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Thu. 03/04/21
Lincoln City Felon Sentenced to 17 Years in Federal Prison for Drug and Gun Offenses
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 03/04/21 4:36 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Lincoln City, Oregon man with multiple felony convictions was sentenced to federal prison today for his role in a conspiracy to distribute large quantities of methamphetamine in and around Lincoln City and illegally possessing a firearm, announced Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug.

Felix Daniel Garcia-Mendoza, 28, was sentenced to 204 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release.

“The U.S. Attorney’s Office is committed to doing everything we can to reduce drug trafficking and violent crime across Oregon. A key pillar of our strategy is to reduce illegal gun ownership and use by drug traffickers,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Asphaug. “I applaud our law enforcement partners for their persistence in bringing Mr. Garcia-Mendoza to justice and making our coastal communities safer in the process.”

“The brazenness of Garcia-Mendoza’s actions clearly warrant this significant sentence,” said ATF Seattle Field Division Assistant Special Agent in Charge Jonathan E. Blais. “He showed a complete disregard for the law and jeopardized the community as a whole. The removal of Garcia-Mendoza and his co-conspirators from the streets will help make Lincoln City and Lincoln County safer.”

According to court documents, beginning in March 2018, agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) began infiltrating the Lincoln City methamphetamine market. Soon after, one of Garcia-Mendoza’s co-conspirators brokered the sale of a quarter pound of methamphetamine from Garcia-Mendoza to an undercover agent. At their initial meeting, agents purchased 113 grams of methamphetamine from Garcia-Mendoza.

Garcia-Mendoza met repeatedly with undercover agents and sold them increasingly larger quantities of methamphetamine. On one occasion, in June 2018, Garcia-Mendoza sold the agents more than one and half pounds of methamphetamine. Garcia-Mendoza also sold the undercover agents a handgun later determined to have be stolen from a Lincoln City gun shop. He wore a Glock pistol prominently in his waistband during various transactions and displayed it by raising his shirt and pulling it out during deals.

On December 12, 2018, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned an 11-count indictment charging Garcia-Mendoza with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine, possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine, felon in possession of a firearm, possession of a stolen firearm, and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. He was arrested on January 5, 2019 and pleaded guilty to all but three of the charges on January 20, 2020.

Three other co-defendants—Billy Jack Reese, Jr., 42, of Lincoln City, Oregon; James Levi Boyer, 51, of Springfield, Oregon; and Patricia Rose Hedrick, 25, of Newport, Oregon—were charged and have pleaded guilty to conspiring with Garcia-Mendoza to distribute methamphetamine. All were sentenced to time served in federal prison and are serving five-year terms of supervised release.

This case was investigated by ATF, the Lincoln City Police Department, and the Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office. It was prosecuted by Nathan J. Lichvarcik and William M. McLaren, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

For 2019, Oregon sees increased suicide rates across all ages, but youth deaths decline
Oregon Health Authority - 03/04/21 2:22 PM

March 4, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

For 2019, Oregon sees increased suicide rates across all ages, but youth deaths decline

Adult Suicide Intervention and Prevention Plan, COVID-19 adjustments in youth programming among strategies state is using to address problem

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon had the nation’s ninth highest suicide rate across all ages in 2019—a significant difference from the year before when the state was 17th in suicide deaths, according to suicide mortality data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The state had 20.4 deaths by suicide per 100,000 people in 2019 — the same rate as Idaho — with a total of 906 deaths. In 2018, the suicide death rate was 19 per 100,000, which amounted to 844 total deaths. Oregon was ranked 15th in the nation in suicide deaths in 2017, when its rate had also been 19 deaths per 100,000, which amounted to 825 total deaths. The 2019 change in ranking is due to several factors, including a 2.1% decrease in suicide deaths nationwide and increased suicide rates in Oregon.

The data for youth in 2019 were more promising. That year, the rate of suicide for youth ages 10 to 24 decreased for the first time since 2015. In both 2019 and 2018, Oregon ranked 11th highest in the nation for youth suicide deaths. Preliminary information indicates that the youth suicide rate decreased again in 2020, pending finalized 2020 data released by the CDC.

“Every loss to suicide is a tragedy,” said Dean E. Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed., health officer and state epidemiologist at Oregon Health Authority. “Our state has done a tremendous amount of work in suicide prevention in the past two years, including launching new programs that provide emotional support for COVID-19 concerns. While it appears that Oregon has not seen increased deaths by suicide linked to the pandemic in 2020, Oregon’s rates of suicide in recent years are still concerning. After all, Oregon remains above the national average for suicides, and above average for youth age groups as well.”

According to preliminary data, there were about 90 fewer suicides across all ages in Oregon in 2020 than in 2019, and about 28 fewer than in 2018. In addition, the number of suicide-related visits to emergency departments and urgent care centers in January of 2021 are similar to the final quarter of 2020, and the number of suicide-related calls to Oregon Poison Center in January 2021 are similar to the final quarter of 2020. The percent of suicide-related visits to emergency departments and urgent care centers in January 2021 is similar to the final quarter of 2020.

Call volume to Lines for Life, a regional substance abuse and suicide prevention nonprofit that operates several crisis helplines, has increased annually since 2016. There have been no increases in call volume beyond what’s expected, and of the crisis calls staff answer, roughly the same percent of callers reported thinking about suicide in 2020 as those who did in 2019.

The state continues to focus on improving and expanding suicide prevention efforts. Funding was allocated to Youth Suicide Prevention programming in 2019 and is now available statewide. In 2019, Oregon passed legislation creating an adult suicide prevention coordinator position at OHA that would be responsible for developing an Adult Suicide Intervention and Prevention Plan (ASIPP) for the state to identify action steps that can be taken to reduce suicide among Oregonians 25 and older. More than 100 partners across the state are supporting the plan’s development, which should be completed this fall.

In fall 2020, OHA received federal funding through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to support health systems in providing safer and specific suicide care for adults 25 and older through a nationally recognized model known as the Zero Suicide Initiative. This approach aims to improve care and support for persons at risk of suicide served by health systems.

This federal funding has allowed OHA to hire full-time staff to support health systems through training and development of tools that support adults 25 and older in addition to the adult suicide prevention coordinator position providing dedicated staff to reduce suicide among Oregon adults 25 and older. OHA is collaborating on suicide prevention efforts across all ages with partners to reduce suicides and the impacts of suicide on all Oregonians.

If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health crisis, please know that help is available:

  • Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24/7 run by Lines For Life at 800-273-8255 or text “273TALK” to 839863 (text services available Monday–Friday, 2–6 p.m. Pacific Time). The Veterans Crisis Lines can be reached by calling the above number and pressing “1.” En español: 1-888-628-9454. TTY: Dial 711 then 1-800-273-8255.
  • YouthLine is a teen-to-teen crisis and help line. Teens are available to help daily from 4–10 p.m. Pacific Time (off-hour calls answered by Lines for Life). Call 877-968-8491, text “teen2teen” to 839863 or chat at oregonyouthline.org.
  • See Crisis Services by Oregon County and a list of crisis lines on OHA’s website.
  • The Safe + Strong website and helpline operate 24/7 (1-800-923-4357). Safe + Strong is designed to support people who are facing challenges related to COVID-19 or other life stressors. Use the website as a tool to help make sense of what you’re going through and to learn more about what resources and support can help you, your loved ones, and the communities you live and work in.

Oregon employers, workers invited to take a 'Safety Break' May 12
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 03/04/21 1:34 PM
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Salem – Committing to workplace health and safety is no small task. New hazards and challenges arise – sometimes unexpectedly. Stepping back to re-assess how far you’ve come and how far you still need to go can be difficult during the daily thrum of work.

Yet, it is essential. That is why Oregon OSHA encourages employers and workers across the state to take part in Safety Break for Oregon. The annual event – now in its 18th year – calls on employers and workers at a variety of worksites to pause and reflect on  the importance of protecting people from hazards and harm while on the job.

Will you take the Wednesday, May 12, stand-down as an opportunity to refresh your knowledge and training? Will you conduct  a clear-eyed examination of where safety and health could be improved at your worksite?  Or will you celebrate your successes and recognize emerging safety leaders?

The choice of activity is yours. Sign up now. You could even win a prize.

“This stand-down provides an opportunity for employers and workers to remember the high value they should place on preventing injury and illness in the workplace,” said Michael Wood, administrator of Oregon OSHA. “Safety Break for Oregon is not merely symbolic. At its best, it offers an opportunity to focus on the best ways to make safety a reality in the workplace by identifying and eliminating hazards.”

“And this year’s event takes on even greater importance,” Wood added, “when you consider our collective and ongoing project to keep Oregon workers safe – from workplace health and safety hazards of all kinds – during the global coronavirus pandemic.”

Oregon OSHA encourages employers and workers to share their Safety Break activities on social media:

  • Share what your worksite is doing by using #SafetyBreak and #OregonOSHA hashtags
  • Tag Oregon OSHA on Facebook at @OregonOSHA and at @OregonDCBS on Twitter
  • Check out what organizations have shared on social media during previous Safety Break events by using #TBT

Those who participate in Safety Break are expected to follow the appropriate guidance and rules related to COVID-19 in the workplace. Companies that sign up online by Friday, May 7, and participate in Safety Break for Oregon will be entered to win one of three $100 checks, to be used for a luncheon of their choice.

The prizes will go to participating companies as part of a random drawing. The Oregon SHARP Alliance sponsors the contest. The nonprofit group promotes safety and health management by encouraging teamwork and cooperation among people, employers, and organizations to improve workplace health and safety for Oregon workers.

For more information, ideas on how to host an event, or to download graphics, visit the Safety Break for Oregon website. Learn more about Oregon OSHA’s workplace guidance and resources related to COVID-19.

The division offers free consultation services for employers (no citations or fines), as well as technical specialists:

Consultation services – Provides free assistance with safety and health programs

   Technical staff – Helps employers understand requirements

 

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: Safety Break for Oregon logo

Oregon reports 392 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 03/04/21 1:21 PM

March 4, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 392 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 32 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 32 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,284, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 392 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 156,673.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 24,014 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 16,376 doses were administered on March 3 and 7,638 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on March 3.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 1,043,609 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,341,775 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 140, which is the same total from yesterday. There are 29 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (8), Clackamas (24), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (21), Crook (4), Curry (2), Deschutes (26), Douglas (23), Grant (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (37), Jefferson (10), Josephine (23), Klamath (7), Lake (4), Lane (18), Lincoln (1), Linn (8), Malheur (1), Marion (38), Morrow (1), Multnomah (52), Polk (6), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (18), Union (8), Wallowa (1), Washington (34) and Yamhill (6).

NOTE: Details from today’s reported deaths are being reviewed and will be posted in an updated version of this press release.

Tableau technical difficulties

Tableau engineers have resolved an issue that was preventing users from viewing and interacting with Tableau Public. Engineers are continuing to monitor the situation to ensure all services are operational. OHA appreciates your patience while this issue is fully resolved.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.

Two useful resources added today:

How adults 65 and older in the Portland metro area can find appointments at the Oregon Convention Center

Who can find a vaccine on the Vaccine Information Tool (chatbot)?


Western Oregon University Announces Intention for In-Person Fall Term
Western Oregon University - 03/04/21 12:24 PM
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MONMOUTH, Ore. – Western Oregon University looks forward to having the campus community Together Again for an in-person fall term following state safety protocols. WOU expects to offer an expanded range of course delivery options so that students can make the best choices for them.

 “We are all looking with renewed hope for fall term 2021 to be Together Again,” said WOU Provost Rob Winningham. “Though masks and social distancing will likely still be necessary, we expect WOU to have a robust offering of courses with an in-person component.”

Winningham said campus activities also should be closer to “normal,” with student and campus activities such as arts, co-curricular activities, intercollegiate athletics, music, theater and myriad other events organized with safety guidelines in place.

University Housing will configure residence halls to maximize capacity while also following COVID protocols, said Dean of Students Tina Fuchs. Dining establishments on campus are expected to operate much more extensively than they did during the 2020-21 academic year, when the number of students on campus was diminished.

Starting March 8, campus will be open for in-person admissions tours on an appointment-only basis, and the spring sports season gets under way in earnest this month.

The format for Commencement in June is still under discussion; an announcement is planned for the first week of spring term. Course modalities for summer term traditionally are largely online, and that remains the plan for summer 2021.

“We are so looking forward to welcoming students and employees to campus in the fall, or earlier if vaccine distribution and state guidance allows, and we appreciate the sense of hope we are all feeling after a difficult year,” said Winningham. “For those who are eager to return to campus, we’ll have a full offering of class and campus life options. For people who feel safer at home for a while longer, course formats will be available for them as well. And, as always, we are prepared to respond if safety protocols change in Oregon.”

To learn more about WOU this fall, visit https://wou.edu/fall-2021.

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving approximately 4,500 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with nearly 75 percent of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.

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Attached Media Files: 2021-03/1107/142989/3.png

Updated: Oregon reports 276 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 27 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 03/04/21 10:33 AM

March 3, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Updated: Oregon reports 276 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 27 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 27 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,252, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 276 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 156,287.

Note: A large volume of backlogged electronic laboratory reports (ELRs) were received yesterday. As a result, today’s test counts are higher than anticipated. Test results were from Jan. 1 to March 1. Approximately 99% of these test results were negative results and today's percent positivity is lower than anticipated.

Oregon hits milestone: 1 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine administered

Today, OHA recorded more than 1 million vaccines administered to Oregonians. There were 22,346 doses recorded yesterday, bringing the total number of doses administered in the state to 1,019,767. The first dose was administered on Dec. 14, less than three months ago.

Approximately, one in five Oregonians who likely are eligible have received at least one dose. The vaccine has been delivered to every Oregon county, long-term care and residential care facilities, adult foster homes, group homes for those with disabilities, hospitals, mass vaccination events, mobile events, clinics, Tribal health centers, group homes, congregate care settings, pharmacies, outpatient clinics, federally qualified health centers and other locations throughout the state.

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 1,019,767 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,310,175 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

 “This could not happen without the partnerships that have been strengthened and developed to move Oregon closer to community immunity, and the thousands of providers, volunteers, nurses and countless other Oregonians who made this happen,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “Every day we are delivering more than 22,000 doses of vaccine that will bring us to the end of this difficult journey for so many.

“Our ability to meet our timelines for opening up scheduling opportunities to additional groups will still require an adequate and consistent supply of doses from the federal government, a large number of Oregonians who are able and willing to get vaccinated and the ability of our vaccination sites to immunize all eligible persons.”

As Oregon continues the vaccine rollout, OHA encourages all Oregonians to keep taking the protective measures to help keep themselves, families, coworkers, loved ones, friends and communities safe and healthy. We continue to recommend that all Oregonians:

  • Maintain 6 feet of physical distance;
  • Wear a face covering when outside the house;
  • Practice good hand hygiene;
  • Avoid any gatherings with non-household members;
  • If you start to have symptoms — even mild ones — consult with a medical provider quickly to get instructions on how to care for yourself and your household members and to determine whether to get tested;
  • And finally, if you get a call from a local public health authority, answer it, and take their advice on how to protect yourself and those around you.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 140, which is nine fewer than yesterday. There are 31 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

Details of today’s reported deaths will be published later.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (3), Clackamas (20), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (24), Deschutes (10), Douglas (22), Grant (2), Harney (2), Jackson (47), Jefferson (5), Josephine (5), Klamath (2), Lane (15), Linn (4), Malheur (2), Marion (28), Multnomah (26), Polk (4), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (7), Union (10), Washington (25) and Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 2,226th COVID-19 death is a 101-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Feb. 9 and died on Feb. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,227th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Feb. 6 and died on Feb. 14 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,228th COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Feb. 6 and died on Feb. 12 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,229th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 22 and died on Feb. 21 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,230th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 22 and died on Feb. 10 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,231st COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 25 and died on Feb. 21 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,232nd COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 19 and died on Feb. 15 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,233rd COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 22 and died on Feb. 24 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,234th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 18 and died on Feb. 28 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,235th COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 22 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,236th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 27 and died on Feb. 14 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,237th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 25 and died on Feb. 10 at Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,238th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 11 and died on Feb. 12 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,239th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 20 and died on Jan. 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,240th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on Feb. 11 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,241st COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 5 and died on Feb. 22 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,242nd COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 3 and died on Feb. 24 at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,243rd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on Feb. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,244th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Benton County who tested positive on Jan. 17 and died on Feb. 18 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,245th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 8 and died on Feb. 14 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,246th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Yamhill County who tested positive on Dec. 29 and died on Feb. 19 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,247th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Dec. 29 and died on Feb. 17 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,248th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Yamhill County who tested positive on Jan. 24 and died on Feb. 14 at her residence. He  had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,249th COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Wallowa County who tested positive on Jan. 25 and died on March 2 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,250th COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 18 and died on March 1 at Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,251st COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Feb. 13 and died on Feb. 23 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,252nd COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Polk County who tested positive on Jan. 20 and died on Jan. 30 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


Seek Assistance Filing Taxes to Claim Important Tax Credit
Umpqua Bank - 03/04/21 10:28 AM

Umpqua Bank employee volunteers are among those providing free tax preparation assistance

Millions of dollars go unclaimed each year during tax season. This year, more than ever, filing taxes can put money back into pockets of those who need it most.

Among the IRS-certified volunteers providing assistance, Umpqua Bank employee volunteers contribute more than 200 hours annually to assist nonprofit organizations with free tax preparation for low-income residents to help them claim important federal tax credits, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit. Similar state tax credits may also be claimed.

The Earned Income Tax Credit, which may give families up to $6,660 back when they file taxes, is a federal and state tax credit for people making up to $56,844 per year. Too many miss out because they simply do not know about it. Check eligibility requirements for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and other credits, which can still be claimed going back to 2017.

“Only three out of four eligible Oregonians claim the tax credits for which they are eligible, according to CASH Oregon,” said Brenden Butler, Umpqua Bank vice president and community development officer. “Umpqua Bank employees are committed this year, as we are every year, to help return as many tax credits as possible back into the community.”

"MFS CASH Oregon is dedicated to helping Oregonians access the Earned Income Tax Credit, and we're grateful to all our volunteers, including Umpqua Bank associates, for their ongoing commitments," Riley Eldredge, MFS CASH Oregon Program Manager.

Oregon and Washington locations to seek free tax assistance include MFS CASH Oregon, NeighborWorks Umpqua’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA), United Way of King County, United Way My Free Taxes, and AARP Foundation’s Tax-Aide. During the current tax season, advance appointments are required and most assistance will be conducted remotely.

Pre-pandemic, Umpqua Bank began ramping up its virtual volunteering infrastructure as part of its human-digital strategy, expanding upon the Bank’s long-standing employee volunteer program. Since 2004, Umpqua Bank associates have served more than 550,000 volunteer hours.

The bank’s Connect Volunteer Network allocates each employee 40 hours of paid volunteer time off annually, and the bank also has an employee giving match program. For more information on the EITC, visit https://www.eitc.irs.gov/. For tools to help file your return for free online or seek assistance, visit www.cashoregon.org.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 223 - Polk County
Oregon State Police - 03/04/21 7:05 AM

On Wednesday, March 3, 2021 at approximately 7:44 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Hwy 223 and Pleasant Drive in Dallas.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a pedestrian, Chloe Blatchley (77) of Dallas, was crossing Hwy 223 when she was struck by a Landrover, operated by Curtis Cook (72) of Dallas.

Blatchley sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Polk County Sheriff's Office, ODOT and Dallas Fire Department.

 


COVID-19 special enrollment period offers health coverage to eligible Oregonians: HealthCare.gov is open until May 15 to enroll in health coverage (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 03/04/21 4:00 AM
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(Salem) – Feb. 15 was the first day of a new special enrollment period triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic. This limited-time window, which runs through May 15, has allowed nearly 2,000 additional Oregonians to enroll in health coverage outside the standard open enrollment period in the month of February, up 34 percent from the same time in 2020.

Traditionally, people in Oregon who qualify to shop through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace must do so during the annual open enrollment period, Nov. 1 to Dec. 15. If an individual or family experiences significant change during the year to to their household, income, or job status, they may qualify for a 60-day special enrollment period.

The 2021 COVID-19 special enrollment period does not have any special qualifiers, other than qualifying for a health plan through the Marketplace. To qualify for a Marketplace plan, people must live in the United States, be legally present in the United States (except Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals status), and not be incarcerated.

In 2020, more than 70 percent of Oregonians who chose plans through HealthCare.gov got an average of $450 per month in advanced premium tax credits to help lower their monthly premiums. Individuals making $51,040 or less per year, and families of four making $104,800 or less, may get help paying for coverage. People can also browse plans and find out how much savings they are eligible for at OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop.

Oregonians who do not get health insurance through their job or a program such as the Oregon Health Plan or Medicare may qualify for help paying for 2021 coverage through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. Even if people are temporarily uninsured or are currently enrolled in COBRA coverage, they can sign up for help before May 15 to get health insurance for the rest of 2021.

“We are encouraged to see so many Oregonians taking advantage of this enrollment opportunity,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “Quality health coverage protects your financial future in the event that you get sick, injured, or something else unforeseen happens.”

To apply, go to OregonHealthCare.gov by May 15 and answer a few Oregon-specific questions to get to the right application. You can also search the “get help” directory on OregonHealthCare.gov to find an insurance agent or community partner organization to help complete the application and enroll. Insurance agents and community partners provide local, one-on-one assistance at no charge to the client. This help is available virtually and over the phone, and in person following safety protocols.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2021-03/1073/142968/OHIM_logo-center_text.png

Wed. 03/03/21
Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - March 3, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 03/03/21 5:29 PM
2021-03/3986/142969/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png
2021-03/3986/142969/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png
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The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for March 3, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

Photo Captions:

Example of an emergency kit from the American Red Cross. The Red Cross Cascades Region is offering free virtual preparedness training through March.  Photo courtesy American Red Cross Cascades Region.

OEM Oregon Rising Stronger Together Logo: The Oregon Office of Emergency Management Wildfire Recovery Logo.




Attached Media Files: 2021-03/3986/142969/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png , 2021-03/3986/142969/Red_Cross_Emergency_Kit.png

Weekly COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, deaths rise
Oregon Health Authority - 03/03/21 4:12 PM

March 3, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Weekly COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, deaths rise

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows increases in daily cases, hospitalizations and deaths from the previous week.

OHA reported 2,652 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Feb. 22 through Sunday, Feb. 28 — a 17% increase from the previous week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations also rose to 164, up from 159 the previous week.

Reported COVID-19 related deaths also increased to 57, up from 17 last week. That represents the lowest total since mid-November.

There were 120,678 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Feb. 21 through Feb. 27, a sharp increase from the previous week. The previous week’s total was most likely affected by the inclement winter weather event that took place throughout the region.

Roughly 117,000 tests were administered on a weekly basis earlier this year. The percentage of positive tests was 3.7%.

People 70 years of age and older have accounted for 40% of COVID-19 associated hospitalizations and 77% of COVID-19 associated deaths.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 56 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.


Grants Pass has most new Firewise neighborhoods of any city in the state, adding to efforts to lower wildfire risk
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 03/03/21 11:20 AM
Five neighborhoods in the Grants Pass area have become the latest Firewise communities in Oregon to take steps to reduce wildfire risk. Actions can include many things, including clearing excess woody debris, such as in this photo showing firefighter trai
Five neighborhoods in the Grants Pass area have become the latest Firewise communities in Oregon to take steps to reduce wildfire risk. Actions can include many things, including clearing excess woody debris, such as in this photo showing firefighter trai
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-03/1072/142957/thumb_IMG_7330.JPG

SALEM, Ore. – Five neighborhoods in and around Grants Pass joined the national Firewise program last year - the most of any single city in Oregon. The neighborhoods were among 182 communities across the state that conducted a variety of projects from cutting brush to thinning overcrowded stands of trees, to clearing brush away from evacuation routes and promoting education and outreach. This places Oregon in second place nationally for number of Firewise communities. The Oregon Department of Forestry manages the program in Oregon.

The new Firewise communities are:

  • Ashland – Glenn Vista Estates and Mill Pond Homeowners Association
  • Bend – Boonesborough POA, Mountain High, Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village and Wyndemere
  • Canyon City – Canyon Creek Lane
  • Central Point – Jackson Oaks Neighborhood Association
  • Culver – Forest Park Estates – Grandview
  • Glendale – Old Booth Lane - Harrel Lane
  • Grants Pass – Birdseye Creek, Board Shanty, Hugo/Hidden Pine Drive and Woodson Drive
  • Jacksonville – Timber Ridge Homeowners Association
  • Mill City – Dogwood Road
  • Oakridge – Greater Oakridge-Westfir
  • Portland – Linnton
  • Shady Cove – Deerfield Park 1 and 2
  • Sisters - Indian Ford Meadows East and Trout Creek Village
  • Springfield – Wallace Creek
  • West Linn – Skyline Ridge Neighborhood

The Oregon Department of Forestry’s National Fire Plan Coordinator, Jenna Trentadue, who manages the Firewise program in Oregon said, “Staff in our local ODF offices partner with fire departments to work with communities across the state to organize projects or activities that reduce wildfire risk. Through this process, those communities become designated as Firewise.”

To achieve the designation, communities must have at least eight participating dwelling units and conduct at least one event or activity related to reducing fire risk. Firewise is a nationwide program of the National Fire Protection Association.

                                                                # # #




Attached Media Files: Five neighborhoods in the Grants Pass area have become the latest Firewise communities in Oregon to take steps to reduce wildfire risk. Actions can include many things, including clearing excess woody debris, such as in this photo showing firefighter trai

Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board to Meet
State of Oregon - 03/03/21 10:21 AM

Salem, OR- The Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board (EPAB) will meet at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, March 10, 2021. The meeting will take place remotely via the internet on Microsoft Teams and is open to the public.

This is a special EPAB meeting to address agenda items that are deemed time sensitive. The agenda and handouts will be posted on the advisory boards’ website: (https://www.oregon.gov/epab/Pages/Meeting-Documents.aspx)

What:        Meeting of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board 

When:       Wednesday March 10, 2021, 9 a.m. – 11 a.m.

Where:      Microsoft Teams (Click here to join the meeting) Call Toll free: 1-503-446-4951 | Participant pin code: 45126-7837#

Who:         Members of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board 

The Legislature established the advisory board with enactment of ORS 276A.270-276. The board will advise the State Chief Information Officer (CIO) on key decisions and strategic choices about how the state CIO manages and operates the state’s web portal services.

The Oregon.gov portal is the connection point for citizens to access state agency services and information on the internet. The board provides oversight to specific websites, services and online payments where agencies choose to utilize the State Chief Information Officer’s E-Government Program as their service provider.

With the board’s advice, the state CIO wants to make the Oregon web portal services and their operation as effective as they can be for Oregonians to interact with state government. 


Southwest Oregon has more new Firewise communities than any other part of the state, adding to efforts to lower wildfire risk (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 03/03/21 7:30 AM
Southwest Oregon had the most new Firewise communities of any region in Oregon last year. Firewise communities conduct yearly projects to reduce wildfire risk, such as these firefighters are doing by burning a pile of excess woody debris.
Southwest Oregon had the most new Firewise communities of any region in Oregon last year. Firewise communities conduct yearly projects to reduce wildfire risk, such as these firefighters are doing by burning a pile of excess woody debris.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-03/1072/142943/thumb_IMG_7330.JPG

SALEM, Ore. – Five neighborhoods in Ashland, Central Point, Jacksonville and Shady Cove joined the national Firewise program last year - the most of any region in Oregon. The neighborhoods were among 182 communities across the state that conducted a variety of projects from cutting brush to thinning overcrowded stands of trees, to clearing brush away from evacuation routes and promoting education and outreach. This places Oregon in second place nationally for number of Firewise communities. The Oregon Department of Forestry manages the program in Oregon.

The new Firewise communities are:

  • Ashland – Glenn Vista Estates and Mill Pond Homeowners Association
  • Bend – Boonesborough POA, Mountain High, Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village and Wyndemere
  • Canyon City – Canyon Creek Lane
  • Central Point – Jackson Oaks Neighborhood Association
  • Culver – Forest Park Estates – Grandview
  • Glendale – Old Booth Lane - Harrel Lane
  • Grants Pass – Birdseye Cr., Board Shanty, Hugo/Hidden Pine Drive and Woodson Drive
  • Jacksonville – Timber Ridge Homeowners Association
  • Mill City – Dogwood Road
  • Oakridge – Greater Oakridge-Westfir
  • Portland – Linnton
  • Shady Cove – Deerfield Park 1 and 2
  • Sisters - Indian Ford Meadows East and Trout Creek Village
  • Springfield – Wallace Creek
  • West Linn – Skyline Ridge Neighborhood

The Oregon Department of Forestry’s National Fire Plan Coordinator, Jenna Trentadue, who manages the Firewise program in Oregon said, “Staff in our local ODF offices partner with fire departments to work with communities across the state to organize projects or activities that reduce wildfire risk. Through this process, those communities become designated as Firewise.”

To achieve the designation, communities must have at least eight participating dwelling units and conduct at least one event or activity related to reducing fire risk. Firewise is a nationwide program of the National Fire Protection Association.

                                                                                                         # # #




Attached Media Files: Southwest Oregon had the most new Firewise communities of any region in Oregon last year. Firewise communities conduct yearly projects to reduce wildfire risk, such as these firefighters are doing by burning a pile of excess woody debris.

Tue. 03/02/21
DEA Releases 2020 National Drug Threat Assessment - The Pacific Northwest is Flooded with Fentanyl by the CJNG Cartel
DEA Seattle - 03/02/21 2:30 PM

SEATTLE– DEA Acting Administrator D. Christopher Evans today announced the release of the 2020 National Drug Threat Assessment, DEA’s annual publication outlining the threats posed to the United States by domestic and international drug trafficking and the abuse of illicit drugs.

“This year’s report shows the harsh reality of the drug threats facing communities across the United States,” said Acting Administrator Evans. “While the COVID-19 pandemic plagues this nation, so, too, do transnational criminal organizations and violent street gangs, adjusting to pandemic restrictions to flood our communities with dangerous drugs. DEA and our local, state, and federal partners continue to adapt to the ever changing landscape, remaining focused on the current threats and looking to the horizon for emerging threats. We will always defend the American people against illicit substances that ruin lives, devastate families, and destroy communities.”

DEA Special Agent in Charge Frank Tarentino said, “The DEA Seattle Field Division, which includes the Pacific North West states of Idaho, Oregon, Washington and Alaska is primarily focused on the opioid threat, more specifically the illicit manufactured fentanyl that many drug trafficking and transnational criminal organizations are smuggling into our communities and selling to our citizens with dire consequences.” 

Drugs trends in the United States continue to evolve. While fentanyl and fentanyl analogues from China have decreased substantially following the DEA’s 2018 emergency scheduling action of fentanyl related substances and China’s enactment of fentanyl-class controls in May 2019, the opioid threat remains at epidemic levels, affecting large portions of the country. Meanwhile, the stimulant threat, including methamphetamine and cocaine, is worsening both in volume and reach, with traffickers selling increasing amounts outside of traditional markets.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 83,000 people lost their lives to drug-related overdoses in the twelve-month period ending in July of 2020, a significant increase from 2019, when more than 70,000 people died of overdoses.       

2020 NDTA findings of note:

·Mexican Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) remain the greatest criminal drug threat in the United States.

·Illicit fentanyl is one of the primary drugs fueling the epidemic of overdose deaths in the United States, while heroin and prescription opioids remain significant challenges to public health and law enforcement.

·Mexican cartels are increasingly responsible for producing and supplying fentanyl to the U.S. market. China remains a key source of supply for the precursor chemicals that Mexican cartels use to produce the large amounts of fentanyl they are smuggling into the United States.  

·Drug-poisoning deaths and seizures involving methamphetamine have risen sharply as Mexican TCOs increase the drug’s availability and expand the domestic market.

·Constraints associated with the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic – daily travel restrictions, U.S. border closings, closure of nonessential businesses, and broad shelter-in-place orders – temporarily posed new challenges to criminal organizations’ movement of drugs during the first half of 2020. 

The Pacific Northwest of the United States is under siege by the Mexican based Cartel de Jalisco Nueva Generacion (CJNG) cartel who is flooding the region with clandestine produced synthetic opioids in the form of prescriptions pills.  This transnational criminal organization (TCO) is taking advantage of the readily available and extremely dangerous, in fact lethal, synesthetic opioid; Fentanyl. These transnational criminal organizations, specifically CJNG are mixing illegally and clandestinely made fentanyl into most illicit narcotics, to include cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine and pills, resulting in a significant increase in non-fatal and fatal overdose deaths.  

The National Drug Threat Assessment provides a yearly assessment of the challenges communities face related to drug abuse and drug trafficking. Highlights in the report include usage and trafficking trends for drugs such as prescription drugs, heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and hundreds of synthetic drugs. New to this year’s report is the effect of COVID-19 during the first part of 2020.

The assessment gathers information from many data sources such as drug investigations and seizures, drug purity, laboratory analysis, information on transnational and domestic criminal groups, and U.S. government drug cultivation and production estimates.

The National Drug Threat Assessment is available at www.dea.gov/documents/2021/03/02/2020-national-drug-threat-assessment.

 

 


Oregon reports 269 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 03/02/21 2:14 PM

March 2, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 269 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 13 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,225, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 269 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 156,037.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 10,911 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 3,894 doses were administered on March 1 and 7,017 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on March 1.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 997,448 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,244,505 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 149, which is 17 more than yesterday. There are 29 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

First case of P.1 variant detected in Oregon

OHA was notified yesterday that a person in Oregon, identified as a Douglas County resident, has tested positive with the variant COVID-19 virus strain originally detected in Brazil.

This is the first identification in Oregon of the Brazil variant strain, also called strain P.1. The individual has known travel history prior to testing positive. The individual has worked closely with the local health department and has followed public health recommendations for self-isolating.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (3), Clackamas (20), Columbia (2), Coos (3), Crook (1), Deschutes (6), Douglas (20), Gilliam (1), Harney (2), Jackson (44), Jefferson (2), Josephine (20), Klamath (5), Lake (2), Lane (24), Lincoln (3), Linn (6), Marion (26), Morrow (1), Multnomah (28), Polk (4), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (11), Union (1), Washington (23) and Yamhill (6).  

Oregon’s 2,213th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Baker County who tested positive on Feb. 24 and died on Feb. 26 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,214th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Baker County who tested positive on Feb. 24 and died on Feb. 26 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,215th COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 25 and died on Feb. 16 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,216th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Feb. 19 and died on Feb. 28 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,217th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Jan. 23 and died on Feb. 16 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,218th COVID-19 death is a 27-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 26 and died on Feb. 19 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,219th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Feb. 19 and died on Feb. 28 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,220th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Jan. 12 and died on Feb. 26 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,221st COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 6 and died on Feb. 14 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,222nd COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 8 and died on Feb. 10 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,223rd COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 29 and died on Feb. 19 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,224th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Yamhill County who tested positive on Jan. 25 and died on Feb. 9 at his residence. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,225th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on Feb. 19 and died on Feb. 28 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


One-on-one assistance coming to communities hard hit by September wildfires
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 03/02/21 12:29 PM
Oregon Department of Human Services
Oregon Department of Human Services
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-03/3986/142934/thumb_ODHS.jpg

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) has been awarded a $6.3 million grant by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for a disaster case management program.

This disaster case management program provides funding and technical assistance to ensure holistic services to each impacted Oregonian. The program will offer a single point of contact to coordinate a variety of services to assist in addressing the unmet disaster-related needs of September 2020 wildfire survivors.

Disaster case managers work with survivors to identify their unique needs and help coordinate services with federal, state and local programs, including services provided through voluntary and charitable organizations and long-term recovery groups in local communities.

“Thousands of Oregonians’ lives remain disrupted from the devastating wildfires of September 2020. Case managers are essential to identify barriers faced by individuals. They can help connect survivors with services and resources to support them on the path to full recovery,” said ODHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht.

“In our work with survivors and local agencies, it is clear those survivors have struggled to find resources and information about available supports, including shelter, housing resources, food, and other basic necessities,” said Ed Flick, director of the ODHS emergency management unit.

“These services are unique to each individual,” Flick said. “Based on what we’ve seen with current survivors and from disasters in other states, disaster case managers can help people with document recovery and navigating the eligibility and appeals process for FEMA programs; finding interim and permanent housing along with household supplies and furniture; and accessing counseling and job search support.”

Disaster case management will be open to all Oregon residents impacted by the wildfire disaster, regardless of whether they are registered with FEMA.

ODHS is seeking a not-for-profit provider to carry out the disaster case management program. A request for proposal will be published in March with selection of a vendor soon thereafter.

About ODHS’s role: Oregon’s emergency and recovery plans give ODHS responsibility to support impacted Oregonians during emergencies and recovery, in keeping with the agency’s primary role to assist people in meeting their basic needs while moving toward independence. ODHS is responsible for supporting the sheltering, feeding, emergency assistance, and human services needs of people impacted by disasters. In this role, ODHS coordinates efforts among local and Tribal governments, and nongovernmental organizations.




Attached Media Files: Spanish - One-on-one assistance to communities hard hit by September wildfires , Oregon Department of Human Services

Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council meets March 12
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 03/02/21 12:07 PM

The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. March 12 via web conference. The meeting includes a discussion of plans to recognize the 50th anniversary of the Oregon Recreation Trails System Act.

The meeting is open to the public and will include opportunity for public comment. The agenda and link for the meeting is posted on the ORTAC website at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/BWT/Documents/ORTAC-agenda-March-2021.pdf.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

The council is made up of seven volunteer members representing the five congressional districts and two coastal representatives. Members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. For more information about ORTAC, visit https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/BWT/Pages/BWT-ortac.aspx

For more information, contact Program Coordinator Jodi Bellefeuille at 503-856-6316 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov.


Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 03/02/21 12:00 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wednesday, March 3, 2021, at 1 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on the federal Continued Assistance Act (CAA) that extends and provides additional federal unemployment benefits, new PUA eligibility, economic and workforce-related trends and more on Wednesday, March 3 at 1 p.m. PT.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PT on March 3. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for weekday updates. A recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters attending the briefing after the briefing concludes.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-03/930/142920/03.03.21_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

Oregon Historical Society's Museum Reopens Saturday, March 6, with Limited Weekend Hours
Oregon Historical Society - 03/02/21 10:51 AM
Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography
Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-03/2861/142929/thumb_Nevertheless_She_Persisted-Andrea_Lonas_Photography-298.jpg

Portland, OR — The Oregon Historical Society (OHS) is excited to announce the reopening of its museum and museum store this Saturday, March 6. Until further notice, public museum and store hours will be Saturdays and Sundays from 12pm – 5pm. The museum will also have special hours during the week of Oregon’s spring break, opening from Tuesday, March 23 through Sunday, March 28, from 12pm – 5pm.

The OHS Research Library remains closed for renovations that began in January 2020. More information on library services that are available during the renovation can be found at ohs.org/libraryreno.

Following the guidance and requirements of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for indoor entertainment establishments, the Oregon Historical Society has implemented important safety protocols for the health of our staff and visitors. Current protocols are detailed at the bottom of this press release as well as at ohs.org/reopening.

Current Exhibitions:

Nevertheless, They Persisted: Women’s Voting Rights and the 19th Amendment
On exhibit through December 5, 2021

Discover the many ways that Oregon history connects to the national history of woman suffrage and to the complex history of democracy in the United States in the original exhibition, Nevertheless, They Persisted. The exhibit focuses on the work necessary to win the 1920 ratification of the 19th Amendment (granting women the vote) as well as invites visitors to consider how and why political leaders have denied women the vote; how women have fought for equal rights; and how teamwork and fights across race, class, and organizing tactics have shaped this history. Through storytelling and original artifacts and documents, visitors will connect to the past and feel the struggles and triumphs of the women and men who demanded the vote and used their rights to shape our nation and our world.

We are the Rose City! A History of Soccer in Portland
On exhibit through September 26, 2021

Attend a soccer game at Providence Park and you may hear people chanting, “We are the Rose City, the mighty PTFC!” Thousands of supporters flock to the park on match days to watch the Portland Timbers and the Portland Thorns take to the pitch, competing in a sport that is beloved by many in the Pacific Northwest. From the athletes, to the fans, to the many events that have shaped “Soccer City,” We are the Rose City! explores the history of professional soccer in Portland and the cultural context of the game.

Experience Oregon
Permanent Exhibit

Visitors of all ages, and from all parts of the world, come to the Oregon Historical Society each year to learn about Oregon. Whether you were born here, have chosen to make this place home, or are just passing through, it is undeniable that there is something special about this state. From its varied geography to its innovative legislation, Oregon is complex and distinctive, filled with people whose stories are the foundation of the state we see today. A dynamic educational space, Experience Oregon allows visitors to learn about the countless people, places, and events that have shaped this place.

The Oregon Historical Society is excited to reopen its museum to share these exhibitions with visitors, while continuing its efforts to provide programs and content virtually for those who are not able to visit in person. For a full schedule of upcoming virtual programs, visit ohs.org/events. For other ways to discover Oregon history online, visit the OHS blog Dear Oregon for weekly blog posts; explore over 33,000 photographs, manuscripts, and clips of archival footage on OHS Digital Collections; and learn about Oregon history from A to Z on The Oregon Encyclopedia!

Current Health and Safety Protocols

The Oregon Historical Society thanks visitors in advance for adhering to the following guidelines in an effort to keep staff and visitors as safe as possible: 

Wear A Face Covering: Pursuant to the statewide reopening guidance on masks, face coverings, and face shields, all visitors age five and older are required to wear a face covering at all times during their visit. 

Maintain Distance: Signage throughout the museum will remind visitors to keep six feet of distance between themselves and visitors outside of their party.

Modified Exhibit Access: For visitor safety, only a limited number of interactive elements in the Experience Oregon and Oregon Voices exhibits that visitors can operate using a stylus pen will be available. OHS’s History Hub exhibit is closed until further notice due to the hands-on nature of this exhibition. 

Other Safety Precautions Include:

  • Additional hand sanitizing stations installed at the museum’s entrance and throughout the building
  • Plexiglass sneeze guards installed at point of sale stations
  • Designated one-way paths to maintain required distancing as visitors enter, exit, and enjoy the exhibitions
  • Limited contact transactions; at this time, OHS discourages cash/check transactions
  • At this time, building capacity is limited to a maximum of 50 people (includes staff and visitors) in the museum at one time
  • Museum Store capacity is limited to four shoppers at one time


Museum and museum store hours are subject to change; OHS recommends visiting ohs.org/reopening before visiting or calling 503.222.1741. Please note that while OHS’s visitor services staff are not on site during weekdays they are checking voicemails and returning calls remotely.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography , Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography , Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography , Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography , Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography , Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography , Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography , Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography , Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography , Courtesy Andrea Lonas Photography

Oregon OSHA proposes requirements to address COVID-19 risks in employer-provided housing
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 03/02/21 10:07 AM
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(Salem) – Oregon OSHA is proposing to extend protective measures against COVID-19 for workers who rely on housing provided by employers, including as part of farming operations. The risk-reducing measures – which include new options and updates – cover everything from physical distancing and ventilation to face coverings and sanitation.

The proposed permanent rule will receive three virtual public hearings later this month and a comment period through April 16. Oregon OSHA expects to repeal the rule once it is no longer needed to address the coronavirus pandemic in the context of labor housing.

“While there is good news on the horizon, the public health challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic remain a significant concern in Oregon. In the labor housing environment, addressing an airborne disease poses unique challenges,” said Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “We believe this proposed rule addresses those challenges by protecting vulnerable workers – especially those who spend both their work and off-work hours at the employer’s location. But it also strikes a balance based on the current economic realities.”

The proposed rule would replace the current labor-housing requirements established through Gov. Kate Brown’s executive order, issued in October 2020. That order lasts through April 30, 2021. It effectively maintained COVID-19 safety measures that Oregon OSHA adopted on a temporary basis in April 2020, which otherwise expired Oct. 24, 2020.

While largely similar to the previous requirements, the proposed rule includes new options and updates. The changes reflect experiences under the previous safety measures. They also speak to the evolving nature of COVID-19 risks.

The proposed requirements include:

Ventilation

  • Ensuring that existing ventilation systems are optimized according to the requirements of Oregon OSHA’s current temporary rule addressing COVID-19 in all workplaces. The purchase or installation of new ventilation systems is not required. 
  • Increasing air circulation and ventilation by opening windows and doors in labor housing when doing so is safe for occupants.

Masks, face coverings, and face shields

  • Ensuring all people entering the housing – including all common areas – follow the Oregon Health Authority’s statewide guidance regarding masks, face coverings, and face shields. Exceptions include when people are eating or drinking; sleeping in their bed or cot; staying in housing occupied solely by members of the same family or household; and children younger than 5 years old.
  • Ensuring all occupants of labor housing have access to adequate face coverings – and enough face coverings to enable employees to “double mask” – at no cost to the occupants.

Physical distancing

  • Designing housing operations to allow six feet of physical distancing whenever possible.
  • Appointing one or more distancing monitors to ensure safety measures are carried out.
  • Allowing bunkbeds only for members of the same pre-existing household and relaxing certain density and distancing requirements if the only affected occupants are part of the same household. Previous requirements included similar provisions, but they were based on whether the people were related.
  • Providing two options for sleeping areas. One allows somewhat greater density than previous requirements, while the other requires still lower density – depending on whether employers choose to use air purifiers.

Cleaning and sanitation

  • Cleaning or sanitizing regularly all common areas, shared equipment, and high-touch surfaces.
  • Reducing the frequency of cleanings of common-use areas (such as chemical or plumbed toilets) from two or three times daily – required under previous measures – to once daily.
  • Ensuring cleaning materials are provided at no cost to occupants to use in their individual living areas.
  • Returning to the requirement to provide one toilet for every 15 occupants. Previous measures mandated one toilet for every 10 occupants.

Similar to previous requirements, the proposed rule also spells out steps to take when there are suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases.

The rule’s development included input from advisory committees. Also, the division received comments on a petition that was filed in response to the temporary requirements extended by the governor’s executive order.

Oregon OSHA encourages a careful reading of the proposed rule regarding COVID-19 and labor housing. Virtual public hearings will be held at 5 p.m. Thursday, March 25; 10 a.m. Friday, March 26; and 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 30. Details on how to sign up for the hearings – as well as other options for commenting on the proposed rule – are now available. The comment period will close Friday, April 16.

Meanwhile, the division continues to take public comments on its proposed permanent rule extending protections against COVID-19 in all workplaces. Learn more about the division’s workplace guidance and resources related to COVID-19: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/re/covid-19.aspx

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.  

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Robbery at Gunpoint
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 03/02/21 9:20 AM

On March 2, 2021 at approximately 2:22 AM, Grants Pass Police responded to the 700 block of SW Ramsey Avenue regarding a robbery at gunpoint. Upon arrival, officers learned a white male adult had held a female employee at gunpoint while she was in the business parking lot. The suspect took property from the victim before fleeing the area on foot. Following an extensive search, officers were unable to locate the suspect.

Anyone having information that could assist with this ongoing investigation is asked to contact the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety at 541-450-6260.


Search Warrant, Arrests Made in Multiple Burglary Cases (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 03/02/21 9:06 AM
Lanier
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DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - Several thousand dollars in stolen property was recovered by deputies on Thursday during the execution of a search warrant and a subsequent investigation.  
 
Deputies began receiving reports of stolen property from businesses and residences in southern Douglas County. 
 
Deputies developed a case which lead to the application and issuance of a search warrant for a residence in the 200 block of Alameda. 
 
On Wednesday, February 24, 2021, at approximately 11:00 a.m., deputies served the warrant. As a result of the warrant and investigation Douglas Lanier, Gabriel Goodwin, Brian Garrison, Charlene Stevers, Kelle Evans were taken into custody and charged with crimes relating to the investigation.
 
Deputies also located evidence of the crimes and stolen property from several businesses including Seven Feathers, Les Schwab, South Umpqua School District, Cullett’s Towing as well as several local residents.
 
Deputies followed up on information obtained during the execution of the warrant and conducted follow up at subsequent locations where additional stolen property was located. Additionally, a substantial amount of heroin was seized. 
 
The following were arrested and lodged in the Douglas County Jail: 

  • Douglas Lanier - Multiple Burglaries, Unlawful Entry into Motor Vehicle, Trespass, Theft 1, Theft by Receiving
  • Gabriel Goodwin - Multiple Burglaries, Unlawful Entry into Motor Vehicle, Trespass, Theft 1, Theft by Receiving
  • Brian Garrison - Trespass, Theft 1, Theft of Services 1
  • Charlene Stever - Theft 1 Conspiracy, Theft 1, Theft of Services 1, Criminal Trespass II
  • Kelle Evans - Unlawful Delivery of Heroin

Additional arrests and charges may be pending. 




Attached Media Files: Lanier , Goodwin , Garrison , Stever

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against COVID-19 Good Samaritan Frauds (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 03/02/21 9:00 AM
TT - C19 Good Samaritans - GRAPHIC
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against fake Good Samaritans. 

Thanks to COVID, many families are having trouble keeping food on the table and paying their bills. Of course, this means that scam artists will try to take advantage of what is already a desperate situation. 

The Oregon FBI is getting reports that people are seeing – and responding to – offers of assistance on social media platforms and elsewhere. The Good Samaritan is offering to send a few hundred – or even a few thousand dollars – in your time of need. 

In one version of the scam, the fraudster sends you a cashier’s check. The supposed benefactor may ask you to forward some of the money on to a third person (which is usually back to him) or he may tell you that he accidentally sent you too much and ask you to return some of it. 

In another version of the scam, he sends you funds by Zelle or some other cash app. He manages to gain access to your bank account and transfers money to himself instead of to you. 

Here’s how to protect yourself: 

  • Look for established, reputable charities to help you and your family. 

  • Be suspicious of people or groups offering help through social media. Do research to ensure the person or group is legitimate before accepting any funds. 

  • If you are unsure whether a check is real, check with your bank before depositing. 

  • Don’t forward money to a third party. The scammer may be using you to launder funds or act as a money mule – both of which can get you in trouble legally. 

If you believe are a victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - C19 Good Samaritans - AUDIO - March 2, 2021 , TT - C19 Good Samaritans - GRAPHIC

Red Cross Cascades Region offering free virtual preparedness classes to encourage everyone to prepare for disasters (Photo)
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 03/02/21 8:00 AM
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PORTLAND, Ore. - The devastating winter storms our region just experienced, and this past summer’s wildfires, serve as a painful reminder that disasters can happen to anyone, anywhere, anytime – even during a pandemic.  

So, in honor of March being Red Cross Month, the Red Cross Cascades Region is hosting a series of free emergency preparedness presentations throughout the month. All presentations are virtual, and everyone is welcome to attend. Red Cross volunteers are available for virtual media interviews today.

How to prepare for emergencies:  

Starting today and taking place every Tuesday in March from 6 p.m. – 7 p.m., classes will cover the most common disasters we face in the Pacific Northwest and how to prepare for them. Whether you’re motivated to start building your preparedness kit, or need a refresher course, these classes are designed to help families and individuals learn how to be better prepared. Information and links can be found at redcross.org/cascades.  

  • March 2nd: Winter Storm Safety 
  • March 9th: Wildfire Safety 
  • March 16th: Earthquake Safety 
  • March 23rd: Flooding Safety 
  • March 30th: Home Fire Safety 

We recognize that preparing for emergencies looks a little different right now, but the three basic action steps remain the same: Build a Kit, Make a Plan and Be Informed. In addition to the preparedness series, the Red Cross Cascades Region has a free downloadable Prepare! Guide available in four languages, EnglishSpanishVietnamese and Russian. Red Cross B-roll is available here.

WHAT IS RED CROSS MONTH For nearly 80 years, U.S. presidents have proclaimed March as Red Cross Month to recognize people giving back through its lifesaving mission — which is powered by more than 90% volunteers. 

They include people who volunteer to provide emotional support, psychological first aid and referrals to community assistance for families coping with disasters during the pandemic. 

HOW TO HELP You can help ensure that families don’t face emergencies alone — especially during a pandemic: 

  • DONATE: Support our Disaster Relief efforts at redcross.org/GivingDay. A gift of any size makes a difference to provide shelter, food, relief items, emotional support and other assistance. Your donation will be part of our annual Giving Day on March 24 to aid families in need across the country. 
  • VOLUNTEER: Visit redcross.org/VolunteerToday for most-needed positions and local opportunities. 
  • GIVE BLOOD: If you’re healthy and feeling well, make an appointment at RedCrossBlood.org. Your donation can make a lifesaving difference for a patient in need. As a thank you, those who come to give blood, platelets or plasma on March 15-26 will receive a Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last. 
  • LEARN LIFESAVING SKILLS: Take a class in skills like CPR and first aid to help in an emergency at redcross.org/TakeAClass. Online options include our Psychological First Aid for COVID-19 course, which covers how to manage stress and support yourself and others. 

About the American Red Cross: 

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/cascades or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc

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Attached Media Files: 2021-03/1190/142836/Virtual_Preparedness_Classes.png

Mon. 03/01/21
The DEA Announces 20th Take Back Day The Pacific Northwest prepares for April event on the heels of largest collection to-date
DEA Seattle - 03/01/21 6:27 PM

SEATTLE – With opioid overdose deaths increasing during the pandemic, the Drug Enforcement Administration announced its 20th Take Back Day scheduled for s://3">April 24, 2021.  At its last Take Back Day in October, DEA collected a record-high amount of expired, unused prescription medications, with the public turning in close to 500 tons of unwanted drugs. Over the 10-year span of Take Back Day, DEA has brought in more than 6,800 tons of prescription drugs. With studies indicating a majority of abused prescription drugs come from family and friends, including from home medicine cabinets, clearing out unused medicine is essential.

“The DEA Take Back is a safe, convenient, and responsible program to dispose of prescription drugs and keeping your family and our communities safe,” said DEA Special Agent in Charge Frank Tarentino.  “This initiative is more vital now than ever before due to the alarming spike in overdose deaths throughout our nation.  I hope to see record breaking participation this April, which will contribute to the safety of all our citizens and the communities.”

Last October, residents of Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington turned in an all-time record for the Pacific Northwest of 40,517 pounds at 150 collection sites. In addition, Alaska and Idaho had all-time record collections.  Collection numbers by state are as follows:

Alaska, 4,598 pounds at 16 collection sites.

Idaho, 10,526 pounds at 42 collection sites.

Oregon, 11,551 pounds at 45 collection sites.

Washington, 13,842 pounds at 56 collection sites.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. has seen an increase in overdose deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic, with 83,544 Americans overdosing during the 12-month period ending July 1, 2020, the most ever recorded in a 12-month period. The increase in drug overdose deaths appeared to begin prior to the COVID-19 health emergency, but accelerated significantly during the first months of the pandemic.

The public can drop off potentially dangerous prescription medications at collection sites which will adhere to local COVID-19 guidelines and regulations in order to maintain the safety of all participants and local law enforcement.

DEA and its partners will collect tablets, capsules, patches, and other solid forms of prescription drugs. Liquids (including intravenous solutions), syringes and other sharps, and illegal drugs will not be accepted. DEA will continue to accept vaping devices and cartridges at its drop off locations provided lithium batteries are removed.

Helping people dispose of potentially harmful prescription drugs is just one way DEA is working to reduce addiction and stem overdose deaths. 

Learn more about the event at www.deatakeback.com, or by calling 800-882-9539.

 


School Zone Safety Operation
Medford Police Dept. - 03/01/21 3:18 PM

            With students from kindergarten through 6th grade returning to the classrooms the Medford Police Department provided extra patrol in some school zones today with an emphasis on traffic safety and an education first approach.  It is the goal of the Medford Police Department to improve traffic safety through education and enforcement. During the morning of March 1st our Traffic Team and School Resource Officers issued 29 warnings for speed violations in various school zones in just 2 hours. There were 5 citations issued to drivers traveling at excessive speeds ranging from 17 mph to 22 mph over the posted speed limit. During the operation several citations were issued for other various violations and they are listed below.   

            We ask that drivers be aware of school zones and use caution when driving through them. It is important to know that fines for speed violations increase significantly when they are within a designated school zone. To help with public awareness we have included descriptions for the two categories of reduced school speeds in school zones. We have also included a link to the ODOT website with information on School Zones.

                                                                                                                

Other Citations Issued:

Driving While Suspended = 2

Driving Uninsured = 2

Operating Without Driving Privileges = 1

Fail to Use Seatbelt = 4

Violation of the Open Container Law = 1

Minor in Possession of Alcohol = 1

 

Zones Adjacent to School Grounds:

Will have signage displaying the speed limit at 20 MPH When Flashing or School Days 7AM – 5PM.

Zones at School Crosswalks away from Schools Grounds:

Will have signage displaying the speed limit at 20 MPH When Flashing or When Children are Present.

ODOT School Zone Information Link:

https://www.oregon.gov/odot/Engineering/Pages/School-Zones.aspx


Oregon reports 197 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 03/01/21 3:09 PM

March 1, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 197 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are four new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,212, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 197 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 155,787.

Oregon to receive Johnson & Johnson vaccine

Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose vaccine has received an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the federal government, making it the third COVID-19 vaccine available for use in the United States.

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is the first single-dose vaccine against COVID-19. It can be stored in a refrigerator for months, making it easier to distribute without the need for ultra-cold storage.  

OHA estimates Oregon will receive 34,000 doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine this week. OHA is working with Local Public Health Authorities, state retail pharmacy partners and hospital systems to administer the vaccine.

It is anticipated that less of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be available in the next few weeks following this week’s initial allocation. OHA is planning for strategic deployment of the vaccine to speed up vaccinations in Oregon.

“Having access to a third highly effective COVID-19 vaccine is a game changing development for Oregonians,’ said Paul Cieslak, M.D, medical director for communicable diseases and immunization, OHA Public Health Division. “We believe this vaccine is effective against the virus, and a one-dose regimen will allow us to vaccinate more Oregonians more quickly.”

The process for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine review and approval was the same as it was for the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines. The company submitted its application for EUA on Feb. 4.  

In its review of Johnson & Johnson’s application, the FDA reported the vaccine was 66% effective for moderate to severe/critical COVID-19 in all groups across all regions studied starting at 28 days after vaccination. The observed efficacy in the United States was 72%. The clinical trial involved 43,783 participants in the United States, Latin America, Brazil and South Africa.

“The best thing is that this one-dose vaccine was 85% efficacious in preventing severe COVID-19,” Dr. Cieslak said.

Reported vaccine side effects include pain at the injection site, mild to moderate headache, fatigue and muscle aches.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 13,794 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 6,169 doses were administered on Feb. 28 and 7,625 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 28.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 986,816 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,241,415 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 132, which is two fewer than yesterday. There are 27 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Test reporting change provides more detailed estimate of COVID-19 testing in Oregon

OHA continues to adapt how it reports COVID test results to provide a more detailed estimate of testing volume and percent positivity. The change will add test results reported via the Oregon COVID-19 Reporting Portal (OCRP) to the current Electronic Lab Reports (ELRs) totals.

OHA changed from the person-based test counts (i.e., number of people who test positive, negative, total people tested) to test-based counts on Dec. 3 by reporting the number of positive, negative and total COVID-19 electronic laboratory reports, representing the majority of COVID-19 test results reported statewide.

COVID-19 test results may also be reported by the secure, web-based confidential reporting system: Oregon COVID-19 Reporting Portal (OCRP). These reports were automatically routed to the appropriate local health department for public health action. Recent database improvements have made reporting these additional data possible.

These additional testing data will be published starting today in the Tableau dashboards and in risk level metrics for schools and counties. While there may be some changes to previously reported test positivity rates, case counts, and case rates have not changed.

OHA recommends that all Oregonians continue to follow the safe practices to prevent the spread of COVID-19. That includes wearing a mask or face covering, maintain physical distancing, minimize indoor social get-togethers, stay home if you feel sick, and frequently wash your hands.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Clackamas (19), Columbia (5), Coos (6), Deschutes (4), Douglas (11), Jackson (13), Jefferson (2), Josephine (3), Lane (33), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Marion (20), Multnomah (16), Polk (3), Umatilla (1), Washington (54) and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 2,209th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Feb. 22 and died on Feb. 28 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,210th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Feb.12 and died on Feb. 28 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,211th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Feb. 25 and died on Feb. 27 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,212th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Feb. 8 and died on Feb. 21 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


Former Eugene Elementary School Teacher Sentenced to Federal Prison for Sexually Abusing 15-Year-Old
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 03/01/21 11:49 AM

EUGENE, Ore.—A former Eugene elementary school teacher was sentenced to federal prison today for sexually abusing a minor female, announced Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug.

William Hamann, 38, was sentenced to 156 months in federal prison and ten years supervised release. Hamman was also ordered to pay restitution to his victim.

According to court documents, on several occasions beginning in 2018 and continuing until July 2019, Hamann paid a minor female for oral sex and recorded the minor performing the sex acts. The minor female was 15 years old during the first encounter with Hamman. Eugene Police Department detectives and FBI agents arrested Hamann on July 26, 2019, when he came to meet the minor a fourth time. Agents searched his mobile phone and found a recording of one of the sex acts. Hamman used social media to arrange the meetings with the minor.

A search of Hamman’s residence and digital devices revealed that he had previously approached several other females online who said they were minors. Investigators uncovered evidence that Hamman had engaged in sexually explicit conversations with them even after they said they were underage.

On August 21, 2019, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned a four-count indictment charging Hamann with sexual exploitation and trafficking of a child, possession of child pornography, and attempted sex trafficking of a child. On January 19, 2021, he pleaded guilty to sex trafficking of a child.

This case was investigated by the FBI and the Eugene Police Department. It was prosecuted by Jeff Sweet, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Katherine Green, Lane County Deputy District Attorney.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov.

Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct involving a minor. It is important to remember child sexual abuse material depicts actual crimes being committed against children. Not only do these images and videos document victims’ exploitation and abuse, but when shared across the internet, child victims suffer re-victimization each time the image of their abuse is viewed. To learn more, please visit the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children’s website at www.missingkids.org.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

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Changes to scheduling vaccine appointments via the Vaccine Information Tool (chatbot) go into effect Monday
Oregon Health Authority - 03/01/21 9:23 AM

March 1, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Changes to scheduling vaccine appointments via the Vaccine Information Tool (chatbot) go into effect Monday

Portland, OR — To help alleviate the challenges people have faced attempting to schedule a vaccine appointment at the Oregon Convention Center, the Oregon Health Authority and the All4Oregon health system partners will change the process for appointments via the Vaccine Information Tool (chatbot), starting Monday, March 1, 2021.  

As of today, adults who are 65 and older will become eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine. But adults who are 65 and older, and most people who are eligible for vaccines in Phase 1A in the Portland metro area, will no longer be directed to the chatbot to schedule appointments at the Oregon Convention Center.

The change does not apply to people with mobility issues, who will continue to be able to access appointments at the Portland Airport Red Economy Parking Lot drive-thru clinic through the chatbot. Educators in the Portland metro area and people who live in Marion County also can continue to find appointments through the Vaccine Information Tool.

The change does not impact people who have already scheduled vaccine appointments at the Oregon Convention Center, the Portland Airport or the Legacy Woodburn Health Center.

All Oregonians, including senior adults age 65 and over, can sign up to be notified about vaccination events when they are eligible at the Get Vaccinated Oregon signup tool. The Get Vaccinated Oregon (GVO) signup tool can be found at covidvaccine.oregon.gov.

The new appointment scheduling process for eligible older adults who live in Clackamas, Columbia, Multnomah or Washington counties, will be based on names being pulled from the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool.

On a weekly basis, OHA will use that GVO tool to electronically scramble the names of all eligible older adults in the metro area.  OHA will then send a list of names to All4Oregon that matches the number of vaccination appointments available for scheduling.  

All4Oregon will contact individuals to schedule their appointment.

Due to limited supply, not everyone who is eligible will be included on the weekly list. All eligible groups who want a vaccine will get a vaccine over the coming months.

All4Oregon is the joint effort of Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence to collaborate in operating the mass vaccination clinic at the Oregon Convention Center.

 As more vaccines become available, vaccine distribution sites will expand to more locations, such as retail pharmacies, outpatient clinics and other sites linked to hospitals and health systems.

The additional vaccine and additional sites will help address the challenges people are experiencing as high demand exceeds the limited supply.

Older adults and anyone who needs help better understanding the scheduling options are encouraged to call 211.


Myrtle Creek Man Dies in Vehicle Crash Saturday
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 03/01/21 9:05 AM

ROSEBURG, Ore. - A Myrtle Creek man died in a single vehicle crash Saturday night. 

On Saturday, February 27, 2021, at approximately 11:25 p.m., 9-1-1 dispatchers received reports of a single vehicle crash in the 3000-block of Buckhorn Road. Deputies arrived on scene and located a 2001 Ford F-150 pickup which had left the roadway and rolled. The driver, identified as 30 year-old Brandon Martin of Myrtle Creek, was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the crash and was ejected from the pickup.

Alcohol and speed are believed to be a contributing factors to the crash. 

Next of kin has been notified.

The Sheriff's Office was assisted by Douglas County Fire District #2.


Arson and Burglary Suspect Apprehended (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 03/01/21 8:21 AM
Joshua Lee Leach
Joshua Lee Leach
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-02/6530/142881/thumb_Leach.jpg

On February 28th, 2021 at about 1905 Hours, The Grants Pass Department of Public Safety (GPDPS) 911 agency began fielding calls of a male subject lighting the gas pumps on fire at the Pacific Pride, located at 505 Rogue River Hwy. At approximately the same time, an alarm call came in at 85 Fruitdale Dr., which is the Industrial Source Welding Supply and in close proximity to the gas pumps. GPDPS Police and Fire/Rescue units responded to each scene. Dispatch began to provide updates from callers, of a male subject who was responsible for both the fire at Pacific Pride and what was determined to be a burglary at the welding supply. This male subject had used a gas pump to spray fuel into the air and directly onto the pumps. The gas pump had been taken from a citizen's vehicle who had been filling her tank. He then tried to start a fire numerous times, until he was successful. The male subject then ran to the welding supply and shattered the front glass door to make unlawful entry to the business. 

With the help of witness statements, the male subject was located and placed in custody without incident, near the intersection of Fruitdale Dr. and Williams Hwy. He was identified as 44 year-old, Joshua Lee Leach who is transient but has a listed address in Pennsylvania. GPDPS Fire/Rescue was able to extinguish the fire quickly at Pacific Pride and prevented what could have been a large explosion. Businesses that were nearby were evacuated for precautionary measures by Police units, until the scene was safe. The GPDPS Fire Marshal responded and assisted at the scene of the fire. The location was made safe and is not a danger to the public. Damage appears to be limited to one island at the fueling station.  

Police units investigated both scenes and were able to get witness statements and video footage of the incidents. When the investigations were completed, Leach was lodged at the Josephine County Jail on the charges listed below. 

1. Arson in the First Degree (3 counts)

2. Burglary in the Second Degree

3. Criminal Mischief in the First Degree

4. Reckless Endangering

5. Unlawful Entry to a Motor Vehicle

6. Theft in the Third Degree (2 counts)

7. Disorderly Conduct 

We extend our thanks to the citizens who observed the suspect and remained in the area to talk with officers and assist with the investigation of this case.  Luckily there were no injuries and as a result of the rapid response of police and fire units, the fire was contained and the suspect was stopped before he created more hazards and citizens were injured. 

The Grants Pass Department of Public Safety asks any witnesses to these incidents to please call (541) 450-6260 and reference Case # 2021-9229. We would also like to thank anyone who was inconvenienced during this alarming event for their patience. Witnesses in the area were crucial in assisting with the identification and ultimate capture of the suspect. 




Attached Media Files: Joshua Lee Leach

Sun. 02/28/21
OHA Director Patrick Allen marks 1 year since first case of COVID-19 in Oregon with Open Letter to Oregon
Oregon Health Authority - 02/28/21 1:15 PM

Feb. 28, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA Director Patrick Allen marks 1 year since first case of COVID-19 in Oregon with Open Letter to Oregon

Director thanks Oregonians and asks state residents to maintain pandemic precautions and choose vaccination

(Salem – Feb. 28, 2021) Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen released an open letter to Oregonians to mark the one-year anniversary of Oregon’s first COVID-19 case.

Open Letter to Oregon

By Patrick Allen, Director of the Oregon Health Authority

It’s been one year since the first case of COVID-19 was diagnosed in Oregon. Twelve grim months later, nothing is the same. The pandemic has claimed more than half a million lives in the United States. More than 2,200 Oregonians have died with the coronavirus. All of us have felt their loss. All of us have seen our lives altered: a beloved grandparent’s lonely wave through the glass of a nursing home window. The empty storefront of a bedrock local business. Birthdays, graduations and anniversaries awkwardly celebrated on a screen instead of in-person. Frustration as parents struggle to help kids in school while trying to meet work demands.

But there’s another number Oregonians should bear in mind, especially as we confront the coming months of the pandemic: 4,000. That’s approximately the number of lives you’ve saved by wearing a mask, limiting in-person gatherings and maintaining social distance.

Oregon was one of the first states in the nation to report a case of COVID-19, but a year later our state has the 4th lowest coronavirus case rate in the nation, the 4th lowest death rate and the 4th lowest COVID-19 death rate among seniors. If Oregon’s death rate matched the nation’s, three times as many Oregonians would have lost their lives.

You made the difference. Month after month, deep into the pandemic, about 8 in 10 Oregonians continue to observe lifesaving pandemic precautions. While we know who’s died from COVID-19 – in ages ranging from under 1 to more than 100 years old, we’ll never know for sure whom you’ve saved. Maybe it’s an esteemed elder who’s alive to lead a virtual devotional group for his faith community. A middle-age mother who’s here to help her daughter apply for college. A thirtysomething who agrees to be best man at his friend’s wedding, once the pandemic is over. Maybe it’s someone reading this message. Maybe it’s you.

State and local public health actions saved lives too. Governor Kate Brown issued early stay at home orders. Our state was the first in the nation to protect the most vulnerable nursing home residents by limiting visitation. Oregon put limits on bars, restaurants, gyms and other types of businesses that could fuel the virus’ spread. Those limits figured as vital factors in Oregon’s life-saving calculus – but they came with undeniable costs to workers and business owner. Still, and unlike other states, Oregon kept manufacturing and construction going, blunting the worst-case economic fallout on working families.

Here’s another number: 973,022. That’s the number of COVID-19 vaccine first and second doses Oregon nurses and other vaccinators have administered so far, as of today. It’s true Oregon’s vaccine roll-out has been no less bumpy than it has been elsewhere. Yet Oregon has fully vaccinated about 1 in 12 adults, putting us ahead of most other states (Oregon ranks 16th in the percent of people fully vaccinated).

But the pandemic isn’t over. More contagious and more dangerous variants of the virus are taking hold. We are in a race to vaccinate as many people as possible, as soon as we can.

It’s been a hard year. On top of the pandemic, we’ve endured historic wildfires that also claimed lives, displaced thousands and obliterated the homes and businesses that comprised entire communities. We’ve awakened to an overdue reckoning with racial injustice – including unacceptable health inequities. Winter storms compounded our discomfort and disruption.

We’re tired. But we can’t give up.

With gratitude, and respect for all the lifesaving sacrifices you’ve made so far, I ask Oregonians to:

  • Keep wearing masks, limiting your social get-togethers and maintaining your physical distance. Until we know more, we need to keep our guard up.
  • Choose to get vaccinated when you are eligible, as soon as an appointment is available to you.

On Friday, Governor Brown told Oregonians we are speeding up our timelines to vaccinate Oregonians. Over the next month we expect to vaccinate more than 3 in 4 seniors. People with underlying health conditions will be eligible on March 29th. Frontline workers will be eligible no later than May 1. And we’ll open vaccinations to the first healthy members of the general public no later than June 1.

I know many people have questions about COVID-19 vaccines. I know the experience of racism and memories of historical trauma and medical experimentation are alive in many communities. Other people are wary of government.

Yet once again, we depend on each other to save lives. The COVID-19 vaccine is the safest and most effective way to protect yourself and your loved ones and return to more of our normal life. We need enough Oregonians to get immunized, so all of us are protected.

Thank you for the lives you’ve saved so far and the lives we can all save in the months to come.


Oregon reports 292 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/28/21 11:01 AM

Feb. 28, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 292 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 0 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, and the state’s death toll remains at 2,208 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 292 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 155,597.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 29,330 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 19,513 doses were administered on Feb. 27 and 9,817 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 27.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 973,022 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,194,495 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 134, which is 14 fewer than yesterday. There are 26 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (7), Clackamas (26), Columbia (4), Coos (10), Curry (3), Deschutes (6), Douglas (11), Grant (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (21), Jefferson (3), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (36), Lincoln (1), Linn (4), Malheur (1), Marion (52), Morrow (2), Multnomah (25), Polk (11), Umatilla (8), Washington (42), Yamhill (10).

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

656

7

Benton

2,344

16

Clackamas

13,380

175

Clatsop

775

6

Columbia

1,265

21

Coos

1,491

19

Crook

775

18

Curry

429

6

Deschutes

5,952

59

Douglas

2,474

54

Gilliam

53

1

Grant

223

1

Harney

273

6

Hood River

1,069

29

Jackson

8,395

112

Jefferson

1,958

28

Josephine

2,340

50

Klamath

2,791

55

Lake

376

6

Lane

10,258

126

Lincoln

1,132

20

Linn

3,590

56

Malheur

3,351

58

Marion

18,468

285

Morrow

1,049

14

Multnomah

31,877

528

Polk

3,064

42

Sherman

53

0

Tillamook

414

2

Umatilla

7,659

82

Union

1,284

19

Wallowa

142

4

Wasco

1,221

26

Washington

21,211

212

Wheeler

22

1

Yamhill

3,783

64

Statewide

155,597

2,208

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

ELRs received 2/27/2021

County

Negative Els

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

106

6

112

5.4%

Benton

141

7

148

4.7%

Clackamas

857

34

891

3.8%

Clatsop

141

2

143

1.4%

Columbia

79

7

86

8.1%

Coos

263

42

305

13.8%

Crook

33

0

33

0.0%

Curry

15

1

16

6.3%

Deschutes

430

8

438

1.8%

Douglas

186

10

196

5.1%

Grant

2

0

2

0.0%

Gilliam

2

0

2

0.0%

Harney

7

0

7

0.0%

Hood River

93

0

93

0.0%

Jackson

565

39

604

6.5%

Jefferson

41

4

45

8.9%

Josephine

136

5

141

3.5%

Klamath

68

2

70

2.9%

Lake

10

0

10

0.0%

Lane

773

31

804

3.9%

Lincoln

39

3

42

7.1%

Linn

152

3

155

1.9%

Malheur

43

1

44

2.3%

Marion

812

38

850

4.5%

Morrow

8

1

9

11.1%

Multnomah

2,714

27

2,741

1.0%

Polk

236

11

247

4.5%

Sherman

3

0

3

0.0%

Tillamook

36

2

38

5.3%

Umatilla

129

7

136

5.1%

Union

23

1

24

4.2%

Wallowa

11

0

11

0.0%

Wasco

46

0

46

0.0%

Washington

1,504

48

1,552

3.1%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

281

10

291

3.4%

Statewide

9,986

350

10,336

3.4%

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELR

Positive ELR

Total ELR

Percent Positivity

Baker

8,167

1,552

9,719

16.0%

Benton

105,877

3,416

109,293

3.1%

Clackamas

344,997

18,680

363,677

5.1%

Clatsop

26,709

1,265

27,974

4.5%

Columbia

32,441

1,591

34,032

4.7%

Coos

31,551

1,599

33,150

4.8%

Crook

12,173

1,015

13,188

7.7%

Curry

8,235

353

8,588

4.1%

Deschutes

130,378

7,604

137,982

5.5%

Douglas

52,746

2,055

54,801

3.7%

Gilliam

902

28

930

3.0%

Grant

3,362

178

3,540

5.0%

Harney

2,655

213

2,868

7.4%

Hood River

25,453

1,324

26,777

4.9%

Jackson

165,307

10,569

175,876

6.0%

Jefferson

15,168

1,653

16,821

9.8%

Josephine

44,771

2,205

46,976

4.7%

Klamath

37,911

2,821

40,732

6.9%

Lake

2,480

361

2,841

12.7%

Lane

356,119

11,444

367,563

3.1%

Lincoln

34,855

2,156

37,011

5.8%

Linn

105,478

6,532

112,010

5.8%

Malheur

17,989

4,565

22,554

20.2%

Marion

261,760

25,865

287,625

9.0%

Morrow

5,565

1,207

6,772

17.8%

Multnomah

797,010

43,920

840,930

5.2%

Polk

54,341

3,736

58,077

6.4%

Sherman

1,103

47

1,150

4.1%

Tillamook

11,302

373

11,675

3.2%

Umatilla

51,622

7,951

59,573

13.3%

Union

10,139

957

11,096

8.6%

Wallowa

2,100

73

2,173

3.4%

Wasco

26,875

1,281

28,156

4.5%

Washington

497,643

29,610

527,253

5.6%

Wheeler

337

20

357

5.6%

Yamhill

101,527

5,164

106,691

4.8%

Statewide

3,387,048

203,383

3,590,431

5.7%

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Sat. 02/27/21
Oregon reports 455 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/27/21 11:33 AM

Feb. 27, 2021

Media Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 455 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are two new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,208 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 455 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 155,315.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 32,288 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 24,926 doses were administered on Feb. 26 and 7,362 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 26.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 943,692 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,194,495 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 148, which is four fewer than yesterday. There are 31 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (7), Clackamas (35), Columbia (13), Coos (42), Curry (2), Deschutes (14), Douglas (16), Hood River (4), Jackson (67), Jefferson (4), Josephine (9), Klamath (5), Lake (1), Lane (29), Lincoln (2), Linn (9), Malheur (7), Marion (43), Morrow (1), Multnomah (32), Polk (12), Umatilla (12), Union (3), Wasco (1), Washington (73), Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 2,207th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Feb. 22 and died on Feb. 25 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,208th COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Jan. 13 and died on Feb. 15 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

656

7

Benton

2,335

16

Clackamas

13,357

175

Clatsop

775

6

Columbia

1,261

21

Coos

1,482

19

Crook

775

18

Curry

426

6

Deschutes

5,946

59

Douglas

2,463

54

Gilliam

53

1

Grant

222

1

Harney

273

6

Hood River

1,068

29

Jackson

8,377

112

Jefferson

1,955

28

Josephine

2,337

50

Klamath

2,789

55

Lake

375

6

Lane

10,224

126

Lincoln

1,131

20

Linn

3,586

56

Malheur

3,350

58

Marion

18,416

285

Morrow

1,047

14

Multnomah

31,853

528

Polk

3,053

42

Sherman

53

0

Tillamook

414

2

Umatilla

7,651

82

Union

1,284

19

Wallowa

142

4

Wasco

1,221

26

Washington

21,170

212

Wheeler

22

1

Yamhill

3,773

64

Statewide

155,315

2,208

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

Electronic Laboratory Reporting (ELR) received Feb. 26, 2021

County

Negative Els

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

14

3

17

17.6%

Benton

548

12

560

2.1%

Clackamas

1,187

35

1,222

2.9%

Clatsop

90

0

90

0.0%

Columbia

138

15

153

9.8%

Coos

306

35

341

10.3%

Crook

41

2

43

4.7%

Curry

60

7

67

10.4%

Deschutes

401

6

407

1.5%

Douglas

287

8

295

2.7%

Grant

4

2

6

33.3%

Harney

32

1

33

3.0%

Hood River

167

5

172

2.9%

Jackson

736

52

788

6.6%

Jefferson

61

2

63

3.2%

Josephine

254

12

266

4.5%

Klamath

97

0

97

0.0%

Lake

3

2

5

40.0%

Lane

3,565

41

3,606

1.1%

Lincoln

91

4

95

4.2%

Linn

459

8

467

1.7%

Malheur

101

7

108

6.5%

Marion

937

55

992

5.5%

Morrow

30

1

31

3.2%

Multnomah

3,175

36

3,211

1.1%

Polk

200

10

210

4.8%

Sherman

2

0

2

0.0%

Tillamook

21

0

21

0.0%

Umatilla

342

26

368

7.1%

Union

86

2

88

2.3%

Wallowa

13

0

13

0.0%

Wasco

63

2

65

3.1%

Washington

1,676

66

1,742

3.8%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

319

11

330

3.3%

Statewide

15,507

468

15,975

2.9%

Cumulative Electronic Laboratory Reporting

County

Negative ELR

Positive ELR

Total ELR

Percent Positivity

Baker

8,061

1,546

9,607

16.1%

Benton

105,736

3,409

109,145

3.1%

Clackamas

344,140

18,646

362,786

5.1%

Clatsop

26,568

1,263

27,831

4.5%

Columbia

32,362

1,584

33,946

4.7%

Coos

31,288

1,557

32,845

4.7%

Crook

12,140

1,015

13,155

7.7%

Curry

8,220

352

8,572

4.1%

Deschutes

129,948

7,596

137,544

5.5%

Douglas

52,560

2,045

54,605

3.7%

Gilliam

900

28

928

3.0%

Grant

3,360

178

3,538

5.0%

Harney

2,648

213

2,861

7.4%

Hood River

25,360

1,324

26,684

5.0%

Jackson

164,742

10,530

175,272

6.0%

Jefferson

15,127

1,649

16,776

9.8%

Josephine

44,635

2,200

46,835

4.7%

Klamath

37,843

2,819

40,662

6.9%

Lake

2,470

361

2,831

12.8%

Lane

355,346

11,413

366,759

3.1%

Lincoln

34,816

2,153

36,969

5.8%

Linn

105,326

6,529

111,855

5.8%

Malheur

17,946

4,564

22,510

20.3%

Marion

260,948

25,827

286,775

9.0%

Morrow

5,557

1,206

6,763

17.8%

Multnomah

794,296

43,893

838,189

5.2%

Polk

54,105

3,725

57,830

6.4%

Sherman

1,100

47

1,147

4.1%

Tillamook

11,266

371

11,637

3.2%

Umatilla

51,493

7,944

59,437

13.4%

Union

10,116

956

11,072

8.6%

Wallowa

2,089

73

2,162

3.4%

Wasco

26,829

1,281

28,110

4.6%

Washington

496,139

29,562

525,701

5.6%

Wheeler

336

20

356

5.6%

Yamhill

101,246

5,154

106,400

4.8%

Statewide

3,377,062

203,033

3,580,095

5.7%

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.


Fatal Crash on Interstate 5 - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 02/27/21 7:14 AM

On Friday, February 26, 2021 at approximately 5:30 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a three-vehicle crash on Interstate 5 near MP 270.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Toyota Corolla, operated by Norma Palacios (59) of Keizer, was northbound in the center lane, began to change lanes, and collided with a Nissan Rogue operated by Arnold Brown (52) of Albany.  The Toyota Corolla then collided with a Nissan Rogue operated by Paul Tallman (57) of Eugene. 

Palacios sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

There were no other serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by Woodburn Fire Department and ODOT.


Fri. 02/26/21
Oregon Farm Bureau Statement on Hammonds' Grazing Permit
Oregon Farm Bureau - 02/26/21 6:54 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Oregon Farm Bureau Statement on Hammonds’ Grazing Permit

February 26, 2021, Salem, Oregon: The Hammond family are long-standing pillars of the Harney County community who have been subjected to continued government overreach while sustainably managing their ranch for the benefit of the local community, local ecosystems, and generations of their family. The decision to issue their grazing permit should be a criteria-based process, and one that BLM approaches objectively. The Hammonds have demonstrated several times that all applicable factors favor them being restored their permit, including the family’s record of stewardship, their ownership of intermingled private land and several range improvements, and their contributions to the local economy. It is fundamentally unfair to continually subject this family to ever-changing regulatory whims, and in the process, jeopardize their livelihood, proper rangeland management, and ability to fully utilize their private lands. The Hammond’s permit should be restored, and the family should be allowed to move forward with their lives in peace. 

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Housing Stability Council Monthly Meeting - March 5, 2021
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 02/26/21 3:49 PM

The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be on Friday, March 5th, 2021 from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM.  The meeting will be held electronically due to the current COVID-19 health crisis. Please register for access link.

Webinar Meeting Only

Public register in advance for this webinar:

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_uowii8KdRFyNz5LTR9jucQ

 

AGENDA:

9:00  Meeting Called to Order - Roll Call 

9:05  Public Comment

9:25  Homeownership Division

  • Oregon Bond Residential Loan Program Information for 2020

9:55  Affordable Rental Housing Division Updates 

  • HUD Consolidated Plan

10:45 Break

10:55 Housing Stabilization Division Updates 

  • Emergency Rental Assistance (ERA)
  • Statute Modernization

11:45  Report of the Director

  • Update on OHCS’s Internal Equity and Racial Justice Work

12:15  Report of the Chair

12:30  Meeting Adjourned
 


Emergency Allotments for SNAP Recipients Continue in March
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/26/21 3:09 PM

Oregon has been approved to issue Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) emergency allotments for the month of March 2021. These emergency allotments will be available on:

  • March 10 for current SNAP recipients
  • March 30 for new SNAP recipients after March 10

Emergency allotments raise each household’s regularly monthly SNAP allotment to the maximum allowable amount based on household size. Per the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), SNAP households already receiving the maximum allowable allotment based on household size are not eligible to receive the emergency allotment.

SNAP recipients do not have to take any action to receive these supplemental benefits as they will be issued directly on their EBT cards. Total benefits will be different based on each household's regular monthly allotment for the month of February.

The maximum monthly SNAP benefit amounts by household size and more information about emergency allotments are available at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/About-SNAP.aspx.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance, and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.

 


Dunk a Cop / So. Or. Polar Plunge
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 02/26/21 3:05 PM
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On 02-27-2021 from 1100am to 200pm, members of the Grants Pass Police Department will be hosting a "Dunk A Cop" fundraiser for Special Olympics Oregon.  We will be holding the event in the parking lot next to the Dutch Bros coffee stand located near 6th and G Streets in downtown Grants Pass.  

Due to the current state of emergency, the in-person Polar Plunge for 2021 is being held "Brrr-tually".  Our team decided to get creative and try to raise funds by putting our folks hovering over a freezing tank of water and meeting the current restrictions on gatherings.  Each $5 donation will get you one try at sending an officer into the icy waters, $10 gets you three tries and for $25 you will get a GUARANTEED dunk!!

So swing by and help us support our local Special Olympics athletes.  Our GP team is slightly behind the first place Eagle Point PD team and we want to take over the top spot for the second year in a row!  We will be out there rain, snow or sun! 

Our team of plungers include: Capt. Todd Moran, Sgt. Mike Miner (sure to get dunked), both of our School Resource Officers, Jennings Stewart and Justin Hoy, Cadet James Loper, Capt. Jim Hamilton and our Records Specialist Susan Stone.  We even recruited former GPDPS member Battalion Chief Tom McGowan of the Medford Fire Department! 

Donations can be made in person or by visiting our webpage located at:

Online donations for the GPDPS team can be made at: https://support.soor.org/team/313800

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/6530/142845/Plunge_pic.jpg , 2021-02/6530/142845/20210225_151557.jpg


Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 02/26/21 2:52 PM

On 02-27-2021, from 11:00am to 2:00pm, members of the Grants Pass Police Department will be hosting a "Dunk A Cop" fundraiser for Special Olympics.  The event will take place in the parking lot next to the Dutch Bros coffee stand located at 6th and G streets in downtown Grants Pass.  Due to the current state of emergency, the in-person Polar Plunge for Special Olympics has gone "Brrr..tual".  Our team decided to get creative and do a "Dunk A Cop" to help rasie funds for our local athletes while still maintaining the current restrictions on gatherings.  



The public is welcome to come by and donate to Special Olympics and have a chance to send one of our officers and department members into an icy cold dunk tank!  We will have a few options to ensure you get to see our folks take the plunge.  For a $5 donation you get one throw, for $10 you get three tries and for only $25 you get a GUARANTEED dunk!



Swing by this Saturday and show your support for our local Special Olympics athletes and have a little fun trying to dunk an officer.  Your GP team is currently in 2nd place behind the Eagle Point PD team.  We are going to do our best to be the top team for two years in a row!  With your help, we can show the State of Oregon "We Are GP" and we are #1!



The current list of officers who will be on the "hot" seat for this event:



Capt. Todd Moran, Sgt. Mike Miner, Officer Jennings Stewart, Officer Justin Hoy, Cadet James Loper, Capt. Jim Hamilton, and our Records Specialist Susan Stone.  We even recruited one of our former GPDPS members, Battalion Chief Tom McGowan from the Medford Fire Department!



Donations can be made in person, or by going to our team webpage located at:



Online donations for the GPDPS team can be made at: https://support.soor.org/team/313800



 


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets March 2 and March 3, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 02/26/21 2:49 PM

Feb. 26, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets March 2 and March 3, 2021

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: The council will discuss governance structure and the council’s relationship with the legislature.

When: Tuesday March 2, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Where: Virtual. YouTube link: https://youtu.be/mb-jIyOT42E

When: Wednesday, March 3, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Where: Virtual. YouTube link:  https://youtu.be/0dsKcM31HmY

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Addiction Recovery Centers throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the centers.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brandy L. Hemsley at 971-239-2942 711 TTY or RANDY.L.HEMSLEY@dhsoha.state.or.us">brandy.l.hemsley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Health Care Workforce Committee to meet March 3rd via Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 02/26/21 2:44 PM

Feb. 26, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, PHILIP.SCHMIDT@dhsoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Jaime Taylor, 503.689.7926, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet March 3rd via Zoom meeting

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee.

When: Wednesday, March 3, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 pm. Public testimony will be heard at 12:20-12:30 pm.

Where: Virtual Meeting Only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1602176681?pwd=RThMZ2kzZDlBZDd2T3drQnM4SUUyZz09

To dial in via audio only into the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number:

+16692545252,,1607086306#,,,,,,0#,,347072# US (San Jose)

 Agenda: Convene HCWF Committee, Approval of the January Meeting Summary, OHPB and OHA Updates, Discussion: Health Equity Framework, Legislative Update, Presentation and Discussion: Telehealth, Discussion: 2021-23 Topics of Focus, Public Comment, Adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP-HCW/Pages/Meetings.aspx.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503.689.7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Board of Forestry hosts virtual public meeting on March 3
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/26/21 2:33 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, March 3. In compliance with Gov. Kate Brown’s directive on social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19, this will be a virtual public meeting.

The meeting will include a joint session with the Environmental Quality Commission in the morning, and Board business will be conducted in the afternoon beginning at 1 p.m. The joint session agenda includes:

  • Agency Directors, Board and Commission Chairs Comments
  • Smoke Management Rule Implementation 
  • ODF-DEQ Collaboration Quarterly Update

The Board business agenda includes:

  • Santiam State Forest Restoration and Recovery
  • Oregon Global Warming Commission – Natural and Working Lands Goal Update
  • State Forests Closure Rulemaking     
  • Forest Practices Interagency Meeting Report           
  • Department Financial Report - January and February 2021 
  • Approval of Agency Director Financial Transactions, Fiscal Year 2020

View the agenda for additional topics to be discussed at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

The meeting will be livestreamed and written public comment will be accepted. There is no live testimony. Written testimony can be submitted before or after the meeting to oardofForestry@oregon.gov">BoardofForestry@oregon.gov. The board packet and livestream option are available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/aboutbof.aspx.

The Oregon Environmental Quality Commission is a five-member panel appointed by the governor of Oregon for four-year terms to serve as the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality's policy and rulemaking board. In addition to adopting rules, the commission also establishes policies, issues orders, judges appeals of fines or other DEQ actions and appoints the DEQ director. For more information about the Oregon Environmental Quality Commission, please visit the EQC homepage at https://www.oregon.gov/deq/about-us/eqc/Pages/default.aspx


Oregon reports 336 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 02/26/21 2:06 PM
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Feb. 26, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 336 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are two new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,206, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 336 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 154,878.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 30,594 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 22,353 doses were administered on Feb. 25 and 8,241 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 25.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 911,648 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 1,177,945 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 152, which is four fewer than yesterday. There are 34 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is four fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (7), Clackamas (20), Columbia (5), Coos (15), Curry (8), Deschutes (17), Douglas (19), Harney (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (16), Jefferson (1), Josephine (14), Klamath (9), Lane (28), Linn (12), Malheur (2), Marion (38), Morrow (2), Multnomah (47), Polk (10), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (8), Union (6), Washington (38) and Yamhill (8).

Note: Due to a server error, a large volume of electronic laboratory reports (ELRs) were not processed until after business hours yesterday. Today’s test counts include all ELRs received yesterday. Case counts are lower than anticipated because local health departments were not able to create cases from positive ELRs that were received after hours.

Oregon’s 2,205th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Feb. 10 and died on Feb. 24 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,206th COVID-19 death is a 55-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 23 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

In today’s news conference, OHA mistakenly reported the current percentage of Oregon seniors vaccinated was one in three. That is an error. The correct percentage is one in four, or 25%. OHA regrets this miscalculation.

Today, OHA also provided updates on Oregon’s vaccination program and vaccination eligibility:

  • Vaccine eligibility will open to people 65 and older on March 1. We expect to have been allocated enough vaccines to immunize at least 75% of all seniors by March 29, weeks ahead of our original timelines.
  • The first members of the general public will be eligible for the COVID vaccine no later than June 1 and remaining groups of the general public on July 1.

A revised sequencing infographic highlights the updates (attached).

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/3687/142837/OHA_Powerpoint_for_Press_Conference_2.26.21.png

updated Covid Information in Jail
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/26/21 1:39 PM

FEB 26, 2021

Update/Correction Regarding COVID cases in Jail

It was reported yesterday that all Adults in Custody who tested positive for Covid – 19 were housed together for 23 days. It should have been reported the minimum time in custody was 23 days.

We are working with the County Health Department and our other county partners to best handle this situation.

On Monday February 22, 2021 Jail Administration was informed that several Adults-In-Custody (AIC) who share a housing unit were feeling symptoms consistent with Covid-19. Jail Medical Staff offered tests to the eleven AIC’s housed in the unit, ten of whom opted for the test. These individuals have been housed together for 23 days at the time the tests were administered.

On Wednesday, Jail Medical Staff was informed that preliminary lab results showed all ten samples were positive for Covid-19. Sheriff’s Office and Jail Medical Staff immediately implemented the established additional protocols to limit potential spread of the virus within the facility.

All eleven AIC’s who are housed together in the unit are presumed/confirmed to be positive for Covid-19. They are lodged and awaiting trial for allegedly committing serious person crimes. The severity of the charges, which range from Sex abuse 2, Rape 1, and Federal Holds, preclude the possibility of releasing the individuals back in to the community, at this time. We must consider the safety of the community when decisions are made as to who is released from jail.

All involved AIC have been quarantined in place and are being monitored by medical staff multiple times each day. At this point all of the individuals exhibit only minor symptoms which can be adequately treated within the facility.

Jail Staff is working on contact tracing within the facility, both to determine the possible source of the spread and to reduced further positive cases. At this point no source has been identified and the spread appears to be isolated to the one housing unit.


Stolen Property and Drugs: Three Reedsport Residents Arrested (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/26/21 1:05 PM
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WINCHESTER BAY, Ore. - Three Reedsport residents were arrested following a theft investigation over the weekend. 

On Saturday, February 20, 2021, deputies assigned to Dunes Patrol took a report that a vehicle had been broken into at the 2nd Beach parking lot in Winchester Bay. Similar reports had been received over the past week.

Through their investigation, deputies obtained information on a suspect vehicle and were able to locate it at a residence in the 400 block of Camellia Court in Reedsport. Once there, two suspects, Douglas Michael Grable and Ashley Marie Shaw, were taken into custody and some stolen property was recovered. 

It was further learned that some of the property had been sold in exchange for drugs. Deputies contacted David Allen Taylor and took him into custody for possessing stolen property. Additionally, Taylor was found to be in possession of 14.2 grams of methamphetamine and 1.2 grams of heroin. 

The three were transported to the Douglas County Jail where they were lodged on the following charges: 

Grable: Unlawful Entry into a Motor Vehicle x3, Theft in the 1st Degree x2, Criminal Mischief in the 2nd Degree x3, Driving While Suspended - Misdemeanor x2, Conspiracy 

Shaw: Unlawful Entry into a Motor Vehicle x3, Theft in the 1st Degree x2, Criminal Mischief in the 2nd Degree x3, Conspiracy  

Taylor: Possession of Stolen Property in the 1st Degree, Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine, Unlawful Delivery of Heroin   
 




Attached Media Files: 2021-02/5204/142829/Taylor.jpg , Grable , Shaw

Arizona Accountant Charged with Tax Evasion
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/26/21 11:48 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A former certified public accountant and former chief financial officer of a McMinnville, Oregon company faces federal criminal charges after allegedly evading $99,000 in personal income taxes, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Kent Jensen, 58, a resident of Gilbert, Arizona, has been charged by criminal information with two counts of felony tax evasion.

According to court documents, in 2014 and 2015, Jenson, who also previously worked as an auditor with an international accounting firm and a financial consultant for a business in Milwaukie, Oregon, allegedly set up several nominee companies and nominee bank accounts to conceal most of his personal income from the IRS. Jensen arranged for his financial consulting clients to pay his consulting fees to these nominee companies. He then deposited the funds into nominee bank accounts and used the proceeds for personal expenses. In 2014 and 2015, Jensen submitted fraudulent personal income tax returns that substantially underreported his personal income and the taxes owed.

“Now that the tax filing season has begun, and tax revenues are right now being used to assist Americans through the COVID pandemic, cases like this are a reminder that all taxpayers have a lawful duty to file accurate tax returns and pay their fair share of taxes,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “This office and the IRS will aggressively investigate and prosecute anyone who criminally abuses the tax system.”

Jensen faces a maximum sentence of 5 years in prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release for each of two counts of tax evasion. He will be arraigned on March 18, 2021 before a U.S. Magistrate Judge.

This case is being investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation. It is being prosecuted by Seth D. Uram, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

A criminal information is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregonians respond to cultural community's need by donating record $5.2 million to Cultural Trust in 2020
Oregon Cultural Trust - 02/26/21 10:06 AM
"All We Need is Love," a scene from the 2021 Portland Winter Light Festival. Photo by Jamie AM Crawford.
"All We Need is Love," a scene from the 2021 Portland Winter Light Festival. Photo by Jamie AM Crawford.
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Salem, Ore. – Donations to the Oregon Cultural Trust surpassed $5 million for the first time ever in 2020, as generous Oregonians responded to the cultural community’s urgent need due to losses suffered during the pandemic. The $5.2 million in donations represents a 13 percent (close to $605,000) increase over 2019 and will support grant awards to cultural organizations across the state this summer.

“We asked Oregonians to help us protect Oregon culture and their response exceeded our expectations,” said Cultural Trust Executive Director Brian Rogers. “These funds will go a long way in helping us support the cultural community’s recovery in 2021.”

“It’s extraordinary that, despite the challenges we all faced last year, so many Oregonians stepped up to support our arts, history, heritage and humanities,” said Cultural Trust Board Chair Niki Price. “It’s a testament to how much we value our great quality of life and the more than 1,500 cultural organizations that contribute to it every day. We are incredibly grateful.”

The $5.2 million fundraising total includes 11,161 donations, a 17.5 percent increase over 2019, and 2,028 new donors. It also includes a record $537,909 raised through an ongoing partnership with the Willamette Week Give!Guide.

“Our partnership with Give!Guide is one of the cornerstones of our campaign,” said Rogers. “It is a great way for people to learn about the Cultural Trust and the tax credit, bringing in 994 new donor households this year alone.”

More than half of the money raised will be distributed directly to Oregon’s nonprofit cultural community this summer; the remainder will grow the Cultural Trust permanent fund. Cultural Trust grants are distributed through five Statewide Cultural Partners – Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage, Oregon Historical Society, Oregon Humanities and the Oregon State Office of Historic Preservation – as well as to 45 County/Tribal Cultural Coalitions, who regrant the funds in their communities, and directly to cultural nonprofits via Cultural Development Grants.

The 78 projects supported by Cultural Development Grants in FY2021 include:

  • The preservation and sharing of Hawaiian traditional cultural practices online and in person by Kapi Oanuenue in Ashland;
  • The development of an interactive digital media channel for nonprofits and independent mediamakers by Open Signal in Portland;
  • A series of cultural programs to reengage the community after months of COVID shutdown by the Tower Theatre Foundation in Bend;
  • The production of “From the Streets to the Symphony,” a documentary about the collaborative composition of new music by houseless young filmmakers and Oregon Symphony creative chair Gabriel Kahane with Outside the Frame in Portland;
  • The restoration of Native American access to First Foods and other cultural plants of significance in Southwestern Oregon by the Indigenous Gardens Network at Southern Oregon University in Ashland;
  • The development of the first Oregon Online African American Museum by Oregon Black Pioneers in Salem; and
  • Access to media arts for historically underserved Black students to exercise their imaginations, develop a voice and prepare stories for public dissemination through the Journalistic Learning Initiative in Eugene.

For a full list of Cultural Trust grant projects, including links to Cultural County Coalitions and several hundred county projects they are funding this year, visit www.culturaltrust.org.

The exclusive contracted partner for the Cultural Trust’s 2020 fundraising campaign was Bell+Funk of Eugene.

# # #

The Oregon Cultural Trust was established by the Oregon Legislature in 2001 as a unique means to reward Oregonians who invest in culture. Oregonians who donate to a cultural nonprofit and then make a matching gift to the Cultural Trust receive a 100% state tax credit for their gift to the Trust.




Attached Media Files: "All We Need is Love," a scene from the 2021 Portland Winter Light Festival. Photo by Jamie AM Crawford.

Oregon's Project Turnkey Gains Momentum: $11.4 Million in Additional Grants Brings Three More Motel Properties Online to Provide Lodging for Displaced Community Members (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 02/26/21 7:30 AM
NW Coastal Housing Lincoln City Oregon
NW Coastal Housing Lincoln City Oregon
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Oregons Project Turnkey Gains Momentum: $11.4 Million in Additional Grants Brings Three More Motel Properties Online to Provide Lodging for Displaced Community Members

Project Turnkey Provides Grants for Properties Located in Corvallis, Eugene and Lincoln City

Corvallis, Eugene and Lincoln City, Ore. – February 26, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) today announced that Project Turnkey is gaining momentum with three additional grants awarded to properties in Corvallis, Eugene and Lincoln City.

Corvallis Housing First (CHF) was selected to receive one of the next Project Turnkey grants, in the amount of $2.475 million in state funds to purchase and transform a 24-room hotel in Corvallis, Oregon. Priority will be given to the most vulnerable members of the Corvallis community who are unhoused, including people with disabilities, veterans, people of color and seniors.

"We are so excited for this opportunity to provide more safe shelter options during the pandemic and permanent supported housing to people experiencing chronic homelessness in our community," said Andrea Myhre, Executive Director of Corvallis Housing First, This project came together because of good planning as well as partners and volunteers working tirelessly to come up with new solutions for getting people into housing.”

Located at 1480 SW 3rd St, Corvallis, OR 97333, CHF anticipates the facility to be in use beginning in March 2021.

Lane County Human Services was also selected to receive a Project Turnkey grant, in the amount of $5.56 million in state funds to purchase and transform a 50-room hotel in Eugene, Oregon. Priority will be given to wildfire evacuees.

The Holiday Farm Fire was absolutely devastating to thousands of residents along the McKenzie River,” said Lane County Commissioner Heather Buch. Six months later and people are still struggling to find acceptable temporary housing. Project Turnkey is an incredible investment and will provide a lot of families with a safe place to live while they work through the rebuilding process.”

Located at 599 East Broadway, Eugene, OR 97401, Lane County Human Services anticipates the facility to be in use beginning in March 2021.

Northwest Coastal Housing (NWCH) in Lincoln City is another Project Turnkey grant awardee, slated to receive $3.348 million in state funds to purchase a 42-room hotel along Highway 101 in Lincoln City, Oregon. Priority will be given to community members displaced by the Echo Mountain Complex Fire.  

"This is wonderful news for survivors of the Echo Mountain Fire,” Claire Hall, Board of County Commissioners for Lincoln County and Chair of Oregon Housing Stability Council, said. North Lincoln County's critical housing shortage was exacerbated by the fire. Too many individuals and families are still living in their vehicles, are doubled up with friends or relatives, or in other unstable situations. This will give them a safe, long-term place to work on rebuilding their homes and their lives."

Located at 1014 NE Hwy 101, Lincoln City, OR 97367, NWCH anticipates the new Phoenix Rising NW” to be in use beginning in March 2021.

We at Northwest Coastal Housing are so grateful for this opportunity to help our neighbors impacted by the wildfires, COVID and other crisis by providing temporary lodging complete with service navigation.  Our goal is to ease the trauma, provide our occupants with lodging, help them to stabilize and breathe,” stated Sheila Stiley, Executive Director of Northwest Coastal Housing.  Our agency was established to advocate for and support community efforts addressing housing needs.  This is an unconventional and innovative way of accomplishing just that, which seems to be a growing trend when responding to crisis, and we could not have succeeded without overwhelming support from our partners.”

Earlier this month OCF announced the first Project Turnkey grant of $4.2 million in state funds for Options for Helping Residents of Ashland (OHRA) to purchase and transform an Ashland motel. The new OHRA Center anticipates beginning to safely house community members negatively impacted by wildfires and COVID-19 pandemic beginning in March 2021.

Now that the application window has closed, the Project Turnkey Advisory Committee is doubling down on efforts to review and move highly-qualified applicants through the due diligence process,” said Megan Loeb, Program Officer, Oregon Community Foundation. We have a strong pipeline of nearly 30 applicants and are excited to see more projects awarded in the weeks ahead.”

When funds became available from the state for this project, OCF convened a diverse statewide advisory committee to create an equitable review process of all applicants. Working with urgency, and with counsel from real estate development experts, the selection committee has condensed a complicated real estate transaction into a 6-8-week process.

The scale of this humanitarian crises for unsheltered Oregonians is enormous,” said Dr. Ernesto Fonseca, CEO, Hacienda CDC and Project Turnkey Advisory Committee Member. Project Turnkey is one innovative and cost-effective solution that brings affordable housing in record time to people in critical need.”

OCF has been studying root causes of Oregons dual crisis of homelessness and affordable housing for two years, beginning with research commissioned from ECONorthwest, Homelessness in Oregon” which provided statewide analysis of the disproportionately large homeless population in Oregon.

About Project Turnkey

The Oregon Legislature allocated a total of $65 million for Project Turnkey for the purpose of acquiring motels/hotels for use as non-congregate shelter for people experiencing homelessness or at-risk of homelessness. Two discrete funds were provided by the state: one totaling $30 million to be awarded in counties and tribal communities impacted by the 2020 wildfires; and one totaling $35 million for the remaining 28 counties in the state. Oregon Community Foundation is administering both funds through an application and selection process, with guidance from an Advisory Committee of state, local, and community stakeholders. For more information, please visit Project Turnkey online.

About Corvallis Housing First

Corvallis Housing First (CHF) was founded in 2007 (as the Corvallis Homeless Shelter Coalition) to provide solutions for ending homelessness and achieving self-sufficiency. CHF provides housing and services for individuals experiencing homelessness in the Corvallis community. For more information about CHF, please visit: corvallishousingfirst.org.

About Lane County Human Services

Lane County Human Services administers a range of programs that support people in communities—veterans, seniors, children, youth and families—during challenges and transitions in their lives. The resources offered by Lane County Human Services and its public and nonpro?t partners open new doors to an entire network of services, providing help and creating opportunities. For more information about Lane County Human Services, please visit: lanecounty.org.

About Northwest Coastal Housing

Based in Newport, Oregon, Northwest Coastal Housing (formerly known as the Community Development Corporation of Lincoln County) was established in May 1991. NWCH is a nonprofit organization committed to developing affordable housing, advocating for and supporting community efforts that enhance affordable living options. NWCHs mission is to provide affordable, safe, decent, and stable housing with compassion and integrity”.  For more information about NWCH, please visit: nwcoastalhousing.org.

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) puts donated money to work in Oregon – more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving–time, talent and resources from many generous Oregonians–creates measurable change. For more information about OCF, please visit: oregoncf.org.

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Attached Media Files: Project Turnkey FAQ , Project Turnkey News Release_CorvallisLANECOUNTYLincolnCity_02 26 2021 , Project Turnkey Graphic , NW Coastal Housing Lincoln City Oregon , Corvallis Housing First Corvallis Oregon , ProjectTurnkey Map for 02 26 2021 Announcement CorvallisEugeneLincolnCity , ProjectTurnkey ALL Sites Map as of 02 26 2021 AshlandCorvallisEugeneLincolnCity , Generic Motel Facade ProjectTurnkey

Fatal Crash on Hwy 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 02/26/21 7:29 AM

On Thursday, February 25, 2021 at approximately 7:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 227.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a commercial motor vehicle with double trailers had became disabled on the northbound shoulder of Hwy 101.  Previous to becoming disabled the CMV was operated by Anthony Prom (50) of Seattle, WA.  

A Chevrolet S-10 pickup, operated by Frank Martinez (77) of Lakeside,  traveled onto the shoulder and crashed into the rear of the CMV combination. 

Martinez sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Prom was not injured.

OSP was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Department, Hauser Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, ODOT, and Southern Oregon Public Safety Chaplains.