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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Mon. Dec. 10 - 2:24 am
Fri. 12/07/18
Oregon winter weather is starting to set in across Oregon. Are you prepared? (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/07/18 1:57 PM
2018-12/1002/120184/Winter_Weather.jpg
2018-12/1002/120184/Winter_Weather.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1002/120184/thumb_Winter_Weather.jpg

Oregon winter weather is starting to set in across Oregon. Are you prepared? With the increase chances of snow, freezing rain, and ice on the roadways it is more important than ever to #Knowbeforeyougo.

Checking www.tripcheck.com is the best way to get information on highway closures/construction, minimum chain requirements and road conditions utilizing their traffic cameras.

Those traveling in lower elevations, expect rain and wet roadways.  Which means you will need to increase your following distances due to decreased traction on those wet roads.

OSP is also urges all motorists to plan their travels by: 

  • Be prepared in the event you become stuck during your travels- Carry water, food, and blankets in the event you are stuck in your vehicle during your trip
  • Put the distractions away. Pull over to use that handheld electronic device, ask as passenger to help or wait to arrive at your destination to use them.
  • Watch your speed; often speeding will not get you to your destination any faster. You will fatigue faster, burn more fuel, and create a more hazardous environment on the highway.
  • Be extra vigilant in highway work zones. Even when workers are not present, all work zone speed limits still apply and fines double. Inactive work zones still have equipment, detours, and incomplete changes in the roadway so drivers need to slow down and be alert.
  • Get rested before you travel. Fatigued drivers are more frequent during holiday weekends because of increased travel and activity. Be patient and allow plenty of time to reach your destination.
  • Wear your safety belt. Ensure your passengers and children are properly restrained too. We see too many crashes were people would have walked away with minor in any injuries.
  • Get a designated driver (plan ahead) if you plan on consuming intoxicating substances.

Our partners at Oregon Department of Transportation recently reminded drivers about the dangers of not checking the roads before you go and only utilizing GPS. When roads are closed and your navigation systems direct you onto a detour route, keep in mind that the device you count on for guidance could instead guide you into trouble. http://bit.ly/2rp6ufP




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/1002/120184/Winter_Weather.jpg

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets December 13 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 12/07/18 12:40 PM

December 7, 2018

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us (media inquiries)

Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets December 13 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: December 13, 2-4 p.m.

Where: 421 SW Oak St, Suite 850, Abraham Room, Portland. Attendees also can join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6730937893581997569 and conference line at 877-810-9415, access code 1773452#.

Agenda: Introduction and meeting goals; general updates; 2020 administrative rule draft edits, public comments,

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-559-2216, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Construction safety summit coming to central Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/07/18 11:34 AM

(Salem) – A two-day training conference in central Oregon will focus on the safety and health of workers in residential, commercial, and industrial construction. The Jan. 28-29 Mid-Oregon Construction Safety Summit will offer discussions of everything from fall protection and ladder safety to excavation hazards and prevention of pipeline damage.

Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA), a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, encourages employers and workers to attend the 18th annual summit at the Riverhouse on the Deschutes Convention Center in Bend.

The summit’s keynote speakers are Russ and Laurel Youngstrom, co-owners of Youngstrom Safety in the Seattle area. The Youngstroms are safety advocates and motivational speakers. In 1995, Russ Youngstrom, who was working for a painting company, fell from a scaffold and severed his spinal cord. The accident left him a paraplegic and changed the family’s life forever.

The Youngstroms have dedicated their lives to sharing their tragic experience in hopes that others will benefit from hearing their story. Their Jan. 29 keynote presentation, “It Won’t Happen to Me,” will emphasize the importance of personal accountability in workplace safety by offering two different perspectives on the permanent and ongoing consequences of ignoring safety precautions.

Russ Youngstrom said the attitude that ignores putting safety first can be summed up in two phrases: “It’s not worth it” and “I’ve got this.” Laurel Youngstrom said accidents affect families and friends. “You don’t want your family to get that phone call,” she said. “Being unsafe is selfish.”

The construction safety summit also offers opportunities for attendees to earn continuing education credits through Oregon’s Construction Contractors Board and Landscape Contractors Board. Certification and re-certification will be offered for first aid personnel and workzone flaggers. Moreover, the OSHA 10-hour training for construction certification will be offered.

The two-day summit’s other workshops include:

  • Construction A-Z. This session reviews the many hazards found in construction and demolition, and the best practices – and requirements – for correcting them.
  • Scaffold user training.
  • Planning for safety, every phase.
  • Asbestos and lead awareness.
  • Defensive driving strategies for central Oregon.
  • Hand/power tools and personal protective equipment.

Registration for pre-conference workshops (Monday, Jan. 28) is $50. Conference registration (Tuesday, Jan. 29) is $85. Registration for the OSHA 10-hour training for construction is $140 for both days.

To register, go to http://safetyseries.cvent.com/events/2019. If you have questions or need help registering, call the Oregon OSHA Conference Section, 503-947-7411.

###

About Oregon OSHA:

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 


First Day Hikes event returns to state parks Jan. 1, 2019 (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/07/18 11:22 AM
L.L Stub Stewart State Park
L.L Stub Stewart State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1303/120210/thumb_Snowy_First_Day_Hike_2017_Stub_Stewart.jpg

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians outdoors on New Year’s Day for the annual First Day Hikes event. Visitors can choose from 32 hikes in 31 parks across the state. All hikes will be guided by a park ranger or volunteer who will share stories about the park’s history, geology, wildlife and plants. 

All hikes are free; day-use parking fees will be waived at all participating parks Jan. 1 only.

Hikers can register for specific hikes online at the Oregon State Parks Store: bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. While online registration isn’t required for participation, visitors are encouraged to register. It helps park staff plan the hike and provides them with participant contact information should hike details change.

OPRD advises visitors to plan for inclement weather, dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, bring water and remember to carry binoculars for viewing wildlife.

OPRD has sponsored First Day Hikes annually since 2012, part of a larger national event organized by America’s State Parks.

Participating parks and meeting areas are below. Full details for each hike are also on bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents.

PORTLAND

  • L.L. Stub Stewart State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Hilltop Day-use area.
  • Tryon Creek State Park: 9 a.m., meet at the nature center.

COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE

  • Deschutes River State Recreation Area: 9 a.m., meet at Oregon Trail kiosk.
  • Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail: 1 p.m., meet at Mark O. Hatfield Visitors Center West trailhead.
  • Latourell Falls (Guy W. Talbot State Park): 10 a.m., meet at Latourell Falls parking lot.
  • Starvation Creek State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Starvation Creek Falls trailhead.

WILLAMETTE VALLEY/CASCADES

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area: 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., meet at the visitor center.
  • Dexter State Recreation Site: 11:00 a.m., meet at the information kiosk for disc golf.
  • Elijah Bristow State Park: noon, meet at the equestrian parking area for horse riding (bring your own horse.)
  • Fort Yamhill State Heritage Area: 11 a.m., meet at the main parking lot.
  • Silver Falls State Park: 10 a.m., meet at South Falls Lodge porch.

COAST

  • Bullards Beach State Park: 1 p.m., meet at the meeting hall.
  • Cape Lookout State Park: noon, meet in the Lookout Trailhead parking lot.
  • Fort Stevens State Park: 10 a.m., meet at parking lot A.
  • Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Cleawox Lodge.
  • Oswald West State Park: 8 a.m., meet at Elk Flats Trail parking lot. Parking is limited; please arrive early, carpool, or use another nearby lot.
  • Port Orford Heads State Park: 1 p.m., meet at Port Orford Heads lifeboat.
  • South Beach State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the park day-use area.
  • Umpqua Lighthouse State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Lake Marie swim area.
  • Whale Watch Center at Depoe Bay: 10 a.m., meet at the Whale Watch Center.

SOUTHERN OREGON

  • Collier Memorial State Park: 9 a.m., meet at Logging Museum parking lot.
  • Joseph H. Stewart State Recreation Area: 11 a.m., meet at the group camp.
  • OC & E Woods State Line Trail: 9 a.m., meet at Switchbacks trailhead.
  • TouVelle State Park: 1 p.m., meet at TouVelle area F parking lot.
  • Valley of the Rogue State Park: 1 p.m., meet at Valley of the Rogue program area.

EASTERN/CENTRAL OREGON

  • Cottonwood Canyon State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the experience center.
  • Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area: 11 a.m., meet at the day-use parking lot (right of park entrance.)
  • LaPine State Park: 11 a.m., meet at south loop.
  • Smith Rock State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the welcome center.
  • Tumalo State Park: 11 a.m., meet at Deschutes River Trail trailhead, near the day-use parking lot.
  • Wallowa Lake State Park: 10:30 a.m., meet at the parking area across from the south entrance of Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site.

More information about participating parks, including maps and directions, is on oregonstateparks.org.




Attached Media Files: L.L Stub Stewart State Park , OC and E Woods Line State Trail , Silver Falls State Park , Tryon Creek State Natural Area , Cottonwood Canyon State Park

Animal Rescue Entity Licensing Requirement
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/07/18 10:10 AM

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office Animal Control Division would like to remind those organizations that take in animals and solicit or accept donations from the public to register as an Animal Rescue Entity per Douglas County Code 6.18 “Animal Rescue Entities”.

The purpose of the ordinance, which became effective April 16, 2018, is to facilitate operation of Oregon law which provides for the regulation of animal rescue entities.

The license fee is $100 annually to register an Animal Rescue Entity under the ordinance. Applications are available at the Sheriff’s Office or online at http://www.dcso.com/documents/ARE_app.pdf.

The full text of the Animal Rescue Entity Ordinance can be found online at http://www.co.douglas.or.us/legal/ani_rescue.pdf

Additional questions may be directed to Douglas County Animal Control 541-440-4450 or by email dcso.info@co.douglas.or.us.




Attached Media Files: Animal Rescue Entity License Application

Thu. 12/06/18
Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in theft of salmon and damage to ODFW Equipment at Bull Run Fish Trap - Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/06/18 5:21 PM
2018-12/1002/120195/Dodge_Park.JPG
2018-12/1002/120195/Dodge_Park.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1002/120195/thumb_Dodge_Park.JPG

The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help to identify the person(s) responsible for trespassing, vandalism, and theft of salmon and ODFW equipment at the Bull Run River Fish Trap in Clackamas County.

A photo was taken of one of the suspects and the Oregon State Police is requesting that anyone with information about who this person is to please contact Senior Trooper Mark Kingma at 503-779-3623.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/1002/120195/Dodge_Park.JPG , 2018-12/1002/120195/Suspect_2.png

UPDATE - Serious Injury Motor Vehicle VS. Pedestrian Hit and Run (Photo)
Medford Police Dept. - 12/06/18 3:49 PM
Suspect Photo
Suspect Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/6231/120157/thumb_Walker_J._(2).png

On 12/5/18 at 5:14 PM officers from the Medford Police Department were dispatched to a motor vehicle crash involving a pedestrian on South Pacific Hwy. south of Garfield Street.  Officers arrived on scene and began the investigation while the seriously injured pedestrian was treated by Medford Fire and Mercy Flights personnel.  The initial investigation determined the involved vehicle was traveling southbound when it struck the pedestrian who was crossing South Pacific Hwy.

The pedestrian was rushed to a local hospital and is currently undergoing treatment for serious injuries related to the crash.  The involved vehicle fled the scene before officers arrived and has not been located.  The involved vehicle is reported to be an unknown color sedan missing the rear bumper.  The front passenger side may have damage to the front headlight area.

ODOT personnel responded to the scene and are assisting with traffic control during the investigation.  The southbound lanes of South Pacific Hwy will continue to be diverted for an undetermined amount of time while the scene is being investigated.

This crash is being investigated by members of the Serious Traffic Accident Reconstruction (STAR) Team from the Medford Police Department and the Jackson County District Attorney's Office. 

 

Involved Pedestrian:

Chantal Haney  26 yrs


UPDATE

On 12/6/18 at 1247 PM a citizen provided information regarding the location of a vehicle they believed was involved in this hit and run case.  Officers from the Medford Police Department responded to the 3600 block of Crater Lake Hwy. and located a silver BMW sedan with front end damage consistent with the case.  Officers were able to identify the owner of the vehicle, who was then contacted at work.  The suspect was cooperative and upon being interviewed was lodged at the Jackson County Jail on the below listed charges.

Suspect: 

Janathean Walker  20 yrs

Fail to Perform Duties of Driver (Felony)       Bail $7,500.00

 

 




Attached Media Files: Suspect Photo

Redmond Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Hash Oil Explosion (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/06/18 3:00 PM
2018-12/6325/120187/Marijuana_Plants.jpg
2018-12/6325/120187/Marijuana_Plants.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/6325/120187/thumb_Marijuana_Plants.jpg

EUGENE, Ore. – On Wednesday, December 5, 2018, William E. Wild, Sr., 48, of Redmond, Oregon, was sentenced to 120 days in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for endangering human life by manufacturing hash oil, a controlled substance.

According to court documents, on December 12, 2016, law enforcement and first responders responded to an explosion at Wild’s residence in Redmond. The explosion occurred in a detached garage where the defendant had been illegally manufacturing butane hash oil (BHO). The force of the explosion blew out Wild’s garage door. By his own admission, Wild had been smoking a cigarette in close proximity to the lab at the time of the explosion.

Officers on scene reported finding burnt clothing, a pressure cooker, a Pyrex dish, a large bin of marijuana stem bud and seed as well as an amber substance later identified as BHO. Officers also found a grow room adjacent to the garage with more than 20 mature marijuana plants. In total, investigators seized 57 mature marijuana plants; scales; packaging materials and containers; ledgers containing drug amounts, debts and receipts; approximately $20,000 in cash and several pipe bombs in Wild’s home.

Wild and his 18-year-old daughter were present at the time of the explosion, suffered burns and smoke inhalation and were transported by ambulance from the residence. Wild’s daughter was later intubated and flown by air-ambulance to Portland for treatment.

Wild, a first-time offender, previously pleaded guilty to one count of endangering human life on August 16, 2018. A restitution hearing is scheduled for February 7, 2019.

This case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) in partnership with the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement team (CODE), the Oregon State Police and the Redmond police and fire departments. It was prosecuted by Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/6325/120187/SENTENCING-Wild-Final.pdf , 2018-12/6325/120187/Pipe_Bombs.bmp , 2018-12/6325/120187/Marijuana_Plants.jpg , 2018-12/6325/120187/Garage_Door.jpg

Public comment period open for Jordan Cove Energy Project removal-fill permit application
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 12/06/18 2:31 PM

SALEM, Ore. –  The Oregon Department of State Lands is now accepting comment on the Jordan Cove Energy Project removal-fill permit application. 

Oregon's removal-fill law requires projects that remove or fill material in wetlands or waterways to obtain a permit from the Department of State Lands (DSL). The Jordan Cove removal-fill permit application is for three elements of the project: the liquefied natural gas (LNG) slip and access channel, the LNG terminal, and the natural gas pipeline. 

A 60-day public review and comment period begins Dec. 6, 2018, and ends Feb. 3, 2019, at 5 p.m. 

DSL will hold five public hearings to hear comment on the application: 

•    Monday, Jan. 7 from 5:30-8 p.m. at Klamath Falls Community College, 7390 S 6th St., Klamath Falls, Ore.   
•    Tuesday, Jan. 8 from 5:30-8 p.m. at the Jackson County Expo, 1 Peninger Rd, Central Point, Ore. 
•    Wednesday, Jan. 9 from 5:30-8 p.m. at Seven Feathers Casino, 146 Chief Miwaleta Ln., Canyonville, Ore.  
•    Thursday, Jan. 10 from 5:30-8 p.m. at the Mill Casino, 3201 Tremont Ave., North Bend, Ore. 
•    Tuesday, Jan. 15 from 5:30-8 p.m. at the Department of State Lands, Land Board Room, 775 Summer St NE, Salem, Ore.

Room locations and additional hearing details will be announced in late December.  

Comments may also be submitted online, by email, or by postal mail. Comment submittal information is available on the DSL website. Comments must be recieved by 5 p.m. on Feb. 3, 2019, to be considered. 

The complete application is also available for download on the DSL website. Paper copies of the application are available at the Coos Bay Public Library, the Sutherlin Library, the Winston Branch Library, the Jackson County Library and the Klamath County Library. 


Former Portland Resident Found Guilty of Sexually Exploiting Children While Babysitting
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/06/18 1:37 PM

Defendant subjected minor victims as young as two years old to sexual intercourse, sadistic and masochistic abuse and lascivious exhibition for child pornography

PORTLAND, Ore. – After deliberating for just 20 minutes, a federal jury returned guilty verdicts against Andrew Franklin Kowalczyk, 44, formerly of Portland, for the repeated sexual abuse and exploitation of three minor female victims.

“Andrew Kowalczyk’s actions have brought unthinkable distress and terror to the lives of his victims and their families. Our two prosecutors, each with many years’ experience handling similar cases, describe Kowalczyk’s conduct as the worst they’ve seen in their careers,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I applaud the unwavering resolve of our trial team, our partner investigators and the victim survivors who persevered against a defendant who attempted every conceivable tactic to delay justice for more than 10 years.”

“I am proud of the people on the FBI's Child Exploitation Task Force, people who work tirelessly to bring justice to victimized children and help put their abusers behind bars. This defendant will never violate our most vulnerable again, and I hope this sentencing sends a strong message to those who would sexually exploit children,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

“Heinous crimes like those committed by the defendant must come to an end,” said Brad Bench, Special Agent in Charge of HSI Seattle. “I’m very proud of the agents and law enforcement partners responsible for removing this dangerous person from our streets. Let this be a warning to others who attempt to harm our children. We will work tirelessly to ensure you are brought to justice.”

According to court documents and information shared during trial, law enforcement first learned of Kowalczyk’s abuse in early 2008. On December 27, 2007, a Des Moines, Washington police officer stopped Kowalczyk for several traffic violations. Kowalcyzk did not own the vehicle he was driving, did not have a driver’s license and gave the officer a false name. After refusing the officer’s request to step out of the vehicle, Kowalczyk fled, leading police on a high-speed chase that was later terminated for public safety reasons.

Kowalczyk was later located at the Northwest Motor Inn in Puyallup, Washington. A records check run on the alias used by Kowalczyk to book his hotel room returned an outstanding arrest warrant for failing to appear in an unlawful use of a weapon case in Washington County, Oregon. Kowalczyk was arrested early the next morning when attempting to leave the hotel in a cab. Officers seized Kowalcyzk’s personal belongings including two pieces of luggage and a backpack.

In January 2008, Des Moines police detectives sought and obtained a state warrant to search computer equipment, a digital camera and digital storage devices found in Kowalczyk’s luggage. The searched returned a tremendous amount of child pornography including a number of images and videos that appeared to be homemade. Numerous videos and images depicted an unidentified male sexually abusing two very young children. Metadata embedded in many of the digital images revealed that they were created using the same camera found in Kowalczyk’s luggage.

Puyallup Police officers later published certain non-pornographic images of the victims and an adult woman found on Kowalczyk’s devices in an attempt to identify the victims. An adult woman, later identified as the victims’ mother, saw the images and contacted Puyallup Police. She confirmed she knew Kowalczyk and that he had regular access to her daughters in Portland. After reviewing some of the images seized, the victims’ mother was able to identify locations where the images were taken.

The victims’ mother told investigators she met Kowalczyk, a friend of her deceased brother, in 2003. In 2005, after the victims’ mother and her children wound up in a domestic violence shelter, Kowalcyzk offered to pay for them to stay in a motel. Between April and the beginning of June 2005, Kowalczyk arranged for the victims’ mother and her children to stay with or adjacent to him in three different Portland motels. Kowalcyzk and the victims’ mother later rented separate apartments.

The victims’ mother frequently left her children alone in Kowalczyk’s care while she searched for work or housing. The victims’ mother believed Kowalczyk treated the victims well, buying them clothing, diapers, shoes, and even a birthday cake for their second birthday and was unaware of the abuse that transpired. The cake—with the victims’ names on it—appeared in some of the non-pornographic images found on Kowalczyk’s devices.

Investigators were later able to track down the Portland motel rooms Kowalczyk rented for the family. Kowalczyk took photos of himself sexually abusing two of the minor victims at each location. He took sexually explicit photos of the third minor victim at his apartment in Southeast Portland. In March 2008, investigators conducted a federal search warrant of a storage locker Kowalczyk rented in Woodlawn, Washington. They found a sofa, a mirror and several shirts depicted in the pornographic images found on Kowalczyk’s devices.

A federal grand jury charged Kowalczyk with a single count of sexual exploitation of children on February 2, 2008. A superseding indictment with eight additional counts of sexual exploitation of children was returned on March 21, 2012. Kowalczyk sought the replacement of counsel more than a dozen times and filed extensive motions to suppress evidence, causing a decade-long delay in bringing the case to trial.

He faces a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison with a 15-year mandatory minimum on each of the nine counts. Kowalczyk will be sentenced in March 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

The case was investigated by the FBI, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), the Portland Police Bureau, and the Puyallup and Des Moines, Washington Police Departments. It was prosecuted by Scott M. Kerin and Gary Y. Sussman, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. Led by the U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state, and local resources to locate, apprehend, and prosecute individuals who sexually exploit children, and to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at www.fbi.gov/tips.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/6325/120183/VERDICT-Kowalczyk-Final_66.pdf

DPSST Maritime Task Force Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 12/06/18 11:45 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

December 12, 2018

Contact:                Kayla Ballrot
                                503-378-2596

Notice of Regular Meeting

The DPSST Maritime Task Force will hold a regular meeting at 0900 on December 12, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Boardroom. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Teleconference number: 1-888-398-2342 and Access Code: 4256088

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

  • Review draft documentation from previous meeting to determine if it is an accurate reflection of the changes the Task Force was hoping to make
  • Discuss curriculum possibilities and the Task Force’s idea of a curriculum development workgroup
  • Discuss additional courses and certifications that are acceptable for certification in lieu of Maritime courses
  • Discuss creation of Guide to Certification
  • Review OARs
  • Final discussion/questions

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by DPSST Maritime Task Force members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets December 11 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 12/06/18 11:34 AM

December 6, 2018

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-239-6483, phd.communications@state.or.us

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets December 11 in Portland

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee (HAIAC).

Agenda: Outbreaks update; National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) data; Jackson County pilot project; panel: Health Care Personnel influenza vaccination programs and policies in long-term care facilities; brainstorm topics to address at future meetings and for future reports; public comment.

When: Dec. 11, 1-3 p.m. A 10-minute public comment period is scheduled at 2:55 p.m.; comments are limited to five minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. A webinar line is available at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3570318058788287745.

Background: OHA provides oversight and support for the mandatory reporting of health care-associated infections in Oregon via the HAI Program. The HAI advisory board meets on a quarterly basis; the purpose of the board is to make recommendations to OHA regarding infection measures reportable by health care facilities. For more information, see the program's webpage at  http://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/HAI/Pages/index.aspx.

Program contact: Roza Tammer, 971-673-1074, oza.p.tammer@state.or.us">roza.p.tammer@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Diane Roy at 971-673-1093, 711 TTY or oy@state.or.us">diane.m.roy@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Oregon Association of Nurseries recognizes Friends of Nurseries
Oregon Association of Nurseries - 12/06/18 11:25 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Wilsonville —December 7, 2018 — The Oregon Association of Nurseries (OAN) has recognized four people and one coalition with Friends of Nurseries awards.

“The OAN gives these awards annually to recognize officials and others from outside our industry who are solution oriented, who consider the nursery and greenhouse point of view, and who act as a partner, regardless of party affiliation,” said Jeff Stone, executive director of the Oregon Association of Nurseries. “We appreciate their help and support in attempting to solve problems that affect agriculture and particularly the nursery industry.”

The winners for 2018 are:

  • U.S. Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-Oregon-4) and U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-Oregon-5) were recognized for their support for the OAN’s coalition leadership efforts pertaining to unallocated water, largely impounded behind dams, in the Willamette River Basin. “There are many water users with claims to and needs for the water, including farms, fisheries and cities,” OAN Executive Director Jeff Stone said.  “Reps. Schrader and DeFazio worked hard to help federal officials understand the urgent need to carefully and equitably balance these demands on the available water.
  • U.S. Rep. Greg Walden (R-Oregon-2) was recognized for supporting efforts of the House Judiciary Committee, led by retiring U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Virginia), to create immigration reform and meet the labor needs of agriculture while upholding border security and the rule of law. “Rep. Walden’s support in the Republican caucus was critical in trying to move this forward,” Stone said. “The immigration issue is difficult and representatives were not able to come to agreement, but it wasn’t for a lack of effort. Rep. Walden was all in on this effort.”
  • Andrea Williams, executive director of Causa, was recognized for her leadership in the successful campaign to defeat Measure 105, which would have repealed Oregon’s sanctuary law. “The campaign was tremendously successful with a 63 percent ‘no’ vote,” Stone said. “It showed that Oregonians are pushing back on attempts to demonize and profile segments of the population. They understand that safe communities begin with open dialogue and rapport with law enforcement, two things that the sanctuary law is designed to protect.”
  • A coalition award to several partners on the water issue, including the Oregon Water Resources Congress, the Special Districts Association of Oregon, the League of Oregon Cities, the Oregon Farm Bureau Federation, The Freshwater Trust and The Nature Conservancy of Oregon. “All of these groups were willing to come to the table with us and talk about different water uses in the Willamette River Basin,” Stone said. “If we don’t attempt to cooperate on this, we all lose. It’s only through planning, coordination and constructive dialogue that we can arrive at mutually beneficial solutions.”

# # #

CONTACT:

Jeff Stone or Curt Kipp, Oregon Association of Nurseries, 503-682-5089

The Oregon Association of Nurseries, based in Wilsonville, represents more than 800 wholesale growers, retailers, landscapers and suppliers. Oregon’s ornamental horticulture industry is among the state’s largest agricultural commodities, with annual sales of nearly $947 million. Oregon’s nursery industry is a traded sector; more than 75 percent of the nursery plants grown in Oregon are shipped out of state. For information, visit www.oan.org or call 503-682-5089.


***UPDATE*** Missing Roseburg Woman ***LOCATED*** (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/06/18 10:58 AM
Michelle Reyes
Michelle Reyes
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/5204/120159/thumb_Reyes.jpg

UPDATE
Michelle Reyes, the 57 year old woman reported missing yesterday has been located safe and sound.  Reyes was located at the Samaritan Inn.  She apparently checked into the shelter last night, and was recognized by one of the employees this morning, who then called authorities.  
END UPDATE

ORIGINAL RELEASE 
ROSEBURG, Ore. - The Douglas County Sheriff's Office is seeking information about a Roseburg woman who left the Green area on Wednesday, December 5, 2018. 

57 year-old Michelle Reyes of Roseburg was last seen leaving a residence in the Green District on Wednesday around 12:30. She is approximately 5'01'', 110 lbs with black hair and brown eyes. She was last seen wearing a light brown jacket with fur trim, blue jeans and carrying a large Marshall's shopping bag. Ms. Reyes suffers from a medical condition which may leave her in a confused state and has difficulty walking. She may be hitchhiking to an unknown destination. 

Douglas County Search and Rescue Coordinators are working to attempt to locate Ms. Reyes. Anyone who has information about her whereabouts is asked to contact the Douglas County Sheriff's Office at (541) 440-4471 referencing case number 18-5392.




Attached Media Files: Michelle Reyes

BPA cuts costs in proposed rates for 2020 and 2021
Bonneville Power Administration - 12/06/18 9:46 AM

Portland, Ore. – The Bonneville Power Administration today released its initial wholesale power and transmission rates proposal for fiscal years 2020 and 2021. The rates proposal includes significant program cost reductions and supports a multi-year grid modernization initiative to maximize the capacity of the federal power and transmission systems and improve grid efficiency.

The proposed average wholesale power rate increase is 2.9 percent for the two-year rate period and the average transmission rate increase is 3.6 percent. The initial proposal kicks off the rate-setting process, which will end with final decisions in July 2019. The new rates will take effect on Oct. 1, 2019.

“This rates proposal demonstrates BPA’s commitment to disciplined cost-management while investing in the most valuable work, including grid modernization and strengthening our financial health,” said Administrator Elliot Mainzer. “The proposal is a result of the focus and determination of the BPA workforce, the hard work of our federal and nonfederal generation partners, and an effective collaboration with our customers, states, tribes and other constituents throughout the region.”

BPA worked diligently to lower program spending through the 2018 Integrated Program Review, where it found $66 million in annual program spending reductions compared to the current rate period.

“Our customers have clearly articulated their concerns about our cost structure and long-term competitiveness,” said Mainzer. “By fully absorbing inflation and further reducing costs, we have made real progress in bending the cost curve. But we are not stopping here. We must continue to lean in to find additional savings and new sources of revenues as we execute on our 2018-2023 Strategic Plan.”

The program cost reductions helped to offset significant upward power rate pressures from a continued decline in surplus power sales revenues, lower customer and direct-service industry

loads, and the financial result of a 2015 decision to fund energy efficiency through expense instead of capital.

The power rate proposal also supports investments in BPA’s financial health by ensuring adequate liquidity in the form of financial reserves during the next rate period. Additional savings from debt-management actions and lower transmission costs that are tied to a proposed transmission rates settlement contributed to BPA’s ability to offset most of the upward power rate pressure.

BPA has offered and expects to reach a settlement on transmission rates, as well as the associated ancillary and control area services rates, as part of its efforts to reach an agreement with customers about the terms and conditions of a new transmission tariff.  BPA is proposing the new tariff in a separate proceeding called TC-20. This settlement includes a 3.6 percent average transmission rate increase.

BPA is a nonprofit federal wholesale utility that receives no congressional appropriations and must recover its costs through rates. The new rates will affect local retail utilities differently depending on the amount of power and type of services they purchase from BPA. Local utilities ultimately determine the impact of BPA’s rates on individual businesses and residents.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 143 electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 260 substations to 511 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

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BLM Proposes Increased Flexibility and Access in Sage-Grouse Plans
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 12/06/18 8:32 AM

Proposed amendments would align conservation efforts at state and federal levels

PORTLAND, Ore. – In keeping with Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke’s commitment to work closely with states to enhance conservation, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced the availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and proposed plan amendments addressing Greater Sage-Grouse conservation on public land in Oregon.

The proposed plan amendments aim to better align BLM resource management plans with state plans for conserving sage-grouse populations, strike a regulatory balance and build trust among neighboring interests in Western communities.  The proposed amendments and final EISs also addresses the issues remanded to the agency by a March 31, 2017, order by the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada, which determined that the BLM had violated the National Environmental Policy Act when it finalized the 2015 Nevada plan.

“We have appreciated the opportunity to work with Governor Brown’s team on a carefully crafted amendment to the 2015 plan,” said Deputy Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. “We know the successful conservation of the Greater Sage-Grouse requires the shared stewardship vision of the states, private citizens, landowners and federal land management agencies, including those within the Department of the Interior.

Bernhardt continued, “With today’s action we have leaned forward to address the various sates’ issues, while appropriately ensuring that we will continue to be focused on meaningfully addressing the threats to the Greater Sage-Grouse and making efforts to improve its habitat.”  

The BLM developed the plan changes in cooperation with Oregon Governor Kate Brown, state wildlife managers, and other concerned organizations and individuals, largely through the Western Governors Association’s Sage-Grouse Task Force. 

“Collaboration is hard work, and I appreciate the efforts by our stakeholders, state agencies and the Department of the Interior to craft an agreement to protect the sage grouse,” Gov. Brown said.  “Balancing sage grouse habitat protection and economic development requires mitigation of negative impacts.  This agreement is a critical step that marks a shift away from planning toward active conservation and landscape management to protect this iconic species. Oregon’s bounty is beautiful and worth continuing to protect and fight for.” 

“Throughout this process we've worked with Governor Brown and the affected counties in identifying a targeted plan amendment that simultaneously deals with threats to Greater Sage-Grouse and opens approximately 22,000 acres to livestock grazing,” said Chris McAlear, BLM Oregon/Washington Acting State Director.  

The proposed changes refine the previous management plans adopted in 2015.  Under the 1976 Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), the BLM is required by law to work cooperatively with states on land-use plans and amendments.

In Oregon, the proposed amendments focus on continuing to make public lands designated as Research Natural Areas (RNA) available for livestock grazing.  Seventeen permittees currently use parts of 13 RNAs in southeast Oregon, with an estimated annual direct economic impact of $30,000 to the ranches.  The amendment process also offers an opportunity for the BLM to align its mitigation requirements under FLPMA with those established under Oregon law.

The BLM has also published Final EISs for lands it manages in Colorado, Idaho, Nevada and northeastern California, Utah and Wyoming. 

Publication of the Final EIS and proposed amendments in tomorrow’s Federal Register initiates a 30-day protest period, which will run through January 8, 2019.  The Oregon Governor also has 60 days to review the proposed amendments for consistency with state and local laws and regulations.  The process will conclude with a Record of Decision following resolution of any protests received during the 30-day review period. 

Approval of the Final EIS Proposed Plan Amendment would require amendments to eight current BLM resource management plans: Andrews, Baker, Brothers/LaPine, Lakeview, Southeastern Oregon, Steens, Three Rivers, and Upper Deschutes.

Anyone who participated in the process for the 2018 Oregon Greater Sage-Grouse EIS and who has an interest that is or may be adversely affected by the proposed land use plan amendments in the Final EIS will have the opportunity to protest the proposed plan amendments. 

The Final EIS is now available online at https://goo.gl/4CNtH8.  Instructions for filing a protest with the Director of the BLM regarding the Proposed RMPA/Final EIS are found online at https://www.blm.gov/programs/planning-and-nepa/public-participation/filing-a-plan-protest.  All protests must be in writing and mailed to the appropriate address or submitted electronically through the BLM ePlanning project website.  To submit a protest electronically, go to the ePlanning project webpage https://goo.gl/4CNtH8 and follow the instructions at the top of the home page.

If submitting a protest in hard copy, it must be mailed to one of the following addresses:

U.S. Postal Service Mail:  BLM Director (210), Attention: Protest Coordinator, WO-210, P.O Box 71383, Washington, D.C. 20024-1383

Overnight Delivery:  BLM Director (210), Attention: Protest Coordinator, WO-210,
20 M Street SE, Room 2134LM, Washington, D.C. 20003

Protests submitted electronically by any means other than the ePlanning project website will be invalid unless a protest is also submitted in hard copy.  Protests submitted by fax will also be invalid unless also submitted either through ePlanning project website protest section or in hard copy. 

Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personally identifiable information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment – including your personally identifiable information – may be made publicly available at any time.  While you can ask the BLM in your comment to withhold your personally identifiable information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

-BLM-


The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.


The early bird gets the $118,000 Oregon Lottery Keno prize (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 12/06/18 7:30 AM
Sam Hawley of Portland and Louis.
Sam Hawley of Portland and Louis.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/4939/120165/thumb_Sam_Hawley.JPG

December 6, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – Arriving early at the Wilsonville Payment Center paid off for a Portland man who won more than $118,000 while waiting for the center to open.

Sam Hawley of Portland felt he had great luck when he won $1,750 playing Special Keno 8-Spot, so he headed for the Oregon Lottery’s Wilsonville Payment Center. The problem is he arrived early, the center opens at 8:30 a.m. and he arrived around 7:30. While he waited, he went to the Wilsonville Fred Meyer and purchased another Keno ticket with his tried and true numbers.

“I have used the same numbers for years,” Hawley told Lottery officials.

When he turned in his $1,750 ticket, he realized while waiting he had purchased a $118,759 winning Keno 8-Spot ticket.

All eight of his numbers matched, bringing him $25,000 and the 8-Spot rolling jackpot was $93,759.60. When players play the Keno 8-Spot, if no one has selected all eight numbers drawn, the rolling jackpot continues to grow. Hawley also opted to play Special Keno, a free option, where there is an expanded prize structure for larger prizes.

During the 2015-17 biennium in Clackamas County, where Hawley played Keno, more than $55 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, and watershed enhancement.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25,1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###




Attached Media Files: Sam Hawley of Portland and Louis.

Wed. 12/05/18
Medicaid long term quality council meets Dec. 12
Oregon Department of Human Services - 12/05/18 6:29 PM

Salem, Ore. – The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council meets from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018, at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 160, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: public comment, the Governor’s Recommended Budget, the ventilator assistance program, the annual report and council business.

For those who aren’t able to attend in person, there is a toll-free phone number that can also be accessed through Skype for Business: 1-503-934-1400 with participant code: 1272017.  

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Alex Pelusi at alex.j.pelusi@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Max Brown, 503-945-6993 or max.brown@state.or.us.

About the Medicaid Long Term Care Quality & Reimbursement Advisory Council

The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council (MLTCQRAC) was established by the 1995 Legislative Assembly to advise the Department of Human Services Aging and People with Disabilities program on changes or modifications to the Medicaid reimbursement system for long-term care and community based care services.

                                                                                           # # #


Quality Measurement Council meets Dec. 19
Oregon Department of Human Services - 12/05/18 5:25 PM

Wilsonville, Ore. – The Quality Measurement Council will hold a meeting from 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2018, in Training Rooms 1 and 2 at the Oregon Child Development Coalition, 9140 S.W. Pioneer Court, Wilsonville, Oregon, 97070. The council meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include a review of training and metrics for the use of anti-psychotic drugs.  

Sign language interpreters and live captioning will be provided. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join by calling toll-free phone number, 1-888-363-4735, and using Conference ID #3439085. 

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us  Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us

About the Quality Measurement Council

The council was established to create and maintain a system through which community-based, long-term care facilities report reliable and meaningful data that will make possible a system for measuring a facility’s performance compared with other long-term care providers in the state.

                                                                                               # # #


Oregon Disabilities Commission Executive Committee meets Dec. 18
Oregon Department of Human Services - 12/05/18 5:20 PM

Salem, Ore. – The Oregon Disabilities Commission (ODC) Executive Committee will meet from 1:30 to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018, at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St NE, Room 166, Salem, Oregon, 97301.

The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes regular ODC business, review and approval of the meeting agenda and prior meeting minutes, public comment, announcements, ODC business topics, other topics and next meeting agenda ideas.

Those who are not able to attend in person may call into the meeting using this conference line and access code: 877-336-1828, 1093140.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Lori Watt at Lori.C.Watt@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.

For questions about the meeting, please contact: Jeff Puterbaugh, policy analyst at Jeffrey.L.Puterbaugh@state.or.us.

About the Oregon Disabilities Commission:

The Oregon Disabilities Commission is charged by state statute to advise the Department of Human Services, the Governor, the Legislative Assembly and appropriate state agency administrators on issues related to achieving the full economic, social, legal and political equity of individuals with disabilities. ODC also acts as a coordinating link between and among public and private organizations services individuals with disabilities.

                                                                                          # # #

 


Governor's Commission on Senior Services meets Dec. 13 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 12/05/18 5:16 PM

Salem, Ore. – The Governor’s Commission on Senior Services (GCSS) will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018, at the Department of Human Services’ Office, 500 Summer St. N.E., Room 166, Salem, Oregon, 97305.

The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include regular and new commission business; updates from the Aging and People with Disabilities program and the stakeholder meeting on eligibility; a discussion about the governor’s recommended budget and potential legislative guidelines; the Oregon Long-Term Care Ombudsman and Public Guardian programs; and, a conversation with Department of Human Services leadership.

Those who aren’t able to attend in person may call into the meeting using this conference line and access code: 1-888-808-6929, 4517555.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Lori Watt at Lori.C.Watt@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting. For questions about the meeting, please contact: Deb McCuin, program analyst at Debbie.Mccuin@state.or.us.

About the Governor’s Commission on Senior Services

The Governor’s Commission on Senior Services is dedicated to enhancing and protecting the quality of life for all older Oregonians. Through cooperation with other organizations, and advocacy, the commission works to ensure that seniors have access to services that provide, choice, independence, and dignity.

                                                                                          # # #


2018 Shop with a Cop event to be held on Saturday (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/05/18 4:50 PM
2018-12/5204/120152/ShopWithaCop2_2018_(2).png
2018-12/5204/120152/ShopWithaCop2_2018_(2).png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/5204/120152/thumb_ShopWithaCop2_2018_(2).png

On Saturday, December 8, 2018, uniformed officers and support staff from local law enforcement agencies will be volunteering their time at the Roseburg Walmart store to help provide a brighter Christmas for foster children in Douglas County.

The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Roseburg Police Department, Sutherlin Police Department, Winston Police Department, Myrtle Creek Police Department, Oregon State Police, and Douglas County Parole and Probation will be participating in the annual "Shop with a Cop" holiday event. The event will be held at the Roseburg Walmart from 8:15 – 10:30 a.m. on Saturday.

Thirty-one children have been selected and will be paired up with a police officer and given money to buy Christmas gifts for their families. The officers help the children pick out gifts for their family members and then help wrap them. Before leaving, each child is given their own gift and a stocking filled with goodies from Santa.

The purpose of this event is to help make the holiday season brighter for these children and to give them the opportunity to interact with law enforcement in a positive setting.

Shop with a Cop is fully funded through donations. We would like to thank Christmas for Kids of Douglas County for their generous donation of $2,100 to make this event possible. We would also like to thank the Roseburg Walmart store for hosting and to our many volunteer elves.   

All members of the media are invited to attend.




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/5204/120152/ShopWithaCop2_2018_(2).png

2018 Shop with a Cop
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/05/18 4:49 PM

On Saturday, December 8, 2018, uniformed officers and support staff from local law enforcement agencies will be volunteering their time at the Roseburg Walmart store to help provide a brighter Christmas for foster children in Douglas County.

The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Roseburg Police Department, Sutherlin Police Department, Winston Police Department, Myrtle Creek Police Department, Oregon State Police, and Douglas County Parole and Probation will be participating in the annual "Shop with a Cop" holiday event. The event will be held at the Roseburg Walmart from 8:15 – 10:30 a.m. on Saturday.

Thirty-one children have been selected and will be paired up with a police officer and given money to buy Christmas gifts for their families. The officers help the children pick out gifts for their family members and then help wrap them. Before leaving, each child is given their own gift and a stocking filled with goodies from Santa.

The purpose of this event is to help make the holiday season brighter for these children and to give them the opportunity to interact with law enforcement in a positive setting.

Shop with a Cop is fully funded through donations. We would like to thank Christmas for Kids of Douglas County for their generous donation of $2,100 to make this event possible. We would also like to thank the Roseburg Walmart store for hosting and to our many volunteer elves.   

All members of the media are invited to attend.


Fatal vehicle crash on Hwy 51 - Polk County
Oregon State Police - 12/05/18 4:16 PM

On Wednesday, December 5, 2018 at approximately 6:38 am, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Hwy 51 at Rogers Ln.  

Preliminary investigation revealed that a silver 2005 Cadillac Escalade, operated by Hannah Parks (26) of Dallas, was turning northbound onto Hwy 51 from Rogers Lane.  The Cadillac turned into the path of a 1985 International farm truck operated by Armando Trapala-Amador (36) of Independence.    The farm truck hit the Cadillac on the driver's side and both vehicles left the roadway.

Parks sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  Three juveniles in the Cadillac were treated for minor injuries.

Trapala-Amador was not injured.  

OSP was assisted by the Polk County Sheriff's Office, Polk County Fire, and ODOT.    


UPDATE - Prineville resident loses life in head on crash on Highway 97. (Deschutes County) (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/05/18 4:12 PM
2018-12/1002/120138/20181205_105902.jpg
2018-12/1002/120138/20181205_105902.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1002/120138/thumb_20181205_105902.jpg

The identity of the deceased has been confirmed as 73 year old Prineville resident Richard James Lanning.  The investigation is continuing and any further information will be released as it becomes available. 

 

 

On Wednesday December 5, 2018 at approximately 9:00am, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle crash on Highway 97 at MP 124.  This crash was located on the southern end of Redmond.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a silver 2005 Chevy Malibu, operated by a 73 year old Prineville resident, was traveling northbound on Highway 97.  For unknown reasons, the Malibu crossed over into the oncoming lanes and crashed head-on into a southbound commercial motor vehicle, operated by Bend Roof Truss and driven by 48 year old Bend resident, Kavan Rose.  The driver of the Malibu suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  The driver of the commercial motor vehicle was transported to St. Charles Redmond for non-life threatening injuries.

Highway 97 was closed for approximately three and a half hours following the crash.  OSP was assisted at the scene by the Redmond Police Department, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Bend Police Department, ODOT and Redmond Fire and Rescue. 

The identity of the deceased will be released at a later time to allow notification to the next of kin. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-12/1002/120138/20181205_105902.jpg , 2018-12/1002/120138/20181205_105820.jpg , 2018-12/1002/120138/20181205_105757.jpg

Health advisory for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach lifted December 5
Oregon Health Authority - 12/05/18 4:12 PM

December 5, 2018

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@state.or.us

Health advisory for water contact at Sunset Bay State Park Beach lifted December 5

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Sunset Bay State Park Beach located in Coos County. The health authority issued the advisory November 28, after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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New entrance gate to be installed Dec. 7 in TouVelle State Recreation Site (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/05/18 2:50 PM
TouVelle entrance
TouVelle entrance
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1303/120140/thumb_Tou_Velle_entrance_sign.jpg

MEDFORD, Ore. – Construction work to install a new gate to the Table Rock Road entrance of TouVelle State Recreation Site will occur Dec. 7. The gate will be installed on the east side of the road entrance only. Access to the boat ramp, located on the west side of the road, will remain open.

Park staff expect no interruptions to traffic on Table Rock Road during the construction, however they ask motorists and day-use visitors to be mindful of any workers present near the park entrance on Dec. 7.

Nathan Seable, park manager, says the new gate will help enforce day-use hours at the park and help curb vandalism and improper use of the park’s facilities.

Park hours are 7 a.m.- 6 p.m., Nov. - Feb. and 7 a.m. – 9 p.m., March – Oct. The new hours and gate use will go into effect Jan. 1, 2019.

TouVelle State Recreation Site—a popular day-use area for group recreation, swimming and boating—is located along the bank of the Rogue River, about 9 miles north of Medford. 

Learn more about the park at oregonstateparks.org.




Attached Media Files: TouVelle entrance

Five tips for the last 10 days of open enrollment; Oregonians who buy their own health insurance must enroll by Dec. 15
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/05/18 10:31 AM

(Salem) – Time is running out for people who want health insurance in 2019 but do not get coverage through their job or another program. Dec. 15 is the last day to enroll. The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace has five tips for Oregonians who need to get or renew coverage and financial assistance. The marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov.

Tip No. 1: Don’t assume you make too much to get help paying for your plan. Families of four making about $100,000 a year or less may qualify. The most single people can make and qualify is about $48,000. The income guidelines rise every year, so even if you have not been eligible for subsidies in the past, try again this year. Start at OregonHealthCare.gov.

Tip No. 2: Get free, local help enrolling. Licensed insurance agents and certified community partners are ready to help you. Agents and partners are experts on the HealthCare.gov application for financial assistance. They can also guide you through your health plan options before you enroll. Choose an agent or partner in the directory at OregonHealthCare.gov/gethelp, or call the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace at 1-855-268-3767 (toll free).

Tip No. 3: Look beyond the sticker prices. More than 70 percent of people who got coverage through HealthCare.gov last year also qualified for financial assistance. That means their coverage cost them less than the full premium. On average, they saved $421 each month off their premium. The best way to find out how much you might pay once financial help is factored in is to apply for coverage. If you want an estimate first, visit HealthCare.gov/see-plans and answer a few screening questions.

Tip No. 4: Read the fine print on deductibles. Sometimes health insurance shoppers wince when they see the deductibles that come with health plans. Deductibles are usually the amount a person with insurance has to pay for care before the health plan kicks in. The good news is that deductibles do not apply to everything. Even a plan with a deductible will cover eligible preventive care for no extra cost. Plus, all Oregon plans on HealthCare.gov with “Standard Silver” in the plan name, and some others, cover in-network office visits even if you have not paid the deductible. You pay only your co-payment for those visits and not the full cost of the visit. Check for those details when you shop, or work with an insurance agent who can look them up for you.

Tip No. 5: Don’t miss the deadline. The deadline to enroll is Dec. 15. If you miss it, you may go a year without health insurance. Avoid the risk and get started at OregonHealthCare.gov.


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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.


Tue. 12/04/18
Oregon Coast Trail public meetings to be held in Coos Bay, Tillamook and Portland (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/04/18 4:56 PM
The Oregon Coast Trail at Sam Boardman State Scenic Corridor
The Oregon Coast Trail at Sam Boardman State Scenic Corridor
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-12/1303/120106/thumb_Sam_Boardman_scenic_shots__(6).JPG

UPDATE: PHOTOS INCLUDED

The public is invited to weigh in on the future of the Oregon Coast Trail at three upcoming open houses hosted by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). Participants can drop in at any time during the meeting to learn more about plans to close trail gaps and make improvements to the trail that stretches along the entire coastline.

The same drop-in format will be presented at each open house, scheduled as follows:

Coos Bay: 5:30-7:30 p.m., Dec. 10, Coos Bay Public Library, 525 Anderson Avenue

Tillamook: 5:30-7:30 p.m. Dec. 11, Port of Tillamook Bay – Officers’ Mess Hall, 4000 Blimp Boulevard

Portland: 5:30-7:30 p.m. Dec. 13, REI Downtown – Community Meeting Room, 1405 NW Johnson

A little less than half of the OCT is on sand; the trail also winds through forests, along scenic headlands and through 28 coastal cities. Some portions of the trail require hikers to walk along the shoulder of US Highway 101. In 2017, Oregon lawmakers tasked OPRD — in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Transportation and local governments — to identify steps and funding needed to address these gaps. These meetings are part of an ongoing public planning process.

For those who prefer to comment online, materials will be posted at oregoncoasttrailplanning.com  on Dec. 14. Public comment is welcome through Jan. 31, via the website, or email comments directly to OPRD’s project manager, Robin Wilcox, obin.wilcox@oregon.gov">robin.wilcox@oregon.gov.

Services, programs and activities of OPRD are covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); if accommodations are needed, please call 503-986-0743 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting




Attached Media Files: The Oregon Coast Trail at Sam Boardman State Scenic Corridor , The Oregon Coast Trail at Ecola State Park , The Oregon Coast Trail at Ecola State Park

Marine Board Seeks Written Public Comments on Proposed Rules for Marine Sanitation Devices
Oregon Marine Board - 12/04/18 3:36 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board is accepting written public comments on proposed rules for Marine Sanitation Devices.  The proposed rules are to align state rules with existing federal rules for the protection of state waters against the discharge of untreated black waste and sewage. 

Written comments will be accepted until January 2, 2019, at 5 pm. Comments can be submitted by email to .rulemaking@oregon.gov">osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov or by U.S. Mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, Oregon State Marine Board, 435 Commercial St. NE., Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301.  Comments via telephone will not be accepted. 

For more information and to view the proposed rule language, visit https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Pages/Rulemaking-and-Public-Notices.aspx.

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DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 12/04/18 3:15 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

December 4, 2018

Contact:                Mona Riesterer
                                (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on December 13, 2018. The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Baker, Jason DPSST #46912-Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications Only; Department of Corrections - WCCF

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

3.  Brown, Shannon (aka Kuehl) DPSST #40076-Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications; Josephine County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

4.  Bryant, Lejeune DPSST #56580-Basic Corrections Certification; Department of Corrections – CCCF

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

5.  Gable, Robert DPSST #48832-Basic Corrections Certifications; Department of Corrections – OSP

Presented by Kristen Hibberds 

6.  Jones, Stephanie DPSST #49703-Basic Corrections Certification; Department of Corrections- SRCI

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7.  Kempas, Nicholas DPSST #56639-Application for Certification; Department of Corrections - TRCI

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  McClendon, Reece DPSST #56137-Basic Corrections Certification; Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Muschek, Steven DPSST #46720-Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Correction Certifications; Washington County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Navarro, Paul DPSST #36388-Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Correction Certifications; Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

11. Sharp, Billy DPSST #52472-Basic Corrections Certification; Department of Corrections-OSP

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

12. Tracy, Christopher DPSST #51211-Basic Corrections Certification; Springfield Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

13. Vaughn, Sherill DPSST #18399-Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications; Marion County Sheriff’s Office 

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

14. Staff Update

15. Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting – February 12, 2019 @ 1:30 p.m. 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Corrections Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

 

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Fatal Industrial Accident
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/04/18 3:13 PM

WINSTON, Ore. - An industrial accident on Tuesday morning resulted in the death of a 57 year-old Tenmile man. 

A 9-1-1 call was placed to Douglas County Emergency Communications at 9:27 am requesting medical assistance at a logging site off of Kent Creek Road for the male who was injured while working on a piece of equipment. 

The victim, 57 year-old Richard Allen Smith of Tenmile, was declared deceased at the scene. 

The Douglas County Medical Examiner's Office is investigating the death.

Next of kin has been notified. 


FBI Media On-Call
FBI - Oregon - 12/04/18 2:18 PM

FBI PIO Beth Anne Steele is on leave starting at 5 pm on Tuesday, December 4th and returning to the office on Monday, December 17th. During this time, reporters needing assistance during normal business hours should email the on-call PIO at media.portland@fbi.gov. After hours, reporters can call the media pager at (503) 208-6241.

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Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Business Email Compromise Involving Gift Card Fraud (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 12/04/18 10:00 AM
BEC Gift Card Audio
BEC Gift Card Audio
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/thumb_2018-11/3585/119594/BECGiftCards-TT-FBI.mp3

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: Building a digital defense against Business Email Compromise, this time combined with gift card fraud.

Scammers know businesses are more likely to reward employees or thank customers during this time of year. ‘Tis the season, after all, for presents, incentives and end-of-year bonuses. That combined with an upward spike in business email compromise scams make companies particularly vulnerable to this kind of fraud.

Over the past year and a half – and especially in the last few months – the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center – IC3.gov – has seen a huge increase in the number of businesses that are getting hit with this kind of fraud. From January 2017 to this fall, the adjusted loss topped $1 million.

The scam starts with a spoofed email or text from a person of authority, such as a CEO or HR director, telling an employee to purchase gift cards for the executive to give away or to use to purchase items, say, for a Christmas party. The employee is told to send the gift card info – including the number and PIN – back to the “boss” – really the fraudster – who then can cash out the value before you know there is a problem.

There are ways to prevent these types of scams:

  • Keep an eye out for email addresses that look similar to – but not exactly the same as – the ones used by your work supervisors or peers.
  • Be wary of requests to buy multiple gift cards, even if the request seems ordinary.
  • Watch out for grammatical errors or odd phrasing.
  • Notice language that tries to pressure you to purchase the cards quickly.
  • Finally, be wary if the sender asks you to send the gift card number and PIN back to him.

In any case, requests for gift card purchases or wire transfers should be highly scrutinized. Make sure your business uses two-factor authentication protocols or at least follow up a phone call to confirm any transfer of funds.

IC3 says that while this kind of fraud can happen to any company, there are a variety of sectors most at risk. They include the real estate, legal, medical, and distribution and supply parts of our economy as well as religious organizations.

If you have been victimized by this or any cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.




Attached Media Files: BEC Gift Card Audio , BEC Gift Card Graphic