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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Wed. Sep. 23 - 9:00 pm
Wed. 09/23/20
Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion Counties Workers May Be Eligible for Disaster Unemployment Assistance
Oregon Employment Department - 09/23/20 5:43 PM

The Oregon Employment Department is announcing the availability of Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) for individuals who became unemployed, had their work hours substantially reduced or are unemployed self-employed individuals as a direct result of the wildfires and straight-line winds that have been taking place since September 7, 2020. They also must not qualify for regular state unemployment insurance (UI), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), other extension programs, or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) is a federal program that provides temporary unemployment assistance benefits to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost or interrupted or had their work hours greatly reduced as a direct result of a major disaster. The Oregon Employment Department administers the DUA program for the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, on behalf of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Individuals eligible for regular unemployment benefits or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) are not eligible for DUA.

DUA is available to eligible individuals for weeks of unemployment beginning September 13, 2020. Benefits for this disaster will be available until March 20, 2021, as long as your unemployment continues to be a direct result of the major disaster. You must file the application within 30 days after this announcement date. The deadline for filing a DUA claim related to these fires is October 23, 2020. 

In addition to people who lost their jobs as a direct result of the major disaster, DUA may include individuals who:

  • were self-employed and prevented from performing such services as a result of the disaster and the work or self-employment was their primary source of income,
  • were unable to reach their job because of the disaster,
  • were scheduled to and prevented from beginning work or self-employment in the disaster area,
  • were unable to work due to injury as a direct result of the disaster, or
  • became head of household due a death caused by the disaster,
  • Have applied for and used all regular unemployment benefits from any state, or do not qualify for regular unemployment benefits, or extension programs and remain unemployed as a direct result of the disaster.

Unemployment is a direct result of the major disaster if the unemployment resulted from:

  • the physical damage or destruction of the place of employment;
  • the physical inaccessibility of the place of employment due to its closure by the federal, state, or local government in immediate response to the disaster; or
  • lack of work, or loss of revenues, if, prior to the disaster, the employer or self-employed business received at least a majority of its revenue or income from an business in the major disaster area that was damaged or destroyed in the disaster or an entity in the major disaster area closed by the federal, state, or local government.

To receive DUA benefits, all required documentation must be turned in when you file or within 21 days from the day your DUA application is filed. You will need to provide supporting documentation, including but not limited to, proof of employment at the time of the disaster, or proof of self-employment at the time of the disaster, and income information for tax year 2019. Specifically, required documentation includes a Social Security number and a copy of the most recent federal income tax form or check stubs, or documentation to support that  you were working or self-employed when the disaster occurred. Documentation for the self-employed can be obtained from banks or government entities, or affidavits from individuals having knowledge of their business.

Affected individuals are encouraged to apply for DUA through the Oregon Employment Department (OED), which will first check if applicants can qualify for state unemployment benefits, PEUC, other extension programs or PUA benefits.

Applications for DUA are available in English and Spanish online at www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. Your application may be mailed to the address listed below, or submitted online at unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Application packets will be available at certain evacuation sites and WorkSource Centers. Please include the weeks you would like to claim in your initial application. More information is available on our public website and social media pages. For additional questions or to request an initial application, please call: 503-570-5000

Contact Information:

Address:        Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit

875 Union Street NE

Salem, OR 97311

 

Telephone:   

503-570-5000

 

Additional Information:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

 

Submit your Application Online:            unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/930/138413/09.23.20_DUA_Press_Release_Wildfires_2020_English_FINAL.pdf

Suspect Arrested after Knife / Hammer Assault and Attempted Arson (Photo)
Medford Police Dept. - 09/23/20 5:10 PM
Moore mugshot
Moore mugshot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6231/138414/thumb_Moore_Jeffrey.jpg

On September 23, 2020, at about 5:54 a.m., fire and police personnel were dispatched for a small fire next to a residence in the 2200 block of Crater Lake Avenue. A passer-by saw a small fire on the side of the house and extinguished it with water, while also calling 911. Medford Fire Department responded and alerted the occupants of the house who did not know who started the fire, which was highly suspicious for arson. Officers and fire eventually cleared the scene.

At about 7:51 a.m., officers were dispatched back to the residence for an assault. Officers arrived and found the 61 year old victim had sustained injuries after being attacked by a 25 year old family member, Jeffrey Aaron Moore. The victim reported Moore attacked her with a knife and a hammer, which were consistent with her injuries.

The investigation revealed the victim confronted the suspect for starting the fire, which he admitted to. The suspect then armed himself with a knife and a hammer and attacked the victim.

The victim was transported to the hospital where she was treated and later released.

Officers initially believed the suspect was inside his bedroom, still armed and refusing to coming out. Officers later learned he had fled prior to arrival.

Officers eventually located the suspect walking on Cherry Lane, near N. Phoenix Road. He was taken into custody without incident and lodged in jail.

Suspect:

Moore, Jeffrey Aaron

25 years old

 

Charges:

Assault 1

Assault 2

Attempted Arson 1

Bail: $ 210,000

 




Attached Media Files: Moore mugshot

Civil Air Patrol Aircrews Bring Home More Wildfire Photos
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/23/20 4:03 PM

SALEM, Ore. (Sep. 23, 2020) – Civil Air Patrol crews gathered more than 100 photos Tuesday of key infrastructure in Oregon wildfire zones to help determine damage caused by the worst fires in the state in decades. 

This was CAP’s sixth day of missions in the wildfire zones. Some planned trips for CAP crews were canceled because other aircraft were in the areas helping fight the wildfires.  

More flights are planned for the near future as Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM) requests have come in for CAP’s high-resolution photography. That depends on weather, as CAP aerial photography depends on good visibility. Low clouds and smoke inhibit that. Weather forecasts also show the possibility of rain. 

CAP has flown 30 sorties so far in response to the wildfires. More than 20 CAP volunteers have worked organizing, flying and recording activities. In addition, CAP has highly trained emergency services personnel imbedded with the OEM in Salem, responding to requests for air support and advising on other interagency cooperation. 

Acting as a Total Force partner and the U.S. Air Force auxiliary, CAP is aligned with First Air Force to rapidly respond to nonmilitary threats domestically when tasked in a Defense Support of Civil Authorities capacity to save lives, relieve suffering, prevent property damage and provide humanitarian assistance. 

At last count, CAP’s Oregon Wing has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously to FEMA standards each year to be ready to help in emergencies like the unprecedented onslaught of wildfires that have burned more than 1 million acres this year and thousands of structures and displaced huge numbers of Oregonians. The wing also has 247 young cadet members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship. Many also train in emergency services to ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

Visit www.orwg.cap.gov, www.CAP.News or www.GoCivilAirPatrol.com for more information.


Sheriff's Office Announces Additional Reductions in Evacuation Notices (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/23/20 4:00 PM
DCSO Seal
DCSO Seal
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5204/138407/thumb_Sheriff-seal-web.jpg

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - The Douglas County Sheriff's Office, working in conjunction with fire managers, is announcing additional reductions in evacuation notices. 

Effective, Wednesday, September 23, 2020, at 5:00 PM, the following areas have been reduced from a Level 2 "BE SET" evacuation notice down to a Level 1 "BE READY". 

  • Dry Creek, including Happy Creek Lane, Felix Flat, Elk Ridge Drive and Illahee Road
  • Little River Road from Buckhorn Road to New Bridge Road, including all side roads between these two points (Cavitt Creek Road). 

The following evacuation notices remain unchanged: 

  • Level 1 "BE READY": Nonpareil Road at Banks Creek east to the end of Nonpareil, including all side streets between these two points. 
  • Level 2 "BE SET": Little River Road at New Bridge Road to the end of Little River Road, including all side streets between these two points. 
  • Level 2 "BE SET": Highway 138E at the Narrows Wayside (Idleyld Trading Post) east to Steamboat Creek, including all side streets between these two points. 
  • Level 2 "BE SET": Diamond Lake, including the Resort, all recreation sites, residential and summer homes

The most current interactive evacuation map can be found at www.dcso.com/evacuations




Attached Media Files: DCSO Seal

2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 23, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/23/20 3:52 PM
2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg
2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138405/thumb_2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5714.jpg_FEMA: Salem, Ore. - September 19, 2020 - FEMA staff working on the 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery at the State Emergency Coordination Center. - Jeff Markham / FEMA  

2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731.jpg_FEMA: Salem, Ore. - September 19, 2020 - FEMA staff working on the 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery at the State Emergency Coordination Center. - Jeff Markham / FEMA

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5714_FEMA.jpg

Victim Identified In Stabbing Death
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/23/20 2:55 PM

Case 20-17591

UPDATE September 23, 2020

Jackson County Sheriff’s Office Identify Murder Victim

On September 18, 2020 at 1924 hours, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a report of a fatal stabbing in the Elderberry Flats area near Wimer, OR.

A suspect, Branden Rex Stansell, DOB 07-24-00, was lodged at County Jail on September 21, 2020 on charges of Murder II and Assault I.

The identity of the victim has now been released after next of kin were notified. The victim is Matthew James Joseph Stephens, DOB 03-07-1997. He had been staying at homes of friends in the area.

The Jackson County Grand Jury will review the case on September 24, 2020. Further information will be released by the Jackson County District Attorney’s Office.


Oregonians affected by the wildfires get more time to report the loss of SNAP benefits
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/23/20 2:01 PM

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) has received federal approval to extend the normal 10-day deadline for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients in 20 counties to request replacement of benefits as a result of food lost due to power outages and wildfires that began on Sept. 7.

The extension gives SNAP recipients in Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Coos, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, and Yamhill counties until Oct. 7 to apply to replace food purchased with their SNAP benefits.

“Replacing SNAP benefits will help Oregonians provide food for their families so they can focus on recovering from the wildfires,” said Dan Haun, ODHS Self-Sufficiency Programs Director. “We hope that these replacement benefits will help alleviate worries about food and feeding themselves and their families.”

SNAP recipients do not need to visit an office. They can request replacement food benefits by calling their local office and submitting the required information by email, fax or regular mail. Recipients can use either Form DHS 0349D (Affidavit for Nonreceipt or Destroyed Food Stamp Benefits) or submit a signed and dated written request that includes how the food was destroyed, the date it happened, destroyed food items and the amount paid for each item.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1.


Oregon reports 193 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/20 1:23 PM

Sept. 23, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 193 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 537, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 193 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 31,503.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (2), Clackamas (9), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (2), Deschutes (2), Douglas (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (22), Jefferson (3), Josephine (4), Klamath (1), Lane (36), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Malheur (22), Marion (17), Multnomah (29), Polk (2), Umatilla (12), Wasco (4), Washington (14), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 532nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on September 11 and died on September 15 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 533rd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on September 14 and died on September 15 at Portland Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 534th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on August 17 and died on September 19 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 535th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on September 1 and died on September 22 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 536th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on September 3 and died on September 7 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 537th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 17 and died on August 31 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

NOTE: Updated information is available for Oregon’s 295th COVID-19 death, a 26-year-old man in Yamhill County. The updated death certificate does not list COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or as a significant condition that contributed to his death, and he is no longer considered a COVID-19 related death or case.


OHA Releases Weekly Report

In today’s Weekly Report, OHA notes that the week of Sept. 14 through Sept. 20 reported new COVID-19 infections rose 17% from the week prior, to 1,511. The number of Oregonians newly tested rose 8%, to 18,840, and the percentage of tests that were positive rose from 5.6% to 6.2%. Eighteen Oregonians were reported to have died in association with COVID-19, compared to 29 the prior week. One hundred and sixteen Oregonians were hospitalized, up from 83 in the previous week. The age group with the highest incidence of reported infection continues to be 20–29-year-olds. People under 30 years old have accounted for 37% of reported cases.


OHA changes child care reporting guidelines

Starting today, Sept. 23, OHA is changing the process for reporting COVID-19 outbreaks in child care facilities. The change will provide a more transparent and comprehensive reporting of these cases.

Child care providers are required to report COVID-19 cases to their local health care authority. Since July, OHA has reported on outbreaks of 5 or more cases in facilities that enrolled 30 or more children in the Weekly COVID-19 Report.

Under the new reporting threshold, outbreaks of more than 2 children in facilities with a capacity of more than 16 children will now be reported, provided they are not siblings in the same household.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Shooting Investigation - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 09/23/20 1:14 PM

Oregon State Police is currently investigating a shooting incident that occurred on Interstate 5 near Brooks.

This event occurred at approximately 11:50 A.M. southbound on Interstate 5 between Woodburn and Brooks.

OSP is asking anyone with any information or that might have a witnessed a road rage type incident between a Black Honda Accord and another vehicle to call Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP.

One person was transported to the hospital with injuries.

 


Plan Ahead Before Going Home
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/23/20 12:20 PM

As evacuation levels change, people affected by the fires are eager to know when it is safe to go home. As conditions may be unknown in an area, it is important that residents follow the advice of local authorities to learn when it is safe to return. Residents should also check road closures and conditions to know the safest way to travel. Check roads by visiting Oregon Dept. of Transportation’s TripCheck.com.

Once local authorities have given the all-clear to re-enter properties, homeowners should take steps to protect themselves and others, when cleaning up after a wildfire. Many dangers may remain, such as ash and fire debris, which can be toxic. 

Staying safe around ashes:

  • If you see ash or a layer of dust, keep children away until it has been cleaned.
  • Cloth face coverings, paper masks or bandanas are not effective at filtering out fine airborne ash, dust or asbestos fibers. N95 or KN95 respirators, if properly fit, tested and worn, can offer protection from airborne particles.
  • Avoid activities that could stir up ash and make it airborne again, like using a leaf blower, dry sweeping, or vacuuming without a HEPA filter.
  • Use rubber gloves when cleaning up ash. Wash any ash off of your body or clothing right away.
  • To clean up ash outdoors: Gently dampen the ash – do not use a pressure washer, which will generate dust before it wets things down. Then use a vacuum with a high efficiency HEPA filter if you have one. If you don't have a HEPA-equipped vacuum, gently sweep or scoop up the ash.
  • To clean up ash indoors: Use a damp cloth to clean surfaces, a wet mop on floors. Do not use a vacuum to clean up ash unless it has a high efficiency HEPA filter.
  • Turn on an air purifier or ventilation system with a HEPA filter, if you have one, to help remove particles from indoor air.
  • Find more safety tips on the Oregon Dept. of Environmental Quality website.

Making your yard safe:

  • Extinguish hot embers. Check for them in yard debris, rain gutters or crawl spaces, on the roof, and under overhangs and decks.
  • Clear away debris. Move it away from the house to the edge of your home.
  • Check the electric meter. If there is visible damage, don’t turn the breaker on. Call your utility company.
  • Stay clear of electrical wires on the ground. Report them to your utility company.
  • Check the gas meter, gas lines or propane tank. If there is visible damage or if you smell gas, call your local utility or propane company.

Before entering structures: If you have safety concerns, have a qualified building inspector or structural engineer inspect your structures. Don’t enter if you smell gas. Turn off the power before you inspect your structure. Use a flashlight, but turn it on outside because the flashlight battery may produce a spark that can cause a fire.

Entering your structures safely:

  • Check for immediate dangers. This includes remaining fire and fire damage, and wild or domestic animals that may have taken refuge.
  • Check the attic. Embers may have entered through vents.
  • Keep appliances turned off until you have determined the electric meter and electrical lines are undamaged.
  • Discard food that has been exposed to heat, smoke, or soot.
  • Don’t drink or use water from the faucet until emergency officials say it’s okay. Water systems may become polluted if there is post-fire flooding.
  • Take safety precautions for utilities:
    • Electric – If you turn on the breaker and still have no power, contact your utility company.
    • Propane tank or  system – Turn off the valves and call your propane supplier to inspect the system.
    • Heating oil tank system – Call your supplier to inspect it before you use it.
    • Solar electrical system – Have it inspected by a licensed technician to verify the solar panels and wiring are safe.

Documenting Damage and contacting your insurance company: Call your insurance agent. Make a list of the damage and document it with photos and videos. Keep all receipts for repair and cleaning costs.

###

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362)  711/VRS - Video Relay Service). Multilingual operators are available. (Press 2 for Spanish). TTY call 800-462-7585.

 


9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/23/20 11:48 AM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 120th Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT120 Graduation will be held at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, October 2, 2020, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, in Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the need for social distancing, the graduation will be closed to the public.  However, we would like to publicly congratulate Basic Telecommunications Class #BT 120 for a successful completion of their Basic Training.
 
Members of Basic Telecommunications Class #120:

Dispatcher Lorin Alexander

Klamath 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher John Bustard

Umatilla Tribal Police Department

 

Dispatcher Alexis Bynon

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Alexander Doby

METCOM 9-1-1

 

Dispatcher Angela Drorbaugh

Yamhill Communications

 

Dispatcher Sarah Ferris

Tillamook County 911

 

Dispatcher Carsen Funkhouser

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Larissa Hackett

Klamath 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher Kaylee Hamm

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Alexis Hayes

Corvallis Police Department

 

Dispatcher Roderick Hogan

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Melody Holmes

Frontier Regional 9-1-1

 

Dispatcher Iliya Kuzmenko

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Jessica Lundmark

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Jacob Olson

Yamhill Communications

 

Dispatcher Kylee Peck

Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Erika Powell

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Annabelle Thompson

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Kimberly Whanger

Columbia 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher Jennifer Zeman

W.C.C.C.A.

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


ODF fire update and fire map for Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/23/20 11:08 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

 

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

203,685

15%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,828

46%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

27%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,027

31%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

52%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,751

87%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,215 in Oregon

24%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

80%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

95%

N/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,916

26%

E of Diamond Lake

More information




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1072/138389/Fire_map_for_Wednesday_Sept._23_2020.pdf

621 organizations awarded $25.7 million in Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support grant awards (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 09/23/20 10:45 AM
The Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center on Sept. 9, when it served as an evacuation center for families and livestock fleeing the wildfires. The Fairgrounds received a $187,287 CRFCS grant award.
The Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center on Sept. 9, when it served as an evacuation center for families and livestock fleeing the wildfires. The Fairgrounds received a $187,287 CRFCS grant award.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1171/138388/thumb_CCFEC_Fire_Pictures-203.jpg

Salem, Ore. – Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support (CRFCS) grant awards totaling $25.7 million will be distributed to 621 cultural organizations across Oregon through a partnership between the Oregon Cultural Trust and its County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions. The funds, allocated to the Cultural Trust for Oregon cultural organizations facing losses due to the COVID-19 health crisis, were made available through a $50 million relief package for Oregon culture approved by the Emergency Board of the Oregon Legislature in July.

“Many cultural organizations and institutions have closed their doors to help keep us all safe during this pandemic. These grants will mean that more than 600 Oregon arts and culture organizations across our state’s counties and Tribes will be able to keep up their vital creative work,” said Governor Kate Brown. “Everything from museums to fairgrounds to the summer events we all know and love can continue to enrich our lives—connecting us to one another and giving us the hope and inspiration we need.”

“These funds are life blood to Oregon’s cultural community,” added Chuck Sams, chair of the Cultural Trust Board of Directors. “While they won’t replace all the losses suffered during the pandemic, they will ensure Oregon culture survives this crisis. We are deeply grateful to the Oregon Legislature for making this possible.”

The largest award is $1.4 million to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry; the average grant award is $41,458. Just under $90 million in requests were received from 751 organizations; 130 organizations were ineligible for awards based on program guidelines.

“Due to the incredible need, we were able to fund a percentage of organizations’ eligible expenses,” said Brian Rogers, Cultural Trust executive director. “Smaller organizations received a higher percentage of their eligible expenses. The final awards represent a statewide, equitable distribution plan that was approved by our Board of Directors, the Governor’s Office, Business Oregon and our legislative sponsors.”

The organizations to receive funding include cultural institutions, county fairgrounds, cultural entities within federally recognized Indian Tribes based in Oregon, festivals and community event organizations, in addition to some for-profit organizations that have significant cultural impact in their communities. Awards will be issued directly to the organizations by their local County or Tribal Coalition.

Funding was determined based on eligible request amounts, an award allocation formula that established a base amount of funds per county or Tribe and the organization’s fiscal size. COVID-19 expenses previously reimbursed by other federal CARES Act programs were not eligible.

The intended use of the CRF Cultural Support funds is to provide financial assistance to cultural nonprofit organizations and community venues that have canceled or postponed public programming because of public health executive orders associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Guidelines for the funding are in accordance with the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

The legislation allows Coalitions to be reimbursed for up to 5 percent of their total grant awards for documented administrative expenses. Requests from Coalitions for administrative expenses totaled $209,515.

Below is a list of funds awarded per county; the full list of grant awards (listed alphabetically by county) is posted on the Cultural Trust website.

NOTE: No applications were submitted from Gilliam County and the Tribes chose not to apply due to previously received CARES Act funding. Washington County, which serves as the fiscal agent for the Cultural Coalition of Washington County, chose not to participate in the CRFCS program; the Cultural Trust is currently working to identify potential solutions.

Baker County Cultural Coalition                                   $126,485

Benton County Cultural Coalition                                   $97,691

Clackamas County Cultural Coalition                          $620,073

Clatsop County Cultural Coalition                                $402,881

Columbia County Cultural Coalition                               $22,668

Coos County Cultural Coalition                                     $304,916

Crook County Cultural Coalition                                      $22,220

Curry County Cultural Coalition                                      $57,264

Deschutes County Cultural Coalition                           $998,668

Douglas County Cultural Coalition                               $102,606

Grant County Cultural Coalition                                        $5,924

Harney County Cultural Coalition                                   $25,075

Hood River Cultural Trust                                              $171,602

Jackson County Cultural Coalition                            $1,057,193

Jefferson County Cultural Coalition                             $271,715

Josephine County Cultural Coalition                            $241,778

Klamath County Cultural Coalition                                 $72,001

Lake County Cultural Coalition                                       $94,291

Lane County Cultural Coalition                                  $2,575,914

Lincoln County Cultural Coalition                                 $160,625

Linn County Cultural Coalition                                      $179,277

Malheur Cultural Trust                                                    $183,608

Marion County Development Corporation                   $835,398

Morrow County Cultural Coalition                                   $41,740

Multnomah County Cultural Coalition                     $13,106,828

Polk County Cultural Coalition                                      $245,072

Sherman County Cultural Coalition                                  $3,830

Tillamook County Cultural Coalition                             $213,444

Umatilla County Cultural Coalition                               $579,444

Union County Cultural Coalition                                      $54,609

Wallowa County Cultural Trust Coalition                     $151,756

Wasco County Cultural Trust Coalition                       $209,256

Cultural Coalition of Washington County                 $1,638,592

Wheeler County Cultural Heritage Coalition                 $12,241

Yamhill County Cultural Coalition                                 $858,658

_________________

About the Oregon Cultural Trust

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testament to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was designed as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, poets, acrobats and dreamers who define our famous quality of life.

In 2019 Oregonians gave $4.5 million to the Cultural Trust. Sixty percent of that went straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent helped grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners, 45 County and Tribal Coalitions and 1,450+ qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.

More information at culturaltrust.org.

 

 




Attached Media Files: The Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center on Sept. 9, when it served as an evacuation center for families and livestock fleeing the wildfires. The Fairgrounds received a $187,287 CRFCS grant award. , The semi finalists from the 2020 August Wilson Monologue Competition, part of World Stage Theatre’s Black History Festival NW. The final celebration for the Festival was held virtually due to COVID-19. Photo by Shawntee Sims. World Stage Theatre received , The labyrinth at Pacifica: A Garden in the Siskiyous in Williams, Oregon. Pacifica received a $43,348 CRFCS grant award. Photo by Cate Battles/ Argosy Odyssey and Josephine County Cultural Coalition.

UPDATE: Missing Person (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 09/23/20 10:35 AM
Missing Person Bulletin
Missing Person Bulletin
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6530/138386/thumb_MO_Angela_Slover_corrected.JPG

UPDATE

The missing person has been located safe.

The Grants Pass Department of Public Safety is seeking the public's assistance in locating missing person, Angie Slover. See attached bulletin for further. Please contact us at 541-450-6260 if you have any information. 




Attached Media Files: Missing Person Bulletin

Oregon Department of Forestry develops draft Habitat Conservation Plan for western Oregon's state forests
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/23/20 10:19 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry has developed a draft Habitat Conservation Plan for western Oregon’s state forests, proposing enhanced conservation for threatened and endangered fish and wildlife with increased certainty that counties and rural communities will receive revenues for decades to come.

Covering approximately 639,000 acres of state forestlands west of the Cascades, the draft Habitat Conservation Plan would offer enhanced protections for threatened and endangered fish and wildlife, while ensuring predictable timber revenues to help fund public services in rural communities. An independent analysis found that under the draft HCP, ODF can achieve more certainty in environmental protections as well as timber harvest volume compared to ODF’s current approach to complying with the Endangered Species Act. If an HCP were approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries, ODF would be assured ESA compliance over a 70-year permit term.

The draft plan can be viewed by visiting https://www.oregon.gov/odf/aboutodf/Pages/HCP-initiative.aspx. On October 6, the Board of Forestry is set to vote on whether to advance the project into the National Environmental Policy Act process. Written comment can be submitted to oardofforestry@oregon.gov">boardofforestry@oregon.gov, while information on providing verbal comment will be posted on the Board of Forestry page at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/Pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Lands owned by the Board of Forestry must, by law, provide economic, environmental and social benefits to Oregonians under a concept called Greatest Permanent Value – and to achieve this ODF must comply with the federal Endangered Species Act. At the same time, ODF’s State Forests Division is funded almost entirely on timber sale revenue, and Forest Trust Land counties rely on timber revenue to help fund local services.

As more species become listed as threatened or endangered, this is projected to result in reduced harvest opportunities over time. Additionally, ESA compliance on ODF lands currently costs several million dollars each year, with expenses likely to grow with more listings. The draft HCP takes a holistic approach to protecting and increasing habitat for threatened and endangered species, while assuring a more predictable rate of timber harvest over a 70-year HCP permit term and reducing costs compared to the current site-by-site approach to ESA compliance.

As part of ODF’s commitment to public and stakeholder involvement, ODF hosted six meetings open to the public throughout development of the draft HCP as well as dozens of individual and focus group meetings. Recognizing the unique relationship between ODF and Forest Trust Land counties, ODF has provided updates and solicited input from county representatives at every opportunity provided.

The plan was developed under a Steering Committee and Scoping Team with input from their technical experts that included representatives from the following federal and state agencies U.S. Fish & Wildlife and NOAA Fisheries, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of State Lands, Department of Environmental Quality, and Oregon State University.


Newly launched resource network connects Eastern Oregonians to the resources they need
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/23/20 9:59 AM

The newly launched Eastern Oregon Community Resource Network (EOCRN) uses technology to connect resources to people and communities in need. Multiple organizations in Baker, Union and Wallowa counties act together through this resource network.

“During times of adversity such as these, we recognized the need and also the resources in our Eastern Oregon communities. This resource network includes private and public sector non-profits, tribes, social service groups, hospitals, school districts, churches and individuals to share resources to address the needs of people and to address social service gaps in our community,” said Maria Weer, Building Healthy  Families Executive Director.

Building Healthy Families is the administering organization overseeing this network. The Oregon Department of Human Services has been a coordinating agency helping with its organization and launch. This product has been developed by Galaxux Inc. Galaxux is responsible for hosting and providing ongoing maintenance and support.

Here’s how EOCRN works: When an EOCRN member becomes aware of a need, either through a phone call or through the EOCRN website, they first check with 211 and other local resources. If that member can’t meet the need, they post it on EOCRN (https://www.eocrn.org/) to mobilize the entire community. EOCRN uses custom matching to notify members with profiles that match the need. These EOCRN members contact the member who made the request to coordinate details to fulfill the need. EOCRN values privacy of the clients and does not identify the client.

Requests could be anything from food to clothing to essential household items. Eastern Oregon has higher poverty rates than the state in general; as well as high childhood poverty rates; lack of public transportation and in many areas, there are food deserts, meaning there is a lack of affordable, heathy food nearby.

“The network also works to address the long-term solutions to needs. We want to help support a thriving community. We live here. We believe in working together to make a better world for all of us,” Weer said.

So far, there are 55 members in the network. They will meet quarterly to connect, network and act on identified social priorities.

For more information about EOCRN, or to sign up, go to www.EOCRN.org/.  


Corporate Activity Tax registrations top 15,000
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/23/20 9:50 AM

Salem, OR—The Department of Revenue reminds business owners and their tax preparers that once their business has earned more than $750,000 in commercial activity for the year, they are required to register for Oregon’s Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) within 30 days.

The CAT applies to all business entity types, such as C and S corporations, partnerships, sole proprietorships, and other entities. More than 15,000 businesses have registered for the CAT since registration opened for the new program in December 2019.

To register go directly to the CAT page of the Revenue website and click on the “Register for the CAT” link in the center of the page.

For those who need help, a short CAT registration training document is available on the page.

To register, individuals doing business in Oregon will need their name and their Social Security number or individual taxpayer identification number. Businesses will need their entity’s legal name and federal employer identification number.
Businesses and individuals will need:
• Their mailing address;
• The date they exceeded or expect to exceed $750,000 in Oregon commercial activity;
• A valid email address or current Revenue Online login, and;
• Their Business Activity Code (Refer to the current list of North American Industry Classification System codes found with their federal income tax return instructions.)
The 2019 Legislature created the CAT to boost funding for public schools. The CAT is imposed on businesses for the privilege of doing business in Oregon, including those located inside and outside of Oregon. It’s measured on a business’s commercial activity—the total amount a business realizes from activity in Oregon.

Registration doesn’t mean a business will owe tax. Only businesses with taxable commercial activity in excess of $1 million must pay the Corporate Activity Tax. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of taxable commercial activity greater than $1 million after subtractions.

The CAT page of the Revenue website includes links to the administrative rules that govern the tax, a list of basic frequently asked questions (FAQ), and a Beyond the FAQ section that includes high-level summaries of the rules and other topics to help answer taxpayer questions.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


State issues insurance emergency order for wildfire victims
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/23/20 9:25 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services’ Division of Financial Regulation has issued an insurance emergency order for people affected by the state’s wildfires. 

Insurance companies must immediately take steps to do the following until the order is no longer in effect: 

  • Extend all deadlines for policyholders to report claims or submit other communications related to claims
  • Take all practicable steps to provide opportunities for policyholders to report claims
  • Establish a grace period for premium payments for all insurance policies issued, delivered, or covering a risk in the affected areas
  • Suspend cancellations and nonrenewals

The order applies to several ZIP codes across the state. The division’s bulletin No. DFR 2020-16 provides a list of ZIP codes that are subject to the order. 

“We issued this order to make sure evacuees and other Oregonians affected by these wildfires are able to access the insurance resources they need, especially while they are displaced,” said DCBS Director and Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “We appreciate all the work our state’s insurance representatives are doing to help their customers right now, and we encourage everyone to be patient and work together throughout the recovery process.”

If your home or property was damaged by the wildfires, contact your insurance company as soon as possible to discuss your situation and learn next steps. If you still have concerns, the division’s consumer advocates are here to help. Call 888-877-4894 (toll-free) or email .insurancehelp@oregon.gov">dfr.insurancehelp@oregon.gov.

Visit the division's wildfire insurance resource page to view the order, bulletin, and more insurance information.

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets September 24
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/20 9:16 AM

September 23, 2020

Contact: Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: September 24,1-3 p.m.

Where: By call-in or webinar only. The public may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/5590554135910010380 and listen-only conference line conference line at 888-398-2342, participant code 5731389.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; updates; 2021 Benchmarks; preventive dental; meaningful language access – technical aspects of reporting; EHR-based measures – changing national landscape; adjourn. The agenda is available on the group's webpage.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 199 - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 09/23/20 8:53 AM

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020 at approximately 12:18 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 199 near milepost 16.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevrolet Malibu, operated by Rianna McGonagle (18) of Sisters, was southbound when it veered off the road and struck a tree. 

McGonagle sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Rural Metro Fire and the Josephine County Sheriff's Office.


Tue. 09/22/20
Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's Process Improvement Committee meets October 7
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 4:32 PM

September 22, 2020

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's Process Improvement Committee is holding its third meeting. This meeting was rescheduled twice (Sept. 9 and Sept. 23) due to various emergencies.

Agenda:

  • Review the committee agenda and summary from previous meeting.
  • Finalize recommendation on survey process priorities and Nurse Staffing Report format.
  • Review components of the nurse staffing complaint investigation process.
  • Discuss nurses’ concerns with the current complaint investigation process and role of NSAB and OHA in addressing these concerns.
  • Discuss communication to share with nurses regarding complaint investigation process.
  • Summarize action items and next steps.

The agenda will be available on the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's webpage at www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Oct. 7, 1:30-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom: dial 669-254-5252, meeting ID 160 454 8059, passcode 900107.

The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to OHA based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker, 971-673-0389, erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker at 971-673-0389, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon SNAP recipients who lost food due to wildfires may be eligible for replacement benefits
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/22/20 3:23 PM

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) is currently processing replacement benefit requests for individuals who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and who suffered loss of food due to the wildfires.

SNAP recipients who lost or disposed of food that was unsafe to eat, can request SNAP replacement benefits. Current SNAP recipients should contact their local ODHS office as soon as possible to find out if they are eligible.

Replacement benefits are available to existing SNAP recipients who:

  • Lost food due to a power outage
  • Lost food due to home damage
  • Request replacement benefits within 10 calendar days of experiencing food loss

Replacement benefits are not automatic. The amount of replacement benefits each SNAP recipient will receive is based on their monthly issuance.

Learn more at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/assistance/food-benefits/pages/replacement%20-benefits.aspx.

SNAP customers can contact their local ODHS SSP, APD or AAA office for more information. Find a local office at: oregon.gov/DHS/Offices/Pages/index.aspx.

For other ways to connect with DHS, contact 211info:

  • By calling 2-1-1 from any phone
  • Text your zip code to 898211
  • By email at help@211info.org
  • 211info.org

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Attached Media Files: REplacement Benefits Flyer

Bureau of Land Management Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council to meet virtually October 26 and 30 (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/22/20 2:41 PM
Western Oregon RAC
Western Oregon RAC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5514/138350/thumb_Western_OregonRAC1.jpg

Medford, Ore.  – The Bureau of Land Management’s Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council will meet virtually Monday, October 26 and Friday, October 30.

This will be the first meeting of the Western Oregon RAC. Planned agenda items at the meeting include member introductions and overview of roles and responsibilities of the RAC, including processes to review and recommend projects for funding under Title II of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act.

“The Western Oregon RAC is made up of valuable partners who represent the diverse perspectives of Western Oregon communities,” said Medford District Manager Elizabeth Burghard. “Their work on Secure Rural Schools Funding is critical for our local communities and the BLM is looking forward to having an excellent dialogue with them,” continued Burghard.

The meeting runs from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. each day.  The meetings are open to the public, with a public comment period scheduled for 2:30 p.m. on October 26.  Individuals who want to make a statement during the public comment period are encouraged to also submit a written copy of their statement at the meeting for the administrative record.

To participate in the meeting, please contact Kyle Sullivan, RAC Coordinator, ksullivan@blm.gov or (541) 618-2340 for registration information.

The Western Oregon RAC will meet multiple times a year. It is one of several citizen advisory councils to BLM Oregon/Washington. Its 15 members are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior and represent a broad range of public land interests, including environmental, local government, recreation, timber, and commercial activity. The Western Oregon RAC advises the BLM in Western Oregon, including the Coos Bay, Medford, Northwest Districts, and parts of the Lakeview District.

For more information about the Western Oregon RAC, visit: https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington.

###

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.




Attached Media Files: Western Oregon RAC

Heceta Beach health advisory issued September 22
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 2:36 PM

September 22, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for higher than normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Heceta Beach in Lane County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher than normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Heceta Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll free).

Video and audio resources for media here.

 

 


Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/22/20 1:38 PM
Jeffrey R. Williams
Jeffrey R. Williams
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1070/138338/thumb_Williams_J.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Jeffrey R. Williams, died the evening of September 21, 2020. Williams was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in the infirmary while on end of life care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Williams entered DOC custody on May 4, 1989, from Coos County and was sentenced to death. Williams was 59 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

####

 




Attached Media Files: Jeffrey R. Williams

Oregon reports 328 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 1:33 PM

Sept. 22, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 328 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 532, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 328 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 31,313.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (6), Clackamas (31), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (3), Crook (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (11), Douglas (10), Hood River (1), Jackson (12), Jefferson (1), Josephine (4), Klamath (2), Lane (32), Lincoln (1), Linn (10), Malheur (14), Marion (38), Multnomah (60), Polk (9), Umatilla (3), Wasco (25), Washington (42), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 530th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Sept.10 and died on Sept. 20, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 531st COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 15 and died on Sept. 20. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 532nd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 20, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. She did not have underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Thielsen Fire Evacuation Level Reduced at Diamond Lake (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/22/20 12:03 PM
Level 2
Level 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5204/138337/thumb_Level_2.JPG

DIAMOND LAKE, Ore. - Effective at 12:00 PM on Tuesday, September 22, 2020, the Level 3 "GO!" Evacuation notice for Diamond Lake will be reduced to a Level 2 "BE SET". 

LEVEL 2 "BE SET" means: YOU MUST PREPARE TO LEAVE AT A MOMENTS NOTICE. This level indicates there is significant danger to your area, and residents should either voluntarily relocate to a shelter or with family/friends outside of the affected area, or if choosing to remain, to be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice. Residents MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at their own risk. THIS MAY BE THE ONLY NOTICE YOU RECEIVE. Emergency services cannot guarantee that they will be able to notify you if conditions rapidly deteriorate. 

"The reduction in these areas does not mean that the danger is gone, but rather, has improved to a level that the Sheriff's Office and fire officials feel comfortable reducing the Level 3 "GO!" notice. Residents, if deciding to return, must continue to monitor official sources of information and be prepared to leave at a moment's notice if the situation changes," said Sgt. Brad O'Dell.

The reduction in the evacuation level also does not override the forest closure issued by the United States Forest Service, which remains in place. Individuals should check with the Umpqua National Forest regarding closures before planning a trip to the forest. 

With this reduction, there are no longer any Level 3 "GO!" notices remaining in Douglas County at this time. Interactive evacuation maps are found at www.dcso.com/evacuations.

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Attached Media Files: Level 2

Slater Fire Partial Reduction In Evacuation Levels
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/22/20 12:00 PM

INCIDENT DATE AND TIME: September 22, 2020 @ 12:00PM

REPORTING DEPUTY:  Sheriff Dave Daniel

DETAILS:

After coordination with the Northern Rockies Team 2 Incident Management Team, the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office is reducing a current Level 2 “Be Set” evacuation level of the town of O’Brien Area to a Level 1 “Be Ready” evacuation level. 

We would like to thank the residents of the Illinois Valley for their patience and understanding during the Slater and Devil Fire incidents. This current downgrade is for all residences located on the following road systems including secondary roads; US Hwy 199 from mileposts 34 to 36.5 including all of Lone Mountain Rd. including secondary roads, O’Brien Rd., O’Brien St., Primrose Ln., Udee Rd. and Waldo Rd. from US Hwy 199 to Big Springs Dr. including Big Springs Dr.

Although the Level 2 “Be Set” evacuation level is being reduced to a Level 1 “Be Ready” evacuation level, we would like to remind all residents of Josephine County they should always be in the “Preparedness” mindset. Fires, floods or winter weather could cause us to evacuate our homes, sometimes at a moment’s notice.

The current Level 3 “Go” evacuation level is being reduced to a Level 2 “Be Set” evacuation level for all residents in the area of Wood Creek Rd. and Shepherd Hill Rd.

Although the Level 3 “Go” status is being reduced in these areas, we would like to remind those residents you will still be in a Level 2 “Be Set” evacuation area. In the event of a change in fire behavior, you may be asked to evacuate “Go” at a moment’s notice.

If you need information or assistance on developing preparedness plans for you and your household, go to the Rogue Valley Emergency Management web page at www.rvem.org and sign up for Citizen Alert for Josephine County. The link for signing up for Citizen Alert can also be found on the homepage of www.rvem.org or call (541) 474-5305 for assistance. Additional preparedness and incident information is also available on https://www.facebook.com/josephinecountyEM/.


ODF fire report for Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/22/20 10:46 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

198,916

       13%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,775

       38%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

       22%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,020

       26%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

       44%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,510

       55%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,215 in Oregon

       22%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

       70%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

       89%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,916

       26%

E of Diamond Lake




Attached Media Files: ODF fire map for Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020.

Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/22/20 10:35 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died on September 21, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Snake River Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 80 and 85 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. This is the seventh AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC requires employees and AICs to wear masks if they cannot maintain six feet of social distancing. Wearing masks is mandatory at all times in health services areas, some work areas, and in food services areas. Cloth masks have been provided to AICs and staff. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu like symptoms, then CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care are followed.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


UPDATE -- Isaiah Moore found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/22/20 10:20 AM

(Salem, Ore.) – Isaiah Moore, an infant born on July 25, 2020, who went missing after his birth has been found. Isaiah was found Monday, Sept. 21, 2020. The Oregon Department of Human Services is thankful for the community support to find him.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. You can also report child abuse by calling a local police department, county sheriff, county juvenile department, or Oregon State Police.

###


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Gaming System Sales Frauds (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/22/20 9:00 AM
TT - Gaming System Sales - GRAPHIC - September 22, 2020
TT - Gaming System Sales - GRAPHIC - September 22, 2020
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3585/138312/thumb_TT_-_Gaming_Shopping_Scams_-_September_22_2020.png

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against online shopping frauds. 

We are six months in to the pandemic now, and one thing is clear: life has changed dramatically. Many kids are going to school in their kitchens, we know we must wear a mask to walk into a grocery store, and finding toilet paper is still something to be celebrated. 

One thing that hasn't changed: fraudsters will take advantage of any situation to empty your wallet. One particular crime that we are seeing on the rise in Oregon involves scams related to the purchase of gaming systems. 

Whether you are trying to find one for you kids or yourself, it is obvious that people are desperate to escape the real world with a journey into the virtual world.? Since the pandemic hit, though, finding a Switch or a PlayStation or any other popular gaming system has been difficult.? 

That has people looking online for any deal they can find. Unfortunately, buying a gaming system through an online platform can leave you empty handed. 

In just a couple weeks, we've had more than 20 Oregonians tell us they ordered and paid for a system only to find out they had been scammed. In at least one case, the buyer eventually ended up receiving a box ... but there was no system inside. When he complained to the online platform, the buyer tried to make him pay to send the bogus item back to China. 

Here's how to protect yourself: 

  • Do your research on the seller. Avoid any seller with bad reviews or no reviews. You can also do an online search for the seller's name with the words "scam" or "fraud". 

  • Stick to reputable online platforms with protection policies in place. Know your rights if something goes wrong.? 

  • Make your payment through the online platform's secure service. Do not take the transaction outside that system. 

  • If the price is low, the risk is high. You often get what you pay for. 

If you have been victimized by a charity fraud scam or any other online scam, be sure to file a report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office. 

### 

 




Attached Media Files: TT - Gaming System Sales - AUDIO - September 22, 2020 , TT - Gaming System Sales - GRAPHIC - September 22, 2020

First quarter Hospital Financial Reports show drop in revenue due to COVID-19
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 8:36 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 22, 2020

Today the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) provided the agency’s first look at how COVID-19 has impacted hospital revenue during this public health crisis. Hospital revenue and operating margins suffered steep drops at the end of March, likely due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

For the first time OHA is releasing its quarterly hospital financial reports as an interactive online dashboard. The dashboard allows users to interact with hospital financial data from 2007 to 2020, displayed monthly or quarterly.

"The broad health and economic impacts of COVID-19 highlight why we need a sustainable health care system that ensures everyone has access to quality, affordable care when they need it," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA’s director of health policy and analytics.

Hospitals ended 2019 in a strong financial position, with revenue outpacing expenses. Net patient revenue increased 7.3% compared with the fourth quarter of 2018, while operating expenses increased only 1.2%. Uncompensated care remained essentially flat during that period. Hospitals closed out 2019 with a robust median operating margin of 4.2%.

However, the strong fourth quarter of 2019 stands in stark contrast to the first quarter of 2020. Oregon’s first COVID-19 case was identified on February 28, 2020. To conserve hospital capacity and preserve personal protective equipment (PPE) for the COVID-19 emergency, on March 19, 2020, Governor Kate Brown issued executive order 20-10, prohibiting elective and non-urgent medical procedures.

Decreases in hospital utilization in March led to a drop in patient revenue. At the same time, hospital expenses continued to increase, leading to large drops in operating margins in the first quarter of 2020. A drop in hospital stocks exacerbated the losses.

Key findings from the report include:

  • Statewide total margin fell from 9.3% in the first quarter of 2019 to -8.8% in the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of 19.4 percentage points.
  • Median statewide total margin fell 11.3 percentage points, from 6.7% to -4.6% in the same time period.
  • Statewide net patient revenue was down slightly, $22.7 million or -0.6%, when compared with the first quarter of 2019.
  • Total operating expenses remained on trend, increasing $215 million, 6.3%, when compared with the first quarter of 2019.

The first quarter financial reports don’t reflect financial assistance that was provided to the health system in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The second quarter hospital financial reports, released later this fall, will reflect federal and state grants or other assistance that was provided to hospitals to stabilize and support the health system.

"We have been working closely with our partners across the health system to contain the rising costs of health care," said Vandehey. "These data demonstrate the risks health systems face when their revenue depends on the numbers of patients they treat and procedures they perform. We see that paying for volume instead of value can contribute to financial uncertainty during a crisis, just when we need hospitals the most."

Quarterly reporting on Oregon's acute care hospitals assists policymakers and the public in monitoring the impact of state and federal health reforms on hospital care and financial stability. These reports track key measures of hospital finances and utilization including profitability, charity care, bad debt, and inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department visits.

For more information about OHA’s hospital reporting program, go to the Health Policy and Analytics website.

# # #


Umpqua Bank Announces Wildfire Relief for Impacted Communities, Customers and Associates (Photo)
Umpqua Bank - 09/22/20 8:26 AM
Wildfires destroyed Umpqua's store in Phoenix, Oregon.
Wildfires destroyed Umpqua's store in Phoenix, Oregon.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6798/138314/thumb_Phoenix_Store.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. – September 22, 2020 – Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), today announced a package of relief and support for communities, customers and associates impacted by the devastating wildfires raging across the West Coast.

“The personal loss experienced by so many people from these historic wildfires is truly incalculable. As a bank, we’ve experienced the devastation firsthand, including the complete loss of one of our stores in Phoenix, Oregon,” said Umpqua Bank CEO Cort O’Haver. “The road to recovery will take time, but Umpqua is committed to doing all we can to help our communities rebuild what’s been lost.”

Today’s announcement comes as wildfires in Oregon, Washington and California have already consumed more than five million acres and resulted in at least 36 deaths. In response to the devastation, Umpqua has activated relief programs for community, customers and associates to support both immediate needs and longer-term recovery efforts.

Community Relief
Umpqua has committed $750,000 in relief funding for impacted communities. This includes $100,000 for both response and recovery efforts in the coming weeks. An additional $650,000 is allocated for community organizations helping small businesses and local economies recover. The bank has also activated a 3:1 corporate match for associates donating to nonprofits supporting those impacted by the wildfires, as well as expanded its Virtual Volunteer program to support the many Umpqua associates currently volunteering time and resources to recovery efforts.

Customer Relief
The bank has activated its Disaster Relief Loan Program to provide impacted customers quick access to cash as needed, as well as to help them recover financially. Mortgage relief options for homeowners impacted by natural disasters are also being actively made available, and the bank will work with all impacted customers to defer or waive any costs associated with their Umpqua accounts incurred as a direct result of the wildfires.

Associate Relief
For the many Umpqua associates directly impacted by the wildfires, the bank has initiated an emergency assistance fund. In addition to providing direct financial support to these associates, the  bank is also providing impacted associates access to a wide variety of services to meet their immediate and long-term needs.

“Especially in moments like this, we want our communities and people to know they’re not alone,” said O’Haver. “In addition to this initial relief, Umpqua will continue partnering closely with local leaders and organizations to help those we serve recover and move forward.”

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank, headquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, and has locations across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the fifteenth consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank also owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to businesses. A subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, Umpqua Investments, Inc., provides retail brokerage and investment advisory services in offices throughout Washington, Oregon, and California. 

 


 




Attached Media Files: Wildfires destroyed Umpqua's store in Phoenix, Oregon.

Mon. 09/21/20
Slater Fire Partial Reduction in Evacuation Level
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 3:23 PM

INCIDENT DATE AND TIME: September 21, 2020 @ 3:00PM

REPORTING DEPUTY:  Sheriff Dave Daniel

DETAILS: 

After coordination with the Northern Rockies Team 2 Incident Management Team, the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office is reducing a current Level 3 “Go" status of the Dick George Rd Area to Level 2 “Be Set”.  

We would like to thank the residents of the Illinois Valley for their patience and understanding during the Slater and Devil Fire incidents. This current downgrade from a Level 3 “Go" to a Level 2 “Be Set” is for all residences located on the following road systems including secondary roads; Takilma Rd from Holland Loop Rd to 7050 Takilma Rd, Dick George Rd, River Grove, Beaver Meadow, Ridge Vista, Glory Ln, Lamont Way, Shadow Wood Dr, Jackadel Ln and Kirkham Rd.

Greenview Dr is remaining on a Level 3 “Go” evacuation status.

Although the Level 3 “Go" status is being reduced for part of these areas, we would like to remind those residences that you will still be in a Level 2 “Be Set” evacuation area. In the event of a change in fire behavior, you may be asked to evacuate at a Level 3 “Go” at a moment’s notice.

If you need information or assistance on developing preparedness plans for you and your household, go to the Rogue Valley Emergency Management web page at www.rvem.org and sign up for Citizen Alert for Josephine County or call (541)474-5305 for assistance. Additional preparedness and incident information is also available on https://www.facebook.com/josephinecountyEM/.


2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 21, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/21/20 3:00 PM
2020-09/3986/138305/red_cross_photo___fema.JPG
2020-09/3986/138305/red_cross_photo___fema.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138305/thumb_red_cross_photo___fema.JPG

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Photo: 09_OR_4562_Stayton_We_Will_Rebuild__DSF5762.jpg

Stayton, Ore. - September 20, 2020 - "We Will Rebuild" sign on Highway 22 overpass just outside Stayton, Ore. - Justin Marquis / FEMA  

Red Cross Photo

Portland, Ore. - September 14, 2020 - Red Cross volunteers working in a shelter at the Oregon Convention Center. - Dominick Del Vecchio / FEMA  




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138305/red_cross_photo___fema.JPG , 2020-09/3986/138305/2020-20-09_OR_4562_Stayton_We_Will_Rebuild__DSF5762.jpg

Civil Air Patrol Continues Flights in Oregon Wildfire Efforts (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/21/20 2:41 PM
2020-09/1184/138303/Randy_and_airplane.jpg
2020-09/1184/138303/Randy_and_airplane.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1184/138303/thumb_Randy_and_airplane.jpg

SALEM, Ore. (Sept. 20, 2020) – As smoke clears from western Oregon, Civil Air Patrol is sending pilots and specially trained aircrews to assist in efforts to recover from devastating wildfires again today.

Two aircraft from CAP’s Oregon Wing and one from the Washington Wing joined the effort in cooperation with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM), marking the fifth day of CAP participation.

CAP is tasked with photographing key infrastructure from the air to help assess fire damage. Aircrews have a mission pilot, an observer and an airborne photographer and are taking on assignments over the Archie, Beavercreek and Echo Mountain wildfires.  

“Our hearts go out to all of those affected by the fires,” said Brig. Gen. William D. Betts, vice commander, 1st Air Force, Air Forces Northern, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. “We are confident in the skills of these selfless, dedicated CAP volunteers who contribute so much to both the local community response and the wider federal effort.”

Acting as a Total Force partner and the U.S. Air Force auxiliary, CAP is aligned with 1st Air Force to rapidly respond to nonmilitary threats domestically when tasked in a Defense Support of Civil Authorities capacity to save lives, relieve suffering, prevent property damage and provide humanitarian assistance.

Using high-resolution digital cameras, the CAP aircrews produced more than 900 images Sept. 19 for emergency operations supervisors. Eight sorties were flown Friday and five Saturday as smoke cleared and showers dissipated. CAP pilots still face tricky conditions in some areas with smoke, low clouds and aircraft not involved of the organized efforts.

CAP members train to FEMA standards so they can operate jointly with other emergency agencies. 

CAP planes based in Hillsboro, Redmond and Salem, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, participated Sept. 19. More than 36 CAP volunteers have worked organizing, flying and recording activities.

In addition, CAP has highly trained emergency services personnel imbedded with the OEM in Salem, responding to requests for air support and advising on other interagency cooperation.

At last count, the Oregon Wing has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously each year to be ready to help in emergencies like the unprecedented onslaught of wildfires that have burned more than 1 million acres this year and thousands of structures and displaced huge numbers of Oregonians. The wing also has 247 young cadet members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship. Many cadets train in emergency services as well and participate in ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.
Squadron locations and contact information can be found at https://orwg.cap.gov.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

Visit www.orwg.cap.gov, www.CAP.News or www.GoCivilAirPatrol.com for more information.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1184/138303/Randy_and_airplane.jpg , This is a CAP Cessna 182 in flight.

Vehicle Crash Results in Death of Motorcycle Operator
Medford Police Dept. - 09/21/20 2:24 PM

On 09/20/20 at approximately 1747 hrs, the Medford Police Department responded to a fatal motor vehicle crash.  A motorcycle was traveling at a high rate of speed southbound on Crater Lake Ave in the left lane.  A truck was stopped in the lane making a left turn onto Temple Dr.  The motorcycle struck the truck and the operator was launched from his motorcycle into an oncoming vehicle.  

The Serious/Fatal Traffic Accidents Reconstruction (S.T.A.R.) team and a Medford detective responded to assume the investigation.    


JCSO Arrests Murder Suspect (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 1:59 PM
2020-09/6186/138301/Mug_Stansell_Brendan_Rex.png
2020-09/6186/138301/Mug_Stansell_Brendan_Rex.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6186/138301/thumb_Mug_Stansell_Brendan_Rex.png

Case 20-17591

Jackson County Sheriff’s Office Arrests Murder Suspect

On September 18, 2020 at 1924 hours, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a report of a fatal stabbing in the Elderberry Flats area of outside of Wimer,  OR. The reporting party was at the scene during the incident. On arrival, deputies found one male adult deceased. The suspect was contacted later after he left the scene.

The investigation lead to the arrest of Brenden Rex Stansell, birth date 07/24/2000, he is an Eagle Point area transient. The arrest was made on 092120.

Stansell has been lodged at Jackson County Jail on charges of Murder Second Degree and Assault First Degree. The Murder II charge is no bail.

Identity of the victim is not being released pending notification of next of kin.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/6186/138301/Mug_Stansell_Brendan_Rex.png

Slater Fire Partial Evacuation Level Reduction
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 12:57 PM

INCIDENT DATE AND TIME: September 21, 2020 @ 12:00PM

REPORTING DEPUTY:   Sheriff Dave Daniel

DETAILS:

After coordination with the Northern Rockies Team 2 Incident Management Team, the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office is reducing a current Level 2 “Be Set” status of the Cave Junction Area to Level 1 “Be Ready”. 

We would like to thank the residents of the Illinois Valley for their patience and understanding during the Slater and Devil Fire incidents. This current downgrade is for all residences located on the following road systems including secondary roads; Hwy 199 from mileposts 25 to 34 including the City of Cave Junction, Finch Rd, Westside Rd and connecting secondary roads, Laurel Rd and connecting secondary roads, Jeannie Way, Caves Hwy to Chapman Creek Rd, Holland Loop Rd to Hayes Cut-Off Rd, Rockydale Rd from US Hwy 199 to Pinecone Dr, Nolan Rd, Idlewild Dr and connecting secondary roads, Crest Dr, Pinewood Way, Myrna Ln, Kenrose Ln and connecting secondary roads, Airport Dr and connecting secondary roads, Patton Bar Rd, Krauss Ln, Elwood Ln.

Although the formal Level 2 “Be Set” status is being lifted for these areas, we would like to remind all residents of Josephine County that they should always be in the “Preparedness” mindset. Fires, floods or winter weather could cause us to evacuate our homes, sometimes at a moment’s notice.

If you need information or assistance on developing preparedness plans for you and your household, go to the Rogue Valley Emergency Management web page at www.rvem.org and sign up for Citizen Alert for Josephine County or call (541)474-5305 for assistance. Additional preparedness and incident information is also available on https://www.facebook.com/josephinecountyEM/.


Oregon reports 201 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/21/20 12:04 PM

Sept. 21, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 201 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 529, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 201 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,995.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (16), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (4), Curry (3), Deschutes (8), Douglas (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (18), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lane (28), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (12), Marion (18), Morrow (2), Multnomah (35), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (4), Wasco (10), Washington (25), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 527th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 21 and died on Sept. 6, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 528th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 16 and died on Sept. 20, at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 529th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Sept. 19, at OHSU. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.


OHA features new COVID 19 dashboard

Today, Monday, Sept. 21, OHA is unveiling a new version of the dashboard Oregon COVID-19 Case Demographics and Disease Severity Statewide to provide more information on the demographics of COVID-19 cases in Oregon.

The new dashboard will present case rates per 100,000 people, which more clearly shows disparities in the burden of COVID-19 between demographic groups. In addition to case counts and rates, users will be able to view the percent of cases in each age group, sex, race, and ethnicity that have ever been hospitalized for their illness or have died with COVID-19.


OHA Ends Publication of Weekly Testing Summary, Data Published Daily

OHA will no longer issue the Weekly Testing Summary because the data is currently available on a more timely basis on the OHA website. The location of the information is linked below:

  1. Testing totals for the prior week(s)
  2. Test positivity statewide (cumulative)
  3. Test positivity statewide for the prior week (same location as #1)

Other testing-related announcements or issues, such as changes in the national testing supply chain, will be noted in daily press releases on an as-needed basis. OHA’s most recent testing guidance for healthcare providers can be found here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


ODF fire report and fire map for Monday, Sept. 21, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/21/20 11:18 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

198,647

       13%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,764

       38%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

170,637

       17%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,880

       25%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

       41%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,447

       52%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,214 in Oregon

       18%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

       65%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

       77%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,689

       22%

E of Diamond Lake

More information




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1072/138293/Fire_map_for_Monday_Sept._21_2020.pdf

Deceased Located within Holiday Farm Fire Perimeter Identified
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 9:46 AM

On September 11, 2020, fire personnel working the Holiday Farm Fire located a deceased male in a residence off Goodpasture Road in Vida.  The Lane County Sheriff’s Office responded and investigated the death with the Lane County Medical Examiner’s Office. 

The deceased has been identified as 59 year old David Perry of Vida.  Perry's next of kin have been notified.  Our thoughts go out to Perry's family and friends as they grieve.  

News Release from 9/11/2020:

We are saddened to report that on 9/11/2020, fire personnel were in the area of Goodpasture Road in Vida when they located a deceased person in a residence within the perimeter of the Holiday Farm Fire. First responders are working with the Medical Examiner’s Office to identify the deceased, which may take some time.  After the person has been identified, we will notify next of kin and afford them the opportunity to notify additional family and friends prior to releasing the person’s name. 

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the death along with the Lane County Medical Examiner’s Office, who will determine cause and manner of death.


Some Oregonians still eligible for Economic Impact Payment
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/21/20 8:46 AM

Salem, OR—More than 130,000 Oregonians will receive a special mailing this month from the IRS encouraging them to see if they’re eligible to claim an Economic Impact Payment.

The IRS will mail the letters to people who typically aren’t required to file federal income tax returns but may qualify for an Economic Impact Payment. The letter urges recipients to visit the special Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info tool on IRS.gov before the Oct. 15 deadline to register for an Economic Impact Payment. 

More than 7 million people nationwide have already used the Non-Filers tool to register for a payment.

This month’s letters, delivered from an IRS address, are being sent to people who haven’t filed a return for either 2018 or 2019. Based on an internal analysis, these are people who don’t typically have a tax return filing requirement because they appear to have income below the filing threshold based on Forms W-2 and 1099 and other third-party statements available to the IRS.

The letter urges the recipient to register at IRS.gov by Oct. 15 in order to receive a payment by the end of the year. Individuals can receive up to $1,200, and married couples can receive up to $2,400. People with qualifying children under age 17 at the end of 2019 can get up to an additional $500 for each qualifying child.

The IRS cautions that receiving a letter is not a guarantee of eligibility. An individual is likely eligible for an Economic Impact Payment if they:

  • Are a U.S. citizen or resident alien.
  • Have a work-eligible Social Security number.
  • Can’t be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s federal income tax return.

For more information on eligibility requirements, see the Economic Impact Payment eligibility FAQ on IRS.gov.

People who are eligible should not wait to receive a letter and should register now. Alternatively, people can wait until next year and claim the recovery rebate credit on their 2020 federal income tax return by filing in 2021.

Those unable to access the Non-Filers tool may submit a simplified paper return following the procedures described in the Economic Impact Payment FAQ on IRS.gov.

Anyone using the Non-Filers tool can speed up the arrival of their payment by choosing to receive it by direct deposit. Those not choosing this option will get a check.

Beginning two weeks after they register, people can track the status of their payment using the Get My Payment tool, available only on IRS.gov.

For Oregon tax issues, visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is Requesting Public's Assistance to Identify the Person(s) Responsible for the Unlawful Take of a Bull Elk - Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/21/20 8:18 AM
2020-09/1002/138286/Elk_Pic.jpg
2020-09/1002/138286/Elk_Pic.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1002/138286/thumb_Elk_Pic.jpg

On September 13, 2020 Oregon State Police Troopers received information that fresh skeletal remains of a bull elk had been discovered on private property between Mt. Richmond Road and Williams Canyon Road.

Evidence at the scene is consistent with a bull elk harvested in the first two weeks of the general archery season.

The person(s) responsible did not have permission to hunt on the property.

The Oregon Hunters Association of Yamhill County has agreed to match the Turn In Poachers (TIP) program reward of $500 for a total reward of $1,000.

The Oregon State Police is requesting that any person with information about this incident contact Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-0776 or OSP and leave information for Trooper Tayler Jerome if you are wishing to remain anonymous you may also contact the OSP through the Turn in Poachers line at TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1002/138286/Elk_Pic.jpg

Fatal Crash Hwy 20 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 09/21/20 8:07 AM

On Sunday, September 20, 2020, at approximately 7:10 A.M.,Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near milepost 67.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Nissan Altima, operated by Robert Snyder (60) of Portland, was westbound on Hwy 20 when it went off the road and struck a tree.

Synder sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Sweet Home Fire Department and ODOT.


The Oregon Air National Guard's 142nd Wing conducts F-15 Night Flying (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/21/20 8:01 AM
2020-09/962/138284/051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg
2020-09/962/138284/051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/962/138284/thumb_051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Oregon Air National Guard’s 142nd Wing will conduct routine F-15 Eagle night training missions on September 21-24, 2020.

Night training allows the Citizen-Airmen pilots based at the Portland Air National Guard Base to stay current with mandatory Air Force requirements. Night flying is conducted as an essential training requirement for nighttime maneuvers to support mission and contingency response. Training flights will be completed each evening before 10:00 p.m.

For more information contact TSgt. Steph Sawyer, 503-335-4351

-30-

FILE PHOTO: 051120-Z-CH590-161: An Oregon Air National Guard F-15C Eagle, assigned to the 142nd Wing takes off from Portland Air National Guard Base at dusk. (National Guard photo by Master Sgt. John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

About the 142nd Wing:

The Portland Air National Guard Base employs around 1,500 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $500 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from Northern California to the Canadian border, as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/962/138284/051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg

Sun. 09/20/20
Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery Update - Sept. 20, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/20/20 1:53 PM
Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. SchraderSeptember
Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. SchraderSeptember
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138276/thumb_2020-19-09_OR_4562_Detroit_Mt_Hagen_DeMob_01.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

 




Attached Media Files: Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. SchraderSeptember , Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. Schrader. September 19, 2020

Slater Fire Partial Evacuation Level Reduction
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/20 12:11 PM

INCIDENT DATE AND TIME:   September 20, 2020 @ 12:00PM               

REPORTING DEPUTY:        Sheriff Dave Daniel

DETAILS:

After coordination with the Rocky Mountain Team 2 Incident Management Team, the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office is reducing a current Level 1 “Be Ready” status of the Selma area to zero.  The residences adjacent to Cave Junction City Limits will remain on a Level 1 “Be Ready” at this time.

We would like to thank the residents of the Illinois Valley for their patience and understanding during the Slater and Devil Fire incidents. This current downgrade is for all residences located on the following road systems including secondary roads; Illinois River Road, Reeves Creek Road, Lakeshore Drive, McMullen Creek Road, Thompson Creek Road, Deer Creek Road, Upper Deer Creek Road, White Creek Road, Clear Creek Road, Hidden Creek Road, Circle W Road, Draper Valley Road, Reeves Creek Road and Hwy 199 from mileposts 16 to 25.

Although the formal Level 1 “Be Ready” status is being lifted for these areas, we would like to remind all residents of Josephine County that they should always be in the “Preparedness” mindset. Fires, floods or winter weather could cause us to evacuate our homes, sometimes at a moment’s notice.

If you need information or assistance on developing preparedness plans for you and your household, go to the Rogue Valley Emergency Management web page at www.rvem.org and sign up for Citizen Alert for Josephine County or call (541)474-5305 for assistance. Additional preparedness and incident information is also available on https://www.facebook.com/josephinecountyEM/.


Oregon reports 208 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 09/20/20 12:04 PM

Sept. 20, 2020

Oregon reports 208 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 526, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 208 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,801.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (7), Clackamas (18), Clatsop (4), Columbia (3), Coos (2), Deschutes (9), Douglas (2), Gilliam (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (5), Jefferson (2), Klamath (1), Lane (23), Linn (7), Malheur (15), Marion (21), Morrow (3), Multnomah (41), Polk (1), Umatilla (8), Washington (28), and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 526th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept.18, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

90

2

1,533

Benton

285

6

12,143

Clackamas

2,256

61

56,853

Clatsop

117

0

5,304

Columbia

154

1

6,608

Coos

138

0

6,445

Crook

60

1

2,470

Curry

27

0

1,705

Deschutes

769

12

28,147

Douglas

209

3

12,176

Gilliam

8

0

265

Grant

8

0

862

Harney

12

0

764

Hood River

245

0

4,772

Jackson

1,039

4

31,732

Jefferson

513

8

4,499

Josephine

183

2

11,311

Klamath

273

2

9,844

Lake

28

0

853

Lane

964

15

60,349

Lincoln

472

13

8,406

Linn

466

13

15,580

Malheur

1,527

23

4,819

Marion

4,447

90

45,305

Morrow

488

6

1,682

Multnomah

6,818

130

133,456

Polk

502

15

8,442

Sherman

18

0

327

Tillamook

48

0

2,915

Umatilla

2,913

41

12,629

Union

435

2

3,409

Wallowa

28

1

930

Wasco

234

3

4,709

Washington

4,289

58

87,468

Wheeler

0

0

159

Yamhill

738

14

16,397

Total

30,801

526

605,268

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Douglas County Wildfire Update Sunday 09/20/2020 (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/20 12:00 PM
FEMA Photo
FEMA Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5204/138268/thumb_OR_Fire_0911-3.jpg

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - Individuals affected by the Archie Creek Fire are encouraged to start the process of applying for Individual Assistance available through FEMA. Residents are encouraged to learn more at https://www.disasterassistance.gov or https://www.fema.gov/assistance/individual

"FEMA is standing by to assist those qualified with individual assistance who have been displaced or who have lost things such as vehicles by the Archie Creek Fire," Sgt. Brad O'Dell said. "However, in order for assistance to be available, it is imperative individuals begin the application process now through FEMA."

Additionally, Emergency Management is seeking information from the public regarding property damages incurred as a result of the Thielsen and Archie Creek Fires. Owners are asked to visit www.dcso.com/fires and fill out the form regarding damages. The information may be shared with local, state and federal organizations who may be able to assist individuals impacted by these incidents.

EVACUATIONS

The Archie Creek Fire has evacuation level changes effective today, Sunday, September 20, 2020, at 12:00 pm. The changes include: 

  • Banks Creek east to the end of Nonpareil Road is reduced from a Level 2 "BE SET" to a Level 1 "BE READY". 
  • Little River Road from the Highway to Buckhorn has had its formal Level 1 "BE READY" notice lifted. There are no formal evacuation levels for this area, at this time. 
  • Glide Proper from Highway 138 at Little River Road, east to the Idleyld Trading Post has had its formal Level 1 "BE READY" notice lifted. There are no formal evacuation levels for this area, at this time. 

The following Archie Creek evacuation levels remain in place and unchanged: 

  • Little River Road west of New Bridge Road to the end of Little River Road. This includes all side streets between these two points remains a Level 2 "BE SET".
  • Highway 138 at the Narrows Wayside (Idleyld Trading Post) east to Steamboat remains a Level 2 "BE SET". This includes all side streets between these two points as well as the Steamboat Inn and Mott Bridge residential area.
  • Dry Creek including Happy Creek Lane, Felix Flat, Elk Ridge Lane and Illahee Road remains a Level 2 "BE SET".

The following Thielsen Fire evacuation levels remain in place and unchanged:

  • Diamond Lake, including the resort, all recreation sites and summer homes remain a LEVEL 3 "GO!". 

RED CROSS WILDFIRE RECOVERY KITS 

The Red Cross now has Wildfire Recovery kits available for pickup daily from 8 AM to 7 PM at the Douglas County Fairgrounds.

Each kit contains a shovel, rake, sifter, N95 masks, work gloves, tarp, trash bags, tote, hand sanitizer, and field meals.

Wildfire kits are free to anyone who proves residence at an address that suffered fire damage.

GLIDE DONATION CENTERS

Beginning Sunday, September 20, 2020, Glide Revitalization and Glide Strong are open at the old Glide Middle School (301 Glide Loop Drive) every day from 10am-7pm for families that have been affected by the Archie Creek Fire. Impacted residents are encouraged to get items that have been donated including diapers and baby items, toiletries, toilet paper, hand sanitizer, food, tents, sleeping bags, bedding, children’s toys, adult and children books and much more. Shoppers will need to show photo ID before admission.

Volunteers will also help individuals register with FEMA if they have lost their home. Residents are asked to bring their Social Security Number, insurance policy information, address, phone number, description of disaster-caused damage and losses, total household annual income, and bank routing information.

Glide Baptist church also still has plenty of clothing available. They are open each day from 10-7.

To volunteer at Glide Baptist Church, please register at www.glidestrong.com

THANK YOU to Douglas Timber Operators and United Way for making this donation center possible!

BEWARE OF SCAMS

The Douglas County Sheriff's Office wants to remind community members who want to assist families, to be cautious of scams. Often times during emergencies, fraudulent crowd funding sites are established to give the appearance of victim relief funding. While we recognize not all crowd funding sites are fraudulent, it can be difficult to determine which ones are legitimate. It is encouraged that those whishing to make financial contributions do so through official organizations. A few are listed below: 

  • Glide Strong (Operating through Glide Revitalization)
  • Glide Helping Hands
  • Cascade Community Credit Union
  • Douglas Timber Operators
  • Greater Douglas United Way
  • Salvation Army
  • American Red Cross

If you decide to make a contribution through a crowd funding site, please take time to research who is operating the donation request and that the funds will go where you intend them. 

STATE HIGHWAY INFORMATION

Highway 138E remains closed to the public. Residents who show proof of residency are being permitted past the road closure, but should expect delays. For the latest information from ODOT regarding road closures, visit www.tripcheck.com.

DOUGLAS COUNTY EVACUATION LOCATION AND EMERGENCY SHELTER INFORMATION:

As a reminder the Douglas County Commissioners along with Douglas County Fair Officials opened up the Douglas County Fairgrounds as an evacuation and temporary re-homing location and continue to welcome displaced wildfire residents and livestock. The Douglas County Fairgrounds continues to be the local hub for our displaced residents with many amenities including full hookup RV sites, camping, showers, emergency shelter, meals, supplies, livestock boarding, resources with a steady supply of amazing of local volunteers and donations to help.  We have an amazing community! 

Update: RV full hook up spaces were available, and we have electrical only hook up locations and plenty of dry camping spots available.  Space and priority is being given to Douglas County residents who have received Level 2 and Level 3 Evacuation notices. For more information about space availability at the Fairgrounds, please contact Ciera Keith at the Fairground Office at (541) 440-4394. 

Update: The horse and large animal stalls have room for livestock.  If you have horses or other large animals, please contact Ciera Keith at the Fairground Office at (541) 440-4394.  If you have small animals and pets (cats, dogs, birds, etc) that need boarding due to the wildfires, please contact Saving Grace at (541) 672-3907.  For other small animals like pigs, sheep or goats, contact the Douglas County Fairgrounds for space information. 

USDA CAN ASSIST FARMERS AND RANCHERS WHO HAVE LOST LIVESTOCK DUE TO WILDFIRES

Shared from the Oregon Department of Agriculture.  This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced livestock owners and contract growers who lost livestock due to wildfires are eligible for assistance under the USDA’s Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP). The LIP program can cover losses but there are several requirements owners must meet to be eligible for payments. The USDA is providing an informational flyer outlining the process. Owners are also encouraged to contact their local USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices for help in applying for assistance, phone numbers can be found on the flyer.  “As soon as Oregon farmers and ranchers can safely evaluate the impacts to their farming operation we encourage them to reach out to their local FSA office,” said Alexis Taylor, Director, Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA). “We know many of Oregon’s wildfires continue to burn and the full impact on agriculture won’t be known for some time, yet as we slowly move into recovery mode we want to ensure our farmers and ranchers have access to every resource available” Statewide there are nearly 30 wildfires burning and more than 900,000 acres burned.  




Attached Media Files: FEMA Photo

Fatal Crash Hwy 42 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 09/20/20 8:42 AM

On Saturday, September 19, 2020 at approximately 9:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 42 near milepost 74.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Dodge Ram pickup, operated by Dustin Robinson (36) from Sutherlin, was westbound when it went off the road.  He struck a Pontiac Grand AM, operated by William McCullough IV (20) from Roseburg,  that was at the intersection of Jackie Avenue and Hwy 42.  

McCullough IV and his passenger, Mark Ritter (20) from Roseburg, sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased. 

Robinson sustained minor injuries from the crash.  

OSP was assisted by Douglas County Sheriff's Office, Winston Police Department, Douglas County Fire District 2, ODOT and the Douglas County District Attorney's Office. 

Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (Robinson) is being investigated as a possible factor in the crash.  Any further information will be released by or with approval from the Douglas County District Attorney's Office.


Sat. 09/19/20
Oregon Civil Air Patrol joins wild fire efforts (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/19/20 8:50 PM
Some people were hit with one building destroyed and the others still standing.
Some people were hit with one building destroyed and the others still standing.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1184/138263/thumb_DSC_1609_sm.jpg

SALEM, Ore. (Sept. 19, 2020) – Flying is tricky due to smoke, temporary flight restrictions over wild fires and on-and-off rain showers, but four Oregon and one Washington Civil Air Patrol aircraft joined the effort to recover from devastating wild fires today.

Working with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM), CAP is tasked with photographing key infrastructure from the air to help assess damage caused by fires that have ravaged almost 1 million acres in the state this year. Air crews composed of a mission pilot, an observer, and an airborne photographer are taking on assignments all over Oregon.

Using high resolution digital cameras, the highly trained CAP aircrews returned more than 151 images to emergency operations supervisors yesterday.  Eight sorties were flown yesterday as the smoke started clearing and thundershowers dissipated.

“Conditions were challenging,” said 1st Lt Jonathan Ritchie, a pilot on Friday and Saturday sorties. “Low cloud layers interfered with access to target areas. Some crews could get to their target areas. It was a little bit challenging working around the TFRs (temporary flight restrictions). ATC (air traffic control) was very helpful in keeping us where we needed to be.”

“It is quite satisfying to be a pilot on these missions,” he said. “We do a lot of training to prepare for these kind of things. We have a great staff running the mission base to plan our sorties and keep us safe.”

Oregon CAP aircraft based in Hillsboro, Medford, Redmond, Salem and Vancouver, Wash., participated Friday. They flew assignments for the Beachie Creek Fire, the Riverside Fire, the Brittain Fire, the S. Oberchain Fire, and the Archie Creek Fire.

This is the fourth day of CAP participation. More than 33 CAP volunteers have worked on organizing, flying, and recording activities.  In addition, CAP has a couple of highly trained emergency services personnel that are imbedded with the OEM in Salem. They are responding to requests for air support and advising on other inter-agency cooperation.

Flying in the time of Coronavirus adds complications, as members of the aircrew need to follow special procedures to keep each other safe and protect the equipment.  You cannot use normal sanitizing wipes on aircraft instruments and surfaces, for instance.

CAP in Oregon has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously each year to be ready to help in situations like Oregon’s unprecedented onslaught of wild fires that have burned thousands of structures and displaced more Oregonians that any emergency in years.  CAP trains to FEMA standards so they can operate jointly with other emergency agencies.  CAP also has 247 cadet members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship.  Many of them train in emergency services as well, and participate in ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.




Attached Media Files: Some people were hit with one building destroyed and the others still standing. , 2020-09/1184/138263/DSC_8882_sml.jpg

2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - SEPT. 19, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/19/20 2:48 PM
2020-09/3986/138260/Riverside_Fire_Mt._Hood_National_Forest_Engine_312_2020_09_18-16.55.41.202-CDT.jpeg
2020-09/3986/138260/Riverside_Fire_Mt._Hood_National_Forest_Engine_312_2020_09_18-16.55.41.202-CDT.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138260/thumb_Riverside_Fire_Mt._Hood_National_Forest_Engine_312_2020_09_18-16.55.41.202-CDT.jpeg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

A7R000845: Marion County, Ore. - September 16, 2020 - US&R Massachusetts Task Force 1 searches homes in Marion County Oregon in response for the wildfires. - Dominick Del Vecchio / FEMA

Marion County: Marion County, Ore. - Vehicles in a yard along Highway 22 burned by wildfire. - Dominick Del Vecchio  FEMA

FEMA Photo: Link  Phoenix, Ore. –  A search and rescue canine, Nyx, working with a handler from a FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Team from Colorado, CO-TF1, rests after searching through damage caused by the Almeda Fire. Historic wildfires have left many people in Oregon homeless, with some still missing. - David Yost / FEMA

Lions Head Fire: Link with information for September 18 Lions Head Fire photo by Nathan Parsons, Ambo 7/E-63

Red Cross: Link with information for September 18: 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Red Cross responders photo.

Red Cross; Link with information for September 19: 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Red Cross responders photo.

Riverside Fire: LINK with information for September 18: Mt. Hood National Forest Engine 312 photo.

ODOT: LINK with information for September 18: OSP Senior Trooper Jeff Johnson and ODOT Maintenance’s Tim Acrey of Central Point save an U.S. flag that survived the Almeda Fire in Phoenix. Senior Trooper Johnson, stopped Acrey – who served in the Marine Corps – while supporting traffic control in the Almeda Fire closure in Phoenix along Oregon 99.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138260/Riverside_Fire_Mt._Hood_National_Forest_Engine_312_2020_09_18-16.55.41.202-CDT.jpeg , 2020-09/3986/138260/Red_Cross_9.19.2020.png , 2020-09/3986/138260/Red_Cross_9.18.2020.png , 2020-09/3986/138260/Lions_Head_Fire_Nathan_Parsons_Ambo_7E-63.jpeg , 2020-09/3986/138260/FEMA_2020-18-09_OR_4562_JacksonCo_1603_Phoenix_Ore._–_Nyx_a_search_and_rescue_canine_working.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138260/Marion_County_Ore._-_Vehicles_in_a_yard_along_Highway_22_burned_by_wildfire._-_Dominick_Del_Vecchio__FEMA.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138260/A7R00845.jpg

Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/19/20 1:43 PM

Sept. 19, 2020

Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 525, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 266 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,599. The new cases  reported today are in the following counties: Benton (27), Clackamas (14), Clatsop (3), Columbia (2), Curry (1), Deschutes (16), Douglas (6), Jackson (13), Jefferson (6), Josephine (3), Klamath (4), Lane (11), Lincoln (2), Linn (4), Malheur (22), Marion (40), Morrow (1), Multnomah (40), Polk (8), Umatilla (10), Wasco (1), Washington (23), and Yamhill (9).

Note: OHA double counted a death on Sept. 4 that was originally recorded on July 24. The duplication occurred because of an incorrectly reported date of birth. Because of this error we are renumbering our reported deaths starting with 521 today.

Oregon’s 521st COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 17, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 522nd COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 15, at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 523rd COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Morrow County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept.14. Location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 524th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old-woman in Marion County who died on May 10. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 525th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 16 and died on Sept.16 in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases (1)

Total deaths (2)

Negative tests (3)

Baker

90

2

1,532

Benton

279

6

12,096

Clackamas

2,237

61

56,699

Clatsop

113

0

5,281

Columbia

150

1

6,599

Coos

136

0

6,385

Crook

60

1

2,460

Curry

27

0

1,689

Deschutes

760

12

27,956

Douglas

206

3

12,126

Gilliam

7

0

264

Grant

8

0

857

Harney

12

0

759

Hood River

241

0

4,758

Jackson

1,034

4

31,655

Jefferson

511

8

4,490

Josephine

183

2

11,263

Klamath

272

2

9,806

Lake

28

0

855

Lane

944

15

60,022

Lincoln

472

13

8,409

Linn

458

13

15,566

Malheur

1,512

23

4,790

Marion

4,427

89

45,143

Morrow

485

6

1,678

Multnomah

6,779

130

133,105

Polk

501

15

8,399

Sherman

18

0

326

Tillamook

48

0

2,904

Umatilla

2,905

41

12,651

Union

435

2

3,416

Wallowa

28

1

927

Wasco

234

3

4,701

Washington

4,264

58

87,235

Wheeler

0

0

159

Yamhill

735

14

16,350

Total

30,599

525

603,311

1 - This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 - For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 - This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon State Parks Begins to Assess Wildfire and Windstorm Damage (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/19/20 8:16 AM
Downed trees at Cape Lookout State Park block trails and access.
Downed trees at Cape Lookout State Park block trails and access.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1303/138251/thumb_20200915_143859.jpg

The devastating wildfires that continue to level the Oregon landscape have so far burned about 900 acres of state park land, most of it undeveloped forest, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) reports. 

 

Some parks remain closed due to windstorm damage, or their proximity to active fires. Twenty-four parks have been closed since Sep. 7, when rare, severe wind events caused wildfires to quickly sweep the landscape. Go to https://stateparks.oregon.gov/index.cfm?do=visit.status to check park status.

 

Given the scope and severity of the fires, the 900-acre toll was a testament to both luck and extraordinary first responders, said OPRD Director Lisa Sumption.

 

The heavily forested Collier Memorial State Park took the biggest hit, losing some 400 acres of Ponderosa Pines. OPRD Forester Craig Leech said that “although 400 acres is a lot by any estimation, the careful fuel reduction and stand improvement slowed the fire spread enough to be contained before major damage occurred.


Detroit Lake State Recreation Area and the Mongold day-use area on the lake suffered only minor damage from the Beachie Creek Fire. Local authorities, the Oregon Marine Board and emergency responders are working together to help safely retrieve boats that people had to abandon on the lake when they evacuated.

Nearby, North Santiam State Recreation Area suffered far worse damage. The fire burned straight through the small campground on the North Santiam River.

Several parks in the Willamette Valley and on the north coast are serving as evacuation sites, some in partnership with the American Red Cross. We are happy to help provide a temporary landing place for those whose lives have been uprooted by this wildfire disaster,” said OPRD director Lisa Sumption. “We are looking forward to restoring and reopening our closed parks as soon as is safely possible.”

 

OPRD staff are assessing damage and scheduling repairs, where conditions allow. In many cases, fires are still burning near parks, evacuation orders are still in place and air quality remains unhealthy. OPRD asks the public to stay out of closed parks as restoration and recovery efforts take place.

“We are still very much in the emergency response mode. We will have more information to share about restoring and reopening damaged parks once it is safe for our staff to do so,” said OPRD Communications Director Jason Resch.

A complete list of closed parks is on our Fire Information Page. Please keep in mind that damage is still being evaluated.

  • Silver Falls
    • 125 acres burned on the SE part of the park. Contained at this time.
  • Detroit Lake State Recreation Area
    • Minor damage along some campground loops closer to the highway.
    • Loss of one water storage tank.
    • 40 acres burned.
  • North Santiam State Recreation Area
    • 120 acres burned.
    • Loss of some structures.
  • Bonnie Lure State Recreation Area
    • 40 acres burned.
  • Collier Memorial State Park
    • 400 acres burned.
    • Damage to historic museum and some equipment.
    • Loss of one historic cabin, wood shed, and host trailer.
  • Wallowa Lake State Park
    • Wind damage to dock.
  • Devil’s Lake State Park
    • No fire damage, but many trees down.
  • Other coastal parks with trees down include Munson Creek Falls State Natural Site, Sitka Sedge State Natural Area, Cape Lookout State Park, Beverly Beach State Park, William M. Tugman and many areas of the Oregon Coast Trail are reported to have trees down as well. 

 

Many parks remain open, but still could be experiencing poor air quality. Some major highways and roads used to access parks are closed.

 

 

 

Photos in this release can be found here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Q565D2q2AFrScOjJWyO_az9MKaXMxrBJ?usp=sharing

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Attached Media Files: Downed trees at Cape Lookout State Park block trails and access. , Downed trees at Devil’s Lake State Park block access in the campgrounds. , Wildfire burns through the night at Collier Memorial State Park. , host RV trailer survived the fire that burned a OPRD shop building at North Santiam State Recreation Area. , Close up of charred remains of a historic cabin at Collier Memorial State Park illustrate some of the damage at the park. , Charred remains of a historic cabin at Collier Memorial State Park illustrate some of the damage at the park.

Fri. 09/18/20
Pacific Power nears complete restoration in aftermath of Labor Day windstorm
Pacific Power - 09/18/20 6:23 PM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018

NOTE TO MEDIA: Images of restoration work underway are available for use, via this link. Photo credit: Pacific Power
 

Pacific Power nears complete restoration in aftermath of Labor Day windstorm

With repairs substantially complete, communities move to recovery and rebuilding

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 18, 2020) —After 10 days of long shifts, with more than 500 personnel in the field at times, Pacific Power has substantially restored service to all the customers able to receive power.

As of 6 p.m., about 350 customers remain out. Certain isolated pockets of outages are expected to extend into next week. At peak, more than 60,000 customers were without service.

 “We thank our customers for their extraordinary patience during this challenging restoration and we will continue to support our communities as we help them rebuild,” said David Lucas, vice president of operations. “The power and resilience of our communities have truly shone through all these long days. And we salute our own folks in the field who showed tremendous commitment to serving our customers. These dedicated professionals will remain at work until all customers are restored.”

Here to help

Pacific Power customer care agents are available and ready to help customers through this incredibly difficult time. They can be reached 24/7 at 1-888-221-7070. 

The company is working with the Red Cross and local agencies to directly aid people in need. Assistance is available for those in wildfire-affected areas; contact the Red Cross for the latest shelter and emergency support information.

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Archie Creek Fire Evacuation Notice Update (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/20 5:00 PM
Firefighting crew sets to go to work in Idleyld Friday morning
Firefighting crew sets to go to work in Idleyld Friday morning
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5204/138245/thumb_IMG_1312.jpg

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - All Level 3 "GO!" Evacuation orders have been downgraded for the Archie Creek Fire, effective 5:00 PM on Friday, September 18, 2020. 

The following is a summary of the current evacuation notices which remain in place. Current evacuation maps can be found at www.dcso.com/evacuations

ARCHIE CREEK FIRE

  • LEVEL 1 "BE READY": Little River Road at Highway 138E to Buckhorn Road; Glide at Little River Road east to Narrows Wayside (Idleyld Trading Post) inclusive of all side roads between these two points.
  • LEVEL 2 "BE SET": Little River Road at Buckhorn Road to the end of Little River (includes all roads off of Little River between these two points); Nonpareil Road at Banks Creek to the end of Nonpareil Road (includes all side roads); Narrows Wayside (Idleyld Trading Post) east on Highway 138E to Dry Creek (includes all side roads between these points).
  • LEVEL 3 "GO!": No Level 3 Orders exist for the Archie Creek fire at this time. 

Please note: Highway 138E remains closed at Idleyld Trading Post and will remain closed throughout the weekend. Residents who can show proof of residency beyond the closure will be permitted through area, but should expect delays. Additional information can be found at www.tripcheck.com.

Residents returning to a Level 2 "BE SET" area, should be aware that danger still exists in the area and should remain ready to leave at a moment's notice. Individuals returning to areas impacted by the fire should be aware there are inherent risks associated with returning. Hazards have not been mitigated from private properties and homeowners assume all risks by returning to their properties. If at any time a resident feels unsafe or in the event of significant wind or rain, they should not wait to be told to leave and should do so on their own. The following safety tips are provided to those returning to areas which have been impacted by the fire: 

LOOK UP:

  • TRAFFIC: Firefighters are NOT used to having the roads open to public use. PLEASE drive slowly for their safety and yours.
  • BURNED TREES: Trees that have been burned are now very weak.  Do not park or stand under burned trees.
  • GREEN TREES: Even green healthy looking trees can have their roots burned which can make them fall. 

LOOK DOWN:

  • SEPTIC TANKS / CULVERTS:  The fire can burn underground septic tanks and culverts but they can look “normal” above ground.  Be careful when walking as the ground over these can be weakened and you could fall through.  DO NOT PARK OVER SEPTIC SYSTEMS.
  • DOWNED WIRES:  Power lines should be de-energized.  Still be careful as they can get tangled in vehicles. 
  • SMOKING / SMOLDERING MATERIAL:  Logs, stumps, and other burned material in the fire may still be soldering or burning.

LOOK AROUND:

  • WIND: If the wind increases this can bring trees and branches down.  Wind can also increase the movement of the fire.  If it gets windy, you should leave the area. 
  • RAIN:  Heavy rainfall can cause rocks, logs, dirt and other debris to slide down hillsides.
  • WILD ANIMALS:  Animals may be showing unusual behavior.  They have been displaced, too, and could be looking for food or water.

Residents may also observe hot spots or smoke when returning 

THIELSEN FIRE: 

  • The LEVEL 3 "GO!" Order for Diamond Lake Resort, Private Homes and all Recreation Sites remain under the current order. 

Residents in all areas are urged to drive cautiously with their headlights on, slow their speeds and watch for falling hazards, debris, firefighting traffic and hazard mitigation crews working in the area. 




Attached Media Files: Firefighting crew sets to go to work in Idleyld Friday morning

Partial Evacuation Level Reduction
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/20 3:49 PM

INCIDENT DATE AND TIME: September 18, 2020 @ 3:45PM

REPORTING DEPUTY:        Sheriff Dave Daniel

DETAILS:

After coordination with the Rocky Mountain Team 2 Incident Management Team and Josephine County Emergency Management, the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office is reducing a current Level 3 “GO” Evacuation Zone.  This is the area along US Hwy 199 from Gene Brown Rd to 37265 Redwood Hwy.  This includes Gene Brown Rd, Arrowhead Dr, and Leuizenger Ck/NF-9938 Rd to a Level 2 “BE SET”. Addresses greater than 37265 Redwood Hwy will remain in a Level 3 “GO” evacuation status.

This decision is based on current forecasted weather models and successful firefighting operations.  As a reminder, if weather and/or fire behavior changes in the future the evacuation level could be elevated again to Level 3 “GO”.  For residents in this area if you have not done so, please sign up for Citizen Alert at www.RVEM.org or call (541)474-5305. Citizens can also follow updates on the Slater and Devil Fires Information or Josephine County Emergency Management Facebook pages.

The Sheriff’s Office, Rocky Mountain Team 2, and Josephine County Emergency Management meet daily to review the evacuation zones.  We are working diligently and responsibly to allow everyone back into their homes as quickly and safely as possible.  We all wish to thank our Josephine County citizens for their patience and understanding of the potential severity of this event.

https://www.facebook.com/SlaterAndDevilFireInformation

https://www.facebook.com/josephinecountyEM


2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - SEPT. 18, 2020
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/18/20 3:13 PM

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Lane County, Ore. - September 16, 2020 - A FEMA Mobile Emergency Response Support team installs mobile communications equipment on Mt. Hagen to replace  equipment destoryed by wildfire. - Don Sheppard / FEMA

Blue River, Ore. - September 15, 2020 - The Holiday Farm Fire destroyed businesses, homes, and vehicles. - David Yost / FEMA


Coffee Creek Correctional Institution adults in custody return to facility after wildfire evacuation
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/18/20 2:16 PM

As of September 18, 2020, adults in custody (AICs) who evacuated Coffee Creek Correctional Facility have returned to their home institution in Wilsonville. On September 10, the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) evacuated CCCF to Deer Ridge Correctional Institution (DRCI) in Madreas due to threats from the Riverside and Santiam wildfires. At that time, the institution was determined to be in potential danger as these two fires threatened to merge. DOC has worked with the Oregon State Police and the State Fire Marshal to keep everyone who works and lives inside this facility safe.

The total number of AICs evacuated from CCCF was 1,303, including AICs from the Coffee Creek Intake Center. The return trip spanned across four days so the department could rely on internal resources, including a fleet of buses—the majority of which included restrooms. Meals, water, and hygiene items were sent with each AIC, and a supply truck returned CCCF supplies that were taken to DRCI during the evacuation. In addition, an ADA accessible portable restroom was dropped partway along the route, and portable restrooms were made available at CCCF to mitigate any delay in processing AICs into the institution. Once DRCI’s medium facility was vacated, AICs being temporarily housed in the minimum facility returned to the medium facility—a move which was also completed on September 18.

DOC is aware of the impact the decision to evacuate may have had on the spread of COVID-19 within its facilities and took precautions to mitigate the impact whenever possible. While social distancing is always challenging in a prison environment—and made even more difficult in the midst of wildfire evacuations—masks continue to be provided and encouraged among all AICs and employees. In addition, DOC Health Services works closely with DOC transport and institutions to ensure AIC health needs are met during this difficult time.   

CCCF is a multi-custody prison located in Wilsonville accommodating 283 men and 1,020 women. The prison has cell and dormitory housing, work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state’s intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all individuals committed to state custody by the courts. CCCF’s minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.

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DOGAMI Governing Board to meet September 25
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 09/18/20 2:14 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet on Friday, September 25 at 8:30 a.m. to 1:40 p.m. The public portion of the meeting begins at 9:35 a.m. To adhere to the state’s social distancing requirements and to slow the spread of COVID-19, this public meeting will be conducted as a virtual meeting.

The meeting agenda is available at https://www.oregongeology.org.

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.

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Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/20 1:38 PM

Sept. 18, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 295 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 295 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 30,342.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (4), Clackamas (28), Clatsop (3), Coos (2), Deschutes (7), Douglas (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (2), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (20), Linn (5), Malheur (20), Marion (51), Morrow (7), Multnomah (56), Polk (4), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (16), Wasco (3), Washington (36) and Yamhill (5).


New COVID-19 modeling released

OHA released its latest COVID-19 modeling report today, showing that the current rate of transmission is continuing a downward trend that began in mid-July, meaning that each case is generating less than one other case.

The model looked at the following scenarios:

If transmission continues at its present rate, then by Oct. 8. daily infections would decrease from 360 to 190. New daily cases would decrease to 80. Severe cases – those requiring hospitalization – would decrease to 6 and the reproduction rate would remain at .87.

If there is a 5-percentage-point decline in transmission, over the next month there would be 130 daily infections. New daily cases would decline to 50. Severe cases would drop to four, and the reproduction rate would be .74.

If there is a 5-percentage-point increase in transmission rates over the next month, the model projects 400 new daily infections with new daily cases rising by 80. Under this scenario, severe cases would double from six to 12.

More importantly, this scenario results in a reproduction rate of 1.0, meaning that the spread of COVID would be increasing, reversing the progress made in recent weeks.

As has been shown since the beginning of the pandemic in Oregon, these trends remain very sensitive to small changes in transmission levels.

Wildfires, which started on Labor Day, are widespread throughout Oregon and have led to evacuations of an estimated 40,000 people and extremely hazardous air quality.

The wildfires and subsequent poor air quality have decreased availability of community COVID-19 testing, but it is unclear what effects the evacuations and the poor air quality might have on COVID-19 transmission and symptoms.

Model results should be interpreted with caution, given these recent reductions in testing and uncertainty behind various COVID-19 model assumptions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Northern pikeminnow season extended, rewards increased - Anglers can make more money catching fish and saving salmon
Bonneville Power Administration - 09/18/20 11:54 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – State and federal agencies are extending the season for the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program on the Columbia and Snake rivers until Oct. 11. They are also boosting the per-fish reward amounts for the remainder of the 2020 season.

Effective Sept. 19, the reward for all eligible northern pikeminnow will increase from the $5 to $8 range, to $10 per fish - regardless of how many northern pikeminnow an angler catches. The reward for verified specially-tagged northern pikeminnow will also temporarily increase from $500 to $1,000 per fish.

The program’s goal is to encourage more anglers to participate by harvesting predator-sized northern pikeminnow this fall, which will help protect more young salmon and steelhead from predation next spring.

“Large northern pikeminnow are responsible for eating a majority of the young salmon and steelhead who fall victim to predators,” says Eric McOmie, a BPA program manager. “Reducing the number of large pikeminnow can really help young salmon survive.”

For 30 years the Bonneville Power Administration has funded the Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program, paying anglers to remove northern pikeminnow from the Columbia and Snake rivers and protecting endangered juvenile salmon and steelhead. The program’s goal is not to eliminate native northern pikeminnow but reduce the average size and number of the predatory fish.

The 11-day extension offsets the delay at the start of the season in May due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also appears the pandemic may have discouraged some anglers from participating in the sport-reward fishery, as the number of anglers is down 28% from this time last year. Currently, the 2020 harvest of northern pikeminnow is on track to be the lowest on record.

According to recent data, anglers are catching more northern pikeminnow now than any other time of the season, but fewer people are participating in the program. Average harvest for the past 29 years is approximately 174,000 fish. Last year, anglers removed approximately 146,000 northern pikeminnow from the Columbia and Snake rivers. So far this year, that number is just over 88,000.

Nearly anyone can make money fishing for northern pikeminnow, and biologists say late summer and early fall can be one of the best times of the year to catch the salmon eaters. In 2019, the program paid out nearly $1.2 million to northern pikeminnow anglers, with the top fisherman making more than $53,000.

For more details on the season extension and reward increases, go to www.pikeminnow.org.

 About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

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ODF fire report for Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/18/20 10:24 AM
Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.
Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1072/138220/thumb_2020_09_14-15.31.22.943-CDT.jpeg

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Department of Forestery is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, (see table below for details). Echo Mountain and the North Cascade complexes were removed from today’s report. Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment. There are more than 6,500 personnel assigned to these fires from across the nation and Canada. This doesn’t include the many government emergency response employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing to the fight in whatever way they can. About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

192,719

10%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,012

20%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

172,510

10%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,865

10%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

130,429

25%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

44,800

20%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

41,395 in Oregon

10%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,833

35%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

37%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,995

15%

E of Diamond Lake

Please note: The acres burned estimates above are based very limited information available. These numbers will change over the next several days, in some cases significantly. We will be taking every opportunity to map these fires. Fire maps are an important tool for both ongoing response operations and keeping people informed. 

More information




Attached Media Files: ODF fire report for Friday, Sept. 18, 2020 , Firefighters at the Echo Mountain Complex in Lincoln County work on a fire control line.

Building Codes Division can help people locate manufactured home ownership documents
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/18/20 9:25 AM

(Salem) – Thousands of Oregonians have evacuated to escape wildfires that have damaged and destroyed homes throughout the state. Many who evacuated did not have time to take important documents with them, including ownership documents for their manufactured home, and those documents may now be destroyed.

The Oregon Building Codes Division’s online system can provide manufactured home owners with that information, including the record of ownership. Having these documents is important when navigating the insurance process.

The Oregon Manufactured Home Ownership Document (MHOD) system is available at https://aca-oregon.accela.com/OR_MHODS/. The system allows people to search for their documents and, once they find them, print or email them.

“These times are stressful enough without having to locate ownership documents in a damaged or destroyed manufactured home,” said Lori Graham, interim administrator of the Building Codes Division, which is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services. “Using the MHOD system is the easiest and quickest way for people to get their documents. Yet, if they need help, we can send them a printed copy.”

If customers need an existing ownership document mailed to them, but are displaced from their home, they can email or call, and the division can send it to any address customers want. Call 503-378-4530 or 800-442-7457 (toll-free) or email mhods.bcd@oregon.gov for help.

The MHOD system also has forms and applications, as well as other resources. People can access the records without needing to log in.

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The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.

The Building Codes Division administers Oregon’s statewide building code, which provides uniform standards that ensure newly constructed residential and commercial buildings are safe for people to occupy.


Thu. 09/17/20
Media Advisory - Archie Creek Fire Tour
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/17/20 7:49 PM

MEDIA ADVISORY - ARCHIE CREEK FIRE TOUR

IDLEYLD PARK, Ore. - Douglas County Media outlets are invited to attend a media tour of the Archie Creek Fire on Friday, September 18, 2020. 

Outlets wishing to attend are asked to be at the Idleyld Trading Post on Friday morning, no later than 10:00 am. Media is asked to wear protective equipment. Those who need protective equipment are asked to contact DFPA Fire Prevention Specialist Kyle Reed at eed@oregon.gov">Kyle.Reed@oregon.gov before 7:00 am Friday morning. 

It is requested that outlets try to limit the number of personnel on the tour to what is necessary for each outlet. 

# # # 


RADE Arrest / Seizure
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 09/17/20 6:26 PM

On 09-16-20 at around 6:45 am, RADE detectives with the assistance of GPDPS patrol units and narcotics detection K9 Match, arrested 73 year old William G. Van Tassell. RADE detectives obtained information Van Tassell was in possession of a large quantity of methamphetamine and located him driving his vehicle southbound on Interstate 5 in Josephine County. A traffic stop was attempted on Van Tassell as he neared exit 58. Van Tassell chose to not pull over and drove several miles before spike strips were deployed by a patrol unit, deflating 3 of Van Tassell's tires. He eventually was stopped and after K9 Match alerted to narcotics in his vehicle, 228.4 grams (approximately 1/2 pound) of methamphetamine was located, hidden in his vehicle. Van Tassell was arrested and lodged in the jail for Unlawful Delivery and Possession of Methamphetamine. More charges are expected to be added by the DA's Office. Anyone with questions can contact Det. Sgt. Doni Hamilton 541-450-6370 or email at dhamilton@grantspassoregon.gov.


Pacific Power concludes Public Safety Power Shutoff watch for Weed, Calif. area
Pacific Power - 09/17/20 6:00 PM

Contact:                                                                                         FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pacific Power media line                                              September 17, 2020

503-813-6018    

Pacific Power concludes Public Safety Power Shutoff watch for Weed, Calif. area

WEED, Calif. — Areas around Weed, Calif., which is considered a high fire risk area, were under a Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) watch today, September 17, beginning at 2 p.m. Real time weather observation and station measurements indicated PSPS conditions diminished by 6 p.m. removing the greater Weed area from the watch status. Elevated winds were experienced in areas north of Weed. However not at a level in combination with additional fire weather metrics that would require a PSPS.

“We appreciate our customers’ patience and understanding during this PSPS watch event” said Erik Brookhouse, vice president of system, operations. “Turning off power to customers is not something we take lightly and would only use a PSPS as a last resort for public safety.”

Turning off power during a PSPS is done to prevent wind-blown or falling debris from making contact with energized power lines. It is a proactive effort to mitigate wildfire risk in the face of hazardous fire weather conditions including extremely low humidity, dry vegetation, elevated levels on key weather indexes and sustained winds and gusts.  

Customers have been notified of that the PSPS watch has ended.  

Visit pacificpower.net/psps for additional information on Public Safety Power Shutoffs, wildfire safety and emergency preparedness. 

Puede hablar con un agente de servicio al cliente sobre cómo prepararse y qué medidas de seguridad tomar para los incendios forestales. Llame al 888-221-7070.

????"? 888-221-7070?1/4OE??'?(R)??oe???"?'~?????(R)??--???3/4?(R)o/oo?...???~??OENLG??NLG...??,

??? 888-221-7070?1/4OE??'?(R)??oe???^?"?????(R)??--???1/2?(R)o/oo?...??^?~???"??NLG...??,

Unsere Mitarbeiter im Kundenservice beraten Sie gerne zu Waldbrandvorsorge und -bekämpfung. Sie erreichen uns unter 888-221-7070.

Lub chaw sawv cev saib xyuas tub lag luam yuav sib tham nrog koj txog ntawm kev nyab xeeb txog hluav taws hav zoov kub thiab kev npaj txhij. Thov hu rau 888-221-7070.

Ang isang ahente ng pangangalaga sa customer ay maaaring makipag-usap sa iyo tungkol sa kaligtasan at paghahanda sa mabilis na kumakalat na sunog o wildfire. Mangyaring tumawag sa 888-221-7070.

M??(TM)t ?'?i di??n ch?NLGm sóc khách hàng có th??NLG trao ?'??-i v??>i quý v??< v? an toàn cháy r?ng và cách chu?n b??< s?n sàng cho cháy r?ng. Vui lòng g?i 888-221-7070.

Whak nheo bene llun xhinlago nha nhelee, akre unha lkues nha bii llaxgenha dá ghapchi nhada kate xde yii lixhe. Nheo: 888 221 7070

Kui kan’ani xi na’I kaston’o sa’a ña kutua’ani te ña kui kidani ta kiño’o yuku yoton, kan’ani 888-221- 7070.


Suspect Arrested after Lighting Sleeping Man on Fire (Photo)
Medford Police Dept. - 09/17/20 4:25 PM
Lyon mugshot
Lyon mugshot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6231/138204/thumb_LYON.png

On 091520, at about 3:56 a.m., a 54 year old male reported he awoke to being on fire and sustained burn injuries. Officers responded and found the victim had been sleeping in an alley in the 100 block of S Grape, when an unknown suspect lit the bottom of his blanket on fire, which spread to his clothing. The victim put the fire out with his hands and sustained 3rd degree burns to his hands and feet.

He was transported to the hospital where he remains in stable condition.

Video surveillance captured the event, which showed a male approach the sleeping victim and intentionally light the victim’s blanket on fire with a lighter and some paper. The suspect watched as the flames increase, before walking away.

The suspect’s clothing was distinct, and the information was put out to other officers. On 091620 at about 3:05 p.m., an officer spotted a male with the same clothing in Hawthorne Park. The male was confirmed to be the same male in the video. He was interviewed and lodged in jail on several crimes. There is no known connection between the victim and suspect.

Suspect:

Lyon, Brandon Nathaniel

22 years old

Transient

Charges:

- Attempted Murder 2nd Degree

- Assault 1st Degree

- Arson 1st Degree




Attached Media Files: Lyon mugshot

Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Troopers Requesting Public's Assistance with Unlawful Killing/Waste of Elk - Lincoln County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/17/20 4:01 PM
2020-09/1002/138201/20200823_123146.jpg
2020-09/1002/138201/20200823_123146.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1002/138201/thumb_20200823_123146.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public's help locating the person(s) responsible for the unlawful killing of a spike bull elk and cow elk in Lincoln County.

On Sunday, August 23, 2020, a Newport OSP Fish and Wildlife Trooper discovered a deceased spike bull and cow elk.

The elk were located on the USFS 5390 road just outside of Waldport.

The cow elk was left to waste with no meat removed from the carcass and was not salvageable.  Most of the meat had been taken from the spike elk.   

The elk were most likely shot the evening prior - Saturday, August 22, 2020.

OSP is asking anyone who was in the area or anyone who may have information on the suspect(s) to call the TIP line at 1-800-452-7888 or dial OSP or by email TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

 

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

 

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s)

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

 

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1002/138201/20200823_123146.jpg

Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery Update - Sept. 17, 2020  (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/17/20 3:56 PM
An Oregon Army Guard HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter empties a water bucket onto flames on the Brattain Fire on September 15, 2020 near Paisley, Ore. Two Army Guard Black Hawks, headquartered out of Salem, Ore. are currently assigned to the fire. The helicop
An Oregon Army Guard HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter empties a water bucket onto flames on the Brattain Fire on September 15, 2020 near Paisley, Ore. Two Army Guard Black Hawks, headquartered out of Salem, Ore. are currently assigned to the fire. The helicop
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138200/thumb_200915-Z-NJ272-003.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or fire.info@state.or.us 




Attached Media Files: An Oregon Army Guard HH-60M Black Hawk helicopter empties a water bucket onto flames on the Brattain Fire on September 15, 2020 near Paisley, Ore. Two Army Guard Black Hawks, headquartered out of Salem, Ore. are currently assigned to the fire. The helicop , Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers and Citizen-Airmen with NG1 team six, grid an area of the Two-Four-Two fire during mop up operations, Chiloquin, Ore., Sept. 14. Approximately 1000 Oregon Guard members are supporting overall firefighting efforts wit

Fatal Crash on Hwy 212 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/20 3:50 PM

On Wednesday, September 16, 2020 at approximately 5:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 212 near Hwy 224.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Kawasaki motorcycle, operated by Dakota Teeter (20) of Milwaukie, was eastbound on Hwy 212 when it left the roadway and struck the guardrail.

Teeter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office and Clackamas Fire.

 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 18 - Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/20 3:40 PM

On Wednesday, September 16, 2020, at approximately 8:35 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 18 near milepost 48.

Preliminary investigation indicates that a Nissan Sentra, operated by Matthew Revelette (34) of Healdsburg, CA. was stopped at the stop sign at the intersection of Cruickshank Rd. and Hwy 18. The Nissan proceeded north across Hwy 18 and into the path of a eastbound Yamaha motorcycle operated by Anthony Banta (29) of Newberg.  The Yamaha and Nissan collided.

Banta sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

The eastbound lane of Hwy 18 was closed for approximately 4 hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Yamhill County Sheriff's Department, ODOT, McMinnville Police Department and McMinnville Fire Department.


"Working While Claiming" Lets Oregonians Earn More Before Benefits Are Reduced
Oregon Employment Department - 09/17/20 3:39 PM

September 17, 2020 (SALEM, ORE.)—Today the Oregon Employment Department announced an update to the “Working While Claiming” program, a result of Oregon Senate Bill 1701. It allows Oregonians to work and earn more each week before having their weekly benefit amount reduced.

“We are glad to share another piece of positive news today with the implementation of Senate Bill 1701. This change in how earnings are reported for those who are “working while claiming” allows us to put more unemployment benefits in the hands of under-employed Oregonians. Originally anticipated to be complete in December, we are proud of our ability to get ahead on this programming change while keeping our other IT priorities on track,” said David Gerstenfeld, acting director of the Oregon Employment Department.

Senate Bill 1701 allows claimants to earn up to $300 before seeing a reduction in their weekly benefits. Claimants working 39 hours or less per week and earning less than their weekly benefit amount can earn up to $300 without seeing any change to their weekly benefits. Any amount earned over $300 will be reduced from their weekly benefit, dollar-for-dollar. However, claimants working 40 hours or more or earning the same or more than their weekly benefit amount in a week are not eligible to receive any benefits.

This statutory change is effective from September 6, 2020 through January 1, 2022. The new income threshold applies to all benefit programs, including regular Unemployment Insurance (UI), Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), and Extended Benefits (EB).

For Oregonians receiving any type of unemployment benefits during this period, adjustments to their weekly benefit amount will be automatic. Claimants do not need to contact the Department to request an adjustment, unless they made a mistake when reporting their earnings. For claims already paid this week, the Department will make manual adjustments as needed and will issue retroactive payments to claimants who qualify. 

###

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/930/138195/9_17__SB_1701_Implementation_FINAL.pdf

Basic Police Class 399 to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/17/20 3:33 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 399th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects.

Basic Police Class 399 will graduate during a private ceremony at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon on Thursday, September 24, 2020

Due to the COVID 19 pandemic and the need for social distancing the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training regrets that this ceremony will be closed to the public. However, we would like to publicly congratulate the diverse group of men and women from agencies around the state who are members of Basic Police #399 on their successful completion of basic training.

Graduation Roster Basic Police BP399 / DPSST Class Coordinator: Robert Ledford

Deputy Sheriff Andres Aldana / Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Shelby Biencourt / Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Police Officer Blake Bowers / Philomath Police Department

Police Officer Drake Brennan / Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

Police Officer Victor Brett / Tigard Police Department

Police Officer James Brewer / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Nicholas DePaulo / Umatilla Tribal Police Department

Police Officer Spencer Douglas / Tigard Police Department

Police Officer Garrett Garcia / Portland Police Bureau

Deputy Sheriff Kyle Geraci / Linn County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jeobany Giron / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Brandon Halter / Roseburg Police Department

Police Officer Kyle Henderson / Tigard Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Kathleen Herboth / Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jose Jimenez / Woodburn Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Dawson Jinkins / Douglas County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Johnson / Union County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Yan Kuvaldin / Salem Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Kevin Lanier / Jefferson County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Scottie Lathrom / Brookings Police Department

Police Officer Ryan Lutz / Oregon City Police Department

Police Officer Jesse Manipol / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Morgan McBride / Salem Police Department

Police Officer Jared McLennan / Ashland Police Department

Police Officer Valeri Miller-Fillman / Oakridge Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Corey Nealeigh / Washington County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Kelly Powell / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Sebastian Precup / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Valeria Ramirez / Salem Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Mark Rose / Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer William Schaap / Silverton Police Department

Police Officer Benjamin Schulz / Roseburg Police Department

Police Officer Nicholas Skelton / Salem Police Department

Police Officer Rachael Skjelstad / Beaverton Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Maksim Solnyshkin / Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Benjamin Stubbs / Beaverton Police Department

Police Officer Elliott Walker / Portland Police Bureau

Police Officer Samuel Whisler / Astoria Police Department

Police Officer Johnny Whitaker / Salem Police Department

Police Officer Anthony Young / Canby Police Department

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Colorado Man Charged With Hate Crime After Unprovoked Stabbing of Black Man
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/17/20 2:30 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a Colorado man has been charged with a hate crime after stabbing a Black man from Ontario, Oregon while the man was sitting in a fast food restaurant.

A federal grand jury in Eugene has returned a one-count indictment charging Nolan Levi Strauss, 26, a Colorado resident, with a hate crime involving an attempt to kill.

According to the indictment, on the morning of December 21, 2019, a 48-year-old Black man arrived at an Arby’s fast food restaurant adjoining the Pilot Travel Center in Ontario where he planned to provide final documentation for a pending job application. The man sat in the lobby of the restaurant while waiting for the manager.

Unprovoked and without warning, Strauss approached the man from behind and stabbed him in the neck. Following a struggle for the knife, the man freed himself and Strauss was detained by store employees. When asked by the store employee why he attacked the man, Strauss stated he did so because the man “was Black, and I don’t like Black people.”

The stabbing resulted in two lacerations to the victim’s neck. Afterward, he was life-flighted to Boise, Idaho for emergency surgical intervention.

Strauss will make his first appearance in federal court on October 19, 2020. If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of life in federal prison.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Ontario Police Department, Oregon State Police, and the Malheur County District Attorney’s Office. It is being prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Cameron A. Bell, Trial Attorney for the Civil Rights Division.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

The Alliance Board of Trustees Elects New Board Officers, Honors Outgoing Business Trustees (Photo)
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 09/17/20 2:23 PM
Dr. Miles K. Davis, President of Linfield University & Chair of Alliance Board of Trustees
Dr. Miles K. Davis, President of Linfield University & Chair of Alliance Board of Trustees
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/4829/138191/thumb_Miles_Davis.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The Board of Trustees of the Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (“The Alliance”) elected Dr. Miles K. Davis, President of Linfield University, as its new Chair at their meeting on September 16.

“I am humbled and honored to be selected as the Chair of the Board of Trustees of The Alliance at this most challenging of times in higher education. I look forward to working with my fellow college and university presidents as we carve out a sustainable future for private higher education in Oregon,” Dr. Davis said.

Dr. Davis succeeds Mark Swenson, Chief Executive Officer of Shepherd’s Grain, who chaired The Alliance from October 2018 to September 2020, served as Treasurer/Secretary from April 2017 to October 2018, and has been a member of the Alliance Board since 2007.

Dr. Lesley Hallick, President of Pacific University, was elected Vice Chair, replacing Dr. Sheldon Nord, President of Corban University. Dr. Audrey Bilger, President of Reed College, was elected Secretary, and Dr. Robin Baker, President of George Fox University, was elected to continue on as Treasurer, the office he has held since October 2019. Additionally, Dr. Joseph Brimhall, President of the University of Western States, was elected to the Alliance’s Executive Committee as a member.

The composition of the Alliance Board of Trustees has also changed. The Board now consists of Alliance member college/university presidents only, meaning there are no longer any Business Trustees. Three Alliance Business Trustees ended their service on September 16: Mark Swenson, Chief Executive Officer, Shepherd’s Grain; Kristin Stathis, Vice President, Operations Services, Portland General Electric; and David Lyon, Senior Fellow, Research, Lonza Pharma & Biotech. Mr. Swenson and Ms. Stathis served as valued Business Trustees for the past thirteen years and Mr. Lyon for the past nine years.

Mr. Swenson, Ms. Stathis, and Mr. Lyon all made outstanding contributions to Oregon’s independent higher education sector during their tenure on the Board. In appreciation for their commitment and leadership, The Alliance is making a one-time $3,000 scholarship gift to each member college and university to identify one Mark Swenson Scholar, one Kristin Stathis Scholar, and one David Lyon Scholar for the current academic year. Each Scholar will receive $1,000. The scholarship recipients must be Oregon students from underrepresented populations with substantial financial need. 

About The Alliance

The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities (“The Alliance”) is comprised of 15 private, nonprofit, independent colleges and universities. In total, these institutions educate approximately 34,00 students, delivering high-quality experiential learning with high-impact teaching strategies. Earned undergraduate and graduate degrees total more than 10,440. The Alliance is the collective voice of private education in public policy advocacy. We are at the intersection of business and philanthropy, creating innovative programs and scholarships that build an advanced and educated workforce for Oregon. For more information, visit www.oaicu.org.




Attached Media Files: Dr. Miles K. Davis, President of Linfield University & Chair of Alliance Board of Trustees

Pacific Power continues to closely monitor Weed, Calif. area for wildfire risk and possible Public Safety Power Shutoff today (Photo)
Pacific Power - 09/17/20 2:15 PM
Weed PSPS Watch Area
Weed PSPS Watch Area
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1270/138189/thumb_Weed_PSPS_Area_Sept_17_2020.png

Contact:                                                                                         FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pacific Power media line                                              September 17, 2020

503-813-6018    

Pacific Power continues to closely monitor Weed, Calif. area for wildfire risk and possible Public Safety Power Shutoff today

Weather forecast for Thursday afternoon is being monitored for possible de-energization of power lines in designated high fire risk areas

WEED, Calif. — Areas around Weed, Calif., which is considered a high fire risk area, remain under a Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) watch today, September 17th beginning at 2 p.m. and extending to around 6 p.m. Peak gusts are expected in an area north of Weed.

If a PSPS is required, the company may reduce the potentially impacted customers from 2,500 to 600 and issue a PSPS to a sectionalized area. This area encompasses north east of Weed, north of Alamo Avenue, out to the Carrick area, a section just west of Old Stage Road and Old Hwy 99 South. This includes an area north of Edgewood. It does not include areas in Hammond Ranch and the community of Lake Shastina.

The measure is a proactive effort to mitigate wildfire risk in the face of hazardous fire weather conditions including extremely low humidity, dry vegetation, elevated levels on key weather indexes and sustained winds and gusts.   

“Taking this extraordinary measure is out of an abundance of caution,” said Erik Brookhouse, vice president of system, operations. “Forecasted high, sustained winds are stronger than what we saw on Sunday when we initiated the previous PSPS. We understand the inconvenience this can cause our customers and appreciate their patience during this important public safety event.”

Customers have been notified of the watch through phone calls, email and text messages. Affected customers will continue to receive updates through ongoing communications. Customers can use the interactive map at www.pacificpower.net/psps to see if they are located in a PSPS area. Customers are encouraged to be prepared and have an outage kit ready.

If a PSPS is needed, customers will receive notification that power will be turned off. Otherwise, customer notification will happen at the conclusion of the event.

For all non-emergency questions about the PSPS, customers and the public should call Pacific Power at 1-888-221-7070.

Turning off power during a Public Safety Power Shutoff is done to prevent wind-blown or falling debris from making contact with energized power lines. Pacific Power crews will actively patrol and remove debris from lines and make repairs if needed. Once line inspections are complete and extreme weather conditions have subsided, Pacific Power will re-energize the lines.

Visit pacificpower.net/psps for additional information on Public Safety Power Shutoffs, wildfire safety and emergency preparedness. 

Puede hablar con un agente de servicio al cliente sobre cómo prepararse y qué medidas de seguridad tomar para los incendios forestales. Llame al 888-221-7070

????"? 888-221-7070?1/4OE??'?(R)??oe???"?'~?????(R)??--???3/4?(R)o/oo?...???~??OENLG??NLG...??,

??? 888-221-7070?1/4OE??'?(R)??oe???^?"?????(R)??--???1/2?(R)o/oo?...??^?~???"??NLG...??,

Unsere Mitarbeiter im Kundenservice beraten Sie gerne zu Waldbrandvorsorge und -bekämpfung. Sie erreichen uns unter 888-221-7070.

Lub chaw sawv cev saib xyuas tub lag luam yuav sib tham nrog koj txog ntawm kev nyab xeeb txog hluav taws hav zoov kub thiab kev npaj txhij. Thov hu rau 888-221-7070.

Ang isang ahente ng pangangalaga sa customer ay maaaring makipag-usap sa iyo tungkol sa kaligtasan at paghahanda sa mabilis na kumakalat na sunog o wildfire. Mangyaring tumawag sa 888-221-7070.

M??(TM)t ?'?i di??n ch?NLGm sóc khách hàng có th??NLG trao ?'??-i v??>i quý v??< v? an toàn cháy r?ng và cách chu?n b??< s?n sàng cho cháy r?ng. Vui lòng g?i 888-221-7070.

Whak nheo bene llun xhinlago nha nhelee, akre unha lkues nha bii llaxgenha dá ghapchi nhada kate xde yii lixhe. Nheo: 888 221 7070

Kui kan’ani xi na’I kaston’o sa’a ña kutua’ani te ña kui kidani ta kiño’o yuku yoton, kan’ani 888-221- 7070.




Attached Media Files: Weed PSPS Watch Area , North Weed PSPS Watch Area

Oregon Bankers Association Joins Wildfire Relief Effort
Oregon Bankers Assn. - 09/17/20 2:06 PM

Oregon Bankers Association Joins Wildfire Relief Effort
Donations collected will support displaced Oregonians

September wildfires have already ravaged more than a million acres in Oregon, resulting in the loss of many lives, homes, businesses and livelihoods. Entire towns have been decimated and many Oregon families are devastated by loss. In fact, we know of many members of the Oregon banking community that have lost their homes.

Amidst the destruction and heartbreak, it has been uplifting to witness the tremendous effort banks across the state are making to help their communities. From dollars to food to shelter – both short and long-term – Oregon’s banks are going way above and beyond the norm to see their employees, customers and communities through this difficult time.

Here at the Oregon Bankers Association (OBA), we are joining Oregon Business & Industry, Oregon Business Council and the Oregon State Chamber of Commerce in establishing a Wildfire Relief Fund to help Oregonians who have been displaced. The organizations will work with local chambers in the impacted areas to determine where funds can be used to have the greatest local community impact.

OBA has made an initial $5,000 contribution to the fund. We are asking our friends and colleagues – both individuals and businesses – to make a 501(c)3 tax-deductible contribution to our Wildfire Relief Fund today. Every dollar donated will go to communities in need.

To make a donation, visit https://obiref.revv.co/wildfire.


Oregon reports 215 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/20 1:24 PM

Sept. 17, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 215 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 521, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 215 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,060.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (11), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Deschutes (7), Douglas (1), Grant (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (7), Klamath (7), Lane (23), Linn (11), Malheur (11), Marion (28), Morrow (1), Multnomah (43), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (7), Washington (29), and Yamhill (3).

Testing Note: The Oregon State Public Health Laboratory resumed normal operations yesterday after a three-day closure caused by HVAC problems and related poor indoor air quality. The lab is once again accepting and testing specimens.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


ODF map of current Oregon wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/17/20 1:04 PM

SALEM, Ore. - Attached is a map of 12 current Oregon wildfires that the Oregon Department of Forestry. The map includes the largest wildfires currently burning in Oregon.




Attached Media Files: ODF fire map for Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020

Pacific Power adjusts outage numbers to reflect structures lost in windstorm aftermath
Pacific Power - 09/17/20 12:13 PM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018

NOTE TO MEDIA: Images of restoration work underway are available for use, via this link. Photo credit: Pacific Power

 

Pacific Power adjusts outage numbers to reflect structures lost in windstorm aftermath

As access to areas expands, company is better able to determine how many customers need to rebuild in order for electric service to be restored

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 17, 2020) —As of noon., Sept. 17 Pacific Power has restored service to approximately 95 percent all of the customers in Oregon and northern California who lost power due to damage inflicted by a historic wind storm.

Current outage map numbers include some customers remaining out due to fire suppression efforts. At peak a week ago, more than 60,000 were without power. Pacific Power is at work to reconcile those numbers and assure that the information available to the public via its online outage map is line with actual circumstances on the ground.

“We are revising our outage numbers based on what we know now with the full knowledge that our customers are needing this information to rebuild and move forward,” said David Lucas, vice president of operations. “We are getting very close to restoring all the power that is possible for us to restore, but we know a tremendous amount of work remains for those customers who will need to rebuild or do significant repair work before service restoration is possible. We’re committed to helping simplify that work and lend a hand with temporary connections during reconstruction whenever possible.”

Based on customers able to receive power, current outages include:

 

  • Medford area, less than 500 customers
  • Happy Camp, Calif., approximately 250
  • Lincoln City, approximately 230
  • Glide/Umpqua Canyon, approximately 250

 

Pacific Power’s website will provide up-to-date estimates of local restorations times at www.pacificpower.net/outage-updates. This page will be updated as new information becomes available. Additional outage maps are available at: www.pacificpower.net/outages-safety.

Community spirit

Pacific Power employees are rolling up their sleeves wherever they can, supporting the communities they serve.

  • Linn County Relief Fund. Donated $10,000 to locally-initiated fund to help residents get back on their feet.
  • Douglas Timber Operators Relief Fund. Donated $2,500 to fund
  • Talent. Purchased and distributed N95 masks to Talent and Shady Cove residents who have been let back into their neighborhoods to assess damage.

How to be ready, how to get help

Pacific Power customer care agents are available and ready to help customers through this incredibly difficult time. They can be reached 24/7 at 1-888-221-7070. 

The company is working with the Red Cross and local agencies to directly aid people in need. Assistance is available for those in wildfire-affected areas; contact the Red Cross for the latest shelter and emergency support information.

Oregon:

  • Josephine County Fairgrounds – 1451 Fairgrounds Rd, Grants Pass
  • Jackson County Expo – 1 Peninger Rd, Central Point
  • Oregon State Fairgrounds – 2330 17th St. NE, Salem
  • Klamath County Fair Grounds – 3531 S 6th St, Klamath Falls
  • Kla-Mo-Ya Casino – 34333 US-97, Chiloquin
  • Lincoln City Community Center--2150 NE Oar Place
  • Linn County Fairgrounds – 3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany
  • Benton County Fairgrounds – 110 SW 53rd St, Corvallis
  • Deschutes County Fairgrounds – 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond
  • Douglas County Fairgrounds – 2110 Frear St., Roseburg
  • Polk County Fairgrounds – 520 S Pacific Hwy W, Rickreall 

Northern California:

  • Kahtishraam Wellness Center – 1403 Kahtishraam, Yreka
  • Siskiyou County Fairgrounds (taking large animals) – 1712 Fairlane Rd, Yreka

 

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FBI Offers Reward of up to $10,000 in Fatal Arson Case in Warm Springs (Photo) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/17/20 12:05 PM
Facebook ad - Warm Springs arson
Facebook ad - Warm Springs arson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3585/138174/thumb_Facebook_ad_-_Warm_Springs_arson_-_Sept_17_2020.png

The FBI is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest, and conviction of the person or people responsible for an arson fire that killed one person and injured two others. The Warm Springs Police Department responded to a fire in a home located at 1713 Foster Street at approximately 11:05 p.m. on May 17, 2020. When the officers arrived, they saw flames shooting 15 feet out the front living room window. 

Officers entered the burning home, removed two victims, and provided medical assistance until paramedics arrived. Lamont Brown, age 77, died of his injuries following transport to a medical facility. The second adult victim removed from the residence suffered critical injuries. A third resident was able to exit the residence on her own but suffered serious burn injuries. A fourth person was able to escape through a ground-floor window and was uninjured.

Investigators with the Warm Springs Fire Department, the Jefferson County Fire Department, and the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office ruled the fire an arson. The FBI and Warm Springs Police Department are jointly investigating this case.

As part of this publicity effort, the FBI has created a "Seeking Information" poster which is attached and can be found at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/structure-fire---arson and a Facebook ad (attached).

Anyone with information concerning this fire is asked to contact the FBI in Bend at (541) 389-1202 during normal business hours, the FBI in Portland at (503) 224-4181 twenty-four hours a day, or the Warm Springs Police Department at (541) 553-3272. Information may also be submitted online at https://tips.fbi.gov 

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Attached Media Files: Poster - Warm Springs arson , Facebook ad - Warm Springs arson

Pacific Power closely monitoring Weed, Calif. area for wildfire risk and possible Public Safety Power Shutoff today (Photo)
Pacific Power - 09/17/20 11:01 AM
Weed PSPS Area
Weed PSPS Area
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1270/138172/thumb_Weed_PSPS_Area_Sept_17_2020.png

Contact:                                                                                         FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pacific Power media line                                              September 17, 2020

503-813-6018    

Pacific Power closely monitoring Weed, Calif. area for wildfire risk and possible Public Safety Power Shutoff today

Weather forecast for Thursday afternoon is being monitored for possible de-energization of power lines in designated high fire risk areas

WEED, Calif. — Pacific Power is closely monitoring weather conditions in Weed, Calif., which is considered a high fire risk area, and may issue a Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) today, September 17th beginning around 2 p.m. and extending to around 6 p.m.

The measure is a proactive effort to mitigate wildfire risk in the face of hazardous fire weather conditions including extremely low humidity, dry vegetation, elevated levels on key weather indexes and sustained winds and gusts.   

“Taking this extraordinary measure is out of an abundance of caution,” said Erik Brookhouse, vice president of system, operations. “Forecasted high, sustained winds are stronger than what we saw on Sunday when we initiated the previous PSPS. We understand the inconvenience this can cause our customers and appreciate their patience during this important public safety event.”

Approximately 2,500 customers in Weed could be affected. Those customers have been notified of the watch through phone calls, email and text messages. Affected customers will continue to receive updates through ongoing communications. Customers can use the interactive map at www.pacificpower.net/psps to see if they are located in a PSPS area. Customers are encouraged to be prepared and have an outage kit ready.

If a PSPS is needed, customers will receive additional notifications at these times:

  • 12 p.m.; two hours before power is turned off
  • 1 p.m.; one hour before power is turned off
  • 2 p.m.; assuming that lines are de-energized as planned
  • 6 p.m.; when restoration work begins
  • 8 p.m.; when restoration work concludes and service is restored to customers

For all non-emergency questions about the PSPS, customers and the public should call Pacific Power at 1-888-221-7070.

Turning off power during a Public Safety Power Shutoff is done to prevent wind-blown or falling debris from making contact with energized power lines. Pacific Power crews will actively patrol and remove debris from lines and make repairs if needed. Once line inspections are complete and extreme weather conditions have subsided, Pacific Power will re-energize the lines.

Visit pacificpower.net/psps for additional information on Public Safety Power Shutoffs, wildfire safety and emergency preparedness. 

Puede hablar con un agente de servicio al cliente sobre cómo prepararse y qué medidas de seguridad tomar para los incendios forestales. Llame al 888-221-7070.

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Unsere Mitarbeiter im Kundenservice beraten Sie gerne zu Waldbrandvorsorge und -bekämpfung. Sie erreichen uns unter 888-221-7070.

Lub chaw sawv cev saib xyuas tub lag luam yuav sib tham nrog koj txog ntawm kev nyab xeeb txog hluav taws hav zoov kub thiab kev npaj txhij. Thov hu rau 888-221-7070.

Ang isang ahente ng pangangalaga sa customer ay maaaring makipag-usap sa iyo tungkol sa kaligtasan at paghahanda sa mabilis na kumakalat na sunog o wildfire. Mangyaring tumawag sa 888-221-7070.

M??(TM)t ?'?i di??n ch?NLGm sóc khách hàng có th??NLG trao ?'??-i v??>i quý v??< v? an toàn cháy r?ng và cách chu?n b??< s?n sàng cho cháy r?ng. Vui lòng g?i 888-221-7070.

Whak nheo bene llun xhinlago nha nhelee, akre unha lkues nha bii llaxgenha dá ghapchi nhada kate xde yii lixhe. Nheo: 888 221 7070

Kui kan’ani xi na’I kaston’o sa’a ña kutua’ani te ña kui kidani ta kiño’o yuku yoton, kan’ani 888-221- 7070.




Attached Media Files: Weed PSPS Area

Be alert for landslides in the Cascade foothills of Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 09/17/20 10:51 AM

Portland, OR—The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch for a portions of the Cascade foothills, including portions of the following counties, Hood River, Multnomah, Clackamas, Marion, Linn, Lane, Douglas, Coos, Jackson, and Klamath for Thursday, September 17, 5 pm, through September 18, early morning.

Heavy rain can trigger landslides, rock fall, and debris flows in steep terrain, and the risk is higher in burn areas. 

Find the latest information here: https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/or.php?x=1

Debris flows are rapidly moving, extremely destructive landslides. They can contain boulders and logs transported in a fast-moving soil and water slurry down steep hillsides and through narrow canyons. They can easily travel a mile or more. A debris flow moves faster than a person can run. People, structures and roads located below steep slopes in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at serious risk.

If your home, work, or route is in a watch area:

  • Stay alert. Track the flood watch by radio, TV, weather radio or online. If told to evacuate, do so immediately.
  • Listen. Unusual sounds might indicate moving debris, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together. A trickle of falling mud or debris may precede larger landslides. If you think there is danger of a landslide, leave immediately.
  • Watch the water. If water in a stream or creek suddenly turns muddy or the amount of water flowing suddenly decreases or increases, this is a warning that the flow has been affected upstream. You should immediately leave the area because a debris flow may soon be coming downstream.
  • Travel with extreme caution. Assume roads are not safe. Be alert when driving, especially at night. Embankments along roadsides may fail, sending rock and debris onto the road.

For more landslide and debris flow information: https://www.oregongeology.org/Landslide/debrisflow.htm


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Oregon Dept. of Forestry Fire Report for Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/17/20 10:44 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 12 major fires in Oregon, (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment. There are about 6,500 personnel assigned to these fires from across the nation and Canada. This doesn’t include the many government emergency response employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing to the fight in whatever way they can. About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Beachie Creek

191,138

20%

15 miles N of Detroit

Lionshead

189,316

10%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Holiday Farm

170,637

8%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

135,956

3%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

128,020

20%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

44,800

20%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

38,721 in Oregon

10%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,814

25%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

29%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

8,645

1%

E of Diamond Lake

Echo Mtn. Complex

2,552

45%

4 miles NE of Lincoln City

North Cascade Complex

2,315

  •  

Multiple locations in ODF’s North Cascade District

Please note: The acres burned estimates above are based very limited information available. These numbers will change over the next several days, in some cases significantly. We will be taking every opportunity to map these fires. Fire maps are an important tool for both ongoing response operations and keeping people informed. 

More information


The Bureau of Land Management seeks nominations to fill vacancies on National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/17/20 9:36 AM

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. — The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking nominations to fill three positions on its National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. The National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board plays an important role in our efforts to be a good neighbor in states where the BLM and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) oversee wild free-roaming horses and burros. The Board advises the agencies on the protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies.

 

Selected board members advise both the BLM and USFS in wild horse and burro management. This call for nominations is for the positions that represent natural resource management, public interest (with special knowledge of equine behavior), and wild horse and burro research.

 

The board typically meets twice annually, though the BLM may call additional meetings when necessary. Members serve a three-year term without salary, though members are reimbursed for approved travel and per diem expenses related to their activities on the board.

 

The board is comprised of nine members who represent a range of interests. Individuals qualify to serve on the board because of their education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent. Successful nominees will demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.

 

Any individual or organization may nominate one or more persons to serve on the board; interested parties may also nominate themselves. However, current federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the board. 

 

If interested, please submit an application packet that includes a resume and nomination letter. Also provide the following information as part of the application packet:

 

  • The nominee’s first, middle, and last name
  • Position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered
  • Business and home addresses and phone numbers
  • E-mail address
  • Present occupation/title and employer
  • Education (colleges, degrees, major field(s) of study)
  • Career highlights (significant related experience, civic and professional activities, elected offices, including prior advisory committee experience or career achievements related to the interest to be represented)
  • Relevant education, training, and experience
  • Experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management
  • Experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management).
  • Experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions
  • Identification of any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by nominee or employer
  • Indication of whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist
  • Explanation of interest in serving on the Board
  • Reference letter(s) from special interests or organizations the nominee desires to represent. References may include, but are not limited to, business associates, friends, co-workers, and local, state and/or federal government representatives or elected officials. All nominations must include at least one letter of reference

 

Submit nominations by e-mail to Dorothea Boothe, Wild Horse and Burro Program Coordinator, at dboothe@blm.gov. To send by U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 9828 31st Avenue; Attn:  Dorothea Boothe, WO-260; Phoenix, Arizona 85051. To send by FedEx or UPS, please mail to the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Wild Horse and Burro Division, 9828 31st Avenue; Attn:  Dorothea Boothe; Phoenix, Arizona 85051. For questions, Ms. Boothe can also be reached by phone at (602) 906-5543 or at the email address listed above.

 

Nominations must be received no later than 45 days after the notice has been published in the Federal Register or postmarked by the same date. The BLM request for nominations appears in the Sept. 17, 2020 edition of the Federal Register.  For more information on the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, visit the BLM website at BLM.gov/WHB.

 

-BLM-

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.


Oregon Health Authority releases 2019 CCO Metrics Report
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/20 9:30 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 17, 2020

Oregon Health Authority releases 2019 CCO Metrics Report

Oregon coordinated care organizations (CCOs) continue to work on health system transformation by focusing on better care and better health outcomes while controlling health care costs. The 2019 CCO Metrics Report shares the results of Oregon’s pay-for-performance quality incentive program. To earn their full incentive payment, CCOs must meet benchmarks or improvement targets on at least 12 of the 16 measures, achieve a performance goal related to enrollment in patient-centered primary care homes, and report data for two electronic health records metrics.

"Oregon’s quality incentive program continues to play a key role in improving health outcomes and the care received by our more than 1 million members," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA's director of health policy and analytics. "As individuals and families begin to re-engage with the health system after the significant disruption caused by COVID-19, these quality measures will help us see how effective CCOs are in connecting people to the care they need during challenging times."

The report includes three new measures: oral evaluation for adults with diabetes; preventive dental services; and well child visits in the third, fourth, fifth and sixth years of life. Preventive dental care and well child visits are part of a multi-year strategy focused on the health sector’s role in preparing children for kindergarten.

For the 2021 measurement year, the Metrics and Scoring Committee added a new measure focused specifically on health equity: Meaningful language access to culturally responsive health care services.

Report highlights

  • The percentage of children in foster care who received timely mental, physical and dental health assessments has improved by more than 200 percent since 2014.
  • Cigarette smoking prevalence declined among 13 of 15 CCOs in 2019. The overall smoking prevalence among CCO members decreased by nearly 9 percent.
  • Emergency department utilization among members with mental illness was first included in the Quality Incentive Program in 2018. In 2019, nine of 15 CCOs improved, and seven achieved their improvement target.

Additionally, 2019 was the first year postpartum care was included in the Quality Incentive Program. All but two CCOs achieved the benchmark or improvement target. This was also the first year timeliness of prenatal care was no longer an incentive measure. Statewide performance on this measure dropped by 12 percentage points, and no CCOs demonstrated improvement on the rate of women receiving timely prenatal care.

The quality pool model rewards CCOs for the quality of care provided to Oregon Health Plan members. This model increasingly rewards CCOs for outcomes, rather than utilization of services, and is one of several key health system transformation mechanisms for achieving Oregon’s vision for better health, better care and lower costs.

The quality pool comprised 4.25 percent of CCOs’ monthly payments in 2019, for a total of more than $166 million. While all CCOs showed improvement on a majority of measures, five out of 15 earned 100 percent of their quality pool dollars. Six CCOs met 11 of the benchmarked measures and 80 percent of their quality pool, and four CCOs earned 60 percent. This left nearly $46 million for the challenge pool. The challenge pool was distributed to CCOs that met the benchmark or improvement target on four measures that impact early childhood: assessments for children in ODHS custody, childhood immunization status, developmental screenings in the first 36 months of life and timeliness of postpartum care.

Changes to the program due to COVID-19

Early in the COVID-19 emergency, OHA evaluated sources of funding that could be released quickly to support CCOs and members during the emergency. Sixty percent of the 2019 quality pool dollars were distributed to CCOs in April, with the remaining balance released to CCOs in June based on the performance described in this report.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and related disruption to the health care system, the Metrics and Scoring Committee elected to modify the design of Quality Incentive Program for 2020 so that CCOs earn credit for reporting only.

For a detailed report of the CCO metrics and how much each CCO earned through the pay-for-performance program, visit the OHA Health Policy and Analytics website.

# # #


Coos Bay District Extends Recreation Site Closures Due to Ongoing Fire Risk
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/17/20 8:56 AM

Coos Bay, Ore. – As a result of extreme fire danger, the Bureau of Land Management Coos Bay District will keep closed all developed recreation sites east of Highway 101, with the exception of Dean Creek Elk Viewing Area. The closure will be in place until further notice.  

Members of the public may not enter closed recreation areas. This temporary closure includes the following developed recreation sites:

  • Smith River Falls Campground
  • Vincent Creek Campground
  • Fawn Creek Campground
  • East Shore Campground
  • Park Creek Campground
  • Edson Creek Campground
  • Sixes River Campground
  • Doerner Fir Trail
  • Blue Ridge Trail System

Recreation sites west of Highway 101, including Bastendorff Beach, the North Spit Boat Ramp and Trail System, and the New River Area of Critical Environmental Concern remain open. Campfires and any open flames remain prohibited at these locations west of Highway 101, as well as on all forest lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management Coos Bay District.

The Coos Bay District will monitor the weather and fire risk in the region to determine when it is safe to reopen the recreation sites.

Public and firefighter safety are the highest priority. The extreme fire danger prompted the closure of these recreation sites starting on September 9, 2020. Firefighting resources continue to be limited. Moderate to heavy smoke impacts from the fires are expected to continue along the western slopes of the Cascades and into the Willamette Valley.

Personal safety is paramount. Stay informed on air quality ratings and more by visiting the Oregon Smoke Blog at http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/. Learn how to stay safe from wildfire smoke at https://www.cdc.gov/air/wildfire-smoke/default.htm.

Please call 911 to report any signs of new fires.

Please observe public use restrictions and help us limit potential new starts during this time. A list of personal use restrictions, as well as closure orders, are available at https://www.blm.gov/programs/public-safety-and-fire/fire-and-aviation/regional-info/oregon-washington/fire-restrictions. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter @BLMOregon.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.

 


Wed. 09/16/20
Level 3 Evacuation Notice Re-Issued for Section of Little River Road (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/20 8:20 PM
Level 3 "GO!"
Level 3 "GO!"
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5204/138152/thumb_Level_3.JPG

GLIDE, Ore. - The Sheriff's Office is re-issuing a Level 3 "GO!" evacuation notice for the residents on Little River Road between New Bridge Road and the end of Little River Road; including all side roads between these two points.

The road is closed at Little River Road and New Bridge Road and open to fire and emergency traffic only. Residents will not be permitted back into the Level 3 area until the risk subsides.

It is strongly recommended that residents evacuate the area immediately and don't attempt to make efforts to protect structures. If you choose to ignore this advisement, you must understand that emergency services may not be able to assist further. This will be the last notice residents in the area will receive. 

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Attached Media Files: Level 3 "GO!"