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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Wed. Jun. 16 - 12:20 pm
Wed. 06/16/21
Local Construction Company Owner Pleads Guilty in Tax Evasion Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/16/21 12:11 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Beaverton, Oregon man pleaded guilty today for his role in a scheme to use construction subcontracting companies to evade $100 million in payroll and income taxes on wages paid to unlicensed construction workers.

Francisco Mendez, 27, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit tax evasion.

According to court documents, between January 2014 and February 2018, Mendez conspired with others to make “under the table” cash payments to unlicensed construction work crews for the purpose of evading payroll and income taxes due on these wages.

As part of the scheme, otherwise legitimate construction companies would bid on residential real estate projects knowing they did not have enough employee-workers to perform all the work required. These companies would supplement their own workforce with independent work crews, some of whom did not possess valid Construction Contractors Board (CCB) licenses. Leaders of unlicensed crews would pay a fee to use another company’s CCB license.

Mendez registered a company, obtained a CCB license in his own name, and began accepting payments from unlicensed work crews for the use of his license. The legitimate construction companies did not put these unlicensed work crews on their regular payroll and, instead, wrote checks payable to Mendez’s company. Mendez cashed these payroll checks at check cashing businesses and made “under the table” cash wage payments to the unlicensed work crews. He further began accepting and cashing payroll checks from construction companies on behalf of other CCB license holding companies.

On May 20, 2021, Mendez was charged by criminal information with one count of conspiracy to commit tax evasion.

Mendez faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years of supervised release. He will be sentenced on September 13, 2021 before U.S. District Court Judge Karin J. Immergut.

As part of the plea agreement, Mendez has agreed to pay restitution in full to the IRS as identified by the government prior to sentencing and ordered by the court.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Seth D. Uram and Gavin W. Bruce are prosecuting the case.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Lower Snake River Dams provided crucial energy and reserves in winter 2021 (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 06/16/21 12:08 PM
Lower Snake River Dams maximum generation
Lower Snake River Dams maximum generation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1236/145890/thumb_Lower_Snake_Total_Max_Generation_by_Month_(MW)_graphics_version.jpg

Portland, Oregon – From December to March and particularly during the deep freeze of early 2021, the four dams on the lower Snake River were once again winter workhorses, according to a recent assessment by the Bonneville Power Administration. These four facilities not only provided important real-time electricity and critical power reserves, they also picked up slack when there was an equipment failure at Chief Joseph Dam – one of the largest dams in the Columbia River power system.

“Year after year, the Pacific Northwest can count on service from these projects in the winter when electricity consumption is highest,” said BPA Administrator John Hairston. “As we feel the impacts of climate change and the region builds more intermittent energy resources like wind and solar, we’re seeing more evidence that these dispatchable hydroelectric facilities are vital to public safety and electric reliability for the region.”

This recent assessment by BPA provides a clearer picture of how each dam performed during the storm. While federal agencies operate the 31 dams of the Federal Columbia River Power System as whole, this more granular data is helpful for power planners who are evaluating the potential impacts of climate change, including extreme-cold weather scenarios, and how the federal system can respond.

As Northwest residents turned up thermostats to keep warm and businesses maintained operations during the February storm, the four dams on the lower Snake River revved up on numerous occasions to meet the demand. In addition to generating more than 1,700 MW of electricity at times this winter, these facilities also accounted for important back-up reserves BPA could use to pick up slack when other hydro units experienced unplanned outages.

These reserves played an important role during the winter storm that battered parts of the Pacific Northwest in February. During that storm, technical issues at Chief Joseph Dam on the upper Columbia River impacted generation at the facility. Some of the electricity production and reserve requirements were transferred to the four lower Snake River dams, which are equipped to provide valuable operational agility and flexibility. Operators were able to bring the lower Snake River dams’ energy production down to zero at night when power demand dropped, and then quickly ramped their production up during the day.

“Knowing we can rely on these facilities for steady energy production under normal circumstances should bring great comfort and confidence to residents of the Pacific Northwest,” said Kieran Connolly, BPA Power Services vice president of Generation Asset Management. “Being able to rely on their operational flexibility during extreme weather truly demonstrates the value they provide to the region.”

The attached chart shows the flexibility of the hydroelectric plants on the lower Snake River during January and February, each plant at times eclipsed 400 MW of production, with some providing more than 500 MW of electricity. It is important to note that hydropower is more flexible and can ramp up and down more quickly than even the most flexible natural gas plants. On an average annual basis, the plants on the lower Snake River provide about 1,000 average megawatts of electricity, which is about the average annual consumption of the City of Seattle.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov  




Attached Media Files: Lower Snake River Dams maximum generation , Lower Snake River Dams net generation

High Desert Museum Annual Fundraiser High Desert Rendezvous Returns on August 28: Signature fundraiser supports Museum educational programs
High Desert Museum - 06/16/21 10:30 AM

BEND, OR — The High Desert Museum’s signature fundraiser, High Desert Rendezvous, returns on Saturday, August 28, at 7:00 pm. The lively evening this year will take place in the virtual world with an in-person viewing party for a number of supporters at the Museum. This marks the 32nd High Desert Rendezvous, making it one of the longest-running fundraisers in Central Oregon.

The event will include special programming, auction items and a raffle, and it’s free to all to attend online. Last year, Terri, Robert and Bindi Irwin of Crikey! It’s the Irwins and actor Sam Waterston sent video messages for the celebration. The Irwins, longtime supporters of the High Desert Museum, will return with another message during this year’s online program. The fundraiser on August 28 will include appearances from more surprise guests.

“We look forward to the High Desert Rendezvous every year, one of the Museum’s most celebratory events,” said Museum Executive Director Dana Whitelaw, Ph.D. “Moving the event to the virtual world allows us a much bigger tent, inviting more people to join the festivities.”

Bidding on silent auction items will begin online prior to the Rendezvous event at highdesertmuseum.org/hdr.

The 2021 Rendezvous Honorees are Merritt and Heather Paulson, supporters of the High Desert Museum since 2016. Merritt is the owner and chief executive officer of the Portland Timbers of Major League Soccer, Portland Thorns FC of the National Women’s Soccer League and T2 (Portland Timbers 2) of the United Soccer League. Heather serves as the Vice President, Connected Marketplace for Nike. She also leads New Commerce + Pure Play partners globally to shape Nike’s digital marketplace. We are deeply grateful to the Paulsons for their commitment to the Museum’s mission.

Registration for the virtual Rendezvous is free and encouraged. Sponsorship is also available: A $3,000 Buckaroo Sponsorship includes recognition with a logo or name prominently displayed in promotional material for Rendezvous. Buckaroo Sponsors will have the opportunity to enjoy an in-person viewing party at the Museum. Buckaroo Sponsors may claim a table for six on a first-come, first-served basis, as seating is limited at present. Alternatively, Buckaroo Sponsors may choose a Party in a Box for their home gathering.

A $2,000 Lucky Horseshoe Sponsorship is also available and includes logo and name recognition associated with the Rendezvous. For sponsorship, learn more at highdesertmuseum.org/hdr.

The High Desert Rendezvous helps support the Museum’s educational programs, bringing science, art and history education to lifelong learners throughout the region. It’s made possible by First Interstate Bank.

Learn more about and register for the High Desert Rendezvous at highdesertmuseum.org/hdr.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:

THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and is a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

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Oregon Heritage Commission awards grants to museum projects across the state
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/16/21 8:56 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission has awarded $74,278 in grants to 13 museums throughout the state. The grants will help fund a variety of projects including collection preservation, visitor education and heritage tourism. Award amounts ranged from $800 - $10,000.

Funded projects:

  • Albany Regional Museum, in Albany, to digitize 16mm film from the U.S Bureau of Mines.
  • Architectural Heritage Center, in Portland, to develop improved collections storage systems.
  • B-17 Alliance Foundation, in Salem, to digitize oral histories of veterans.
  • Crater Rock Museum, in Jackson County, to rehouse the Indigenous America Collections.
  • Deschutes County Historical Society, in Bend, to catalog and digitize photographs from the Bend Bulletin.
  • Elkton Community Education Center, in Elkton, to create and install interpretive signage that incorporates the Native American and European perspectives on the impact of the Hudson’s Bay Company on the land.
  • Five Oaks Museum, in Washington County, to reinterpret and redesign the interpretive pavilion and develop learning materials for local schools.
  • Jordan Valley Owyhee Heritage Council, in Malheur County, for roof replacement at the I.O.N. Heritage Museum.
  • Keizer Heritage Foundation, in Keizer, to install an interactive kiosk and software for visitors to access collections.
  • Sheridan Museum of History, in Sheridan, to catalog and house the collection.
  • The National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Oregon (Hoover-Minthorn House), in Newberg, to install a hanging track system for exhibits.
  • Tillamook County Pioneer Museum, in Tillamook, to upgrade the climate control systems.
  • Willamette Heritage Center, in Salem, to purchase traveling exhibit equipment for the Chinese American and Japanese American history exhibits.

The museum grant program is offered annually by the Oregon Heritage Commission, part of the Oregon Heritage program at Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The grant program began in 1965 when only 24 organizations were eligible for the program. The grant is funded OPRD lottery dollars.

The Oregon Heritage Commission works to secure, sustain and enhance Oregon’s heritage. The Commission sponsors heritage initiatives that educate the public about the value of heritage and celebrate the state’s diversity.

The Oregon Heritage Commission consists of nine members appointed by the governor and nine agency advisors. Members are chosen from state agencies and statewide organizations, and represent a diverse geographical and heritage background.

To learn more about the Oregon Museum Grant or the Oregon Heritage Commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

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PacifiCorp submits final shortlist as key part of company's largest ever renewables solicitation
Pacific Power - 06/16/21 8:49 AM

Contact: 801-220-5018

 

PacifiCorp submits final shortlist as key part of company’s largest ever renewables solicitation

The 19 proposed projects would add nearly 3,250 megawatts of renewable resources and  storage, along with associated transmission, to the company’s portfolio by 2024, enough to supply 1 million typical homes
 

PORTLAND, Ore. — June 16, 2021 — Nearly 3,250 megawatts of new, low-cost clean energy resources including solar, wind, batteries and transmission to interconnect those resources to PacifiCorp’s multi-state grid, could join PacifiCorp’s rapidly decarbonizing system by 2024. PacifiCorp has identified these specific projects in a final shortlist of bids derived through a competitive all source request for proposals that was initiated last year. The shortlist was submitted to state regulators in Oregon June 15.

 

These resource additions build upon PacifiCorp’s groundbreaking Energy Vision 2020 initiative that repowered PacifiCorp’s existing 1,000 megawatt wind fleet and brought online over 1,150 megawatts of new wind resources with new transmission to access those resources.

 

PacifiCorp is the largest regulated utility owner of wind power in the West and these projects will further increase the significant amount of clean energy resources serving customers in six western states managed by its two retail service divisions. PacifiCorp’s resource portfolio serves Pacific Power customers in California, Oregon and Washington and Rocky Mountain Power customers in Idaho, Utah and Wyoming.

The results of the competitive solicitation are consistent with PacifiCorp’s most recent Integrated Resource Plan, which identifies the least-cost, least-risk mix of energy resources to meet customer needs.

“These projects represent PacifiCorp’s longstanding and enduring commitment to create an energy future that is affordable, reliable and increasingly sustainable,” said Rick Link, PacifiCorp vice president of resource planning and acquisitions. “The results of this competitive all-source RFP deliver the best new resources the West has to offer and will enable our customers and communities across the West to benefit from low-cost clean energy to grow their economies and run their businesses and homes.”

The details of the bids are confidential, but a summary of the 19 shortlisted projects that met PacifiCorp’s selection criteria include:

  • 1,641 megawatts of wind capacity in Wyoming, representing continued growth in low-cost Wyoming wind

 

  • 151 megawatts of wind capacity in Idaho, the company’s largest wind acquisition in the state since 2012

 

  • 210 megawatts of solar (including 52.5 megawatts of installed battery capacity) in Oregon, representing the largest investment to date in Oregon’s solar market

 

  • 1,243 megawatts of solar (including 682 megawatts of installed battery capacity, plus one 200 megawatt standalone battery) in Utah

A new 400-mile, 500-kilovolt transmission line from eastern Wyoming to central Utah that was permitted over the previous decade will enable access to low-cost renewables and strengthen PacifiCorp’s multi-state network.

“These are all outstanding projects that will serve customer needs,” said Link. “The battery resources complement the addition of more renewable energy by providing the flexibility needed to smooth imbalances between supply and demand. We are excited to add significant storage resources to our system. This type of flexibility is increasingly critical to maintaining reliable service and we anticipate there will be a growing need for a broad range of storage technologies into the future. Taken together, these projects advance our carbon reduction goals and those of our customers while maintaining reliability and affordability.”

About PacifiCorp: A leader in renewable energy development, PacifiCorp provides affordable, reliable power to 2 million customers in six western states. A Berkshire Hathaway Energy company, PacifiCorp is one of the largest grid operators in the West with nearly 17,000 miles of transmission across 10 states. Learn more at www.pacificorp.com.

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Tue. 06/15/21
Oregon reports 314 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/15/21 5:28 PM

June 15, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 314 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are seven new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,737, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 314 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 205,459.

CDC data tracker update resolved

OHA has relied on a daily U.S. Centers for Disease and Control Prevention (CDC) data update to report the number of people who need to receive a COVID-19 vaccination to reach Oregon’s goal of vaccinating 70% of people 18 and older.

This afternoon, the CDC reports it has resolved an issue with the data feed that contributes to its COVID data tracker dashboard, which Oregon uses to track the state’s progress towards 70%. All data submitted prior to the system going offline last night were processed and pushed live on CDC COVID Tracker today.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 21,811 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 5,510 doses were administered on June 14 and 16,301 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 14.

The seven-day running average is now 16,162 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,395,246 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,682,199 first and second doses of Moderna and 157,937 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,329,871 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,054,069 have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 65,484. A daily countdown can be found on the OHA vaccinations page.

As of today, half of all Oregonians who are 18 years and older have completed their vaccination series, according to CDC vaccination data.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,904,705 doses of Pfizer, 2,195,720 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 172, which is two fewer than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is unchanged from yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,175, which is an 18.7% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 174.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (1), Clackamas (25), Clatsop (3), Columbia (7), Coos (2), Crook (4), Curry (3), Deschutes (6), Douglas (18), Harney (1), Hood River (3), Jackson (39), Jefferson (2), Josephine (4), Klamath (7), Lake (1), Lane (24), Lincoln (2), Linn (9), Malheur (4), Marion (32), Multnomah (34), Polk (13), Umatilla (14), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (40) and Yamhill (11).

Oregon’s 2,731st COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on April 26 and died on May 11 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,732nd COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man from Curry County who died on May 10 at Bay Area Hospital. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,733rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 6 and died on May 21 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,734th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 29 and died on May 27 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,735th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man from Wasco County who tested positive on June 13 and died on June 13 at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,736th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man from Lake County who tested positive on May 16 and died on May 20 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,737th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive on May 18 and died on June 11 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon updates vaccine waste disclosure1,2,3

Oregon Health Authority recognizes that as we create more opportunities to vaccinate more people, we also increase the likelihood of leaving unused doses in a vial.

While OHA and the state’s vaccine providers continue to follow best practices to use every dose possible, we do not want that to be at the expense of missing an opportunity to vaccinate every eligible person when they are ready to get vaccinated.

Our vaccine waste table has been moved to the tableau dashboard. You can find that link to the weekly tab here. OHA reports updates on vaccines not being used each Tuesday in our daily media release.

Vaccine Type

Doses Recalled

Wasted Spoiled Expired

Grand Total

Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine

 

4,152

4,152

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

 

19,669

19,669

Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine

 

6,302

6,302

Grand Total

0

30,123

30,123

1Updated: 06/15/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS) 

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Oregon Employment Department to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 06/15/21 5:24 PM

WHO:                David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department and Gail Krumenauer, OED state employment economist

WHEN:              Wednesday, June 16, 2021 at 1 p.m. PT

WHAT:           Oregon Employment Department will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on economic and workforce-related trends, employment services, unemployment claims processing, claimant resources and more on June 16 at 1 p.m. PT.

WHERE:           Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PT on June 16. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:            The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for weekday updates. A recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters attending the briefing after the briefing concludes.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/930/145877/06.15.21_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

School-based health center use by K-12 students dropped during early part of pandemic, but behavioral health need remained high
Oregon Health Authority - 06/15/21 3:41 PM

June 15, 2021

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

School-based health center use by K-12 students dropped during early part of pandemic, but behavioral health need remained high

OHA report shows behavioral visits, client counts went up from 2019 to 2020

PORTLAND, Ore.—While school-based health centers saw monthly visits by Oregon K-12 students drop between the 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 school years due to pandemic-related school closures, they remained a vital health care access point for young people—particularly in the area of behavior health.

According to Oregon Health Authority’s 2021 Oregon School-Based Health Centers Status Report, overall school-based health center use fell from 130,586 visits in 2018–2019 to 121,144 visits in 2019–2020—a 7% decrease. But behavioral health visit and client counts slightly increased during that time, from 6,466 clients and 43,982 visits in 2018-2019 to 6,537 clients and 44,258 visits in 2019-2020.

“Overall use of school-based health centers went down due to the pandemic, but the need for their services remained high,” explained Rosalyn Liu, MPH, interim manager for Adolescent and School Health Program at the OHA Public Health Division. “Not surprisingly, much of that need was in behavioral health.”

Awareness of the effect school-based health centers have on student health and wellness has grown in the last decade, with the Affordable Care Act providing $200 million for 2010 through 2013 to support capital grants to improve and expand services at these centers. Oregon school-based health centers are located within schools or on school grounds, providing medical care, behavioral health services and, often, dental services. Because of these easily accessible services, school-aged youth have an equal opportunity to learn, grow and thrive.

As of July 1, 2020, Oregon had 78 certified school-based health centers in 25 counties. Seventy-six percent of them are federally qualified health centers, and 47% are state-recognized patient-centered primary care homes.

During the 2019–2020 service year (July 1, 2019-June 30, 2020), school-aged youth (5-21 years old) accounted for 74% of all visits. Of those:

  • 52% of visits were for primary care.
  • 46% of visits were for behavioral health.
  • 2% of visits were for dental health.
  • In 54 school-based health centers, more than half of the youth clients (53%) had Medicaid coverage.

In addition, 8% of all visits were via telehealth, and 97% of school-based health centers had a behavioral health provider on-site.

Behavioral health services, the report indicated, dropped drastically in April, May and June 2020—like physical health services—after schools closed in March 2020. But telehealth, or use of digital services such as videoconferencing applications, internet services and smart phones, helped fill the services void, according to interviews with Oregon school-based health center coordinators and staff. Although the ease of transitioning to telehealth varied across sites, it was particularly useful for continue providing high-quality behavioral health care to youth and was described, at times, as easier to implement in the behavioral health field than the physical health field.

Telehealth had its challenges, Liu said, but it ended up being an important tool for helping school-based health centers continue providing services during the pandemic.

“There was lag time in implementing telehealth services due to equipment needs or establishing policies, and workflow. Plus, many patients had limited or no internet or computer access, or lacked familiarity with technology,” she said. “When telehealth wasn’t possible, patients were allowed to have visits through their phones, and in one case, a center used a grant to purchase tablets for patients who had access to Wi-Fi services.”

Telehealth also helped ensure patients had access to services when transportation or mobility issues limited their ability to go to a clinic.

“Telehealth provided a solution to continue delivering high-quality care to youth,” Liu added.


Western Oregon University Celebrates Passage of Bill Allowing Professional Doctoral Degrees
Western Oregon University - 06/15/21 12:07 PM
2021-06/1107/145863/IMG_2576.jpg
2021-06/1107/145863/IMG_2576.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1107/145863/thumb_IMG_2576.jpg

MONMOUTH, Ore. – Oregon Gov. Kate Brown’s recent signature on SB 230 allows the state’s three regional public universities to offer professional doctoral degrees and aids Western Oregon University’s goal of offering doctoral degrees in high-demand, high-paying fields. The law takes effect Jan. 1, 2022.

 

Since 1997, when the three regional colleges were redefined as comprehensive universities, Western Oregon, Eastern Oregon and Southern Oregon have been restricted to conferring degrees no higher than a master’s. Now, they can offer professional doctoral degrees, which differ from research doctorates (Ph.D.s) in that they are designed to prepare students for a particular specialty; they often lead to professional licensure. Professional doctoral degrees are common in fields WOU is strongest in such as education, health sciences and business.

 

“We are excited about this long-anticipated outcome,” said WOU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Rob Winningham. “Now, Western, under its independent board, can control its destiny by proposing and delivering academic programs that meet market need. WOU is simply continuing its evolution to remain relevant in today’s economy.”

 

As WOU moves forward in its journey to being a Hispanic Serving Institution and supporting underrepresented communities, the bill’s passage will also allow it to provide new pathways for students to be ready for well paying, community-focused professional jobs.

 

“Passage of SB 230 was the result of active support and recognition by the Oregon Legislature that WOU plays a critical role in meeting the emerging workforce needs of the region and the state,” said Associate Vice President for Public Affairs and Strategic Initiatives David McDonald. “The ability to offer professional doctorates is a natural extension of the targeted and successful education and training we have provided for decades in areas such as Community Health, Criminal Justice, Education and other programs designed to prepare students for rewarding professional careers.  We are excited to be able to better serve Oregon and its residents.”

 

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About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving about 4,500 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with about 70% of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1107/145863/IMG_2576.jpg

Oregon Adds 6,900 Jobs in May
Oregon Employment Department - 06/15/21 10:00 AM

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 5.9% in May, the same as the revised rate in April. This was the first time Oregon’s rate was below 6% since March 2020 when the state’s rate was 3.6%. Meanwhile, the U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 5.8% in May from 6.1% in April.

In Oregon, nonfarm payroll employment grew by 6,900 in May, following monthly gains averaging 11,400 in the prior four months. Monthly gains in May were largest in private education (+3,400 jobs); professional and business services (+2,900); construction (+900); and financial activities (+900). Only one major industry shed more than 500 jobs in May: transportation, warehousing, and utilities (-800 jobs).

In May, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment totaled 1,864,000, a drop of 109,000 jobs, or 5.5% from the pre-recession peak in February 2020. Oregon’s employment dropped to a low of 1,687,500 by April 2020. Since then, Oregon has recovered 176,500 jobs, or 62% of the jobs lost between February and April 2020.

Leisure and hospitality accounts for the bulk of Oregon’s jobs not recovered since early 2020. It employed 169,600 in May, and added only 1,600 jobs in the most recent two months. The industry is still 46,700 jobs below its peak month of February 2020, so it accounts for 43% of overall nonfarm payroll jobs lost since Oregon’s pre-recession peak. The restaurants, bars, and hotels that make up accommodation and food services have shown flat hiring trends over the most recent three months; the employment level in this component industry has been close to 150,000 in March, April, and May.

Local government is another industry that has a long way to go to get back to normal. Employment averaged 207,400 in the past 12 months, compared with an average of 229,000 during the most recent pre-recession year of 2019. In May, local government employed 207,800. Local government education—including K-12 schools, community colleges, and public universities—accounts for over half of all local government employment.

A return to pre-pandemic employment is closer at hand for several major industries that were less impacted by the COVID recession. Although the following industries still haven’t surpassed their pre-recession peak, each is within 3% of attaining that milestone: trade, transportation, and utilities; financial activities; information; construction; and professional and business services.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the May county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, June 22, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for June on Tuesday, July 13.

###

The PDF version of the news release can be found at QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

To file a claim for unemployment benefits or get more information about unemployment programs, visit unemployment.oregon.gov.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/930/145852/employment_in_Oregon_--_May_2021_--_press_release.pdf

"No Drone Zone" in Place for the U.S. Olympic Trials in Lane County (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/15/21 9:30 AM
No Drone Zone graphic
No Drone Zone graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3585/145858/thumb_NDZ__1284x758.png

Note to Eugene media: in-person interviews are available between 1 and 2 pm. Please contact media.portland@fbi.gov to schedule a time.

The FBI, working with local, state and federal partners, will enforce a “No Drone Zone” area in Eugene and Springfield during the upcoming U.S. Olympic Team Trials - Track & Field. The zone, which falls under a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR), will be established by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and it will be in effect during the active event days (June 18 – 21 and June 24 – 27).

The TFR will run two nautical miles out from Hayward Field on all active event days and three nautical miles out (to include the Race Walk events in Springfield) on June 26th.

The FAA B4UFLY mobile app is one of many ways that drone operators can access information about controlled airspace, special use airspace, critical infrastructure, airports, national parks, military training routes and temporary flight restrictions. The B4UFLY app is available to download for free at the App Store for iOS and Google Play store for Android. More info on the app can be found here.

The FBI has the authority to seize drones that violate these TFRs, and drone operators may face civil penalties or criminal charges. If you are a drone operator, ensure you are aware of these restrictions and comply with them. 

Congress gave the FBI the authority to counter, seize, and investigate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in 2018 with the passage of the Preventing Emerging Threats Act. The Department of Justice has designated Hayward Field and airspace around the facility as a protected venue, allowing for enforcement of "no drone zones" under this act.

In addition to the “no drone zone” operations, the FBI, Eugene Police, University of Oregon Police, and other local, state and federal partners have been coordinating in order to rapidly share any threat information to the U.S. Olympic Trials or any related activities. There is currently no known threat to any of the scheduled events.

All of the law enforcement partners remind everyone who lives, works, or is visiting the area that if they See Something, Say Something. Working together, we can help keep the events safe for the athletes and the wider community.

Anyone with information about potential threats targeting the U.S. Olympic Trials should contact the FBI at (800) CALL-FBI or at tips.fbi.gov, or call local authorities.

###




Attached Media Files: No Drone Zone graphic

Elder Fraud Report + Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Elder Fraud (Sweepstakes & Telemarketing) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/15/21 9:05 AM
TT - Elder Fraud (Sweepstakes) - GRAPHIC - June 15, 2021
TT - Elder Fraud (Sweepstakes) - GRAPHIC - June 15, 2021
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3585/145854/thumb_TT_-_Elder_Fraud_(Sweepstakes)_-_GRAPHIC_-_June_15_2021.jpg

The FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) today released its 2020 Elder Fraud Report at www.ic3.gov. In 2020, IC3 received a total of 791,790 complaints with reported losses exceeding $4.1 billion. Based on the information provided in the complaints, approximately 28% of the total fraud losses were sustained by victims over the age of 60, resulting in approximately $1 billion in losses to seniors. This represents an increase of approximately $300 million in losses reported in 2020 versus what was reported by victims over 60 in 2019. More info can be found here.

In recognition of Elder Abuse Awareness day (today) and Elder Abuse Awareness Month (June), our next few Tech Tuesday reports will address specific fraud schemes targeting seniors.

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: a look at how to help senior citizens build a digital defense against elder fraud. 

Sweepstakes scams may make you think you are a big winner when, in fact, you could end up losing everything. The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center says that more than 3,700 senior victims reported losses of $38 million to this kind of scam in 2020. 

Here’s how it works: the bad guy convinces the senior that she has won money in a sweepstakes or foreign lottery. The fraudsters often claim to be an attorney, customs official, or lottery representative. They make an effort to appear official and reputable. The scammer tells the victim that she has to pay some kind of fee before receiving a prize… a fee for shipping or insurance costs, customs duties or taxes.  

Through the course of this scam, the criminal will often find and use personal information about the victim in an effort to gain her trust. The scammer knows that older victims are more likely to be polite, trusting and willing to believe those in a position of authority.  

The second kind of elder fraud we are talking about today involves telemarketing scams… scams where the bad guy convinces the victim he can make money fast or avoid some legal or tax problem.

These kinds of scams have been around forever, but evolving technology makes them even harder to spot. Criminals buy and sell marketing lists and personal information so they can have as many details as possible about their victims before they make contact. In some cases, they take the time to build a relationship with the senior so the senior is less likely to look for outside guidance before sending money to the scammer. 

Here’s how you can protect yourself and family members: 

  • Do not give out personal info by phone, mail, or the internet unless you initiate the contact.  
  • Always use publicly available sources to confirm you are using legitimate contact numbers and addresses for a business or agency. 
  • Do not pay for fees or services with a gift card. Legitimate services will not request payment like this. 
  • Be wary if someone tells you that you have to pay immediately or the offer will disappear. 
  • Be wary if you have to pay any fee or provide bank account information for a “free” gift, vacation or prize. 

As the old adage goes – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. 

If you have been victimized by an online scam, report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office. 

###




Attached Media Files: TT - Elder Fraud (Sweepstakes) - AUDIO - June 15, 2021 , TT - Elder Fraud (Sweepstakes) - GRAPHIC - June 15, 2021

Historic cemeteries commission awards grants to multiple projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/15/21 9:00 AM

Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) has awarded $62,500 in grants to 15 historic cemetery projects throughout the state. The funds will help support preservation efforts, repair work and visitor education. Individual award amounts ranged from $596-$9,452.

Funded projects:

  • Marker repair and leveling at the Bonanza Memorial Park Cemetery in Klamath County.
  • Monument repair and cleaning at the Zion Memorial Cemetery in Canby.
  • Marker repair at the Odd Fellows Cemetery in Corvallis.
  • Marker repair at the Dallas Cemetery in Polk County.
  • Installation of security cameras at the Fernwood Pioneer and Fernwood Friends Cemeteries in Yamhill County.
  • Clean and reset headstones at the Hubbard Cemetery.
  • Repair and reset four grave markers and research, design, and install an interpretive panel about the history of the people buried there, including a daughter of a woman who had been freed from slavery and arrived in Oregon in 1853 at Logtown Cemetery in Jackson County.
  • Marker repair at the Lafayette Masonic Cemetery.
  • Complete tree removal and trimming at the Missouri Flat Cemetery in Jackson County.
  • Create and install signs at 10 cemeteries in Columbia County.
  • Repair markers at Riverside Cemetery in Albany.
  • Trim trees at the Scappoose Fairview Cemetery.
  • Clean markers and train volunteers at Tillamook and Bay City IOOF Cemeteries in Tillamook County.
  • Complete a ground penetrating radar investigation at the Weston Cemetery in Umatilla County.

Historic cemeteries are documented by OCHC and must include the burial of at least one person who died 75 years before the current date.

The historic cemetery grant program is offered annually by the OCHC, part of the Oregon Heritage Program at Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The grant program is supported by lottery and other funds.

OCHC maintains a list of all pioneer and historic cemeteries in the state. The seven-member appointed commission helps people and organizations document, preserve and promote designated historic cemeteries statewide.

For more information about the grant program or the OCHC, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


World Elder Abuse Awareness Day recognizes need to protect seniors from financial fraud
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/15/21 8:46 AM

Salem – Financial abuse can happen to anyone at any time, but perpetrators often target seniors. Today is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, and the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation asks everyone to be on the lookout for the financial exploitation of seniors.

Scammers use several tactics to gain trust from seniors in order to steal their finances. Unfortunately, some of these offenders are the guardians who are responsible for acting in the person’s best interest. Guardians are often a person the senior trusts and is granted control of the person’s assets. Financial abuse or exploitation often occurs when the guardian improperly uses the financial resources of a senior.

“Legal guardians are important resources for many older people, and it is vital for guardians to always act in the best interest of the person in their charge,” said TK Keen, Division of Financial Regulation administrator. “Learning to recognize the signs of elder financial abuse and how to report it enables all of us to protect Oregon seniors.”

Senior financial exploitation can be difficult to identify. Here are six examples to watch for:

  • A new and overly protective friend or caregiver, especially if the senior is considering surrendering financial control to the person.
  • Fear of someone or a sudden change in feelings about them.
  • A lack of knowledge about financial status or reluctance to discuss financial matters.
  • Sudden or unexplained changes in spending habits, a will, trust, or beneficiary designation.
  • Unexplained checks made out to cash, unexplained loans, or unexplained disappearance of assets (cash, valuables, securities, etc.).
  • Suspicious signatures on the senior’s checks or other documents.

Call 855-503-SAFE (7233) (toll-free) if you believe an Oregon senior is being financially exploited. You can also visit the division’s protect yourself from fraud website for resources to prevent, report, and recover from financial abuse. 

The division is working with the North American Securities Administrators Association to share resources that will help people identify and report financial abuse. Visit serveourseniors.org for red flags to identify possible elder abuse by a guardian.

Finally, the division and several federal and state partners are providing comprehensive training to the Oregon Chapter of the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors about the Senior Safe Act.

Oregon’s Senior Safe Act makes securities industry professionals mandatory reporters for suspected elder financial exploitation. Securities professionals, such as broker-dealers and investment advisors, should use the division’s file a suspected financial abuse report webpage when they suspect potential financial abuse of an Oregon senior.

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov.


Oregon CERFP conducts Rogue One disaster readiness exercise
Oregon Military Department - 06/15/21 7:00 AM

Media Advisory

 

June 14, 2021                                              

1st Lt. N. Daniel Delgado, 503-888-4973

 

Oregon CERFP conducts Rogue One disaster readiness exercise

 

CAMP RILEA, Ore. -- The Oregon Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive (CBRNE) Enhanced Response Force Package (CERFP – pronounced
“surf pea”) is conducting the Rogue One exercise evaluation to demonstrate their disaster readiness June 14-17, 2021. Rogue One is the first CERFP exercise of this nature and scope since the Covid-19 lockdown began in early 2020. It tests CERFP’s readiness to respond to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive disasters.

 

CERFP provides immediate response capability to local and state governments including: search and extraction, decontamination, medical triage, and initial treatment to stabilize patients for transport to medical facilities. Rogue One participants include members of the Oregon Army Guard, Oregon Air Guard, and Washington Army Guard, making this a joint, interstate exercise.

 

B-roll can be downloaded at the following link:

 

https://www.dvidshub.net/video/801186/rogue-one-2021-day-1

 

For more information about the Oregon National Guard’s CERFP unit, see attached news story and photos:

 

https://www.dvidshub.net/news/124567/alaskan-exercise-tests-oregon-guards-cerfp-agility

 

A limited number of on-site engagements will be available for the media to come on post and cover the exercise. For more information, contact 1st Lt. Daniel Delgado, 142nd Wing Public Affairs, at 503-888-4973.

 

-30-

 

About the 142nd Wing

The Portland Air National Guard Base employs 1,400 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $130 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour Aerospace Control Alert as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/962/145844/210614_Rogue_One_Press_Release.docx

Mon. 06/14/21
Oregon reports 127 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/14/21 4:35 PM

June 14, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 127 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, the state’s death toll remains at 2,730 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. Oregon Health Authority reported 127 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 205,154.

CDC data tracker issue update

OHA has relied on a daily U.S. Centers for Disease and Control Prevention (CDC) data update to report the number of people who need to receive a COVID-19 vaccination to reach Oregon’s goal of vaccinating 70% of people 18 and older.

Unfortunately, CDC is experiencing an issue with the data feed that contributes to its COVID data tracker dashboard, which Oregon uses to track the state’s progress towards 70%.

CDC is working to resolve the issue and anticipates having it fixed by June 15. The COVID data tracker is the only place where doses from all sources administered to Oregonians are reported, including doses administered by federal entities, as well as doses administered to people living in Oregon by providers in other states.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 11,430 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 7,793 doses were administered on June 13 and 3,637 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 13.

The seven-day running average is now 16,766 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,382,590 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,674,408 first and second doses of Moderna and 156,692 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,323,460 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,038,610 have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 71,522. A daily countdown can be found on the OHA vaccinations page.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,881,575 doses of Pfizer, 2,195,420 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 174, which is 11 more than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is seven more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,175, which is an 22.3% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 174.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (1), Clackamas (25), Clatsop (5), Columbia (2), Crook (2), Deschutes (9), Douglas (12), Grant (1), Harney (9), Josephine (3), Lane (5), Linn (13), Morrow (2), Multnomah (30), Union (1), Washington (3), Yamhill (3).

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Oregon Housing and Community Services Encourages Landlords to Apply for Assistance, Millions in Assistance Available to Cover Past Due Rent
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 06/14/21 3:15 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 14th, 2021

CONTACT:
Connor McDonnell Oregon Housing and Community Services
503-986-2051
HCS.MediaRequests@oregon.gov

Oregon Housing and Community Services Encourages Landlords to Apply for Assistance
Millions in Assistance Available to Cover Past Due Rent

SALEM, OR — Millions of dollars remain in the Landlord Compensation Fund (LCF) program and Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) Director, Margaret Salazar, encourages landlords to apply soon as the application closes on June 18th.  This is the final opportunity for landlords to apply to get assistance to cover rental debt for all tenants, regardless of income.

Round three of the Landlord Compensation Fund program opened on June 1, 2021 and included at least $60 million in assistance covering rent-owed by eligible tenants that was accrued from April 1, 2020 through June 30, 2021.   

The agency encourages tenants to pay their July rent as they wait for assistance to cover past rent owed in order to avoid eviction. With unprecedented demand for assistance, the agency also asks landlords to be patient as community organizations distribute funds.  

Oregon's Landlord Compensation Program is designed to provide relief to residential landlords who have been unable to collect rent due to tenant hardships. Participating landlords can receive up to 80% of rent owed from April 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021, for qualifying residents. For the first time, landlords can apply for LCF funds to cover former renters.  For landlords to learn more and how to apply because go to: https://bit.ly/OHCS-LCF

As outlined in statute, landlords may be eligible to receive funding for an amount equal to 80% of the rental debt owed by qualified residents. Participating landlords must agree to forgive the remaining 20% of the tenant's debt as a condition of receiving payment.  

A media briefing was held on May 27, 2021 that provided an overview of the program. To view the briefing please visit: http://bit.ly/LCFbriefingMay27.  

Background on the Landlord Compensation Program  

During the Third Special Session of 2020, the Oregon Legislature enacted an eviction moratorium and established the Landlord Compensation Fund (HB 4401). The Legislature allocated $200 million in rent assistance to support tenants and landlords, which includes $150 million for the Landlord Compensation Fund. This program was designed to provide relief to landlords who have tenants living in their homes who have been unable to pay rent at any point since April 2020 due to a financial hardship. The program will also eliminate the rent owed for those tenants experiencing a hardship.  

Once a landlord’s application is deemed complete and has met the eligibility requirements, Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) will verify ownership, make payments to landlords, and notify tenants that their rent has been forgiven.  To date, over $28 M in payments have been made to landlords for this program and the work is ongoing, as PHAs work around the clock to process payments.

Tenants must provide their landlord with a Declaration of Financial Hardship for Eviction Protection. When tenants provide this form to their landlord, they are protected from eviction through June 30th, 2021, and the landlord may use the form to request payment for rental debt owed from April 1, 2020, through June 2021.  

The Landlord Compensation Fund provides direct support to landlords. This program should not be confused with the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) which is also administered by OHCS and recently opened to low-income tenant applications. Tenants in need of assistance can see if they qualify and find more information at Oregonrentalassistance.org


CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet June 18
Oregon Health Authority - 06/14/21 2:24 PM

June 14, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet June 18

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: June 18, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

  • Join the webinar at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1614420762?pwd=YmFYbmpKUStUeGQ2eWMwL3h5dVdGdz09

  • Conference line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 161 442 0762, Password: 138168.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, minutes approval, and general updates (9:00-9:15); Public testimony (9:15-9:35); Select penultimate 2022 incentive measure set / Challenge Pool (9:35-10:30); Continue selection of penultimate 2022 incentive measure set / Challenge Pool (10:45-11:50); 2021 benchmark reopening timeline (11:50-12:00); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at, 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board -- Equity Subcommittee meets June 18
Oregon Health Authority - 06/14/21 12:39 PM

June 14, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board – Equity Subcommittee meets June 18

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Equity Subcommittee.

Agenda: TBD

When: Friday, June 18, 3-5 p.m. No public comment period available.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Suspect Apprehended for Child Sex Crimes
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/14/21 12:29 PM
2021-06/6186/145832/Cox_Thomas_Grant.jpg
2021-06/6186/145832/Cox_Thomas_Grant.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6186/145832/thumb_Cox_Thomas_Grant.jpg

Case 21-2716

Sacramento (Calif.) Sheriff’s Office Assist JCSO Detectives in Apprehending Suspect Wanted for Child Sex Crimes

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) detectives left the County early Thursday morning to execute a search warrant in Sacramento, Calif. After the crime occurred in Central Point, Ore., the suspect was made aware of the victim disclosure and armed himself while making suicidal statements to a family member. The suspect, Thomas Grant Cox, 58, of Central Point, Ore., then fled to Sacramento, Calif.

In the days after this event, JCSO detectives worked closely with Sacramento Sheriff’s investigators to determine a known location for the suspect. Sacramento Sheriff’s deputies began surveillance Wednesday, June 9, until Cox was arrested Thursday at approx. 1617 hours. The suspect left the residence in a vehicle and Sacramento Sheriff’s SWAT team initiated a traffic stop, taking him into custody without incident.

JCSO detectives interviewed Cox and obtained additional information, which led to him being lodged in the Sacramento County Jail for two counts of first-degree Rape, and two counts of first-degree Sex Abuse. Bail is set at $1,000,000.

An extradition process is necessary prior to Cox returning to Jackson County.

----- end -----




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/6186/145832/Cox_Thomas_Grant.jpg

Deputies Search for Missing Texas Man (Photos)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/14/21 11:05 AM
2021-06/6186/145829/Picture4.png
2021-06/6186/145829/Picture4.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6186/145829/thumb_Picture4.png

Case 21-03055

PROSPECT, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies and Search and Rescue (SAR) personnel are assisting the San Antonio (Texas) Police Department in attempting to locate a man reported missing out of Texas. Kirk E. Jones, 35, has black hair with a widow’s peak, and a scar over his right eyebrow and chin. He has a slim build, standing 6'3" and weighing approx. 210 lbs. He was last seen wearing a red t-shirt, black motorcycle jacket and jeans. Kirk was riding a black 2017 Yamaha motorcycle and has a custom helmet with a green octopus design. he was last seen in Texas on June 3rd. His motorcycle was found in the Sky Lakes Wilderness Boundary East of Prospect, Ore.

If you have contact with this missing person in Southern Oregon or have any information, please call Sergeant Shawn Richards at 541-591-1843 or through Dispatch at 541-776-7206.

###




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/6186/145829/Picture4.png , 2021-06/6186/145829/Picture3.png , 2021-06/6186/145829/Picture2.png , 2021-06/6186/145829/Picture1.png

Five Klamath County Students Awarded $5,000 in Scholarships by Earl and Jane Ferguson Scholarship Fund of Oregon Community Foundation (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 06/14/21 10:06 AM
Yatnary Villaneuva_Klamath Falls_Courtesy of OCF
Yatnary Villaneuva_Klamath Falls_Courtesy of OCF
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6858/145828/thumb_Yatnary_Villaneuva_Klamath_Falls_Courtesy_of_OCF.jpg

OCF Media Contact:

Maureen Kenney, Public Relations Manager, Oregon Community Foundation
(503) 227-5969 | mkenney@oregoncf.org

 

Five Klamath County Students Awarded $5,000 in Scholarships by Earl and Jane Ferguson Scholarship Fund of Oregon Community Foundation

Medford, Ore. — June 14, 2021 — The Earl and Jane Ferguson Scholarship Fund of Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today that it has awarded $5,000 in scholarships to five Klamath County students to support their academic and career goals.

“Students will work for their education if given the opportunity,” said donor Jane Ferguson. Earl Ferguson, donor and former school district superintendent added, “My family had needs when I was growing up, and the community helped us. Jane and I felt that if we were ever in a position to pay the community back, helping those less fortunate, we would.”

Merrill, Oregon, Karla Hernandez-Maya, graduating from Lost River Jr./Sr. High School will receive a $1,000scholarship to attend Southern Oregon University, with plans to major in elementary education and pursue a career as an elementary teacher. Karla has been selected as school valedictorian and has been recognized for academic excellence in English language arts, geometry, and robotics. Karla was an active member in the National Honor Society, Future Business Leaders of America, and several community-service clubs. Karla also participated in robotics competitions and a variety of volunteer opportunities.

Klamath Falls, Oregon, Elli Smith, graduating from Henley High School as a salutatorian will receive a $1,000 scholarship to attend the University of Portland, majoring and pursuing a career in nursing. Elli participated in the National Honor Society, Key Club, and student government. Elli was active in varsity swimming and tennis and spent time volunteering with the local food pantry and the Red Cross as well as projects serving local youth.

Klamath Falls, Oregon, Kayden Kappas, graduating from Mazama High School will receive a $1,000 scholarship to attend Washington State University, with plans to major in and pursue a career in bioengineering. Kayden participated in STEM programs and robotics competitions, volunteered with several local organizations, and served as a member of student government and the National Honor Society. Kayden has been active in a regional competitive soccer league as well as varsity soccer, track & field and cross-country teams.

Klamath Falls, Oregon, Nora Schaeffer, graduating from Eagle Ridge High will receive a $1,000 scholarship to attend the Oregon Institute of Technology in Klamath Falls, with plans to major in civil engineering and pursue a career in architectural drafting. Nora was a volunteer for the Special Olympics, participated in choir competitions, and earned honors for achievements in French language studies.

Klamath Falls, Oregon, Yatnary Villaneuva, graduating from Henley High School will receive a $1,000 scholarship to attend Portland State University to major in business technology and analytics for a career as a business intelligence analyst. Yatnary was a member of the National Honor Society and worked at a family restaurant as well as providing cleaning services to the school. Yatnary volunteered at SMART Reading, Moore Park, and Merrill Presbyterian Church in addition to working at a local ranch and a local farm.

Since the Earl and Jane Ferguson Scholarship Fund awarded its first scholarships in 1999, the fund has awarded more than $85,000 to Klamath County students.

OCF awards approximately 50 scholarships each year to Klamath County students, for a total of more than $600,000 in awards during the past five years. Since 2008, OCF has awarded nearly 4,000 scholarships in Jackson, Josephine, Klamath and Lake Counties for a total of more than $11 million to students pursuing higher education.

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation puts donated money to work in Oregon — more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving — time, talent, and resources from many generous Oregonians — creates measurable change. Throughout 2020, OCF responded quickly and urgently — distributing a record-setting $220 million in charitable dollars to more than 3,000 nonprofits throughout Oregon working to address urgent needs, stabilize communities and prepare for long-term recovery in Oregon. OCF donors responded to the magnitude of need, as reflected in a 44% increase in donor advised fund grantmaking from the previous year. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

###




Attached Media Files: OCF Ferguson Scholarship 2021_FINAL News Release_06 14 2021 , Yatnary Villaneuva_Klamath Falls_Courtesy of OCF , Kayden Kappas Klamath Falls_Courtesy of OCF , Karla Hernandez-Maya_Merrill_Photo I_Courtesy of OCF , Karla Hernandez-Maya_Merill_Photo II_Courtesy of OCF

Sun. 06/13/21
Oregon reports 167 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 06/13/21 12:00 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. There is one new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,730 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 167 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 205,029.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 15,381 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 11,398 doses were administered on June 12 and 3,983 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 12.

The seven-day running average is now 17,498 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,375,566 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,670,469 first and second doses of Moderna and 156,225 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,862,225 doses of Pfizer, 2,176,380 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,207, which is a 22.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 206.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (3), Clackamas (25), Columbia (1), Crook (3), Curry (1), Deschutes (13), Douglas (7), Harney (2), Jackson (6), Jefferson (3), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lane (5), Linn (9), Marion (14), Morrow (4), Multnomah (51), Polk (4), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Washington (4), Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 2,730th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 31 and died on June 12 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. The presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

992

15

Benton

3,239

22

Clackamas

18,748

234

Clatsop

1,026

8

Columbia

1,886

29

Coos

2,157

37

Crook

1,274

23

Curry

685

10

Deschutes

9,931

80

Douglas

3,785

80

Gilliam

75

1

Grant

547

7

Harney

414

9

Hood River

1,215

33

Jackson

11,420

146

Jefferson

2,357

38

Josephine

3,529

72

Klamath

4,753

77

Lake

466

7

Lane

13,772

158

Lincoln

1,412

21

Linn

5,504

79

Malheur

3,597

63

Marion

23,258

322

Morrow

1,150

16

Multnomah

40,113

612

Polk

3,937

55

Sherman

66

1

Tillamook

660

4

Umatilla

8,517

86

Union

1,487

24

Wallowa

194

5

Wasco

1,434

29

Washington

26,647

247

Wheeler

35

1

Yamhill

4,747

79

Statewide

205,029

2,730

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

ELRs received 6/12

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

18

2

20

10.0%

Benton

324

1

325

0.3%

Clackamas

729

32

761

4.2%

Clatsop

72

6

78

7.7%

Columbia

93

8

101

7.9%

Coos

68

0

68

0.0%

Crook

62

5

67

7.5%

Curry

15

1

16

6.3%

Deschutes

322

12

334

3.6%

Douglas

88

8

96

8.3%

Gilliam

3

0

3

0.0%

Grant

2

1

3

33.3%

Harney

6

2

8

25.0%

Hood River

51

0

51

0.0%

Jackson

344

19

363

5.2%

Jefferson

51

0

51

0.0%

Josephine

99

5

104

4.8%

Klamath

54

2

56

3.6%

Lake

6

0

6

0.0%

Lane

571

8

579

1.4%

Lincoln

94

0

94

0.0%

Linn

356

9

365

2.5%

Malheur

67

2

69

2.9%

Marion

504

18

522

3.4%

Morrow

24

4

28

14.3%

Multnomah

1,968

69

2,037

3.4%

Polk

115

10

125

8.0%

Sherman

5

0

5

0.0%

Tillamook

14

0

14

0.0%

Umatilla

200

3

203

1.5%

Union

13

1

14

7.1%

Wallowa

11

1

12

8.3%

Wasco

32

1

33

3.0%

Washington

1,235

15

1,250

1.2%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

208

1

209

0.5%

Statewide

7,825

246

8,071

3.0%

 

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

12,646

1,894

14,540

13.0%

Benton

153,553

4,920

158,473

3.1%

Clackamas

490,314

29,498

519,812

5.7%

Clatsop

37,263

1,771

39,034

4.5%

Columbia

46,978

2,576

49,554

5.2%

Coos

51,113

2,623

53,736

4.9%

Crook

21,724

1,624

23,348

7.0%

Curry

12,267

583

12,850

4.5%

Deschutes

211,219

12,478

223,697

5.6%

Douglas

90,472

4,262

94,734

4.5%

Gilliam

1,343

56

1,399

4.0%

Grant

7,143

478

7,621

6.3%

Harney

4,659

461

5,120

9.0%

Hood River

34,289

1,754

36,043

4.9%

Jackson

236,251

17,280

253,531

6.8%

Jefferson

21,676

2,213

23,889

9.3%

Josephine

82,971

4,142

87,113

4.8%

Klamath

55,006

5,442

60,448

9.0%

Lake

6,270

465

6,735

6.9%

Lane

536,178

16,623

552,801

3.0%

Lincoln

46,612

2,752

49,364

5.6%

Linn

157,152

9,885

167,037

5.9%

Malheur

28,111

5,277

33,388

15.8%

Marion

380,104

34,799

414,903

8.4%

Morrow

8,160

1,377

9,537

14.4%

Multnomah

1,141,288

60,920

1,202,208

5.1%

Polk

78,513

5,220

83,733

6.2%

Sherman

1,543

75

1,618

4.6%

Tillamook

16,661

669

17,330

3.9%

Umatilla

72,492

9,528

82,020

11.6%

Union

23,368

1,887

25,255

7.5%

Wallowa

3,513

198

3,711

5.3%

Wasco

37,062

1,793

38,855

4.6%

Washington

706,046

44,112

750,158

5.9%

Wheeler

777

34

811

4.2%

Yamhill

149,300

7,783

157,083

5.0%

Statewide

4,964,037

297,452

5,261,489

5.7%

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

 

# # #


Sat. 06/12/21
Shooting Incident
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 06/12/21 6:37 PM

On June 11, 2021, at approximately 11:00pm, officers from the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety responded to the 200 block of Grandview Avenue for a report of multiple shots fired. Officers quickly checked the area for any victims and the suspect(s).  Officers confirmed there were no injuries.  

GPDPS Detectives responded to the scene to conduct further investigation.  This investigation is in its early stages with detectives continuing to follow up all leads.  Further information will be relayed as it becomes available. 

We are asking for the public to continue to call and report any suspicious activity. 

Anyone who may have been in the SE area of Grants Pass or with any additional  information is encouraged to call Detective Shali Marshall at 541-450-6260.  Additionally, the Department of Public Safety would like to assure citizens the recent shooting incidents have the highest priority for our personnel.


Oregon reports 285 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/12/21 10:37 AM

June 12, 2021

PORTLAND, Ore. There are three new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,729 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 285 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 204,865.

Clackamas County approved to move to Lower Risk Level

Governor Kate Brown announced today that, effective immediately, Clackamas County has been approved to move to the Lower Risk level under the state's public health framework to reduce transmission and protect Oregonians from COVID-19. The county today achieved a 65% first dose vaccination rate for adults and has submitted an equity plan to the state. Read the press release here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 17,231 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 9,034 doses were administered on June 11 and 8,197 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 11.

The seven-day running average is now 17,567 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,364,446 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,667,165 first and second doses of Moderna and 155,271 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 2,019,299 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,315,940 people who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,862,225 doses of Pfizer, 2,176,380 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 160, which is nine fewer than yesterday. There are 41 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,278, which is a 23.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 206.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (5), Clackamas (28), Columbia (3), Coos (2), Crook (9), Curry (1), Deschutes (14), Douglas (30), Gilliam (3), Harney (2), Jackson (15), Jefferson (3), Josephine (5), Klamath (5), Lane (22), Lincoln (2), Linn (9), Malheur (3), Marion (25), Multnomah (37), Polk (3), Sherman (1), Umatilla (10), Union (1), Washington (38), Wheeler (1), Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 2,727th death is a 77-year-old woman from Klamath county who tested positive on April 19 and died on May 5 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,728th death is a 93-year-old woman from Lane county who tested positive on April 7 and died on May 15 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,729th death is a 96-year-old woman from Lane county who tested positive on June 8 and died on June 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

990

15

Benton

3,236

22

Clackamas

18,723

234

Clatsop

1,026

8

Columbia

1,885

29

Coos

2,157

37

Crook

1,271

23

Curry

684

10

Deschutes

9,918

80

Douglas

3,778

80

Gilliam

75

1

Grant

547

7

Harney

412

9

Hood River

1,215

33

Jackson

11,415

146

Jefferson

2,354

38

Josephine

3,525

72

Klamath

4,751

77

Lake

466

7

Lane

13,768

158

Lincoln

1,412

21

Linn

5,496

79

Malheur

3,597

63

Marion

23,245

322

Morrow

1,146

16

Multnomah

40,063

611

Polk

3,933

55

Sherman

66

1

Tillamook

660

4

Umatilla

8,517

86

Union

1,486

24

Wallowa

193

5

Wasco

1,434

29

Washington

26,642

247

Wheeler

35

1

Yamhill

4,744

79

Statewide

204,865

2,729

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

 

ELRs received 6/11

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

24

1

25

4.0%

Benton

1,149

5

1,154

0.4%

Clackamas

928

41

969

4.2%

Clatsop

98

0

98

0.0%

Columbia

99

3

102

2.9%

Coos

95

2

97

2.1%

Crook

106

8

114

7.0%

Curry

27

1

28

3.6%

Deschutes

554

17

571

3.0%

Douglas

252

35

287

12.2%

Gilliam

3

0

3

0.0%

Grant

13

0

13

0.0%

Harney

10

2

12

16.7%

Hood River

54

0

54

0.0%

Jackson

399

25

424

5.9%

Jefferson

74

5

79

6.3%

Josephine

117

3

120

2.5%

Klamath

112

4

116

3.4%

Lake

17

0

17

0.0%

Lane

737

17

754

2.3%

Lincoln

120

2

122

1.6%

Linn

421

16

437

3.7%

Malheur

105

13

118

11.0%

Marion

948

26

974

2.7%

Morrow

30

1

31

3.2%

Multnomah

2,084

56

2,140

2.6%

Polk

207

9

216

4.2%

Sherman

4

0

4

0.0%

Tillamook

51

0

51

0.0%

Umatilla

151

6

157

3.8%

Union

81

1

82

1.2%

Wallowa

7

0

7

0.0%

Wasco

52

1

53

1.9%

Washington

1,430

37

1,467

2.5%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

244

10

254

3.9%

Statewide

10,804

347

11,151

3.1%

 

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

12,628

1,892

14,520

13.0%

Benton

153,229

4,919

158,148

3.1%

Clackamas

489,585

29,466

519,051

5.7%

Clatsop

37,191

1,765

38,956

4.5%

Columbia

46,885

2,568

49,453

5.2%

Coos

51,045

2,623

53,668

4.9%

Crook

21,662

1,619

23,281

7.0%

Curry

12,252

582

12,834

4.5%

Deschutes

210,897

12,466

223,363

5.6%

Douglas

90,384

4,254

94,638

4.5%

Gilliam

1,340

56

1,396

4.0%

Grant

7,141

477

7,618

6.3%

Harney

4,653

459

5,112

9.0%

Hood River

34,238

1,754

35,992

4.9%

Jackson

235,907

17,261

253,168

6.8%

Jefferson

21,625

2,213

23,838

9.3%

Josephine

82,872

4,137

87,009

4.8%

Klamath

54,952

5,440

60,392

9.0%

Lake

6,264

465

6,729

6.9%

Lane

535,607

16,615

552,222

3.0%

Lincoln

46,518

2,752

49,270

5.6%

Linn

156,796

9,876

166,672

5.9%

Malheur

28,044

5,275

33,319

15.8%

Marion

379,600

34,781

414,381

8.4%

Morrow

8,136

1,373

9,509

14.4%

Multnomah

1,139,320

60,851

1,200,171

5.1%

Polk

78,398

5,210

83,608

6.2%

Sherman

1,538

75

1,613

4.6%

Tillamook

16,647

669

17,316

3.9%

Umatilla

72,292

9,525

81,817

11.6%

Union

23,355

1,886

25,241

7.5%

Wallowa

3,502

197

3,699

5.3%

Wasco

37,030

1,792

38,822

4.6%

Washington

704,811

44,097

748,908

5.9%

Wheeler

776

34

810

4.2%

Yamhill

149,092

7,782

156,874

5.0%

Statewide

4,956,212

297,206

5,253,418

5.7%

 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Fri. 06/11/21
Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 24
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 4:30 PM

June 11, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 24

What: A public Zoom meeting for the Research and Leadership Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: Thursday, June 24, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting.  Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 453 2659 Passcode: 710824.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 308 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 4:08 PM

June 11, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 308 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, and the state’s death toll remains at 2,726, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 308 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 204,587.

Information from today’s media briefing

This morning, Gov. Kate Brown and Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist with OHA, provided an update on Oregon’s ongoing COVID-19 response. Gov. Brown highlighted Oregon’s continued progress in reaching her goal of having at least 70% of all eligible Oregonians vaccinated and in closing the equity gap in vaccinating Oregon’s communities of color. Dr. Sidelinger discussed the highly protective benefits provided by COVID-19 vaccines, noting that virtually every patient now requiring hospital care from a COVID-19 illness has been unvaccinated.

Watch more about that here and read the press conference talking points here.

CDC data tracker issue update

OHA has relied on a daily U.S. Centers for Disease and Control Prevention (CDC) data update to report the number of people who need to receive a COVID-19 vaccination to reach Oregon’s goal of vaccinating 70% of people 18 and older.

Unfortunately, CDC is experiencing an issue with the data feed that contributes to its COVID data tracker dashboard, which Oregon uses to track the state’s progress towards 70%.

CDC believes that approximately two days of data is not appearing on the CDC COVID data tracker dashboard. CDC is working to resolve the issue and anticipates having it fixed by June 15. The COVID data tracker is the only place where doses from all sources administered to Oregonians are reported, including doses administered by federal entities, as well as doses administered to people living in Oregon by providers in other states.

Newest COVID-19 modeling report shows decline in transmission

Today, OHA released its latest COVID-19 forecast, which showed lower transmission of the virus through late May and projects fewer hospitalizations and daily cases through June 29.

According to the model, the effective reproduction rate — the expected number of secondary cases that a single case generates — was estimated at 0.66 through May 26.

At that same level of transmission, daily cases would decline to 100 daily cases and new hospitalizations would decrease to five per day over the next three weeks.

If transmission increases by 20%, new cases would decline more gradually, to 135 new daily cases, with seven new hospitalizations daily.

The modeling shows that estimated immunity from vaccination is present in four times more people than have naturally acquired immunity. Natural immunity is immunity stemming from prior infection.

A person who has had COVID-19 and recovered may not have the same level of immunity as someone who has not been infected and has been fully vaccinated, and it is unknown how long the natural immunity will last.

People who have recovered from the disease have a robust response to the vaccine. OHA recommends that people get the vaccine to increase their protection against COVID-19.

More than 2.3 million Oregonians have received at least one dose of the safe and highly effective vaccine, and 2 million have completed a vaccine series.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 24,213 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 15,926 doses were administered on June 10 and 8,987 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 10.

The seven-day running average is now 17,697 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,352,742 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,662,657 first and second doses of Moderna and 154,388 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 2,007,367 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,310,053 people who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 87,702.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,862,225 doses of Pfizer, 2,176,380 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 169, which is four fewer than yesterday. There are 40 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,278, which is a 23.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 206.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (34), Clatsop (4), Columbia (6), Coos (1), Crook (8), Curry (2), Deschutes (14), Douglas (15), Grant (2), Hood River (2), Jackson (21), Jefferson (3), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (12), Lincoln (1), Linn (12), Malheur (2), Marion (31), Multnomah (67), Polk (5), Umatilla (11), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (37) and Yamhill (7).

Note: Due to routine data quality assurance reviews, OHA identified 19,992 duplicate negative electronic lab reports (ELRs) from April 30 to June 10, 2021, related to a single laboratory in Yamhill County. These duplicate negative ELRs were removed from the system last night. As a result, statewide and Yamhill County ELR counts have decreased and percent positivity has increased for this time period.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 15.
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 2:10 PM

June 11, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 15.

What: A combined public Zoom meeting for the Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: Tuesday, June 15, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 072 1195 Passcode: 439535.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Task Force Arrests Suspect for Encouraging Child Sex Abuse (photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/11/21 11:47 AM
Durham-Gendreau
Durham-Gendreau
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6186/145789/thumb_DURHAM-GENDREAU_Mugshot.jpg

Case 21-0073

Southern Oregon Child Exploitation Team (SOCET) Task Force Arrests Suspect for Encouraging Child Sex Abuse

CENTRAL POINT, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies arrested a Central Point man Thursday morning after serving a search warrant at his place of employment. David Durham-Gendreau, 36, of Central Point, Ore. is lodged at the Jackson County jail on charges related to sharing images of child sexual abuse online.

On September 24, 2020, SOCET was alerted to suspicious online activity by the Oregon Department of Justice (DOJ) Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force. The DOJ had received information from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) regarding images of child sexual abuse that were uploaded online. NCMEC received a report from the internet service provider that images were uploaded at an IP address in the 100 block of Castlewood Court in Central Point, Ore. Further investigation identified Durham-Gendreau as the suspect.

Durham-Gendreau has been charged with five counts of Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse in the first-degree. Bail was set at $100,000. 

SOCET is a joint inter-agency task force that started in June of 2020 to combat child exploitation and human trafficking. The task force consists of investigators from JCSO, Medford Police Department (MPD), Grants Pass Police Department (GPPD), Oregon State Police (OSP), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and Department of Homeland Security (DHS); and prosecutors from our local, state and federal law enforcement partners in Jackson and Josephine County.

----- end -----




Attached Media Files: Durham-Gendreau

Shooting Incident
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 06/11/21 10:38 AM

On June 10, 2021, at approximately 9:43pm, officers from the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety responded to the 2100 block of NW Hawthorne for a report of multiple shots fired from a vehicle. The vehicle was reported to be driving away from the scene, northbound towards Vine Street.  Officers quickly began checking the area for any victims and the suspect vehicle.  Several witnesses were contacted and officers confirmed there were no injuries.  

Witnesses reported the suspect vehicle to be a dark colored sedan, no further information on the suspect vehicle is available at this time.  

GPDPS Detectives responded to the scene to conduct further investigation.  Deputies with the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office also assisted with searching the area for the suspect vehicle.  This investigation is in its early stages with detectives continuing to follow up any leads.  Further information will be relayed as it becomes available.  At this time, there is no indication this is a targeted attack and appears to be random in nature.  We are asking for the public to be aware of this incident and to call and report any suspicious activity. 

Anyone who may have been in the NW area of Grants Pass or with any additional  information is encouraged to call Detective Shali Marshall at 541-450-6260.  Additionally, the Department of Public Safety would like to thank those citizens who called 911 reporting the incident and providing the initial information.  


UPDATE: Oregon reports 370 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 9:55 AM

This is an update of yesterday’s Daily Media Release with information about COVID-19 deaths.

June 10, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 370 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 10 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,726, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 370 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 204,291.

Interim update to release time of this daily news release

To align with the daily Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) update of the numbers of people in Oregon ages 18 and older who have received at least one dose of their COVID-19 vaccine, OHA will be releasing this daily news release later in the day, beginning today.

The CDC posts the number of people in Oregon ages 18 and up who have received at least a first dose daily, generally by 5 p.m. Eastern time.

OHA then pulls the data from the CDC site at 3 p.m. Pacific time daily and subtracts the number of people ages 18 and older who have had at least one dose from Oregon’s target of 2,345,823 (70% of those 18 and over). This calculation shows how many people ages 18 and older still need to be vaccinated to achieve Oregon’s goal of 70%.

OHA will update the website banner to reflect these numbers by 5 p.m. Pacific time daily.

Note: If the CDC has not updated its website by 3 p.m. Pacific time, when OHA pulls the data, OHA communications will add a note in this daily media release and on the dashboard on the Governor’s website stating that CDC’s website has not been updated and OHA will update the banner and dashboard at 9 a.m. Pacific time the next day.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 27,113 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 11,182 doses were administered on June 9 and 15,931 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 9.

The 7-day running average is now 15,761 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,337,634 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,659,139 first and second doses of Moderna and 153,424 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,991,717 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,303,485 people who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 93,234.

Note: OHA is working to determine why CDC's COVID-19 vaccination update today indicates minimal change. We will have a more complete update tomorrow.

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,861,055 doses of Pfizer, 2,173,680 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 173, which is nine more than yesterday. There are 41 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,328, which is a 22.3% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 219.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

One Community Health: collaboration is key

Tomorrow, One Community Health will be administering Pfizer vaccines in The Dalles while offering free food and live music to all who attend the event. Preventative health manager Gladys Rivera readily admits that Friday’s event is more of a celebration than a formal clinic because Wasco County has almost reached a 65% percent vaccination rate. 

Rivera attributes the clinic’s vaccination success to the organization’s great partnership with Oregon Health Authority (OHA), as well as with other community partners, including growers, employers and local businesses.  

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) deployed three mobile vaccination units throughout Oregon’s rural communities, which have successfully vaccinated more than 2,500 people across the state.  

“Collaboration is really the key to make all of this happen,” emphasized Rivera. “It’s relying on all those partners and really sharing the workload.” 

You can read more of this story on OHA’s Oregon Vaccine News blog. For more information about tomorrow’s vaccine clinic in The Dalles, contact One Community Health at 541.386.6380.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (8), Clackamas (30), Clatsop (1), Columbia (4), Coos (2), Crook (11), Deschutes (85), Douglas (17), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (15), Jefferson (1), Josephine (8), Klamath (10), Lane (23), Linn (11), Malheur (2), Marion (35), Multnomah (59), Polk (7), Umatilla (8), Union (1), Washington (22) and Yamhill (4).

Note: Due to a delay in laboratory reporting, OHA received 767 electronic laboratory reports (ELRs) on June 9, 2021 for Deschutes County. The reports are from April 17, 2021 to June 9, 2021. As a result, case counts, ELR totals and percent positivity is higher in Deschutes County for June 9, 2021 than anticipated.

Oregon’s 2,717th death is an 89-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 23 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,718th death is an 83-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 27 and died on Feb. 26 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,719th death is a 90-year-old woman from Crook County who tested positive on June 7 and died on June 8 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,720th death is an 80-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive on May 21 and died on May 23 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,721st death is an 84-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on May 22 and died on June 8 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,722nd death is a 75-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 15 and died on May 21 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,723rd death is a 73-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive on April 17 and died on May 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,724th death is a 55-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 21 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,725th death is a 55-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 21 at Hillsboro Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,726th death is a 73-year-old man from Wasco County who tested positive on April 13 and died on May 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.# # #


Possible Witnesses to the Almeda Fire
Ashland Police Dept. - 06/11/21 9:26 AM
2021-06/6263/145784/IMG_0754.jpg
2021-06/6263/145784/IMG_0754.jpg
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The Ashland Police Department is seeking info on two subjects (see attached picture) seen near the start of the Almeda Fire on 9/8/2020. These individuals are not suspects. APD would like to interview them as witnesses. If you know who they are please contact the Ashland Police Department at 541-488-2211. 




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/6263/145784/IMG_0754.jpg

EMD Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/11/21 8:11 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

June 7, 2021

Contact:   Sara Stewart
                503-378-2424

                sara.stewart@state.or.us

Notice of Special Meeting

The EMD Workgroup, a subgroup of the Telecommunications Curriculum Committee, will hold a regular meeting on June 21, 2021 from 07:00 a.m. - 09:00 a.m.  The meeting will be held virtually via Zoom for public and workgroup members who choose this option over onsite, in-person attendance.  For a link, please contact Sara Stewart at the email address listed above.  A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

  1. Check-In
  2. EMD Card Review & Comparison

              a.  Recommendations

               b.  Corrections

      3.  Next Steps

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Curriculum Committee Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Smith Creek Village at Silver Falls State Park opens June 11; lodging reservations available
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/11/21 8:00 AM

SILVERTON, Oregon—The Smith Creek Village in Silver Falls State Park is now open after a six-month closure. Silver Falls Hospitality is the new management company operating the village in an agreement with the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The area was previously known as Silver Falls Lodge and Conference Center.

“We’re very happy that park visitors now have these overnight options and services once again,” said Park Manager Guy Rodrigue. “Silver Falls Hospitality has hit the ground running and we’re eager to help them succeed in this new partnership.”

Cabin and lodge reservations are now available for stays beginning June 11 and beyond via a new website, www.smithcreekvillage.com. Information regarding the Foothills and Davidson Ranches, weddings, group events and meeting spaces is available by contacting Partnerships & Events Manager Shalimar at shalimar@silverfallshospitality.com.

"Hosting has become both a lifestyle and a practice for us. We started Silver Falls Hospitality with the intention of providing comfortable experiences in the outdoors," said co-owner Brooke Gerken. "We are so grateful to have been given the honor of being the stewards of this space and are looking forward to working closely with OPRD to bring our vision to life. We are stoked to be getting started and to have our guests on-site very soon!"

Big Leaf Coffeehouse will be open daily to all park visitors from 7 a.m.-11 a.m. They will be serving both hot breakfast and take+trek meal options, with a full espresso bar coming soon.

The South Falls Café at the South Falls Lodge in the park day-use area is open daily, 10 a.m.-
6 p.m. The café is managed under a separate agreement with the Oregon Commission for the Blind Business Enterprise Program team.
# # #


Thu. 06/10/21
Summer School Zone Traffic Enforcement
Medford Police Dept. - 06/10/21 4:24 PM

            The Medford Police Department is notifying the public that some Medford schools will have summer learning programs, which means adjacent school zones will be enforced this summer. Classes will be held Monday thru Thursday starting June 14th and ending on August 12th. Drivers need to be aware that school zones adjacent to the listed schools will be enforced. The schools holding summer classes are Abraham Lincoln Elementary, Hoover Elementary, Howard Elementary, Jackson Elementary, Jefferson Elementary, Roosevelt Elementary, McLoughlin Middle School, Central High School, North Medford High School and South Medford High School. The Kids Unlimited Academy starts holding classes June 14th and continues into the fall school year.  

            The Medford Police Department continues to remind drivers about the importance of School Zone Safety. We ask that drivers be aware of school zones and use caution when driving through them. It is important to know that fines for speed violations increase significantly when they are within a designated school zone. To help with public awareness we have included descriptions of the two categories of reduced school speeds in school zones. We have also included a link to the ODOT website with information on School Zones.

                                                                                                              

Zones Adjacent to School Grounds:

Will have signage displaying the speed limit at 20 MPH When Flashing or School Days 7AM – 5PM.

 

Zones at School Crosswalks away from Schools Grounds:

Will have signage displaying the speed limit at 20 MPH When Flashing or When Children are Present.

 

ODOT School Zone Information Link:

https://www.oregon.gov/odot/Engineering/Pages/School-Zones.aspx


Virtual Nisei WWII Veterans' Stamp Dedication Program On Monday, June 14
Oregon Historical Society - 06/10/21 3:06 PM
2021-06/2861/145774/Stamp.jpg
2021-06/2861/145774/Stamp.jpg
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Earlier this month, the U.S. Postal Service released its newest commemorative stamp, the “GO FOR BROKE SOLDIERS: Japanese American Soldiers of WWII” stamp. This Forever Stamp honors the little known contributions of American soldiers of Japanese ancestry (the Nisei) who served courageously during World War II. With the frightening increase in violent attacks on Asian Americans, learning about the patriotism and heroic military history of these Japanese American soldiers during World War II is critical. It teaches us that people of color have contributed to the preservation of freedom and democracy throughout the history of America, often with their lives.

Ceremonies celebrating this Forever Stamp will be or have been held across the nation. Oregon will hold its ceremony on June 14, 5:30pm at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. Due to COVID safety precautions restricting large public gatherings, the public is invited to attend virtually (vimeo.com/543729988). It will also be posted on the website www.StampOurStory.org.

Who were these soldiers and what is the meaning of the motto “GO FOR BROKE”? They were “Nisei,” American citizens born in the United States to immigrants (“Issei”) from Japan. “GO FOR BROKE” characterized their teamwork, spirit and courage. The face of a soldier and the motto of these troops is etched on the stamp. These soldiers served in combat in Europe, as linguists in the Pacific Theatre and in the post-war occupation of Japan. They numbered just 33,000 men and women but suffered huge casualties. They include one of the most decorated military units in history, earning 9,486 Purple Hearts and 21 Medals of Honor. 

While these Nisei soldiers were fighting and dying for their country, America, their grandparents, parents, spouses, children and relatives were incarcerated in American concentration camps. Solely because of their Japanese heritage, over 120,000 Japanese American citizens and others of Japanese ancestry were deemed enemies of the U.S., were ordered to leave almost everything they owned, and were imprisoned in camps surrounded by barbed wire. Four thousand Oregonians were forced to leave their homes, businesses and farms and live in one of ten American concentration camps. The loyalty of these soldiers and their families is indisputable. For more information see www.StampOurStory.org.

In 2005 the “Stamp Our Story” campaign for the “GO FOR BROKE” stamp was launched by three Nisei women in California to honor these soldiers. Support in Oregon has been ongoing since the beginning of the campaign. 

According to Doug Katagiri, son of linguist George Katagiri, veteran of the Military Intelligence Service: “This unique commemoration recognizes and reminds us of the legacy achieved by Nisei veterans of WWII. It’s impossible to overstate their sacrifices in building this legacy, fighting a war abroad while enduring racism and an extraordinary episode of national injustice at home.”

Oregonians across the state are invited to join the celebration (virtually at vimeo.com/543729988) to learn about these patriotic Japanese American soldiers and their families. For Oregonians of Japanese ancestry, it will be a long awaited opportunity to celebrate the contributions of the “GO FOR BROKE” Nisei soldiers and their ancestors.

The program will feature Honorary Chair and former Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski and four generations of Nisei veterans’ descendants. Three vignettes by Asian American actors will portray stories of military service: David Loftus reading an excerpt from Harold Okimoto’s diary, the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion; Alton Chung presenting former Congressman Al Ullman’s tribute to Frank Hachiya, Military Intelligence Service; and Ken Yoshikawa, reading Art Iwasaki’s letter to the HIllsboro Argus, 442nd Regimental Combat Team.

Former Gov. Kulongoski lauded the Nisei veterans in this way: “Our Japanese American World War II veterans fought for democracy while their own families were incarcerated in concentration camps on American soil. They believed in America. We salute them. And we will not forget.”

Sponsors and supporters of the event include the Oregon Nisei Veterans, the Japanese American Museum of Oregon, the Oregon Historical Society, the Portland Japanese American Citizens’ League and the Mary Yamaguchi Foundation at the Community Foundation of Southwest Washington.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/2861/145774/Stamp.jpg

Bureau of Land Management Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council to meet virtually June 24 to 25
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 06/10/21 1:21 PM
Western Oregon RAC Map
Western Oregon RAC Map
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Medford, Ore.  – The Bureau of Land Management’s Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet virtually June 24 to 25, 2021.

The Western Oregon RAC will be reviewing a business plan to modify fees at day-use sites, campgrounds, and group facilities across the BLM’s Northwest Oregon District. The proposal would modify fees at two existing day-use sites, and 13 campgrounds and group facilities. It would establish new fees at 16 day-use sites, campgrounds, and group facilities that currently do not charge fees. A fee approval is also requested for two campground facilities that are proposed for future development. The Northwest Oregon District is also proposing an annual pass that could be used to cover fees at day-use sites.

The Western Oregon RAC has the authority under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act to make formal recommendations on specific recreation fee proposals, an important step ahead of a fee or fee change being implemented. The RAC approval will not result in an immediate increase in fees, but is one important step in the public input process.

In addition, the Western Oregon RAC will be reviewing Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act Title II funding proposals and recommending projects for funding. The projects provide community-based solutions to pressing public lands challenges like wildland fire prevention, trash clean-up, watershed restoration, road maintenance, control of noxious weeds and more. Over the years, Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act projects have provided trail maintenance, culvert replacement or removal, soil improvement, vegetation/density management, wildfire hazard reduction, stream channel enhancement, control of noxious and exotic weeds, and opportunities for youth training and employment. 

“The Western Oregon RAC is made up of valuable partners who represent the diverse perspectives of Western Oregon communities,” said BLM Medford District Manager Elizabeth Burghard. “Their input on recreation fee proposals is a critical step in collecting fees to help operate, maintain and improve popular recreation sites,” continued Burghard.

The meeting runs from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. each day.  The meetings are open to the public, with a  comment period scheduled for 2:00 p.m. on June 24.  Individuals who want to make a statement during the public comment period are encouraged to also submit a written copy of their statement at the meeting for the administrative record.

To participate in the meeting, please register: https://blm.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_1ybd8Yr-RheOXXOgvDCe_Q or contact Kyle Sullivan, RAC Coordinator, ksullivan@blm.gov or at (541) 618-2340.

The Western Oregon RAC meets multiple times a year and is one of six citizen advisory councils throughout Oregon/Washington. The RAC’s 15 members are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior and represent a broad range of public land interests, including environmental, local government, recreation, timber, and commercial activity. The Western Oregon RAC advises the BLM’s Coos Bay, Medford, Roseburg, Northwest Districts, and parts of the Lakeview District.

For more information about the Western Oregon RAC, visit:

https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington

###

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people.?The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 




Attached Media Files: Western Oregon RAC Map

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board -- Training Subcommittee meets June 11
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 1:11 PM

June 10, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board – Training Subcommittee meets June 11

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee

Agenda: Available at: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/Pages/psilocybin-services-act.aspx

When: Friday, June 11, 1-3 p.m. No public comment period available.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets June 16, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 12:56 PM

June 10, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets June 16, 2021

What: A public meeting of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: Council will learn about strategies and engagement for youth and staff from Oregon Housing and Community Services will present on housing and wraparound services.

When: Wednesday, June 16, 2021, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Where: Virtual. YouTube link with live captions (English and Spanish). https://youtu.be/loKE47aCb7c

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Addiction Recovery Centers throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the centers.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brandy L. Hemsley at 971-239-2942 711 TTY or RANDY.L.HEMSLEY@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">brandy.l.hemsley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Vehicular Manslaughter, DUII - Controlled Substance Suspect Arrested
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/10/21 12:45 PM
2021-06/6186/145766/(TAYLOR_ROBERT_LINN_-_#21-004002).jpg
2021-06/6186/145766/(TAYLOR_ROBERT_LINN_-_#21-004002).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6186/145766/thumb_(TAYLOR_ROBERT_LINN_-_#21-004002).jpg

Case 21-2551

Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) Arrests Vehicular Manslaughter, DUII – Controlled Substance Suspect (Photo)

EAGLE POINT, Ore. – On Thursday, May 20, at approximately 0723 hours, 911 dispatch received a call reporting a motor vehicle crash at milepost four on Rogue River Drive in Eagle Point, Ore. It was reported two passenger trucks were involved in a collision on the rural, two-lane highway. JCSO deputies responded to the scene to find the driver of a 1999 Ford F-350 “Dually” pickup truck being attended to by medical staff. The driver of the other vehicle was found unresponsive and died at the scene.

The suspect, Robert Taylor, 50, of Gold Hill, Ore., crossed over the double, solid yellow centerline in his ’99 Ford and struck the victim’s truck head-on. Methamphetamines is thought to be a contributing factor in the crash.

Taylor is being charged with first-degree manslaughter, DUII – controlled substance, and reckless driving. 

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Attached Media Files: 2021-06/6186/145766/(TAYLOR_ROBERT_LINN_-_#21-004002).jpg

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets July 8
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 12:30 PM

June 10, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets July 8

What: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee is holding its quarterly meeting. Members of the public may attend.

Agenda: House Bill 2076; HERO Kids; Pediatric EMS & Suicide Data; Suicide Prevention Project; EMSC Program; AmeriCorps VISTA Member Project; State EMS and Trauma Program.

When: Thursday, July 8, 9 a.m. to noon. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1603380406?pwd=TVlTdWRudlZPSWtyOUFlNmc0UXZHQT09

One tap mobile: +16692545252,,1603380406#

Dial: 1-669-254-5252

Meeting ID: 160 338 0406

Passcode: 918677

Background: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee provides recommendations to the Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Program under ORS 431A.105(2)(d). For more information, see the Emergency Medical Services for Children Program website at www.oregonemsc.org.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Rachel Ford at 971-673-0564, 711 TTY or achel.l.ford@state.or.us">rachel.l.ford@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

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Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/10/21 11:41 AM

INCIDENT NUMBER:    21001142

INCIDENT DATE AND TIME: 06/10/2021 at 12:50 am

REPORTING DEPUTY:  Sergeant Jason Stanton

DETAILS:

On June 10, 2021 at 12:50 am, the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office was notified of a single vehicle motor vehicle crash in the 5900 block of Takilma Road.  Personnel from Illinois Valley Fire District and American Medical Response responded as well.

Upon arrival, Deputies located a heavily damaged vehicle crashed into a tree.  The vehicle had two occupants trapped inside.  The two occupants of the vehicle were determined to be deceased upon arrival. 

The occupants of the vehicle were identified as 23-year-old female Aubrey Nolan of Cave Junction, Oregon and 32-year-old male Jaime Navarrete of Spring, Texas.  The next of kin of both occupants have been notified. 

The cause of the crash is under investigation. 


DPSST Applicant Review Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/10/21 11:25 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

June 10, 2021

Contact:  Mona Riesterer 
               (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 1:00 p.m. June 23, 2021 at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 378-2431.

The Applicant Review Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approve May 26, 2021 Meeting Minutes

3.  Shawnee Wallace, DPSST No. 61966; Curry County Sheriff’s Office

     Presented by Jordan James-Largent

4.  Inquiry Closure Memos – Information Only

     Presented by Jordan James-Largent

5.  Next Applicant Review Committee Meeting – July 28, 2021 at 1:00 p.m.

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Applicant Review Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


UPDATE: Oregon reports 269 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 9:45 AM

This is an update of yesterday’s Daily Media Release with information about COVID-19 deaths.

June 9, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 269 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 16 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,716 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 269 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 203,933.

COVID-19 weekly cases, hospitalizations decline

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows the sixth consecutive week of declining cases and lowest since weekly case tally since last September. OHA reported 1,725 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, May 31, through Sunday, June 6. That represents a 26% decline from the previous week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations also declined from 190 to 112. That’s also the lowest since last September.

There were 20 reported COVID-19 related deaths.

There were 72,443 tests for COVID-19 for the week of May 30 through June 5. The percentage of positive tests was 3.8%.

People 70 years of age and older have accounted for 38% of COVID-19 related hospitalizations and 75% of COVID-19 related deaths.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 19 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

New Variant Labels added to OHA Tableau Dashboards

On May 31st, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a new, “easy-to-pronounce and non-stigmatizing”, labeling convention for Variants of Concern and Variants of Interest using the Greek alphabet as an easier way to discuss variants by non-scientific audiences. 

Starting today, OHA’s  COVID-19 Daily Data Update dashboard and Variants dashboard will include WHO labels added alongside with the current  labels.

OHA uses the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) guidelines for reporting and there are some differences between how the WHO and CDC groups variants of both classifications. 

  • The WHO groups the B.1.427 and B.1.429 variants together and has given them a label of “Epsilon”. OHA will continue to follow how the CDC reports these variants separately and they will both have the “Epsilon” label added to each.
  • The CDC has also identified some Variants of Interest for the U.S. that the WHO has not. As a result, these will not have a Greek alphabet label assigned to it.

Explanations about these WHO label additions will be included in the notes at the bottom of each of the dashboards. Additional information about Variants of Concern and Variants of Interest can be found here.

OHA refreshes vaccine administration trends and metrics dashboard

Today, OHA refreshed the data for the vaccine administration trends and metrics dashboards with a new extract from ALERT IIS. The data are periodically refreshed, which allows for quality assurance and review. The data were last refreshed on April 9.

Following the refresh today, race and ethnicity data for approximately 1,200 people was updated, predominantly affecting Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and American Indian/Alaska Native vaccination rates. County status toward the 65% vaccination goal was not affected by the data refresh, but vaccination rates for five counties decreased minimally - by 1% or less. Those counties are Baker, Benton, Clatsop, Sherman and Wheeler.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 21,934 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 12,736 doses were administered on June 8 and 9, 198 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 6.

The seven-day running average is now 15,264 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,319,302 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,651,646 first and second doses of Moderna and 152,192 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 1,951,646 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,292,591 who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 93,444.

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,861,055 doses of Pfizer, 2,171,060 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

Hospitals across the state have received questions from the public about the need to continue to manage and limit visitation policies for patients. Unlike other public settings, hospitals are subject to special visitation requirements. The COVID-19 policies for hospitals and medical centers are based on federal rule and state law. Visitation guidance can be found here.

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 164, which is eight fewer than yesterday. There are 36 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which represents no change from yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,383, which is a 20.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 228.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (2), Clackamas (37), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (1), Crook (2), Curry (3), Deschutes (19), Douglas (14), Gilliam (1), Grant (6), Harney (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (15), Jefferson (6), Josephine (7), Klamath (4), Lake (1), Lane (10), Lincoln (3) Linn (8), Malheur (7), Marion (40), Morrow (2), Multnomah (32), Polk (7), Umatilla (7), Union (3), Wallowa (1), Washington (14), Yamhill (7).

Oregon’s 2,701st COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 9 and died on May 27 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,702nd COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on April 29 and died on June 2 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,703rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on April 15 and died on May 21 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,704th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died on May 19 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,705th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 15 and died on May 24 at Portland Adventist Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,706th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man from Grant County who tested positive on May 9 and died on May 27. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,707th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on May 14 and died on June 7 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,708th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man from Hood River County who tested positive on April 28 and died on May 21 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,709th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive on May 22 and died on May 26 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,710th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 24 and died on May 26 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,711th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 17 and died on June 3 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,712th COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on May 3 and died on June 6 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,713th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on May 29 and died on June 7 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,714th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 27 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,715th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 3 and died on May 14 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,716th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on April 28 and died on June 7 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Western Oregon University Board of Trustees Appoints Interim President, Approves Standing Diversity Committee
Western Oregon University - 06/10/21 8:07 AM
Dr. Jay Kenton
Dr. Jay Kenton
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1107/145745/thumb_20210602_175102-768x1024.jpeg

MONMOUTH, Ore. – The Western Oregon University Board of Trustees on Wednesday approved the appointment of Jay Kenton as interim president for 2021-22. It also approved the creation of a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee, the first standing committee of its kind at an Oregon public university.

 

Kenton’s nomination for interim president had been reviewed June 1 during the regular Executive, Governance and Trusteeship Committee (EGTC) meeting and then shared with the campus community. The appointment was several months in the making and involved an advisory committee comprising nine members from across campus.

 

Kenton earned his doctorate in public administration from Portland State University and has served in multiple senior administrative roles at various Oregon universities, including interim president at both Oregon Institute of Technology and Eastern Oregon University. He briefly worked as interim vice president of Finance & Administration at WOU in 2018.

 

“Dr. Kenton comes to WOU with a deep wealth of experience that should serve the university well as we search for the regular successor,” said Board of Trustees Chair Betty Komp. The search for a regular president will start in fall 2021.

 

Also Wednesday, the board approved a recommendation from the EGTC for the creation of a standing committee on diversity, equity and inclusions, bringing the number of board committees to four. The standing committee is the first of its kind among Oregon public universities, and its first work will be creating a charter.

 

“The creation of this important committee reflects WOU’s commitment to keeping this priority at the forefront of our actions,” said Chair Komp. “Diversity and inclusion are core values at Western, as specified in the strategic plan. The students have called for this commitment. The campus community has called for this commitment. We’ve responded and are excited to move forward.”

 

Also during the meeting the board:

  • Heard an update from President Rex Fuller about recommendations from the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Task Force, which was created earlier this spring.
  • Heard presentations from the University Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee, the University Cultural Competency Advisory Committee and the department of Multicultural Student Services and Programs.
  • Approved the FY22 Preliminary Budget as presented in the docket.
  • Elected Trustee Doug Morse to a two-year term as vice chair of the board, effective July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2023.
  • Approved the recommendation made by the Finance & Administration Committee to invest additional money into quasi-endowment to support initiatives related to diversity, equity and inclusion moving forward.

 

# # #

 

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving about 4,500 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with about 70% of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.




Attached Media Files: Dr. Jay Kenton

Fatal Crash on Hwy 20 - Harney County
Oregon State Police - 06/10/21 8:03 AM

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at approximately 3:55 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near mile post 152.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Subaru Forester, operated by Lillie Gray (66) of Dallas, was westbound when it moved into the eastbound lane to pass 2 motorcycles and collided with a eastbound Dodge Van operated by Rollie Brubaker (64) of Oceanside, CA. 

Gray sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Brubaker and passenger, Maria Brubaker (56) of Oceanside, CA, were transported to Harney District Hospital.

One of the motorcyclists, Neil Postal (22) of Burns, was unable to avoid the crash and was transported to Harney District Hospital.

A fourth vehicle sustained minor damage when it drove off the road and struck a highway sign to avoid the crash. 

OSP was assisted by the Harney County Sheriff's Office, Burns Fire Department, Harney District Ambulance, and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 27 - Crook County
Oregon State Police - 06/10/21 7:29 AM

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at approximately 8:10 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 27 near mile post 5.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Kia Spectra, operated by Clayton Gray (19) of Halfway, was northbound when it crossed the southbound lane, left the roadway, and rolled.

Gray sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A juvenile passenger was transported by Airlink to St. Charles Hospital with serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Crook County Sheriff's Office, Crook County Fire Department, and ODOT


Fatal Crash on Hwy 51 - Polk County
Oregon State Police - 06/10/21 7:10 AM

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at approximately 11:45 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 51 near mile post 3.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Chevrolet Trax, operated by Richard Davis (74) of Independence, was southbound when it left the roadway and rolled. 

Davis sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Polk County Sheriff's Office, Polk County Fire and Medics, and ODOT.