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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Sun. Aug. 25 - 1:51 am
Sat. 08/24/19
Burglary Arrest (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 08/24/19 10:20 PM
2019-08/6530/127064/Gustin.PNG
2019-08/6530/127064/Gustin.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/6530/127064/thumb_Gustin.PNG

08/23/19

 

ARRESTED:

Gustin III, Joseph J.   WMA (31 Years Old)

Grants Pass Resident

CHARGES:
Burglary in the Second Degree-3 Counts
Attempted Burglary in the Second Degree
Criminal Mischief in the First Degree- 2 Counts
Theft in the First Degree- 2 Counts
Theft in the First Degree (Receiving/Selling)
Attempted Theft in the Second Degree
Forgery in the First Degree
Theft in the Third Degree

 

Beginning in early March of 2019, Officer with the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety (GPDPS) responded to several commercial burglaries where entry was made via the rooftops of local businesses. The investigation into these incidents have been ongoing. On May 1, 2019, Officers responded to an alarm at Shop River Rock (966 SW 6th Street) and located a possible burglary suspect. The suspect fled from officers on foot and was not apprehended at that time. It was determined the suspect had entered the gift shop through a second floor door, which was accessed via the roof.

On August 23, 2019, another alarm at the location revealed a second burglary had been committed at Shop River Rock where entry was made through the rooftop door. During both incidents several thousand dollars in purses and jewelry were stolen. During the second burglary, the suspect had also caused several thousand dollars in property damage by forcing entry. Video surveillance of the suspect was obtained and lead investigators to identify Joseph Gustin III as the suspect.

On August 24, 2019, Gustin returned to the gift shop and was recognized by employees. Police responded, detained Gustin, and transported him to the Grants Pass Police Department for further investigation. At the conclusion, Gustin was lodged at the Josephine County Jail on the above listed charges. Through the investigation, it was determined Gustin is linked to five of the previous rooftop burglaries.  Gustin is being charged with crimes related to those cases.

These incidents are still under investigation and anyone with further information is asked to contact Detective John Lohrfink with the Grants Pass Department of Public safety at 541-450-6260.  




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/6530/127064/Gustin.PNG

Motorcyclist seriously injured in Hwy 26 crash - Baker County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/24/19 8:10 PM
2019-08/1002/127067/August_2019_027.jpg
2019-08/1002/127067/August_2019_027.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/1002/127067/thumb_August_2019_027.jpg

On Friday, August 23, 2019 at approximately 11:15 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a serious injury crash on Hwy 26 near milepost 202.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a  Ford (F350) flatbed pickup hauling a Honda ATV, operated by Justin Jacobs (38) of Prairie City, was traveling westbound on Hwy 26 when the strap holding the ATV to  the truck came loose and the ATV fell off the truck.  The ATV struck an eastbound Honda motorcycle operated by Enes Smith (72) of Madras.

Smith was transported by Air ambulance with serious injuries. 

OSP was assisted by the Baker County Sheriff’s Office, EMS from Unity and Baker City, and ODOT. 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/1002/127067/August_2019_027.jpg , 2019-08/1002/127067/August_2019_018.jpg

Motorcyclist seriously injured in Hwy 22 crash - Polk County
Oregon State Police - 08/24/19 7:41 PM

On Saturday, August 24, 2019 at approximately 1:53 P.M. OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of a serious injury crash on Hwy 22 near milepost 24.

The investigation showed a gray Honda van, operated by Zoe Serrano (25) of Salem, exited a driveway into the path of a westbound Honda motorcycle operated by Issac Esparza (20) of Keizer.

Esparza sustained serious injuries and was transported to Salem Hospital.

Serrano was not injured. 

OSP was assisted by the Salem Police Department and ODOT


Fri. 08/23/19
Nurse Staffing Advisory Board meets August 28
Oregon Health Authority - 08/23/19 1:21 PM

August 23, 2019

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review of minutes from July meeting; status updates on surveys and complaints; committee updates, overtime documentation discussion; nurse staffing complaint discussion; emerging issues in nurse staffing; and public comment. The agenda is available on the OHA’s nurse staffing website at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Aug. 28, 1-5 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. By conference call at 877-336-1829, access code 2075141.

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the basis of those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

For more information, see the agency nurse staffing website at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

Program contact: Matt Gilman, 971-673-2317, matt.s.gilman@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Matt Gilman, MPPA at 971-673-2317, 711 TTY or matt.s.gilman@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Josephine County Sheriff's Office Volunteers Needed
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/23/19 12:23 PM

REPORTING DEPUTY: Undersheriff Travis Snyder

DETAILS:   The Josephine County Sheriff’s Office is looking for additional volunteers to assist with some of our day-to-day duties.  Special functions include community activities, vacation home checks, court security, managing our sub stations as well as other events and office details.

We really appreciate the many volunteers who provide valuable services on behalf of the citizens of Josephine County.  If you are interested in volunteering please submit a volunteer application.  The application can be found on the Josephine County website at http://www.co.josephine.or.us/.  Those interested can also contact the friendly volunteers at the Merlin and Cave Junction Sub Stations.                                                                                                                                    

 

Merlin Sub Station

100 Acorn St.

Merlin, OR 97532

(541) 474-5135

 

Cave Junction Sub Station

222 Lister St.

Merlin, OR 97523

(541) 592-5151

 

 

 


Oregon Lottery offers fairgoers exclusive look at new sports betting game - Scoreboard (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 08/23/19 10:44 AM
Oregon Lottery Scoreboard mobile app
Oregon Lottery Scoreboard mobile app
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/4939/127045/thumb_7-29_OREOGN_LOTTERY_SCOREBOARD_HOME_SCREEN.png

August 23, 2019 - Salem, Ore. A visit to the Oregon Lottery’s “Scoreboard Arena” in Cascade Hall during the Oregon State Fair offers fairgoers an opportunity to have fun, win prizes and get an exclusive video look at Oregon Lottery Scoreboard.

“We’re excited to have people visit us during the fair,” said Lottery Promotions Supervisor Kevin Ziebart. “You must be 21 years of age or older to get into the Scoreboard Arena. Once inside, you’ll be able to watch videos about Oregon Lottery Scoreboard and play sports-related games for fun and prizes.”

Oregon Lottery Scoreboard is the Lottery’s new sports betting game that gives players a chance to place wagers on professional sports. The new game will soon be available on its own mobile app as well on the Lottery’s website at oregonlottery.org. The Lottery is targeting the launch of the game for the NFL regular season.

“Players are anxiously waiting for the release of Scoreboard,” added Oregon Lottery Spokesman Chuck Baumann. “We’re in the final testing phase and just want to ensure the game and player accounts are fully functional and secure prior to release of the game. Once the game is launched, the list of professional sports players will have access to includes the NFL, NBA, Major League Baseball, Major League Soccer, PGA, even NASCAR.”

Oregon Beverage Services will be sharing space with the Oregon Lottery during the fair. Customers will be able to buy all Lottery products including Keno, Scratch-its and Video Lottery.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Attached Media Files: Oregon Lottery Scoreboard mobile app , Oregon Lottery Scoreboard logo , Oregon Lottery "Scoreboard Arena" at Oregon State Fair

D River Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach health advisories lifted on August 23
Oregon Health Authority - 08/23/19 8:19 AM

August 23, 2019

D River Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach health advisories lifted on August 23

The Oregon Health Authority today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at D River Beach and Seal Rock State Park Beach, located in Lincoln County. The health authority issued the advisory August 20 for D River Beach and August 22 for Seal Rock State Park Beach after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

# # #

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ERD/Pages/DRiverSealRockStateParkHealthAdvisoriesLiftedAugust23.aspx


Menacing Arrest (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 08/23/19 7:56 AM
Rhodes, Felicia
Rhodes, Felicia
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/6530/127037/thumb_Rhodes.PNG

ARRESTED:

Rhodes, Felicia Christine      WFA, 36 years old

Grants Pass Resident.  

CHARGES:
Unlawful use of a weapon x3

Menacing x3

Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree x2

On 8/22/2019 at approximately 8:06 am, Officers received a report of a female in a silver Toyota 4 door pointing a handgun at other drivers near SE M Street and SE 6th Street.  Several officers checked the area and the suspect vehicle was not located. Approximately an hour later, dispatch received a second call involving the same vehicle  near NE 7th Street and NE B Street.  The female was again menacing subjects with a handgun and fled the scene in the silver Toyota.   

Officers again respodned and began searching for the suspect vehicle. Officers located the vehicle and conducted a high risk vehicle stop on Ringuette Street near Union Ave.  36 year old Felicia Christine Rhodes was stopped and taken into custody on the listed charges.  She was found in possession .40 caliber handgun. No shots were fired and there were no injuries as a result of these incidents. 

Anyone who may have witnessed any additional incidents or with further information regarding this case is asked to contact Officer Maldonado with the Grants Pass Department of Public safety at 541-450-6260 and reference Case # 19-40768




Attached Media Files: Rhodes, Felicia

Governor's Task Force on the Outdoors meets Aug. 27 in Baker City
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/23/19 7:00 AM

BAKER CITY, Ore. – The Governor’s Task Force on the Outdoors will hold their third meeting of the year 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Aug. 27 at Sunridge Inn and Conference Center, 1 Sunridge Lane, Baker City. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: reviewing participation strategies, recommendations regarding economic impacts, a group discussion of draft recommendations and time for public comments.

View the detailed meeting agenda online.

The meeting is the third in a planned series; subsequent meetings will be held throughout Oregon. The group met for their inaugural meeting in May at Silver Falls State Park, near Silverton. 

Gov. Brown established the task force earlier this year, with the directive to explore long-term strategies for elevating outdoor recreation in the state. Task force members were appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. The governor tapped the Office of Outdoor Recreation, established in 2017 within the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), to guide the task force.

The task force is composed of private and public sector representatives and is chaired by Commissioner Jon Blasher of the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. Cailin O'Brien-Feeney, director of the Office of Outdoor Recreation, will manage the task force. View the full membership list online.

Building on and uniting other statewide outdoor recreation efforts, the task force will deliver its final report in April 2020 on recommendations for legislation, investment of existing public and private resources, future funding, and high-level management strategies. Top recommendations will be presented to the governor, state legislature and the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Carrie Lovellette, OPRD executive assistant, at 503-986-0733 or Carrie.Lovellette@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.


Thu. 08/22/19
BPSST Police Policy Committee Recognizes Washington County Sheriff Pat Garrett (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/22/19 5:26 PM
Left to right - BPSST Chair Patricia Patrick-Joling, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Chief John Teague
Left to right - BPSST Chair Patricia Patrick-Joling, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Chief John Teague
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/1187/127036/thumb_Sheriff_Garrett_-_PPC_8-2019_A.jpg

At its recent meeting, the Police Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (BPSST) recognized outgoing member Sheriff Pat Garrett of the Washington County for his four years of dedicated service on the Committee. 

Sheriff Garrett was presented with a certification of appreciation by BPSST Board Chair Patricia Patrick-Joling and Police Policy Committee Chair and Keizer Police Chief John Teague.

During Sheriff Garrett's four years on the Police Policy Committee, the group has been actively involved in a top-to-bottom review of the professional standards system used for law enforcement officer certification and a complete review and rebuild of the 16-week Basic Police Course used to train newly hired city, county, state, tribal and university law enforcement officers in Oregon. 

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "Sheriff Garrett's active participation on the Police Policy Committee was exemplary and the organization was sorry to see his second term on the Committee come to an end."  Oregon Revised Statute limits participation to two, two-year, terms for Policy Committee members.  Gabliks said "We join Board Chair Patrick-Joling, and Committee Chair Teague, in thanking Sheriff Garrett for his commitment and dedicated service."




Attached Media Files: Left to right - BPSST Chair Patricia Patrick-Joling, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Chief John Teague , Left to right - BPSST Chair Patricia Patrick-Joling, Sheriff Pat Garrett, Chief John Teague

Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 224 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 08/22/19 5:08 PM

On Wednesday, August 21, 2019 at approximately 8:35 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 224 near milepost 13. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2002 Chevrolet Trailblazer, operated by Cecilia Reid (18) of West Linn, was traveling westbound on Hwy 224.  Reid was negotiating a curve when she lost control on wet pavement and slid into the eastbound lane.  Reid collided with a eastbound 2015 Subaru Forester operated by Margaret White (74) of Estacada.  

White was transported to OHSU were she was pronounced deceased.

 

 

 


Newberg Man Pleads Guilty to Threatening School Shooting at California College
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/22/19 3:37 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Vasiliy V. Barbiyeru, Jr., 24, of Newberg, Oregon, pleaded guilty today to one count of transmitting a threatening interstate communication.

According to court documents, on October 7, 2017, Barbiyeru sent a threatening email to several individuals and groups at Deep Springs College in Big Pine, California where he had been denied admission. Barbiyeru had previously sent threatening emails to the college’s president and other associated persons.

On March 1, 2019, Barbiyeru was charged with first degree disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor, in Clackamas County Circuit Court after making similar threats of violence to Lake Oswego High School. Barbiyeru was arrested a short time later by the Lake Oswego Police Department. His state charges are still pending.

Barbiyeru faces a maximum sentence of five years in federal prison, a $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release. He will be sentenced on November 18, 2019 before U.S. District Court Chief Judge Michael W. Mosman.

This case was investigated by the FBI and the Newberg and McMinnville Police Departments and is being prosecuted by Hannah Horsley, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon Veterans' Affairs Advisory Committee's next meeting to be held in Seaside
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 08/22/19 2:20 PM

The next meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be held Wednesday, Sept. 11, at the Holiday Inn Express, 34 N. Holladay Dr., in Seaside. 

The advisory committee’s meetings are normally held at different locations across the state on the first Wednesday in March, June and December, as well as the second Wednesday in September. The public is invited to attend and participate.

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

More information can be found online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email vaac@odva.state.or.us.


Drowning Victim Located on Lost Creek Lake (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/22/19 1:43 PM
2019-08/6186/127022/IMG_1811.jpg
2019-08/6186/127022/IMG_1811.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/6186/127022/thumb_IMG_1811.jpg

TRAIL, Ore. – On June 9, 2019, the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) and other agencies responded to Lost Creek Lake for a reported drowning of two individuals. Deputies located the first victim, Irving Fuentes, 25, unresponsive in the water. He was transported to Providence Hospital where we was pronounced deceased.

The search for the second drowning victim, Juan Carlos Fuentes, 29, has been ongoing since the incident took place in June. Police, Fire, and Search and Rescue (SAR) personnel have worked diligently to recover Fuentes for his family.

Gene and Cindy Ralston, a retired couple from Idaho, were called upon for the search. The Ralston’s are experts in Side Scan Sonar and spend their retirement working to help families and searchers in situations like the one at Lost Creek Lake.

On August 20, the Ralstons arrived and quickly located an object believed to be a body approximately 135 feet below the surface.

On August 22, JCSO Marine Patrol and a JCSO Search and Rescue Dive Team began recovery efforts and were successful. The Jackson County Medical Examiner’s Office has positively identified the subject as Juan Carlos Fuentes.

The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the Search and Rescue personnel as well as Gene and Cindy Ralston for their help in allowing the Fuentes family to move forward in their grieving process.

Case #19-11565




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/6186/127022/IMG_1811.jpg , 2019-08/6186/127022/IMG_1805.jpg

Seal Rock State Park Beach health advisory issued August 22
Oregon Health Authority - 08/22/19 10:30 AM

Aug. 22, 2019

The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Seal Rock State Park Beach in Lincoln County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Seal Rock State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach or discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

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Video and audio resources for media here.

 

 

 

 


Department of the Interior Works with Partners to Improve Public Access Along the John Day Wild and Scenic River (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 08/22/19 9:20 AM
John Day River -- Photo: Lisa Clark, BLM
John Day River -- Photo: Lisa Clark, BLM
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/5514/127012/thumb_John_Day_River_--_Photo_Lisa_Clark_BLM.jpg

Acquisition of more than 11,000 acres will expand boating access to John Day River and open up thousands of acres of previously inaccessible public land for hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation.

PRINEVILLE, Ore. - The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced the final phase of the John Day Wild and Scenic River land acquisition, which consists of transferring 11,149 acres from the Western Rivers Conservancy. Adding these lands to public ownership creates another access point for boaters on the John Day River and offers augmented road access for hunting, fishing, hiking, camping, mountain biking, and horseback riding. The acquisition also opens up an additional 2,000 acres of public lands previously surrounded by private land and inaccessible to the public.

“I applaud the BLM for the years of work and collaboration that went into completing this multiphase significant acquisition along Oregon’s John Day River,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. “This area provides a rich variety of recreation opportunities throughout the year including hunting, fishing, horseback riding, hiking, skiing, camping, and whitewater rafting – pursuits that are also vital to the state’s economy.”

“Managing public lands for the benefit of all Americans requires collaboration among private landowners, conservation and recreation groups, and local, state, tribal, and federal governments,” said BLM Deputy Director for Policy and Programs William Perry Pendley. “This acquisition along the John Day River is a great example of these public-private partnerships and what we can achieve by working together.”

“This is a momentous achievement for the John Day River and recreationists alike,” said Sue Doroff, President of Western Rivers Conservancy. “People can now experience a spectacular stretch of one of the West’s great Wild and Scenic River corridors. At the same time, they can take pride in knowing that the lands they’re exploring are protected for the fish and wildlife—animals they will very likely see while visiting this special place,” continued Doroff.

The acquisition increases outdoor recreation opportunities and enhances conservation stewardship in support of Secretary’s Order 3366, Increasing Recreation Opportunities on Lands and Waters Managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior and Secretary’s Order 3347, Conservation Stewardship and Outdoor Recreation.

The John Day Wild and Scenic River is the second longest free-flowing river in the continental United States and hosts one of the few remaining wild fish runs in the Pacific Northwest. From its headwaters to Camas Creek, the North Fork of the river is one of the most important rivers in northeast Oregon for the production of anadromous fish, including endangered bull trout and summer steelhead, along with chinook salmon, redband trout, and westslope cutthroat trout. Wildlife found along the river's corridor include mule deer, elk, and black bears, along with peregrine falcons and bald eagles.

In 2018, outdoor recreation in Oregon generated $16.4 billion in consumer spending, supporting an estimated 172,000 direct jobs and resulting in $749 million in state and local tax revenues for local communities and visitors from throughout the country and the world.

This acquisition from the Western Rivers Conservancy (WRC) was made possible by an $8 million allocation from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). The LWCF, funded in large part by a portion of the federal revenues from offshore oil and gas development, supports the protection of federal public lands and waters and voluntary conservation on private land. The LWCF investments secure public access, improve recreational opportunities, and preserve ecosystem benefits for local communities.

In December 2014, WRC purchased the 14,148-acre Rattray Ranch which spans four miles of Thirtymile Creek and nearly two miles of the John Day River. In 2018, WRC purchased 2,939 acres of the Campbell Ranch, which spans an additional five miles of Thirtymile Creek, immediately upstream. WRC successfully transferred the first 4,083 acres of the ranch to the BLM in early 2018. Transfer of the remaining 11,149 acres will complete the acquisition process.

The completed acquisition will enable the conservation and restoration of four miles of Thirtymile creek, while improving steelhead habitat, and ensuring the stream remains a permanent source of cold water for the John Day. The project will also conserve 10 miles of river frontage along the John Day River itself and expand access for recreation and exploration. The Rattray Ranch lies at the heart of the John Day’s best habitat for California bighorn sheep, supporting an estimated 600 to 650 head, the largest herd in Oregon. Bighorn sheep are highly vulnerable to disease and can experience steep population declines as a result. Conserving high-quality habitat for these animals is key to their long-term vitality. The ranch is also home to Rocky Mountain elk, mule deer, pronghorn antelope and mountain lion, as well as raptors, upland game birds and numerous sensitive bird species.

The newly acquired area and its boat launch will be managed by the BLM’s Prineville District. Interim guidance will be provided by the John Day Basin Resource Management Plan, and Prineville District specialists will evaluate the new lands for road conditions, cultural resources, recreation needs, fish and wildlife habitat, grazing opportunities, and other resource objectives. 

For more information, please contact the Prineville District at (541) 416-6700 or by email at lm_or_pr_mail@blm.gov">blm_or_pr_mail@blm.gov.




Attached Media Files: John Day River -- Photo: Lisa Clark, BLM

State health officials alert clinicians to watch for severe respiratory illness among people who vape
Oregon Health Authority - 08/22/19 9:05 AM

Aug. 22, 2019

The Oregon Health Authority and local public health departments are urging clinicians to be on alert for signs of severe respiratory illness among individuals who report vaping or e-cigarette use.

OHA is aware of a cluster of respiratory illness primarily among teenagers and young adults in 16 states. These people have been hospitalized after experiencing worsening symptoms, including shortness of breath, cough, and chest pain. No deaths have been reported. CDC and the affected states have not identified a cause, but all cases have reported e-cigarette use or vaping. OHA knows of no cases in Oregon.

"These serious new illnesses are another reason to encourage people to avoid vaping or to quit if they’re ready," said Tom Jeanne, deputy health officer at OHA’s Public Health Division.

Before the new illness reports, OHA was already concerned about the health risks of vaping products. A recent report by the agency details the health risks for the products including nicotine addiction, exposure to toxic chemicals known to cause cancer, and increases in blood pressure.

Individuals who have recently vaped and are having difficulty breathing should seek medical attention immediately.

If you or someone that you know is ready to quit smoking or vaping, free help is available from the following resources:

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Two Canadian Nationals Indicted for Bitcoin Fraud
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/22/19 8:23 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Karanjit Singh Khatkar, 23, and Jagroop Singh Khatkar, 24, of Surrey, British Columbia, Canada, have been charged with wire fraud, money laundering and aggravated identity theft for a scheme to steal bitcoin from an Oregon resident.

Together, Karanjit and Jagroop Khatkar face one count each of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and money laundering, five counts of wire fraud, three counts of aggravated identity theft and multiple counts of money laundering.

According to the indictment, beginning in October 2017 and continuing until August 2018, the defendants used a Twitter account with the name @HitBTCAssist to trick victims into thinking they were communicating with a customer service representative from HitBTC, a Hong Kong-based online platform used to exchange virtual currency. HitBTC provides its customers with web-based “wallets” to store virtual currency and make transactions.

Using the fraudulent Twitter account, the defendants responded to the Oregon victim’s questions about withdrawing virtual currency from her HitBTC account. The defendants convinced the victim to send information they could use to log on and take over her email, HitBTC and Kraken accounts. Kraken is a U.S.-based online platform that offers services similar to HitBTC.

The defendants initiated transfers of 23.2 bitcoins from the victim’s HitBTC account to Karanjit Khatkar’s Kraken account. Karanjit Khatkar in turn transferred approximately 11.6 in stolen bitcoins to Jagroop Khatkar’s Kraken account. The stolen bitcoins have an estimated present value of approximately $233,220.

On July 18, 2019, Karanjit Khatkar was arrested upon arrival at the McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas, Nevada. The following week, a U.S. Magistrate Judge in Las Vegas ordered Karanjit Khatkar detained pending transport by the U.S. Marshals to the District of Oregon.

Karanjit Khatkar made his first appearance in the District of Oregon on August 12, 2019. At a hearing on August 20, 2019, he was ordered detained pending a four-day trial scheduled to begin on October 8, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael H. Simon.

Jagroop Singh Khatkar remains at large and is believed to be in Canada.

This case was investigated by FBI and is being prosecuted by Quinn P. Harrington, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Wed. 08/21/19
Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/21/19 2:17 PM
Donald Miller
Donald Miller
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/1070/126996/thumb_Miller_Donald.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Donald Miller, died August 21, 2019. Miller was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in the Infirmary while on hospice. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Miller entered DOC custody on June 5, 2012, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of June 7, 2021. Miller was 71 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 individuals. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

 

 

 

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Attached Media Files: Donald Miller

Oregon and Washington Co-Host Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) International Conference in Seattle
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/21/19 9:31 AM

Over 1,200 law enforcement, corrections, behavioral health, advocates, and more will attend the CIT International Annual Conference August 26-28, 2019, at the Hyatt Regency Seattle in Washington. This conference focuses on addressing crisis response and providing community supports for people with mental illnesses, addictions, and other vulnerable populations. The conference is cohosted by local partners from the Northwest Regional CIT Conference Committee. 
 
There are over 100 workshops to include, but not be limited to topics involving law enforcement, mental health, and criminal justice fields. With increased pressure on law enforcement to handle encounters with people with mental illness in a manner consistent with mental illness as a disease and not a crime, CIT International brings stakeholders from communities together to highlight best practice models, develop and strengthen community partnerships, and work on training that helps equip communities to serve more effectively and efficiently with emphasis on safety for all parties.
 
“This conference brings together some of the best and brightest in the field for communities addressing the needs of those with mental illnesses, addiction and other special needs to improve services and reduce unnecessary incarceration, injury or death" stated Tom von Hemert, President of CIT International. "The CIT Program promotes safety and smart justice" he went on to add. "And we are also pleased to host Nationally Renowned Keynote Speakers."

Eriks Gabliks, the Director the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) shared that "DPSST is proud to work with the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission and other partners to co-sponsor this important training conference that will bring together public safety professionals, clinicians, and advocates from around the world to share their work.  Oregon will be well represented with more than 100 attendees and nine presentations at the conference will feature work being done in Oregon." 
 
At the conference, Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Programs: A Best Practice Guide for Transforming Community Responses to Mental Health Crises, will be released. The first comprehensive guide for communities to best practices for starting and sustaining CIT programs, it includes seven chapters that guide local mental health advocates, mental health professionals, law enforcement and community leaders through the process of starting and sustaining their CIT programs. The Guide will be available for purchase at the conference and for download at http://www.citinternational.org/bestpracticeguide.
 
Included at the conference is the Crisis Intervention Team International (CITI) Annual Awards Banquet that will be held on Tuesday, August 27, 2019, at the Hyatt Regency Seattle.  The awards banquet will recognize nominees in the following categories: • 2019 CIT First Responder of the Year • 2019 CIT Corrections Officer of the Year  • 2019 CIT People with mental illness lived experience of the Year • 2019 CIT Coordinator (management level) of the Year  • 2019 CIT Law Enforcement Agency Head (Sheriff or Police Chief) of the Year  • 2019 CIT Behavioral Healthcare Practioner of the Year • 2019 CIT Advocate of the Year • 2019 CIT Telecommunications Personnel of the Year.
 
If you have any further questions or need further information email CITI at admin@citinternational.org.


Oregon's top 25 most expensive and most prescribed drugs
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/21/19 8:30 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation has released the lists of Oregon’s most expensive and most prescribed drugs, as well as the prescription drugs that cause the greatest increase to health insurance plan spending.

Brand-name drugs such as Humira and Enbrel, prescriptions commonly prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis, topped the lists of most expensive and greatest increase to plan spending.  Hydrocodone-Acetaminophen, a pain reliever, was the most prescribed, along with several generic drugs treating conditions such as high blood pressure and cholesterol.

“These lists highlight the goal of the drug price transparency program,” said Andrew Stolfi, insurance commissioner. “They provide a first step to transparency for Oregonians, and help all of us better understand which prescription drugs affect health care costs.”

Each of Oregon’s nine insurance companies submitted the drug lists to the division, which reviewed and aggregated them to provide consumers a look at the common prescription drugs that have the biggest effect on health insurance costs.

The Prescription Drug Price Transparency Act (House Bill 4005), from the 2018 Legislative Session, established Oregon’s drug price transparency program. The new law requires prescription drug manufacturers and health insurance companies to report specific drug price information to the division.

Another key component to the program is consumer reporting of price increases. All Oregonians are encouraged to report an increase in the cost of their prescription drugs one of three ways:

The division is excited to bring one of the nation’s first prescription drug price transparency programs to Oregon. Top 25 lists and drug price information from manufacturers is now available by visiting dfr.oregon.gov/drugtransparency and clicking the Data box.

Later this year, the division will also hold a public hearing and begin providing annual reports to the legislature based on all the information received from manufacturers, health insurers, and consumers.

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.

 


CORRECTION ---Three people die in single vehicle crash on Hwy 126 - Deschutes County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/21/19 7:48 AM
2019-08/1002/126983/IMG_7982.JPG
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Last name is spelled Vaughan 

 On Tuesday, August 20, 2019 at approximately 11:30 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Hwy 126 at mp 105.  

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2011 Toyota Venza, operated by Kenneth Vaughan (69) of Redmond, was traveling westbound on Hwy 126 when for an unknown reason it veered off the road and struck large rocks at a driveway access.

Kenneth Vaughn and his passengers  Sheryl Vaughan (63) of Redmond and April Vaughan (33) sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Redmond Fire Department and ODOT

  




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/1002/126983/IMG_7982.JPG

Tue. 08/20/19
Governor Brown signs expansion of Tuition Assistance for Oregon National Guardsmen
Oregon Military Department - 08/20/19 3:38 PM


SALEM, Ore. – With the signing of House Bill 2817 by Oregon Governor Kate Brown, members of the
Oregon National Guard will be able to receive Tuition Assistance at Oregon Health and Science
University (OHSU) and private institutions in addition to community colleges and public higher education
institutions.


This law will expand higher education grants to qualified members of the Oregon National Guard by
permitting grant(s) to be used for undergraduate degree program at OHSU or qualifying private post-
secondary institutions or for program or curriculum designed to lead to certificate of completion at
community college, public university, OHSU or qualifying private post-secondary institution.


The law states that “Grants provided under this section shall be awarded to a qualified student for up to
90 credit hours at a community college; or 180 credit hours at a public university and now 180 credit
hours at a qualifying private institution; or 180 credit hours at Oregon Health and Science University.”


This benefit will be available for the 2020-21 academic year. The provision of HB 2817 helps expand on
HB 4035 signed by Gov. Brown on April 3, 2018 that established Tuition Assistance to members of the
Oregon National Guard to attend public universities and community colleges, and began during the
2018-19 academic year.


Both laws require student to be in “Good standing” with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or
higher at OHSU or qualifying private and public intuitions at which they are enrolled.

 

-30-


D River Beach health advisory issued August 20
Oregon Health Authority - 08/20/19 1:04 PM

D River Beach health advisory issued August 20

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach in Lincoln County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

 

 


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Check Cashing Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 08/20/19 10:00 AM
TT - Check Cashing - GRAPHIC - August 20, 2019
TT - Check Cashing - GRAPHIC - August 20, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/3585/126450/thumb_TT_-_Check_Cashing_Scams_-_GRAPHIC_-_August_20_2019.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against check cashing scams.

There are lots of new apps these days that allow you to instantaneously pay friends and family for your share of dinner, a movie or the upcoming summer vacation. With all of this technology, checks might seem like an ancient form of payment. However, checks are still popular with consumers and, of course, scammers. In fact, the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center – or IC3.gov – is reporting a rise in in the number of Oregonians who say they’ve been hit by a check cashing scam.

Here is how the fraud works: Imagine you have a stereo that you have been needing to get off your hands for months. Garage sales can be so much work that you decide to try selling the stereo online. A few hours after posting it, you get an offer from a potential buyer. The buyer says that he will send you a check as payment for the stereo. At this point, the scam can go one of two ways:

  1. After receiving the check from the ‘buyer’, you send the stereo, only to discover later that the check you received was fraudulent.
  2. After receiving the check from the ‘buyer’, the ‘buyer’ claims that he changed his mind about the purchase and asks for a refund. The victim then sends legitimate funds as refund before discovering that the initial check had been fraudulent.

While both versions of this scam are prevalent, it is the second option that Oregonians are reporting more frequently. Our friends at the Federal Trade Commission have some tips on how to avoid becoming a victim:

  • Never take a check for more than your selling price.
  • Never send money back to someone who sent you a check.
  • The law requires banks to make deposited funds available quickly. However, just because the check has cleared does not mean that it is good. It will sometimes take the bank days to learn that a check is bad.
  • If you are selling online, consider using a secure online payment service.

If you have been victimized by this online scam or any other cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - Check Cashing - AUDIO - August 20, 2019 , TT - Check Cashing - GRAPHIC - August 20, 2019

DPSST Fire Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/20/19 9:42 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

August 28, 2019

Contact:    Mona Riesterer  
                 503-378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Fire Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on August 28, 2019. The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

 

The meeting will be available through video live stream on Facebook at:

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/

 

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.   Introductions

2.  Approval of Minutes of May 22, 2019 Meeting

3.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-009-0005 and 259-009-0062 NFPA Airport Fire Fighter

      Presented by Kayla Ballrot 

4.  Steward, Mary M.  DPSST #38085: NFPA Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator (Driver) Central Oregon Coast Fire & Rescue

     Presented by Kayla Ballrot  

5.  Evans, Joshua J. DPSST #F33221: NFPA Apparatus Equipped with Fire Pump, NFPA Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator, NFPA Fire Fighter 1, NFPA Fire Fighter II, NFPA Rope Rescue Operations Level

      Presented by Kayla Ballrot

6.   Department Update

7.   Next scheduled meeting – November 27, 2019 @ 9:00 a.m.  

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Fire Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


DPSST Private Security/Investigator Policy Meeting MEETING SCHEDULED
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/20/19 8:20 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

August 20, 2019

Contact:     Mona Riesterer  
                      503-378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 1:30 p.m. on August 20, 2019.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

The meeting will be available through video live stream on Facebook at:

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2.  Minutes – February 19, 2019

      Approve the minutes of the February 19, 2019 Private Security/Private Investigations Policy Committee meeting.

3.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-060-0025 and 259-060-0135 Clarifying Continuing Education for Private Security Instructors.

      Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.  Approval of the Event and Entertainment Curriculum

      Presented by Robert Meeks

5.  Proposed Rule Changes to OAR Chapter 259 Division 60: Adding Event and Entertainment Private Security   Professional Training and Certification Requirements to the Private Security Provider Administrative Rules.

      Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.  Private Investigator Application Requirements (ORS 703.425)-Proposed Legislative Concept

      Presented by Linsay Hale

7.  DPSST Regulation of Armed Private Security Businesses – Proposed Legislative Concept

      Presented by Linsay Hale

8.  Private Security Uniforms/Vehicles – Proposed Legislative Concept

      Presented by Linsay Hale

9.   Subcommittee Reports

10. Department Update

11.  Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting – November 19, 2019 at 1:30 p.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Private Security/Investigator Policy members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Oregon Lottery to hand out free Scratch-its to celebrate $3 million Mega Millions win (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 08/20/19 5:00 AM
2019-08/4939/126884/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2019-08/4939/126884/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
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Oregon Lottery to celebrate $3 million Mega Millions win at Jacksonville Chevron

Jacksonville man ties for Oregon’s largest Mega Millions prize

WHO: Oregon Lottery officials

WHEN: Noon, Wednesday, August 21, 2019

WHERE: Jacksonville Chevron, 945 N 5th Street, Jacksonville, OR

WHAT: Oregon Lottery officials will present a $30,000 selling bonus check to representatives of Jacksonville Chevron for selling a winning $3 million Mega Millions ticket. That ties the record for the largest Mega Millions prize since Oregon began offering the game in 2010. Lottery officials will also be handing out a limited number of free promotional Scratch-it tickets at the event.

BACKGROUND: Martin Olverson from Jacksonville won $3 million playing Mega Millions. He hit five numbers but missed the Megaball, however he did spend an extra dollar on the “Megaplier” which increased his $1 million prize to $3 million. He is the second person to win $3 million playing Mega Millions this year. Ann Mingis of Springfield also won $3 million in January, and at the time that was the largest Mega Millions prize in Oregon since the game came to the state in 2010.

During the 2015-17 biennium more than $34.7 million lottery dollars were directed to Jackson County’s state parks, school districts, watershed enhancement projects and economic development.

VISUALS: Oregon Lottery officials will present an over-sized ceremonial check to representatives of Jacksonville Chevron and will also distribute a limited amount of free promotional Scratch-it tickets to patrons of the store.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Attached Media Files: 2019-08/4939/126884/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-08/4939/126884/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Mon. 08/19/19
Portland Woman Indicted for Tax Fraud Scheme Targeting Somali Refugee Community
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/19/19 3:37 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, announced today that a local woman has been indicted for a tax fraud scheme targeting Somali refugees in the Portland Metropolitan Area.

Rukia Mohamed, 35, a resident of Portland, has been charged with thirteen counts of making false statements by willfully aiding and assisting individual taxpayers to submit false or fraudulent tax returns claiming tax credits for which the taxpayers were ineligible. Mohamed is also charged with three counts of filing false tax returns for her own taxes.

The indictment alleges that from 2014-2017, Mohamed claimed more than $1 million in false tax credits on behalf of ineligible taxpayers.

“We encourage members of the public to carefully evaluate those from whom they take tax or other financial advice from,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “We are aware of fraudulent tax preparers targeting refugee communities in the Portland area and are working closely with the IRS to investigate these crimes and bring those responsible to justice.”

Mohamed was released pending a three-day jury trial before U.S. District Court Judge Michael H. Simon.

This case was investigated by IRS-Criminal Investigation and is being prosecuted by Michelle Kerin, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

If you or someone you know have information about tax preparers you believe are engaged in fraudulent activity, please complete IRS Form #3949-A, print it and mail it to: IRS-Criminal Investigation, 1220 SW Third Avenue, G044 M/S 0326, Portland, Oregon 97204.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

State to Honor 169 Fallen Firefighters - September 19, 2019 at 1 PM in Salem / DPSST (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/19/19 2:58 PM
Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial
Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/1187/126954/thumb_Fallen_Fire_Memorial_B.jpg

The Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard and the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) extend an invitation to attend the State's 14th annual Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial on Thursday, September 19, 2019 at 1 p.m. The ceremony will be held at the State’s Fallen Firefighter Memorial which is located on the campus of the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE in Salem. Please note the event is held outside rain or shine.

We are honored to have Kim Lightley of the United States Forest Service as our keynote speaker on the 25th anniversary of the deadly Storm King Mountain fire in Colorado that claimed the lives of many of her co-workers from the Prineville Interagency Hotshots. 

About Kim Lightley – She is a Critical Incident Response Specialist with the United States Forest Service (USFS) assigned to the Washington Office of Fire and Aviation Management.  She was recognized in 2017 by the USFS through its Unsung Hero Award Program for her commitment to give back to the people who sacrifice so much fighting structure and wildland fires, and, even more so, to the survivors of those who never come home. Lightley survived the 1994 South Canyon Fire; nine of her crewmembers from the Prineville Interagency Hotshots and five others were overrun and killed.  Recognizing that her own experiences had impacted her life and recovery from this traumatic experience, Lightley has placed her daily emphasis on helping others within the wildfire community to prepare for—and recover from—tragic events.  She travels nationwide teaching Stress First Aid for Wildland Firefighters and You Will Not Stand Alone, assists in interventions for wildland fire critical incidents and promotes awareness of suicide prevention. Lightley is an active participant and organizer for the annual National Fallen Firefighters Memorial, and participates annually in the South Canyon Fire staff ride and Prineville Memorial Hotshot Run.  In addition to all of this, she can frequently be found on incident locations supporting agency and family survivors when a firefighter dies in the line of duty, and continues to provide vital support to survivors long after the event.

The ceremony will include the reading of the roll call of fallen firefighters, taps, placement of wreaths, and a bell salute.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "The Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial stands as a daily reminder of the sacrifices made by 169 men and women who died in the line of duty protecting our communities, airports and natural resources around our great state.  The memorial also allows us to honor a pledge made to the families of the fallen - we will never forget!  We are thankful that no names are being added to the Oregon memorial during this year’s ceremony which signifies that Oregon did not suffer a firefighter line of duty death in 2018.  Sadly we know that is not the case on a national level as the names of 120 career and volunteer firefighters who died in the line of duty in 2018 and previous years will be honored at the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial at the National Fire Academy on October 5 and 6, 2019 in Emmitsburg, Maryland."

If you have any questions regarding the Memorial, please contact Julie Olsen, Fire Program Manager, at 503-378-2297 or by email at julie.olsen-fink@state.or.us

For More Information on Oregon and National Firefighter Memorials:

Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial  https://www.oregon.gov/DPSST/FC/pages/fallenfirefightermemorial.aspx

National Fallen Firefighter Foundation – National memorial https://www.firehero.org/events/memorial-weekend/about/2019-roll-of-honor/

Those honored on the State memorial include:

Fire Fighter Name

Agency

Date

James  Reed

Protection Engine Co #4 - Portland

1881

George P. Wrenn

Corvallis Fire Department

1882

Fred  Wagner

Portland Fire and Rescue

1890

Tom  O'Keefe

Portland Fire and Rescue

1891

John G. Hewston

Portland Fire and Rescue

1892

Tom  Grenfell

Portland Fire and Rescue

1896

Warren  Bodge

Medford Fire Dept.

1910

David  Campbell

Portland Fire and Rescue

1911

William  Higdon

Portland Fire and Rescue

1912

Emil  Gustafson

Portland Fire and Rescue

1916

Francis H. McCormick

Portland Fire and Rescue

1919

Karl  Gunster

Portland Fire and Rescue

1921

Oscar H. Lehman

Portland Fire and Rescue

1921

James S. Baldwin

Portland Fire and Rescue

1922

Oscar B. Gabriel

Portland Fire and Rescue

1922

Amos R. Willits

Medford Fire Dept.

1923

Fred H. Rittenour

Portland Fire and Rescue

1923

Adolph W. Wefel

Portland Fire and Rescue

1923

William E. Wilbur

Portland Fire and Rescue

1926

Rex  Reed

Eugene Fire and EMS

1928

Harry  Josephson

Portland Fire and Rescue

1928

William John McCreery

Portland Fire and Rescue

1928

Charles A. Ryan

Portland Fire and Rescue

1928

Walter  McBride

Portland Fire and Rescue

1929

Richard D. Laisner

Portland Fire and Rescue

1930

Henry Krimbel

Portland Fire and Rescue

1932

Clement Kemmer

Portland Fire and Rescue

1933

Gustave Adolph Stephan

Portland Fire and Rescue

1933

Frank L. Kearney

Portland Fire and Rescue

1934

Harry B. Morrow

Portland Fire and Rescue

1934

Walter Godfrey Duncan

Sandy Fire Dist. #72

1934

H.U.  Gardner

Portland Fire and Rescue

1935

William D. Heath

Portland Fire and Rescue

1935

Floyd G. McMullen

Salem Fire Department

1935

Melvin Claude Richardson

Oregon National Guard

1935

Frank E. Platt

Portland Fire and Rescue

1937

Harry R. Howard

Portland Fire and Rescue

1939

Ernest W. Bills

Portland Fire and Rescue

1940

Peter P. Kumpf

Portland Fire and Rescue

1940

Carl G. Markstrom

Portland Fire and Rescue

1940

John  Dawes

Mill City RFPD

1941

Elmo St. Clair Bradford

Portland Fire and Rescue

1945

Malvin L. Brown

555th Parachute Battalion - US Army

1945

Joseph Frederick Allerton

Portland Fire and Rescue

1945

William  Inglesby

Portland Fire and Rescue

1946

Gregory A. Warner

Portland Fire and Rescue

1946

Marion  Stark

Portland Fire and Rescue

1947

Alfred E. Berg

Portland Fire and Rescue

1948

Daniel G. Shaw

Portland Fire and Rescue

1949

Clayre Lavon Miller

Tillamook Fire District

1949

Jerry  Bain

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1951

R.E. “Bob” Olivier

Taft-Nelscott-DeLake Fire Department

1954

Harold J. Dean

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1956

W.F.  McCall

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1956

John A. McKy

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1956

Warren  Nott

Milwaukie Fire Department

1956

Al  Troge

Multnomah County Fire District #10

1956

George  Mead

Oregon City Fire Department

1956

Donovan  Hodgson

Springfield DFLS

1957

Victor D. Brown

Portland Fire and Rescue

1957

Glenn H. Ferrington

Multnomah County Fire District #14

1958

Roy W. McFarland

Roseburg Fire Dept.

1959

L.L.  Longton

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1960

John T. Metcalf

Portland Fire and Rescue

1960

Wayne  Osterby

Astoria Fire Department

1961

John J. Richards

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1961

Earl  Edwards

La Grande Fire Dept.

1962

Eldon L. Everton

Grants Pass Fire Department

1964

Leland N. Christensen

Eugene Fire and EMS

1966

Harold  Stinson

Eugene Fire and EMS

1966

Virgil L. Spencer

Portland Fire and Rescue

1966

Dale  Fleming

Multnomah County Fire District #1

1968

Sam P. Baseel

St. Helens Rural Fire Dist.

1969

Leland Roger Marshall

Coquille Volunteer Fire Department

1969

Richard  Christensen

Washington County Fire District #2

1969

C.T.  Arnold

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1970

Ben K. Coburn

Thurston-Walterville RFPD

1970

Henry  Martin

Oregon Department of Forestry

1970

Luis  Rodriguez

Oregon Department of Forestry

1970

Jack  Stephens

Portland Fire and Rescue

1971

Richard  Waldorf

Molalla Fire Protection District

1972

Fayet Arthur Scoggin

Redmond Fire and Rescue

1974

Carl E. Kerr

Scio Fire Protection District

1975

Sanford Causey

Coquille Fire Department

1976

S.L.  Finley

USFS Siskiyou National Forest

1976

Lee Kenneth Register

Multnomah Co. RFPD #14

1977

Dale Laverne Smith

Multnomah Co. RFPD #14

1977

John L. Devaney

Portland Fire and Rescue

1977

Roy  Bratten

Redmond Fire and Rescue

1978

Horst  Rech

Springfield DFLS

1978

Russ  Williamson

Washington County Fire District #1

1978

Richard  Underhill

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1979

Ronald  Huddleston

Oregon Department of Forestry

1980

Paul F. Yost

Lyons RFPD

1981

Clyde E. Golden

Mill City RFPD

1982

Michael K. Maine

North Bay RFPD, N. Bend

1982

Robert W. Thompson

Veneta RFPD

1982

David C. Stephens

Bureau of Land Management, Sweet Home

1984

Elwin I. King

Fair Oaks RFPD, Sutherlin

1984

Barbara A. Booth

Oregon Department of Forestry, Cottage Grove

1984

Richard H. Bowers

Oregon Department of Forestry, Cottage Grove

1984

Mary L. Francis

Crow Valley RFPD, Veneta

1985

Michael Allen Lehman

USDA Forest Service

1986

Mark  Giles

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1987

James  Moore

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1987

Russell  Brine

Elkton RFPD

1987

Wendell L. Beck

Crooked River Ranch Fire Dist.

1988

Joseph J. Stroda

Halsey-Shedd RFPD

1988

Louis A. Mohr

Pine Grove RFPD, Hood River

1988

David Alfred Schas

USDA Forest Service, Redmond

1988

William D. Mills

Oak Lodge RFPD #51

1989

William  McAdams

Aurora RFPD

1990

Julius C. Starr

USDA Forest Service, Redmond

1990

Clark N. Gilkison

Fair Oaks RFPD

1991

James Shannon Campbell

Oregon Department of Forestry

1992

Brian L. Hill

Oregon Department of Forestry

1993

Sydney B. Maplesden

Oregon Department of Forestry

1994

Kathi Julie Beck

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Tamera Jean Bickett

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Scott A. Blecha

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Levi J. Brinkley

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Douglas Michael Dunbar

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Terri Ann Hagen

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Bonnie Jean Holtby

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Robert Alan Johnson

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Jon Roy Kelso

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Phillip  Sherburn

Aumsville Fire Department

1995

Henry Walter Howe

Brownsville RFPD

1995

Robert  Chisholm

Gearhart Volunteer Fire Dept.

1997

George P. Converse

USDA Forest Service

1998

Tony B. Chapin

Willamina Fire Department

1998

Santi  Arovitx

Columbia Helicopters

2001

Richard  Hernandez

Columbia Helicopters

2001

Kip  Krigbaum

Columbia Helicopters

2001

John Robert Hazlett

Odell Fire District

2001

Randall E. Carpenter

Coos Bay Fire and Rescue

2002

Jeffrey E. Common

Coos Bay Fire and Rescue

2002

Chuck  Hanners

Coos Bay Fire and Rescue

2002

Bartholomew Blake Bailey

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2002

Daniel Eric Rama

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2002

Retha Mae Shirley

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2002

Alan W. Wyatt

USDA Forest Service, Rio Grande NF

2002

Paul E. Gibson

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

David Kelly Hammer

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Jeffrey D. Hengel

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Jesse D. James

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Leland Price, Jr.

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Richard Burt Moore, II

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Mark Robert Ransdell

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Ricardo M. Ruiz

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Larry A. Brown

Kingsley Field FD, Klamath Falls

2003

D. Craig Mackey

Oregon Department of Forestry, Western Lane

2003

Thomas Howard Kistler

Polk County Fire Dist. #1

2003

Randall  Harmon

Superior Helicopter, Grants Pass

2003

Richard W. Black

Weyerhauser, Eugene Helicopter Ops.

2003

Lawrence J. Hoffman

Oregon Department of Forestry

2004

Shawn  Blazer

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Scott  Charlson

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Edrik  Gomez

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Matthew  Hammer

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Caleb Renno

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Bryan  Rich

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

David  Steele

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Roark  Schwanenberg

Carson Helicopters, Inc.

2008

Robert A. Hales

Scappoose Rural Fire District

2008

Jesse Trader

County Fire and Security

2013

Oscar Montano-Garcia

Pacific Coast Contractors, Inc.

2013

John Hammack

R&K Water Service

2013

Mark James Burns

Medford Fire and Rescue

2016

 

# # #

The Oregon Law Enforcement Memorial Fund raised funds to build the state fallen officer memorial more than 20 years ago and helps support the annual ceremonies that honor Oregon’s fallen law enforcement officers in May of each year, and fallen firefighters in September of each year.  For more information on the Oregon Law Enforcement Memorial Fund, and the statewide license plate that is available to honor fallen law enforcement officers and firefighters, please visit http://www.oregon.gov/DPSST/MF/pages/policememtrustfund.aspx

 

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial , Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial , Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force meets August 27
Oregon Health Authority - 08/19/19 2:58 PM

August 19, 2019

Contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force.

When: Tuesday, August 27, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Agenda: Welcome, task force purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the task force, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary.

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/SUBSTANCEUSE/OPIOIDS/Pages/task-force.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2Hfha9f

 


Search for missing dementia patient in the Wimer area. *Update*
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/19/19 2:44 PM

Jackson County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue volunteers have located Mr. Brand alive and well.  He is being returned home.  Thanks to all who assisted. 

##

ROGUE RIVER, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) Deputies and Search and Rescue (SAR) volunteers are searching for a missing Dementia patient in the Wimer area.

The Sheriff's Office is looking for 86 year old Billy Brand. Brand lives off of Redthorne Rd., and is thought to have walked off sometime before noon on Monday the 19th.

Anyone with information about the location of Mr. Brand is asked to contact Sergeant Shawn Richards at 541-774-6800.




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/6186/126951/Brand.pdf

Lane County Man Pleads Guilty to Shooting At Endangered Gray Wolf
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/19/19 2:24 PM

MEDFORD, Ore.—Colton Tony Dick, 22, of Oakridge, Oregon, pleaded guilty today to a single count of unlawfully taking an endangered species.

According to court documents, on October 5, 2016, using a rifle and scope, Dick shot at an endangered gray wolf without legal justification as the animal was walking away from him in the Fremont-Winema National Forest. Dick was unable to locate the wolf.

Although Dick did not admit to killing a gray wolf, an investigation began on October 6, 2016 when an adult female GPS-collared gray wolf known as “OR 28” was found dead in the Fremont-Winema National Forest near Summer Lake, Oregon. On November 9, 2016, the US Fish and Wildlife Service Forensic Lab determined OR 28 died as a result of injuries sustained from a single gunshot wound.

Gray wolves (Canis lupus), located in Western Oregon, are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act.

Unlawfully taking an endangered species carries a maximum sentence of one year in prison, a $100,000 fine and one year of supervised release.

Under a deferred sentencing agreement with the government, Dick has agreed to submit to one-year of supervised release, pay restitution of $2,500 to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, not hunt any wildlife for a period of one year and perform 100 hours of community service.

If Dick complies with these conditions, he will be allowed to withdraw his guilty plea and the government will move to dismiss his charge.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement and the Oregon State Police. It was prosecuted by Adam E. Delph, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

If you or someone you know has information about a wildlife crime, please contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement by emailing fws_tips@fws.gov or calling 1-844-397-8477.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

U.S. Attorney Statement on Law Enforcement Response to Portland Demonstration
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/19/19 12:38 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, provided the below statement on the law enforcement response to the August 17, 2019 demonstration in Downtown Portland.

“As a prosecutor, I’ve had the honor of being involved in law enforcement in Oregon for nearly 30 years. Much of this time has been working with agencies in the Portland Metropolitan Area, and, as a federal prosecutor for the last 19 years, partners throughout the state.

This past Saturday, I had the privilege of watching more than 700 local, state and federal law enforcement, fire and medical professionals work tirelessly to protect the City of Portland. These dedicated, unselfish, and non-political public servants worked together to gather the resources needed to protect our community and, in the process, change the narrative of public safety in this city.

Law enforcement does not and cannot take sides in politically-charged public discourse. This weekend’s response effort was consistent with what I’ve observed throughout my career: public servants working together to ensure public safety and help others, irrespective of politics.

In an era where it’s become all too common for politicians and pundits to question the intentions of law enforcement, I hope this weekend’s police response will serve as a definitive counterpoint.

Please join me in thanking the men and women in uniform who gave up their time with family and friends to protect our community and allow people to exercise their rights here in Portland.

To our law enforcement partners throughout Oregon—the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the U.S. Department of Justice appreciate you and have your back.”

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/6325/126943/USA_STATEMENT-8-17_Demonstration-Final.pdf

West Coast Utility Commissions Discuss Changing Wildfire Risk and Mitigation Efforts
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 08/19/19 12:28 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Public utility commissioners from British Columbia, California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington convened at the Oregon Convention Center for a public dialogue on Friday, August 16, focused on wildfire risk and mitigation. The all-day event featured experts who shared their perspectives and evolving approaches to address rapidly changing wildfire risk, driven by climate change and other factors.

Public utility commissions are responsible for ensuring safe and reliable access to utility services. By convening this joint conversation, the Commissions are exploring ways to address the expanding risk of wildfire.

“Working together will better equip us to handle the increased frequency and severity of wildfires in our region and the impacts on electric utilities, their customers, and the communities they serve,” said Letha Tawney, Commissioner for the Oregon Public Utility Commission. “This was a collaborative event amongst four western states and British Columbia to draw from the expertise and lessons learned in our regions.”

“I am pleased to be a part of this important dialogue focussing on addressing the increasing risk of wildfire which has the potential to impact many, including utility companies and ratepayers throughout British Columbia, and the entire west coast,” said Chair Dave M. Morton, British Columbia Utilities Commission. “Today’s dialogue was an opportunity to learn more about what regulators, utilities, and experts are doing, or could be doing, to best address the threat of wildfires.”

Expert panelists engaged in dialogue with the Commissioner roundtable on the realities of wildfires and wide-ranging solutions to mitigate risk. Specifically, the panel discussions focused on the following:

  • Tracking the Changing Risk: How climate change is impacting potential wildfire areas and the current risk mapping practices.
  • Making Risk-Based Changes to the System: How utilities prioritize risk mitigation efforts, and the issues that arise or barriers that develop for utilities in that 'prioritization.'
  • Managing the Financial Risks: The financial tools available to utilities to mitigate ratepayer risk and keep the cost of capital affordable, and whether these tools are robust enough for the scale of possible losses.
  • Expanding Public Safety Coordination: The factors that should be considered to ensure Public Safety Power Shutoffs or other fire driven outages do not increase public safety risk now that transportation, communications, and other essential services are more reliant on electricity.

“This event continues important collaboration among western states on pressing issues facing the utility sector, including adaptation to the impacts of climate change and dealing with wildfire risks. California will share lessons learned as we implement new tools to mitigate public safety risks and cost impacts to ratepayers,” said Commissioner Clifford Rechtschaffen of the California Public Utilities Commission.

One of the wildfire mitigation measures that can impact communities is proactive de-energization, or Public Safety Power Shut-offs, in the event of extreme wildfire risk. As utilities develop plans to mitigate wildfire, Commissions will need to understand and analyze these proposals from the utilities they regulate.

Commissioner Hayley Williamson of Nevada expressed how grateful she is for the opportunity to meet and speak with experts across the West regarding wildfires. “I especially appreciate the discussion on de-energization and what factors should be considered to ensure de-energizing lines does not increase public safety risks during a wildfire threat or event,” added Commissioner Williamson.

Panelists emphasized that climate change is impacting the intensity of wildfire seasons in their respective regions. The research and tools available to understand and plan for that changing risk to help ensure customer safety were highlighted in today’s discussion. The sharing of these best management practices and lessons are helpful in preparing the states and British Columbia as the wildfire risk continues to evolve.

“Climate change is resulting in increased risk of wildfires in the west,” said Washington UTC Chairman David Danner. “Utility regulators in the region need to understand fully the potential impacts of wildfires on utility service, costs, and community safety. Today’s conversation was an important opportunity to discuss how our utilities can best predict, prepare for, and respond to wildfires in our states, and we look forward to future discussions.”

The commissioners expressed a desire to continue this dialogue to help ensure safe, reliable and affordable electricity service at a time when wildfire risks continue to evolve, requiring constant evolution of best practices.

If unable to watch the event live, you can view the recorded panel discussions online by Monday, August 19, 2019. You can learn more about Tracking the Changing Risk, Making Risk-Based Changes to the Systems, Managing the Financial Risks, and Expanding Public Safety Coordination.

This press release was redistributed today due to technical difficulties Friday. I apologize in advance for any duplication.


OHA gathers subcommittees to address socially focused priorities of State Health Improvement Plan
Oregon Health Authority - 08/19/19 11:13 AM

August 19, 2019

Members will develop, track strategies aimed at ending health disparities

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority has gathered teams of community partners to begin tackling State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) priorities focused on social factors that affect health, such as childhood trauma, food security, and access to health care and employment.

The PartnerSHIP, a steering committee developing the 2020-2024 SHIP, has formed subcommittees with representatives from state agencies, nonprofits, tribal health, local public health departments, health care, academia, businesses, and people with lived experience.

The subcommittees’ goal is to identify and track strategies aimed at achieving the five SHIP priorities that include:

  • Institutional bias, or systematic distribution of resources, power and opportunity in society to the exclusion of people of color, people with disabilities, people with low income and people who identify as LGBTQ+.
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress, which can include abuse and neglect, living in poverty, incarceration, family separation, and exposure to racism and discrimination.
  • Economic drivers of health such as housing, living wage, food insecurity and transportation, since poverty is a strong predictor of poor health.
  • Access to equitable preventive health care, which can be limited by health care provider shortages, transportation barriers, health care costs, or language or other cultural barriers.
  • Behavioral health including poor mental health and substance use, which can lead to lower quality of life, unemployment and increased suicide rates.

"Convening these subcommittees is a significant step toward systematically addressing the 2020-2024 SHIP priorities," said Oregon Public Health Director Lillian Shirley. "This provides an exciting opportunity to work with partners to develop strategies for reducing inequities that can have lifelong health effects."

Subcommittee rosters can be viewed by clicking on the 2020-2024 SHIP Priority Area links on the OHA State Health Improvement Plan webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ABOUT/Pages/ship-process.aspx.

The subcommittees will align existing assets and strengths and identity new strategies needed to end health disparities, the disproportionate burden of preventable illness, injury, disability, or mortality experienced by marginalized groups in each priority area. The strategies will be developed using a health equity framework, which aims to eliminate disparities by addressing social, economic and environmental conditions that affect health, and will include policy changes, improvements in daily living conditions, and individual-level interventions.

Strategies will be created with particular attention to the needs of priority populations including people of color, people with disabilities, people who are low-income, people who identify as LGBTQ+, older adults and children. Subcommittees will also identify measures that will be used to monitor progress over the next five years of plan implementation.

The 2020-2024 SHIP is a product of the state’s effort to build a modern public health system. The plan’s focus on social factors affecting health was informed by community partners. Next spring, communities will be asked to weigh in on the proposed strategies to ensure they are culturally relevant to priority populations.

Subcommittees will meet monthly starting in August. All meetings are open to the public. Meeting details for each subcommittee, and additional information about the SHIP, can be found at healthoregon.org/2020ship. For questions or comments, contact at isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us.

# # #

 


Arrest / Drug Seizure (Photo)
Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) - 08/19/19 10:04 AM
2019-08/6255/126932/ENelson.jpeg
2019-08/6255/126932/ENelson.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/6255/126932/thumb_ENelson.jpeg

On Thursday, August 15th, 2019, DINT Detectives arrested 51 year old Eric Nelson, of Sutherlin, on suspicion of multiple drug related crimes.  

Detectives contacted Nelson in the 400 block of N Comstock Road in Sutherlin.  A search of Nelson's residence and vehicle revealed a large amount of suspected methamphetamine and heroin, as well as other drug related paraphernalia.  

In total, detectives seized over 600 grams of methamphetamine (1.3 pounds), and approximately 100 grams of heroin (3.5 ounces).

All of this occurred in close proximity to Sutherlin's West Intermediate School located at 531 N Comstock Rd.  There are additional crimes in Oregon for delivering or manufacturing controlled substances within 1,000 feet of a school.  

Nelson was lodged in the Douglas County Jail and has been charged with the following crimes:

  • Unlawful Possession of Methmaphetamine
  • Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine
  • Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine Within 1,000 Feet of a School
  • Unlwful Possession of Heroin
  • Unlawful Delivery of Heroin
  • Unlawful Delivery of Heroin Within 1,000 Feet of a School



Attached Media Files: 2019-08/6255/126932/ENelson.jpeg

DOI to Treat More Than 1.2M Acres this Wildfire Season, Resources Mobilized across the Nation
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 08/19/19 9:34 AM

Agency personnel and critical assets are poised to respond to wildfires across the country

Washington - With peak wildfire activity predicted in the coming months, the Department of the Interior (DOI) has been working tirelessly to implement preventative measures to limit the size and scope of wildfires, treat current wildfires already underway, and protect wildfire-prone areas to best safeguard people and their communities. 

“As stewards of one-fifth of the country’s public lands, primarily in the West, we know that our ability to be prepared for wildfires and reduce their severity is paramount to protecting communities and saving lives,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. “In collaboration with local, state, and other federal partners, we are using everything in our arsenal to prepare for wildfires this year, treating more than one million acres.”

As a part of the DOI, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the National Park Service (NPS), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) contribute to a total workforce of 4,500 firefighting personnel, 500 tribal firefighters, 151 smokejumpers, 18 interagency hotshot crews and 4 Tribal hotshot crews. These firefighters will have over 600 pieces of specialized equipment available for use, including engines, water tenders, dozers, and other equipment. Aviation assets also play a critical role in efforts to manage wildfires as the DOI will have access to 23 single engine air tankers, 6 water scoopers, 41 Type 1, 2 and 3 helicopters, and a number of other aviation resources.

The Trump Administration has prioritized active management of the nation’s public lands as provided in the President’s Executive Order 13855 and Secretary’s Order 3372, which establish a meaningful and coordinated framework for ensuring the protection of people, communities, and natural resources. Implementation of both Orders is a priority for reducing the risks of deadly and destructive wildfires.

This year, the BLM began analyzing a significant, 11,000-mile stretch of strategic fuel breaks to combat wildfires in the Great Basin, which includes portions of Idaho, Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada, and Utah. This large-scale, collaborative project could serve as a means to better control wildfires within a 223 million acre area. The environmental impact of the proposal is still being evaluated.

As DOI continues to evaluate innovative ways to best limit the destruction of wildfires in the future, it is nearing completion of more than 2,500 wildfire risk-reduction projects on more than 1.2 million acres of DOI and tribally-administered lands in some of the most fire-prone areas of the country. Some of the state totals to be completed and specific projects already completed this fiscal year include:

Alaska: More than 43,000 acres of land will be treated. Already this year, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, in cooperation with two Alaska Native Corporations and the Kenai Peninsula Borough, has implemented 90 acres of fuels management activities through mechanical treatments and prescribed fire treatments. This treatment is a component of a multi-year fuels break project, initiated in 2016, planned and implemented to protect the community of Sterling, AK. The Sterling fuels break was utilized as a contingency fire line, protecting Sterling from the threat from the 2019 Swan Lake Fire, which has now burned 102,521 acres and is currently 80% contained.

Arizona: Nearly 85,000 acres of land will be treated. Fuels treatment projects are ongoing with 21,287 acres treated so far this year, including 6,706 acres in the southwest border area. By the end of the fiscal year, more than 27,544 total acres of fuels are targeted for treatment by prescribed fire, chemical application or mechanical methods.

California: More than 30,000 acres of land will be treated with some projects including: A 93 acre fuels treatment project in the Sandy Gulch unit of the South Fork Mokelumne Project, near the community of Glenco in Calaveras County. In addition to the work completed by the Mother Lode Field Office, the Calaveras Healthy Impact Products Solutions, which is a local non-profit partner, has completed an adjacent 35-acre fuel break on BLM-managed public lands. This 35 acres represents the north portion of a fuel break that was identified as a priority by CAL FIRE after the 2015 Butte Fire. The southern portion of the fuel break is scheduled to be completed this fall, and will connect to ongoing fuels work in the southern part of the South Fork Mokelumne Project. The BLM California Bishop Field Office made improvements to existing fuelbreaks adjacent to residential areas. Wildland fire crews cut and removed downed trees and limbs on BLM-managed lands, reducing the available fuel load. The project was undertaken in partnership with residents of the community of Wilkerson, Inyo National Forest, and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Colorado: More than 27,000 acres of land will be treated. The BLM completed a 286-acre prescribed fire near Bayfield, Colorado, called the Rabbit Mountain Project Prescribed Fire. It was completed to restore and maintain a healthy ecosystem and reduce the risk of wildfire to private lands and improvements in the area. The prescribed fire will reinvigorate grasses, forbs, and shrubs and improve deer and elk habitat.

Florida: More than 183,000 acres of land will be treated. Already this year, Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge has completed 8,747 acres of prescribed fire and 1,839 acres of mechanical fuel reduction treatments, with partners including the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the National Park Service, the Florida Forest Service, and Brevard County. These fuel reduction projects protect residents, tourists, federal employees, public land, and military and private space industry. Minimizing operational disruption and mitigating risks and hazards, the projects reduce the intensity and duration of wildfires, smoke, and road closures.

Montana: Nearly 85,000 acres of land will be treated. The FWS and the BLM worked with the state of Montana and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s U.S. Forest Service to reduce fire risk by removing trees and clearing brush. The project near the Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge reduces the risk of catastrophic fires from spreading to local communities. All timber was harvested and supported local economies.

Minnesota: More than 42,000 acres of land will be treated, primarily from the Red Lake Helitack crew from the Red Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota. They completed a 41,000 acre project to reduce wildfire risk and improve forest conditions. The aviation crew flew for eight hours in coordination with ground support using prescribed burns to remove the grassy understory and replenish the forest.

Nevada: More than 85,000 acres of land will be treated. One project already completed includes: The BLM Nevada Battle Mountain District has recently completed over 2,115 acres of treatments along roadsides including thinning, masticating, herbicide application, mowing, drill seeding, and broadcast seeding to create fuel breaks to limit the wildfire growth potential of roadside ignitions. In 2018, this fuel break allowed the district to successfully suppress a fire, keeping it from becoming a larger, more destructive disaster.

Utah: More than 134,000 acres of land will be treated overall. At BLM Utah, fuels treatment projects are ongoing with approximately 75,000 acres treated so far this year. By the end of the fiscal year, more than 117,000 total acres of fuels are targeted for treatment by prescribed fire or mechanical methods. Fuel treatment accomplishments are continually increasing on an annual basis, with acres targeted for 2019 being the highest planned accomplishment ever. Also, BLM is seeking comments on an environmental assessment (EA) analyzing a proposal to treat vegetation and fuels as part of a wildfire mitigation project near Castle Valley, Utah. The proposal covers approximately 1,400 acres of fuel breaks within a larger 7,500-acre planning and analysis area.

Virginia: More than 11,000 acres of land will be treated. One project already completed includes: The NPS completed a prescribed burn in Manassas National Battlefield Park. The prescribed burn helps to reduce the risk of wildfires and improves the habitat for wildlife.

As wildfire activity likely increases, DOI, in collaboration with local, state, and federal partners, is moving wildfire suppression resources to the most susceptible areas around the country. At the center of this coordination is the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC), which coordinates eight different agencies and organizations’ emergency management responses. The NIFC produces a monthly “National Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook,” which provides wildland fire potential forecasts for the country. The most recent outlook forecasts potential for above normal fire activity in western Oregon and Washington, parts of California and Nevada, and the interior of Alaska.

“Most of the western states experienced a wet spring, which allowed vegetation to grow thickly and quickly,” said Fire Weather Program Manager with NIFC’s Predictive Services group Bryan Henry. “The wet, cool spring delayed fire season, though now, we are seeing hot and dry weather throughout most of the western states, which is rapidly drying the abundant vegetation and creating fuel for wildfires.” 

Due to a cool, wet spring season, wildfire activity has been below normal this year with 27,191 wildfires burning 3,325,456 acres. This is much lower than previous years as around 39,700 wildfires burned over 4.1 million acres at this point in the season last year and 5.8 million acres in 2017. 

Last year was one of the most tragic years on record with more than 58,000 wildfires burning over 8.8 million acres. Additionally, nearly 26,000 structures were destroyed, more than double the previous annual record.

The DOI is currently managing wildfire incidents in Alaska, Arizona, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Washington, and has deployed personnel, aircraft, and equipment throughout the country to work with interagency firefighting partners.