP customers can contact their local Self Sufficiency Program (SSP), Aging and People with Disabilities (APD) or Area Agency on Aging (AAA) office for more information. Find a local office at: oregon.gov/DHS/Offices/Pages/index.aspx

Get help identifying Oregon Department of Human Services programs and resources in your community to meet the needs of older adults and people with disabilities, including home-delivered meals: https://www.adrcoforegon.org/consite/index.php

For other ways to connect with DHS, contact 211info:

  • By calling 2-1-1 from any phone
  • Text your zip code to 898211
  • By email at help@211info.org
  • 211info.org

Find other food resources at needfood.oregon.gov

###




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/973/136867/Federal_action_critical_to_maintaining_access_to_food_benefits_for_Oregonians_081120.pdf

State offers tips to help people affected by wildfire: Division of Financial Regulation's Advocacy Team ready to help with wildfire claims
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/14/20 9:47 AM

Salem – With the Mosier Creek wildfire burning in the Columbia River Gorge, the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation has a dedicated team of consumer advocates who can help answer people’s questions about their insurance coverage or the claims process.

Call 888-877-4894 (toll-free) or go to https://dfr.oregon.gov/help/Pages/index.aspx.

The division, part of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, also has several tips for homeowners and renters who have been affected by fire, smoke, or ash damage.

They are:

  • Insurance companies may pay for additional living expenses (hotel, meals, and more) due to fire evacuation. Check with your insurance company to confirm your specific coverage. Keep all receipts, and call your insurance company or agent as soon as it is safe to do so to let them know you evacuated. Fire damage to a vehicle can be covered through an auto policy if you have elected comprehensive coverage.
  • If you have damage to your personal belongings, your insurance company will request an inventory of the damaged/destroyed items. Be prepared to provide the adjuster with a list, including the item, the age, the approximate original cost, and the approximate replacement cost. Do not dispose of the damaged items until an adjuster can view them. Take photos of the damaged items yourself.
  • If you file a fire-loss claim with your insurance company, your insurer may require a damage inspection before you start repairs. Take steps to prevent further damage or theft and check with your insurance company before beginning repairs.
  • After the investigation is completed and the insurance company is ready to settle your claim, the adjuster will pay your claim in two steps. The first step will be to pay for repairs at an actual cash value basis. This means that the initial payment will be less than the full amount needed to do the job. Once the repairs are completed, the company will reimburse you the difference between the actual cash value and the full repair cost. You will have a deductible applied to the entire claim.
  • Damage to a vehicle, even when parked in a garage, is not covered under a homeowners policy. The comprehensive coverage in your auto policy pays for the damages to a vehicle.
  • Renters insurance covers your belongings and personal liability in much the same way that a homeowners policy does. Typically, the building owner’s policy covers the building you live in, but does not offer any protection for your property, your cost to find other housing, or your personal liability.
  • If your home is damaged due to fire or smoke, and you cannot keep your pets with you, most policies will pay for your pets to be boarded while the repairs are under way.

For more resources, go to https://dfr.oregon.gov/insure/home/storm/Pages/wildfires.aspx.

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

About Oregon DFR:
The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/


Task force to continue helping construction job sites protect against COVID-19
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/11/20 9:30 AM

Portland – The COVID-19 Joint Construction Safety Task Force will continue to meet and arrange visits to job sites in its ongoing effort to help protect workers and increase job safety awareness on construction sites.

Since April 15, the task force has visited 20 job sites in the state to collect data, offer resources, and provide education. Every job site visited had a written COVID-19 safety policy. Nineteen of the 20 had either provided COVID-19-specific safety training or followed an Oregon OSHA recommendation to appoint a safety officer to ensure social distancing on the job site.

“With cases of COVID-19 increasing, it is important for this task force to continue its work, and to reinforce the need for workers to wear face coverings when they are not able to stay at least six feet apart,” said Michael Wood, Oregon OSHA administrator.

Wood said the task force has accomplished important work, including developing free resources, best practices, and innovations to help mitigate the risk of COVID-19 on construction sites.

"The COVID-19 Joint Construction Safety Taskforce has been instrumental in providing resources our organization has used to help protect the health and safety of all our members across four states - Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana," said Matthew Eleazer, president of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers Local #1.

Free resources are available:

Oregon COVID-19 Construction Task Force

Task force members:

About the COVID-19 Joint Construction Task Force

The task force is a partnership of union and non-union industry professionals, with support from Oregon OSHA. The group meets regularly to monitor health information and government guidelines, and to collect data and information.

For general questions about the construction task force, contact Mary Ann Naylor at Oregon Tradeswomen, yAnn@oregontradeswomen.net">MaryAnn@tradeswomen.net

Task force contacts:

Robert Camarillo, executive secretary, Oregon State Building Trades Council: obert@oregonbuildingtrades.com">Robert@oregonbuildingtrades.com

Mike Salsgiver, executive director, Associated General Contractors – Oregon Columbia Chapter: mikes@agc-oregon.org

Mark Long, chief executive officer, Oregon Home Builders Association:
k@oregonhba.com">mark@oregonhba.com

Paul Philpott, political representative, Pacific NW Regional Council of Carpenters:

pphilpott@nwcarpenters.org

Aaron Corvin, public information officer, Oregon OSHA:
on.corvin@oregon.gov">Aaron.corvin@oregon.gov

 


Oregon OSHA accepting grant applications for training, education addressing infectious disease (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/10/20 11:49 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/1073/136835/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

Salem – Oregon OSHA is accepting grant applications for the creation of innovative safety and health training and education projects specifically designed to help combat the risk of infectious disease in the workplace.

The opportunity to pitch the division on funding for such projects comes amid the coronavirus pandemic and as the division pursues new rules to protect workers against infectious diseases.

Applications are due by 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 9.

Go online for more information about this year’s grant process and how to apply. You may also contact Teri Watson, 503-947-7406 or i.a.watson@oregon.gov">teri.a.watson@oregon.gov.

Any employer, labor group, or nonprofit organization may apply. Educational institutions that are interested in applying will be considered only if they partner with another eligible organization.

By way of context, employers are not allowed to use grants to pay for training for their employees. Materials produced by grant recipients become the property of Oregon OSHA. Many of the materials are housed in the Oregon OSHA Resource Center and are available for use by the public. Some materials are available electronically.

Links to past grant-funded training projects are available for viewing and use online.

The Oregon Legislature launched the Occupational Safety and Health Education and Training Grant Program in 1990. Award recommendations are made by Oregon OSHA’s Safe Employment Education and Training Advisory Committee, a group with members from business, labor, and government.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Southwest Oregon (Rogue Valley): Industrial Fire Precaution Level III (3) Takes Effect AUGUST 15TH
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/13/20 4:05 PM

NEWS RELEASE                                                                     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

August 13, 2020

Industrial Fire Precaution Level III (3) Takes Effect AUGUST 15TH

Danger levels rise for industrial and commercial operations on ODF Protected Lands

ROGUE VALLEY, ORE. – Increased fire danger on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Southwest Oregon District has made it necessary to increase the fire prevention measures on industrial operations, such as logging sites and other commercial operations. Industrial Fire Precaution Level (IFPL) III (3) takes effect at 12:01 a.m., Saturday, August 15th.

The following may operate during the hours of 8 p.m. and 1 p.m. daily:

  • Power saws at loading sites
  • Loading or hauling of any product or material
  • Blasting
  • Welding, cutting, or grinding of metal
  • Any other spark emitting operation not specifically mentioned

[CONTINUED]

Conditionally, the following may operate from 8:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. daily, when mechanized equipment capable of constructing fire line is immediately available to reach and effectively attack a fire start:

  • Ground-based operations (tractor/skidder, feller-buncher, forwarder, or shovel logging operations)
  • Power saws on ground-based operations
  • Rotary head saw feller-bunchers with a continuous Firewatch
  • Non-rotary head saw feller-bunchers
  • Tethered logging - winch-assisted, cable-assisted, traction-assisted, etc. systems, which enable ground-based timber harvesting machines to operate on steep slopes

The following is prohibited at all times, except as indicated:

  • Cable yarding systems (prohibited)
    • Exception: gravity operated logging systems using non-motorized carriages, or approved motorized carriages, may operate between the hours of 8:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m., if all blocks and moving lines are suspended at least 10 feet above the ground (excluding: the line(s) between the carriage and the chokers during rigging).

For the general public, ODF Southwest’s fire restrictions remain in effect and unchanged with a fire danger level of “extreme” (red). For more information about the Oregon Department of Forestry’s public or industrial fire season restrictions, visit our Facebook page: ODF Southwest Oregon District, or our website www.swofire.com.




Attached Media Files: PDF , WORD

Southwest Oregon District's New PIO/Public Affairs Officer
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/13/20 3:49 PM

NEWS RELEASE                                                                     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

August 13, 2020

Southwest Oregon District’s New PIO/Public Affairs Officer

Please Forward Public Information/Media Inquiries to Kyle Novy-Riley

ROGUE VALLEY, ORE. – Kyle Novy-Riley has joined ODF and will take over PIO responsibilities from incumbent: Brian Ballou, who will “fully retire” at the end of the 2020 fire season. In addition to PIO duties, Kyle will take up community engagement initiatives to advance the fire prevention program and decrease the region’s number of “human-caused” fires. Kyle’s Southwest Oregon territory will include both Jackson and Josephine Counties, jointly referred to as “Rogue Valley.”

            Our new Public Affairs Officer joins us from the private sector and brings with him almost six years of strategic communications experience. He will relocate to Rogue Valley from Portland, Oregon at the end of August.

            Please forward media inquiries and your updated contact information to Kyle’s email: iley@oregon.gov">Kyle.Novy-Riley@oregon.gov and add his phone number: 541-890-9424 to your contact list.

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/1072/136932/News_Release_-_New_Public_Information_Officer_Rogue_Valley_8.13.2020.docx , PDF

Siskiyou Advisory Committee Meets August 13 Via Zoom
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/11/20 3:34 PM

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon’s Siskiyou Advisory Committee will meet virtually Thursday, August 13 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. To join the call or provide public comment please contact Brooke Burgess, 503-851-9002 rooke.Burgess@oregon.gov">Brooke.Burgess@oregon.gov. On the agenda are:

  • Review draft rule language for salmon, steelhead, and bull trout streams in the Siskiyou Geo-region
  • Review statement of need and fiscal impact for the draft rules

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the beginning of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Brooke Burgess, 503-851-9002 rooke.Burgess@oregon.gov">Brooke.Burgess@oregon.gov.


Has your business reached $750,000 in commercial activity in 2020? Then it's time to register for the Corporate Activity Tax
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 08/13/20 9:05 AM

Salem, OR—The Department of Revenue reminds business owners and their tax preparers that once their business has earned more than $750,000 in commercial activity for the year, they are required to register for Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) within 30 days.

The CAT applies to all business entity types, such as C and S corporations, partnerships, sole proprietorships, and other entities. More than 14,500 business entities have registered for the CAT since registration opened in December 2019.

Revenue has online resources to help businesses register for the CAT.

Registration is through Revenue Online. A short CAT registration training document is available on the CAT page of the Revenue website.

To register, individuals doing business in Oregon will need their name and their Social Security number or individual taxpayer identification number. Businesses will need their entity’s legal name and federal employer identification number.
Businesses and individuals will need:
• Their mailing address;
• The date they exceeded or expect to exceed $750,000 in Oregon commercial activity;
• A valid email address or current Revenue Online login, and;
• Their Business Activity Code (Refer to the current list of North American Industry Classification System codes found with their federal income tax return instructions.)
Taxpayers don’t need a Revenue Online account to register for the CAT. Those who have Revenue Online accounts can’t be logged in to register for the CAT. Instead, they should go directly to the CAT webpage and click on the “Register for the CAT” link on the right-hand side of the page.

The 2019 Legislature created the CAT to boost funding for public schools. The CAT is imposed on businesses for the privilege of doing business in Oregon, including those located inside and outside of Oregon. It’s measured on a business’s commercial activity—the total amount a business realizes from activity in Oregon.

While all business entities with $750,000 or more in commercial activity must register for the CAT, only businesses with taxable commercial activity in excess of $1 million must pay the Corporate Activity Tax. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of taxable commercial activity greater than $1 million after subtractions.

The CAT page of the Revenue website includes links to the administrative rules that govern the tax, a list of basic frequently asked questions (FAQ), and a Beyond the FAQ section that includes high-level summaries of the rules and other topics to help answer taxpayer questions.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Spanish-language Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Application Now Available on Oregon Employment Department Website
Oregon Employment Department - 08/14/20 11:32 AM

August 14, 2020 (Salem, Ore.)—The Oregon Employment Department, in partnership with Google, recently created an online Spanish-language application process for its Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program. This new option will make it easier for Spanish-speaking customers to apply for PUA and file weekly claims. It will also speed up weekly benefit processing by ensuring that all required information is complete prior to submission.

PUA provides unemployment benefits to many Oregonians who are not working due to COVID-19 and do not qualify for regular unemployment insurance benefits. People who are self-employed, independent contractors, and some agricultural workers may be eligible for this program. PUA is not a form of public assistance, and anyone who is authorized to work in the U.S. is welcome to apply.

“Ensuring equal access to our programs is part of living our agency values of respect, integrity, and community,” said David Gerstenfeld, acting director of the Oregon Employment Department. “I encourage our Spanish-speaking PUA claimants to use this new online process so we can get you your benefits as quickly as possible.”

To apply for or receive benefits through the new Spanish-language system, claimants should visit https://pua.emp.state.or.us/ and select “Español” from the top right drop-down menu. Claimants can resubmit their weekly claims through the new form if they have not already been paid for those weeks, though they do not have to. Claimants should not resubmit an initial claim if they have been notified that the claim was received. Resubmitting unpaid claims online will speed up how quickly claimants will get their benefits, and will let claims specialists focus on processing claims for those who have not yet received benefits.

To receive more guidance on using the Spanish-language form, Spanish-speaking PUA claimants should register for the Oregon Employment Department’s next webinar, scheduled for August 20 at 1 p.m. This webinar, which will be held in Spanish, will guide Oregonians on how to use the PUA form and answer questions. Register for the webinar at https://www.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_ORiyX-NdS5G3pLL6M2cWeQ.

PUA claimants can continue to submit their initial application and weekly certifications by PDF upload, mail, fax, or phone, though these will take longer to process than the more automated online claim form. Customers who need assistance in languages other than English can also call the Worksystems hotline at 503-606-6969 or send their name, phone number, and requested language to OED_LanguageAccess@oregon.gov.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/930/136954/8_14__Spanish_PUA_PR_final.pdf

Solicitud de Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia en español ahora disponible en el sitio web del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon
Oregon Employment Department - 08/14/20 11:30 AM

14 de agosto, 2020 (Salem, Ore.)— El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon, en asociación con Google, creó recientemente un proceso de solicitud en línea en español para su programa de Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA por sus siglas en inglés). Esta nueva opción facilitará a los clientes de habla hispana solicitar el PUA y presentar reclamos semanales. También acelerará el trámite de beneficios semanales al garantizar que toda la información requerida esté completa antes de enviarla.

El PUA proporciona beneficios de desempleo a muchos residentes de Oregon que no están trabajando debido al COVID-19 y no llenan los requisitos para los beneficios regulares de desempleo. Las personas que trabajan por cuenta propia, contratistas independientes y algunos trabajadores agrícolas pueden ser elegibles para este programa. El PUA no es una forma de asistencia pública, y cualquier persona autorizada para trabajar en los EE. UU. puede solicitarla.

“Asegurar el acceso equitativo a nuestros programas es parte de vivir los valores de nuestra agencia de respeto, integridad y comunidad”, dijo David Gerstenfeld, director interino del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon. “Aliento a nuestros solicitantes de PUA de habla hispana a utilizar este nuevo proceso en línea para que podamos obtener sus beneficios lo más rápido posible.”

Para solicitar o recibir beneficios a través del nuevo sistema en español, los reclamantes deben visitar https://pua.emp.state.or.us/ y seleccionar “Español” en el menú desplegable superior derecho. Los reclamantes pueden volver a enviar sus reclamos semanales a través del nuevo formulario si aún no se les ha pagado por esas semanas, aunque no es necesario. Los reclamantes no deben volver a presentar un reclamo inicial si se les ha notificado que el reclamo se recibió. Reenviar reclamos no pagados en línea incrementará la rapidez con que los reclamantes obtendrán sus beneficios y permitirá que los especialistas en reclamos se concentren en procesar reclamos para aquellos que aún no han recibido beneficios.

Para recibir más orientación sobre el uso del formulario en español, los solicitantes del PUA de habla hispana deben registrarse para el próximo seminario web del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon, programado para el 20 de agosto a la 1 p.m. Este seminario web, que se llevará a cabo en español, guiará a los habitantes de Oregón sobre cómo usar el formulario PUA y responder preguntas. Registrese aqui: https://www.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_ORiyX-NdS5G3pLL6M2cWeQ.

Los solicitantes del PUA pueden continuar enviando su solicitud inicial y certificaciones semanales mediante carga de PDF, correo, fax o teléfono, aunque estos demorarán más en tramitarse que el formulario de reclamo en línea más automatizado. Los clientes que necesiten asistencia en otros idiomas además del inglés también pueden llamar a la línea directa de Worksystems al 503-606-6969 o enviar su nombre, número de teléfono e idioma solicitado a OED_LanguageAccess@oregon.gov.

 

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Programa de igualdad de oportunidades: ayudas y servicios auxiliares disponibles a pedido para personas con discapacidades. Contacto: (503) 947-1794. Para las personas sordas o con problemas auditivos, llame al 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/930/136951/SP_8_14__Spanish_PUA_FINAL.pdf

New "Gross Earnings" Definition Helps More Self-Employed Oregonians Qualify for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Benefits
Oregon Employment Department - 08/12/20 3:00 PM

August 12, 2020 (Salem, Ore.) -- Self-employed claimants could get a boost today from the Oregon Employment Department. New guidance from the U.S. Department of Labor gives the agency more flexibility to set the definition of “gross earnings” for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) claims.

The new definition now takes self-employed PUA claimants’ expenses into account. Before the new definition of “gross earnings,” benefits for self-employed claimants were solely determined on gross receipts. The Oregon Employment Department is now defining “gross earnings” as gross receipts received during the week, minus 25 percent of the prior calendar month’s expenses. Expenses include the business portion of rent, utilities, products, materials, and office supplies.

Under the new definition, some PUA self-employed claimants who previously reported too much in gross receipts to qualify for benefits could now receive some additional weeks of benefits. This also applies to self-employed claimants who had a reduced benefit amount.

This definition will be used going forward, and will also be applied retroactively. That means some self-employed PUA claimants could get benefits or higher payments for weeks they already claimed. Updated claims resulting in new weeks of PUA benefits will also receive the $600 Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) for eligible weeks between March 29 and July 25, 2020.

“This change could bring substantial financial relief to thousands of self-employed Oregonians who are or have been out of work as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. We heard these concerns of our self-employed PUA claimants, and are happy that we have found a way to address them,” said acting director David Gerstenfeld.

Getting higher weekly PUA benefit payments only applies to those who:

  • Are self-employed (claimants do not get W-2 tax forms),
  • Qualify for PUA,
  • Submitted weekly PUA claims using the old definition of “gross earnings,” which was simply total gross receipts for that week, and
  • Updated “gross earnings” are lower than their maximum weekly benefit amount (not including the $600 FPUC benefits).

Self-employed PUA claimants who wish to request a higher weekly benefit payment may report up to 20 weeks of updated “gross earnings” by visiting the PUA Gross Earnings page on unemployment.oregon.gov. It will take us up to six weeks to complete the “gross earnings” review. We will notify claimants via email when their review is complete. If claimants qualify for any adjustments, they should get their payments within one week of the completion of the review. Self-employed PUA claimants who received the full benefit amount do not need to update their gross earnings for those weeks.

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Note to media: For the latest numbers on unemployment claims processing, an online version of the above press release, and today’s full media briefing recording, visit the Oregon Employment Department’s media page at unemployment.oregon.gov/media. The video and audio will be posted later today.

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/930/136896/8.12.20_Gross_Earnings_Release_FINAL.pdf

Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 08/11/20 12:34 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department
 

WHEN:            Wed., Aug. 12, 2020 at 2:00 p.m. PT (NOTE: This week’s media availability will be held at a different than usual time.)

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on unemployment claims processing on Wed. Aug. 12 at 2:00 p.m. PT. Gerstenfeld will provide an update on federal and state legislation, self-employed PUA claims processing, and overall unemployment claims progress.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference; Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12:00 p.m. PT on Wed., Aug. 12. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for week day updates. A recording of the video conference will be sent out shortly after the media briefing concludes.

 

 

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SUPPORT BUSINESS • PROMOTE EMPLOYMENT

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/930/136864/8.12_Media_availability.pdf

CORRECTION: Oregon reports 323 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 08/14/20 2:48 PM

Resending to correct state total.

August 14, 2020

Oregon reports 323 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 385, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 323 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 22,613.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (2), Clackamas (21), Clatsop (1), Coos (2), Deschutes (6), Hood River (8), Jackson (23), Jefferson (4), Josephine (6), Lane (4), Lincoln (3), Linn (9), Malheur (18), Marion (49), Morrow (10), Multnomah (52), Polk (13), Umatilla (37), Wasco (2), Washington (25), and Yamhill (21).

Oregon’s 384th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on July 25 and died August 12. Location of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 385th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on August 3 and died August 12 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Outbreak surpasses 20 cases

An outbreak of 22 cases of COVID-19 has been reported at Columbia Basin Onion in Umatilla County. The case count includes all persons linked to the outbreak, which may include household members and other close contacts to an employee.

The outbreak investigation started August 1, but the initial case count was below the threshold for public disclosure. State and county public health officials are working with the company to address the outbreak and protect the health of workers.

New face covering guidance issued

Governor Kate Brown and the Oregon Health Authority have issued revised guidance requiring face coverings or face shields for employees in private office spaces, in addition to public office spaces. The guidance requires face coverings in public and private building hallways, bathrooms, elevators, lobbies, break rooms, and other common spaces, unless employees are at individual work spaces or in meeting rooms where 6 feet of distance from other people can be maintained.

The revised guidance also provides an exception for face coverings, allowing for the brief removal of face coverings in situations where someone’s identity needs to be confirmed for visual comparison, such as interactions in banks or with law enforcement.

# # #

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Media advisory: OHA leadership to provide update on COVID-19 today
Oregon Health Authority - 08/14/20 11:07 AM

August 14, 2020

Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen and Dr. Emilio DeBess, a state epidemiologist, will hold a weekly media availability today, Friday, Aug. 14, at 2 p.m.

Featured topics include the release of today’s seroprevalence study and a local perspective on local contact tracing from Analuz Torres Giron, a case investigator/contact tracer for Benton County. 

Media are invited to call in and ask questions at 844-867-6163. The access code is 593699.

For more information: media.COVID-19@state.or.us.

# # #


1% of Oregonians have evidence of COVID-19 exposure, study finds
Oregon Health Authority - 08/14/20 10:12 AM

EDITORS: OHA Director Patrick Allen and Dr. Emilio DeBess, a state epidemiologist, will hold a weekly media availability today (Friday, Aug. 14) at 2 p.m. Media are invited to call in and ask questions at 844-867-6163. Access code is 593699. For more information: media.COVID-19@state.or.us.

August 14, 2020

1% of Oregonians have evidence of COVID-19 exposure, study finds

Rate is 10 times higher than conventional testing shows

PORTLAND, Ore. — As of mid-June, 1% of Oregonians without COVID-19 had evidence of past infection of the virus in their blood, which is 10 times higher than the reported rate of infections obtained through conventional testing, according to a new study.

Oregon Health Authority epidemiologists who authored the study, which appears today in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), found that nine of 897 blood specimens collected from 19 health care facilities around Oregon between May 11 and June 15, 2020, contained antibodies against the virus that causes COVID-19.

The study also suggested that rates of infection increased with age, with no antibodies detected in the blood of pediatric patients 17 and younger. The rate was 0.4-0.5% in those ages 18-64; and 1.6-2.1% in those 65 and older.

The results indicate a “substantial” proportion of Oregon residents have undiagnosed and unreported infection from COVID-19.

“We suspected that a much larger segment of Oregon’s population has been exposed to and infected with COVID-19 than traditional diagnostic testing shows,” said Paul Cieslak, M.D., a study co-author and OHA medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations. “But these results also tell us that the great majority of Oregonians remain susceptible to this virus.”

The first case of COVID-19 in Oregon was diagnosed Feb. 28, 2020. Through May 31, 4,243 people in Oregon, or about one of every 1,000 people, had tested positive for COVID-19. Because this rate doesn’t account for people who were infected but did not seek testing — such as those with mild or no symptoms, or people unable to access testing — the rate is believed to be lower than the state’s actual infection count.

Seroprevalence surveys like this one — testing blood samples to look for antibodies — may estimate the rate of infection more accurately than conventional testing by identifying all people who have had previous infections with COVID-19, including those who didn’t show symptoms or did not seek care.

“Because most of us are still susceptible,” said Cieslak, “we need to keep practicing physical distancing and masking until we have effective vaccines, treatments or other means of mitigating illness.”

The antibody test shows that people whose blood was tested for antibodies were exposed to COVID-19 at some point, even if they never had symptoms. But Cieslak emphasized it’s not a good test to get if you think you have COVID-19, because antibodies don’t appear in your blood until two to three weeks after exposure to the virus. Plus, he explained, “we don’t know if antibodies to COVID-19 mean you are protected, so you still need to wear a face covering, maintain physical distancing, and keep washing your hands.”

For more information on antibody testing, visit the CDC website at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/testing/serology-overview.html.

# # #


Advance Directive Adoption Committee meets August 19
Oregon Health Authority - 08/13/20 2:21 PM

August 13, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Advance Directive Adoption Committee.

Agenda: Finalize Advance Directive form and user’s guide and discuss delivery of the documents to the Legislature.

When: Wednesday, Aug. 19, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: By conference call at 669-254-5252, access code 161 654 0765.

The Advance Directive Adoption Committee provides guidance to the Oregon Health Authority on necessary revisions to Oregon’s Advance Directive form.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY or a.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 294 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 08/13/20 12:46 PM

August 13, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 294 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed eight more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 383, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 294 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 22,300.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (5), Clackamas (14), Columbia (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (4), Hood River (2), Jackson (16), Jefferson (13), Josephine (2), Klamath (2), Lane (7), Lincoln (7), Linn (4), Malheur (12), Marion (35), Morrow (6), Multnomah (84), Polk (6), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (20), Union (2), Wasco (2), Washington (36), and Yamhill (9).

Oregon’s 376th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on August 5 and died August 10 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 377th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 16 and died on August 8, at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 378th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on August 2 and died on August 9. More information about presence of underlying conditions and location of death is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 379th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on August 5 and died on August 11 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 380th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 12 and died on August 9 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 381st COVID-19 death is a 55-year-old man in Columbia County who tested positive on August 7 and died on August 9 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 382nd COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on August 6 and died on August 7 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 383rd COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 30 and died on August 9 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.


OHA leadership to provide update on COVID-19 August 14

OHA Director Patrick Allen and Dr. Emilio Debess, a state epidemiologist, will hold a weekly media availability at 2 p.m. Friday, Aug, 14. Media is invited to call in and ask questions at 844-867-6163. Access Code is 593699.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Media Advisory: OHA leadership to provide update on COVID-19 August 14
Oregon Health Authority - 08/13/20 12:31 PM

Media Advisory: OHA leadership to provide update on COVID-19 August 14

OHA Director Patrick Allen and Dr. Emilio Debess, a state epidemiologist will hold a weekly media availability at 2 p.m. Friday, Aug. 14. Media is invited to call in and ask questions at 844-867-6163. Access Code is 593699

For more information: media.COVID-19@state.or.us


Oregon reports 258 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 08/12/20 1:32 PM

August 12, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 258 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed seven more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 375, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 258 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 22,022.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (4), Clackamas (24), Columbia (2), Deschutes (1), Douglas (3), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (14), Jefferson (5), Josephine (4), Lane (10), Lincoln (2), Linn (7), Malheur (17), Marion (29), Morrow (2), Multnomah (45), Polk (4), Umatilla (30), Wallowa (1), Wasco (1), Washington (41), and Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 369th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on June 17 and died on August 10 at Good Shepherd Health System. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 370th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on August 6 and died on August 8. Location of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 371st COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 15 and died on August 9 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 372nd COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on July 30 and died on August 11 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 373rd COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on August 6 and died on August 10 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 374th COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on July 17 and died on August 9 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 375th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 6 and died on August 2 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.


COVID-19 cases declined last week

Daily cases of COVID-19 declined slightly during the week of Monday, Aug. 3 through Sunday Aug. 9, according to the COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today. There were 2,122 new cases that week, a slight drop from the previous week’s tally of 2,278. Twenty-nine deaths were reported, a drop from 39 the previous week.

The percentage of positive tests also decreased to 5.4%, and hospitalizations have plateaued. The age group most affected by the virus remains 20-29, although the elderly remain the hardest hit age group. Persons 80 or older account for nearly half of all those hospitalized.

Most cases continue to be sporadic, meaning there is no known source, which is an indication the virus is widespread.


Outbreaks surpass 20 cases

An outbreak of 22 cases of COVID-19 has been reported at Pan American Berry Growers in Marion County. The case count includes all persons linked to the outbreak, which may include household members and other close contacts to an employee.

The outbreak investigation started on July 30, but the initial case count was below the threshold for public disclosure.

An outbreak of 29 cases of COVID-19 has been reported at Good Shepherd Health Care System in Umatilla County. The case count includes all persons linked to the outbreak, which may include household members and other close contacts to an employee.

The outbreak investigation started on July 16, but the initial case count was below the threshold for public disclosure. State and county public health officials are working with these organizations to address the outbreaks and protect the health of workers.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 302 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 11 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/20 2:13 PM

August 11, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 302 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 11 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 11 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 368, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 302 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 21,774.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (23), Clatsop (4), Columbia (5), Crook (1), Curry (2), Deschutes (5), Douglas (5), Hood River (8), Jackson (12), Jefferson (6), Josephine (9), Klamath (3), Lane (6), Lincoln (2), Linn (12), Malheur (19), Marion (42), Morrow (6), Multnomah (60), Polk (5), Umatilla (16), Union (1), Wasco (2), Washington (41), and Yamhill (4).

Note: OHA receives death certificate information from the Office of Vital Statistics. Epidemiologists review death certificate information for Oregonians that have COVID-19 listed as a main cause of death or a contributing cause of death. When a death is reported to a county, the county may not always have the cause of death, and this death would not be counted as a COVID-19 related death. During data reconciliation by OHA, additional COVID-19 related deaths may be found and reported. The deaths reported today include eight deaths that were identified during this review process.

Oregon’s 358th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on May 22 and died on August 7 at OHSU. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 359th COVID-19 death is a 105-year-old woman in Clackamas County who died on July 5, in her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease, or SARS-CoV-2, as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death.

Oregon’s 360th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 23 and died on August 8 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 361st COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on May 7 and died on July 27 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 362nd COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on July 23 and died on August 5 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 363rd COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on August 3 and died on August 8 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 364th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on April 7 and died on June 10 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 365th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on May 31 and died on June 14 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 366th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on June 16 and died on June 30 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 367th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 27 and died on July 7 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had no reported underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 368th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on April 8 and died on July 12 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.


Outbreak surpasses 20 cases

An outbreak of 25 cases of COVID-19 has been reported at Smith Foods in Umatilla County. The case count includes all persons linked to the outbreak, which may include household members and other close contacts to an employee.

The outbreak investigation started on July 24, but the initial case count was below the threshold for public disclosure. State and county public health officials are working with the company to address the outbreak and protect the health of the workers.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Health officials urge parents to get their children caught up on vaccines
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/20 9:49 AM

August 11, 2020

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Health officials urge parents to get their children caught up on vaccines

Parents are understandably nervous about taking their children and teens to their doctors’ offices right now. As a result, children in Oregon are falling behind on their childhood vaccinations.

August is National Immunization Awareness Month and we want to work with families to ensure this pandemic is not followed by an increase in cases of vaccine-preventable diseases or a preventable outbreak.

"How students attend school is changing because of COVID-19," says Stacy de Assis Matthews, school immunization coordinator at OHA. "We want to make sure students are fully vaccinated, so they are protected in whatever form their school looks like: in a classroom, in a small group cohort, or online at home with their family."

Families have the power to protect their children against serious, potentially life-threatening diseases. Parents should talk to their child’s doctor or nurse about whether they have missed any routine vaccines.

Before rescheduling any upcoming childhood vaccination or well visit appointments, call the child’s health care provider to find out if the appointment can remain as scheduled and what precautions they are taking to keep everyone safe from COVID-19.

  • Many health care providers’ offices are taking special precautions such as ensuring children who are well are kept separate from sick children.
  • Many providers are limiting the number of people who can go with a child to their appointment and are taking temperatures of all family members before allowing them into the building.
  • Some providers are providing drive-up vaccine programs.

With so many people out of work and without health insurance, it’s important to know you can still keep your child safe. The Vaccines for Children (VFC) program offers free vaccines to families who cannot afford to pay for their children’s vaccines. Call 211 to find out more about VFC.

If your children need health insurance, they may be eligible for the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). It is open to all children and teens younger than 19, regardless of immigration status, who meet income and other criteria. Trained community partners across the state can help you fill out an application. It's free. Visit http://www.OHP.Oregon.gov to find community partners in your area.

Video links

A public health physician urges parents to keep their children up-to-date on vaccines during the pandemic: https://youtu.be/Pu8zooveHtI

A pediatrician explains precautions they are taking to keep families safe from COVID-19 when they take their children for their vaccines: https://youtu.be/-xHUzPKP0BA


OHA Releases Weekly Testing Summary
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/20 6:19 PM

August 10, 2020

Today, OHA released its Weekly Testing Summary which showed that the week of Aug. 2 – Aug. 8, 25,744 tests were reported. Of those tests, 1,380 or 5.4 percent were positive, down from the 6.3 percent rate a week earlier.

This week, OHA has begun using specimen collection date as our denominator for COVID-19 test results, including percentage positivity, across all of OHA’s reported testing data. This change means testing data will be reported based on the date/week in which specimens were collected. These products include the Tableau data dashboards summarizing percent positivity by county, the overall percent positivity in Oregon, the data for metrics relating to schools reopening, as well as this Weekly Testing Summary and the Weekly Report. The data in these various products will not shift significantly as a result of this change.


Odell Lake recreational use health advisory lifted August 10
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/20 1:50 PM

August 10, 2020

Odell Lake recreational use health advisory lifted August 10

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for Odell Lake in Klamath County. The health authority issued the advisory July 22.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in Odell Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.


Oregon reports 227 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/20 11:47 AM

August 10, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 227 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 357, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 227 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 21,488. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Clackamas (10), Columbia (1), Crook (2), Deschutes (7), Hood River (2), Jackson (8), Jefferson (11), Lane (5), Lincoln (2), Linn (3), Malheur (21), Marion (27), Morrow (15), Multnomah (45), Polk (6), Umatilla (15), Washington (37), and Yamhill (8).

Oregon’s 357th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 29 and died on August 5 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 263 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 08/09/20 10:34 AM

August 9, 2020

Oregon reports 263 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 356, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 263 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 21,272.

The new cases are in the following counties: Clackamas (15), Columbia (2), Deschutes (8), Douglas (1), Hood River (7), Jackson (4), Jefferson (5), Josephine (1), Lane (6), Lincoln (2), Linn (4), Malheur (15), Marion (28), Morrow (3), Multnomah (66), Polk (1), Umatilla (40), Wasco (3), Washington (42), Yamhill (10).

Oregon’s 356th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on August 2 and died on August 6, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

38

0

1,066

Benton

169

6

8,723

Clackamas

1,538

40

40,686

Clatsop

85

0

3,834

Columbia

96

0

4,611

Coos

91

0

4,131

Crook

47

1

1,799

Curry

15

0

1,072

Deschutes

604

10

19,219

Douglas

151

1

8,432

Gilliam

4

0

199

Grant

4

0

549

Harney

10

0

585

Hood River

191

0

3,839

Jackson

465

2

19,913

Jefferson

360

4

3,440

Josephine

115

2

7,103

Klamath

201

2

7,521

Lake

32

0

535

Lane

585

3

43,952

Lincoln

416

9

6,931

Linn

281

10

11,210

Malheur

783

14

3,448

Marion

2,911

70

32,122

Morrow

357

3

1,228

Multnomah

4,917

95

94,631

Polk

313

12

5,389

Sherman

16

0

270

Tillamook

34

0

2,143

Umatilla

2,290

28

9,523

Union

394

2

2,530

Wallowa

19

1

713

Wasco

192

3

3,729

Washington

3,088

25

60,176

Wheeler

0

0

139

Yamhill

460

13

10,373

Total

21,272

356

425,765

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.


Oregon reports 376 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 08/08/20 10:53 AM

August 8, 2020

Oregon reports 376 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed seven more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 355, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 376 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 21,010.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (5), Clackamas (23), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (1), Crook (4), Curry (1), Deschutes (15), Douglas (2), Hood River (3), Jackson (12), Jefferson (9), Josephine (1), Lane (14), Lincoln (2), Linn (6), Malheur (14), Marion (47), Morrow (6), Multnomah (87), Polk (5), Sherman (2), Umatilla (27), Wasco (8), Washington (56), Yamhill (22).

Oregon’s 349th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on July 21 and died on August 5, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 350th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on June 17 and died on July 19, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 351st COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Umatilla County who died on July 14 in his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2, as a cause of death or as a significant condition that contributed to his death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 352nd COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 8 and died on July 28, at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 353rd COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on July 23 and died on August 7. Additional details of his death are still being confirmed.

Oregon’s 354th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on August 6 and died on August 7. Additional details of his death are still being confirmed.

Oregon’s 355th COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on August 4 and died on August 5. Additional details of his death are still being confirmed.

There is additional information on Oregon’s 342nd COVID-19 death. He is an 80-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on July 15 and died on August 6, at Rogue Valley Medical Center in Medford. He had underlying conditions

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

38

0

1,061

Benton

169

6

8,700

Clackamas

1,523

40

40,376

Clatsop

85

0

3,805

Columbia

94

0

4,579

Coos

91

0

4,106

Crook

47

1

1,788

Curry

15

0

1,069

Deschutes

596

10

19,007

Douglas

150

1

8,364

Gilliam

4

0

197

Grant

4

0

543

Harney

10

0

584

Hood River

184

0

3,799

Jackson

461

2

19,781

Jefferson

355

4

3,426

Josephine

114

2

7,011

Klamath

201

2

7,496

Lake

32

0

533

Lane

579

3

43,621

Lincoln

414

9

6,926

Linn

277

10

11,155

Malheur

768

14

3,441

Marion

2,883

70

31,940

Morrow

354

3

1,209

Multnomah

4,849

94

93,607

Polk

313

12

5,293

Sherman

16

0

265

Tillamook

34

0

2,125

Umatilla

2,251

28

9,449

Union

394

2

2,530

Wallowa

19

1

711

Wasco

189

3

3,702

Washington

3,047

25

59,724

Wheeler

0

0

139

Yamhill

450

13

10,296

Total

21,010

355

422,358

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.


OHCS Awards $60,822,101 to Build and Preserve 802 Affordable Homes for Oregonians (Photo)
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 08/10/20 10:09 AM
2020 LIHTC Awards
2020 LIHTC Awards
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/1810/136829/thumb_LIHTC-Graph.png

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

August 10, 2020

 

CONTACT:

Kate Gonsalves

Communications and Public Relations Coordinator

Oregon Housing and Community Services

(503) 931-5087, Kate.Gonsalves@oregon.gov

 

Oregon Housing and Community Services Awards $60,822,101 to Build and Preserve 802 Affordable Homes for Oregonians

 

SALEM, OR - Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) is excited to announce funding awards of $60,822,101 worth of grants and tax credits to build and preserve 802 homes through the federal 9% Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), HOME, and General Housing Account Program (GHAP) resources, which leverage local, state, and private investments throughout the state for the development of affordable housing.

“Ensuring all Oregon families have a safe and affordable place to call home is all the more crucial during this pandemic,” said Governor Brown. “I’m grateful to OHCS and the Housing Stability Council for their work to ensure that these critical investments in affordable housing will help Oregonians throughout the state, including people both in urban and rural Oregon, as well as people from Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and other communities of color as we continue to work to address Oregon’s housing needs.”

These investments address the statewide shortage of affordable housing through the development and preservation of affordable rental homes at a time when the long term economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic will make affordable housing even more crucial.  As a result of this funding, over 800 households will have safe, stable housing that will serve Oregonians for generations to come.

“Especially in a time of crisis, access to an affordable, safe, and stable place to call home is critically important, now more than ever,” said OHCS Executive Director Margaret Salazar. “I am proud that we are able to open doors all across the state, in communities large and small, to help Oregon families build stable homes and inclusive, vibrant communities where all our neighbors can thrive.”

On Friday the Oregon Housing Stability Council approved the developments listed on the following page. The full details can be found online.

Here is the direct link in case the hyperlink above did not work:  https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/hsc/Documents/meetings/2020/2020-AUG-07-HSC-Meeting-Packet.pdf

 

Key For Attachment: 

GHAP = General Housing Assistance Program (state resource)

HDGP = Housing Development Grant Program (state resource)

HOME = HOME Investment Partnerships (federal resource)

OAHTC = Oregon Affordable Housing Tax Credits (state resource)

OMEP = Oregon Multifamily Energy Program (state resource)

LIHTC 4% = Low Income Housing Tax Credits (federal resource), non-competitive

LIIHTC 9% = Low Income Housing Tax Credits (federal resource), competitive




Attached Media Files: 2020 LIHTC Awards , 2020 LIHTC Awards

Sweet Home Man Wins "The Golden Ticket" (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 08/13/20 12:14 PM
2020-08/4939/136919/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2020-08/4939/136919/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-08/4939/136919/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

August 13, 2020 - Salem, Ore. – Thousands of times, James Ashcraft of Sweet Home has watched at his bar “Chewy’s Pub” as people from around the state have hit Keno 8-spot jackpots.

This time, he’s the one who hit a jackpot of just over $92,000.

Ashcraft has owned the bar for 18 years. He said that every now and then he will play Lottery games with customers or play when the jackpots get large.

“I figure if I spend $60 for the chance to win $60,000, that’s a good bet,” Ashcraft said. “This time it really paid off!”

Ashcraft said that Sunday he watched as the rolling Keno 8-spot bonus grew to more than $60,000 and decided to take a chance. He purchased $60 worth of tickets over the course of the day, and when he came in for his shift Monday, realized he had won.

“I felt like I had the gold ticket — and I really did!” he said.

Ashcraft had won not only the $25,000 Special Keno prize, but also the rolling 8-spot jackpot of $67,266 for a total of $92,325. Keno 8-spot has a rolling jackpot that grows with each game until it is hit. 

Ashcraft claimed his prize after making an appointment with the Oregon Lottery.


To protect the health and safety of its employees and the public, the Oregon Lottery has temporarily closed the Salem and Wilsonville Lottery offices. Officials with the Lottery continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation closely. If players have a winning ticket up to $50,000, they can fill out a claim form on the Oregon Lottery website, https://oregonlottery.org/about/claim-prizes , and then mail in the signed ticket and claim form.


Players who have winning tickets of $50,000 or more will need to make an appointment to come to the Oregon Lottery office in Salem. Call 503-540-1000 for assistance. Players should always sign the back of their winning tickets. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings.


Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org




Attached Media Files: 2020-08/4939/136919/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2020-08/4939/136919/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , James Ashcraft of Sweet Home claims his Keno prize at the Lottery's Salem headquarters.

Oregon's Office of Emergency Management offers tips to beat the heat and keep safe during wildfire season
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 08/13/20 2:35 PM

Salem, Ore – August 13, 2020 – High temperatures and low humidity are forecasted across the state this weekend, bringing concerns about heat-related illnesses and wildfire activity. 

Heat-related illness is a serious threat, especially for elderly, youth, those without air conditioning, and those working or exercising outdoors. Helpful tips for heat safety include:

  • Hot cars can be deadly. Never leave children or pets in your vehicle. The inside temperature of a car can quickly reach 120 degrees.
  • Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day.
  • Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat. Take frequent breaks if working outdoors.
  • If you’re out on the water to stay cool, be sure to wear a life jacket and wear sunscreen.
  • Stay hydrated, drink water, and avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
  • Even in high heat, face coverings are important in times of COVID-19. Be sure to wear one inside or outside when you cannot maintain a 6 ft. distance from others.
  • The American Red Cross Heat Wave Safety sheet provides additional guidance on what to do before and during extreme heat, and how to treat heat-related illnesses.

Current weather conditions can also create or exacerbate wildfire activity. During these times, common everyday activities such as mowing the lawn or pulling your vehicle off to the side of the road may start a wildfire. Here are some good wildfire safety tips to review:

  • Do not mow when it’s windy or excessively dry; lawn mowers are designed to cut lawn, not weeds or dry grass. Metal blades striking rocks can create sparks and start a fire.
  • Make sure your vehicle is properly maintained with nothing dragging on the road. Don’t drive on dry grass or brush since hot exhaust pipes and mufflers can start fires.
  • Carry a fire extinguisher in your vehicle and learn how to use it.
  • Smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires and also causes additional complications with the COVID-19 pandemic. For comprehensive information about smoke conditions in your area, visit http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com.
  • Ready.gov offers additional guidance on staying safe when a wildfire threatens.

“Know your risks and be prepared for them,” says OEM Director Andrew Phelps. “Make sure to have a ‘go-kit,’ register for emergency notification systems in your community, and make a plan where your family will go and how you will stay in contact if evacuated. OEM’s 2 Weeks Ready initiative offers a real way each of us can help ourselves and our communities prepare for drastic conditions and other emergencies.”

 


Volunteers needed to fill two upcoming vacancies on statewide ATV Advisory Committee
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/12/20 9:00 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking volunteers for two upcoming vacant positions on the All-Terrain Vehicle Advisory Committee (ATV-AC). One of the successful candidates will also serve on the ATV Grant Subcommittee.

OPRD is accepting applications for the following positions:  

  • At-Large ATV User Representative; this person will also serve on the ATV Grant Subcommittee
  • ATV Dealer Representative

Volunteers serve up to two consecutive four-year terms. To apply for one of the open positions, go to the ATV-AC webpage at oregon.gov/oprd/ATV/Pages/ATV-committee.aspx#1  and click the “Committee Interest Form” link at the bottom of the section. Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. September 10, 2020.

The ATV-AC typically holds one to two public meetings per year, which may be conducted either in-person or remotely adhering to COVID-19 guidelines. It is tasked with

  • reviewing accidents and fatalities resulting from ATV recreation;
  • reviewing changes to statutory vehicle classifications as necessary for safety considerations;
  • reviewing safety features of all classes of Off-Highway Vehicles (OHV);
  • recommending appropriate safety requirements to protect child and adult OHV operators.

The Grant Subcommittee holds up to four public meetings per year, which may be conducted either in-person or conducted remotely adhering to COVID-19 guidelines.  The subcommittee is responsible for reviewing and recommending grant funding in support of ATV recreational activities throughout the state, including maintenance, law enforcement, emergency medical services, land acquisition, and planning and development. Computer access and experience is mandatory. Knowledge of OHV riding areas throughout Oregon is beneficial.

OPRD is committed to ensuring that all Boards and Commissions represent the growing age, racial and gender diversity of the state. All citizens with OHV experience are welcome and encouraged to serve.

For more information, contact Jeff Trejo, OPRD ATV safety education coordinator, at ejo@oregon.gov">jeff.trejo@oregon.gov or 503-586-9622.


Counties/Regional
East Pine Street (Central Point) Bridge work over Bear Creek
Jackson County Roads - 08/14/20 10:00 AM

Expect lane closures and delays this Sunday morning (August 16th) as bridge maintenance work is performed between 4:00AM and noon.  Motorists should reduce speed and obey all traffic control devices as lanes are merged and shifted.


Organizations & Associations
On Social Security's 85th Anniversary, Survey Finds Nearly All Americans View Social Security as an Important Program Majority Believe it is More Important in Light of Pandemic
AARP Oregon - 08/14/20 10:29 AM

WASHINGTON— A new AARP survey, released in conjunction with Social Security’s 85th anniversary, confirms that Americans highly value Social Security, and even more so due to the pandemic. The vast majority of Americans – 93% of Republicans, 99% of Democrats, and 92% of Independents – see Social Security as an important government program, and 56% believe it is even more important for retirees in light of the coronavirus pandemic. In a letter sent yesterday to President Trump, AARP asked him to explain his plan to replace Social Security funding.

 

Nearly 665,320 of retired Oregonians receive Social Security retirement benefits and accounts for 50% or more of family income for half of Oregon beneficiaries and 90% or more for 18.7% of Oregon beneficiaries.

 

 “AARP Oregon is fighting to protect voters 50-plus and make their voices heard on the issues that matter – protecting Social Security and Medicare, lowering prescription drug prices, and ensuring you can vote safely from home or in-person,” said AARP Oregon State Director Ruby Haughton-Pitts. “Workers have paid into Social Security with every paycheck. It’s a hard-earned benefit and a promise that must be kept. AARP will never stop fighting to strengthen Social Security, and make sure hard-working Americans get the benefits they’ve earned.

 

AARP’s survey found that Social Security is a key source of income and economic stability in retirement, but they have concerns about whether it will be enough.

 

  • Nearly three-quarters of Americans (74%) are worried that Social Security will not provide enough to live on during their retirement.
  • Two-thirds of Americans believe the average monthly Social Security retirement benefit of $1503 per month is too low. Nearly 3 in 5 Americans are not confident in the future of Social Security, with confidence in the program lowest among 30-49-year-olds at only 28%.
  • Nearly 2 in 5 Americans (39%) say they do or will rely on Social Security for a substantial portion of their retirement income and 4 out of 5 expect it to be part of their retirement income.

Social Security is a key component of AARP Oregon’s “Protect Voters 50+” campaign which launched August 3. The initiative is calling on the presidential candidates to tell us their plan to protect Social Security for current and future generations, and helping voters cast their votes safely from home or in-person this November.

 

This survey was conducted among 1,441 Americans 18 and older between July 14, 2020 and July 27, 2020 with a confidence interval of ± 3.4% at the 95% confidence level.

 

AARP Oregon has more than 510,000 members in Oregon.

 

###

 

About AARP
AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation's largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org or follow @AARP and @AARPadvocates on social media.


The 2020 Scramble for Sight Golf Classic is ON!
Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation - 08/11/20 2:37 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                          

CONTACT: Doug Thompson, Executive Director

Email: DougT@OLSHF.org

NEWS RELEASE

The 2020 Scramble for Sight Golf Classic is ON!

Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, Oregon school students and younger children still are faced with undiagnosed vision issues that can be best discovered through high quality school vision screenings. The Lions of Oregon are as focused as ever in their efforts to help young people read better and do better in school and they have a fun way to help support that mission this summer with The 2020 Scramble for Sight Golf Classic!

Golfers all over Oregon are invited to register the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation, play at their community course during the week of August 30th to September 5th, 2020, donate at least $100 per player to OLSHF, post their 4-Man Scramble or individual 18-hole score and receive over $350 in “tee prizes” including a logo polo shirt, Bluetooth sports ear buds, Bridgestone golf balls and more!

Using the USGA Slope rating of each participating 18-hole golf course, team and individual winners in the following categories will win more great golf prizes like drivers, high-tech golf bags and more!

  • Low Net Team and Individual
  • Most money raised – Team and Individual
  • High Net Score – Team and Individual
  • Best Team and Individual Costumes

What golf formats are recognized?

Almost all! Real USGA courses, community courses, mini-golf and even Wii Golf! Have fun and help children all over Oregon see to their potential so they can learn to their potential!

Please watch our commercial to learn more - https://youtu.be/H9nPwE7To0Q

To register, simply email dougt@olshf.org and he’ll get you started.

About OLSHF & the Lions of Oregon

We are the Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation (OLSHF), serving communities statewide. We are driven by a promise made to American author and deaf blind activist Helen Keller. In 1925, at an International Lions Convention, she challenged Lions to focus on preventable sight and hearing issues as their primary mission. Since our formation in 1959, we have endeavored to uphold this promise by creating programs in response to the need for sight and hearing assistance. We have built upon the promise made to Helen Keller by creating a continuum of care for people who lack access to vision and hearing services.

In partnership with the Lions Clubs of Oregon and community organizations, we serve people through critical sight saving surgeries and treatments; manufacturing new eyeglasses; helping people who can’t afford eyeglasses and hearing aids, and creating the largest vision screening program in the US. Our statewide programs serve children to the elderly, giving them much needed access to optical and hearing services. In 2015, we launched the LEAP Optical Finishing Lab that allows OLSHF to manufacture high quality, low cost eyeglasses. Annually, over 2,000 Oregonians receive new eyeglasses built by our lab. Learn more at www.olshf.org or www.facebook.com/olshf.

MD-36 Lions: Lions of Oregon & Northern California are a part of an international network of 1.4 million men and women in 200 countries and geographic areas who work together to answer the needs that challenge communities around the world. Lions are best known for working to end preventable blindness, the giving of eyeglasses and hearing aids for the needy and local service projects. http://www.md36lionsclubs.org/

About Lions Clubs International:
Lions Clubs International is the largest service club organization in the world. Our 1.4 million members in more than 46,000 clubs provide humanitarian service in more than 200 countries and geographical areas around the globe. Since 1917, Lions clubs have aided the blind and visually impaired, championed youth initiatives and strengthened communities through hands on service and humanitarian projects. For more information about Lions Clubs International, visit www.lionsclubs.org.

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