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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Thu. Feb. 2 - 3:44 pm
Thu. 02/02/23
BLM waives day use fees in observance of Washington's Birthday
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 02/02/23 3:36 PM

PORTLAND, Ore, — In honor of George Washington’s birthday and to increase recreational access to public land, the Bureau of Land Management is waiving recreation standard amenity and day-use fees for visitors on Feb. 20, 2023. The BLM invites the public to visit the unique and diverse natural landscapes and visitor facilities on BLM-managed lands to celebrate the life of the first U.S. President George Washington.

This marks the second of the BLM’s fee-free days of 2023. Fee-free days refer to the waiver of standard amenity fees and day-use fees, such as visitor centers, picnic/day use areas, and National Conservation Lands units where fees are charged. Expanded amenity fees and other fees, like group day use, overnight camping, cabin rentals, and individual special recreation permits, will remain in effect unless the authorized officer determines it is appropriate to waive them.

BLM’s public lands offer spectacular beauty in the colder months. Find a map of BLM’s top recreation locations in the snow, rain, or ice here:
https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/766c58075f574db2b52f3d2e13b75bb8


Winter recreation on public lands

Be prepared:

  • Know before you go. Check with local offices for current conditions, including closures and travel restrictions.
  • Make sure tires have adequate traction for road conditions.
  • Ensure that a friend or family member is aware of your adventure plans.
  • Ensure you have the 10 essentials before venturing out: navigation tools (map, GPS, personal locator beacon), headlamp, sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen, especially against snow glare!), first aid kit, knife/gear repair kit, fire essentials (fire starter, matches, lighter, etc.), shelter (i.e., an emergency blanket that folds up extremely small), extra food, extra water (beyond the minimum expectation), and extra clothes (layer up!).


Recommendations on where to go with snow (NOTE: these locations may or may not have fees): 

  • Burns: Steens Mountain offers an array of winter recreation opportunities, including snowmobiling, snowshoeing, and skiing. Individual permits must be obtained through the Burns District Office.
  • Lakeview: Gerber Recreation Site is popular for ice fishing and open year-round for camping. The paved roads are not plowed but remain clear of snow most winters. Wood River Wetland offers hiking, dog walking, bird watching, hunting, and (when there’s enough snow) snowshoeing. Be aware that the parking area is not plowed in the winter, so parking is not always available.
  • Medford: Cross country skiing and snowshoeing are available at the Cascade Siskiyou National Monument and Table Mountain Winter Play Area.
  • Washington State: Split Rock Recreation Site at Palmer Lake offers ice fishing (or regular fishing if there is no ice). Visitors can also hike on the Similkameen Rail Trail from Oroville to the Enloe Dam or on the Cowiche Canyon Trail (where there is usually little to no snow). The Yakima River Canyon Recreation Site is a great location for winter camping. If winter is mild, the Juniper Dunes Off-Highway Vehicle Area is a good option for recreation, and if the winter is cold, the Fishtrap Recreation Area offers ice fishing and cross-country skiing.

Recommendations on where to go with little to no snow (NOTE: these locations may or may not have fees):  

  • Northwest Oregon: The West Eugene Wetlands offer disc golf, the Sandy Ridge Trail System offers mountain biking, Shotgun Creek Recreation Site is open to off-highway vehicles, and the Wildwood Recreation Site has an underwater salmon viewing chamber.
  • Medford: Sites such as the Upper and Lower Table Rocks, Cathedral Hills, and Mountain of the Rogue offer winter hiking and tend to be free of snow.

In 2023, BLM will waive recreation standard amenity and day use fees for visitors on: 

  • January 16 (Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.)
  • February 20 (Washington’s Birthday)
  • June 19 (Juneteenth National Independence Day)
  • August 4 (Great American Outdoors Day)
  • September 23 (National Public Lands Day)
  • November 11 (Veterans Day)

For more information about the BLM’s recreation fee program, please visit https: //www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/permits-and-fees.


-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.

 


IVFD Board of Directors Workshop 02.13.2023
Illinois Valley Fire District - 02/02/23 3:02 PM

The  at 3:00 pm at the Administration Building, 681 Caves Hwy., Cave Junction, OR, on Monday, February 13, 2023. 

 

The topic of this workshop will be IVFD 2023-2027 five (5) year Strategic Plan.

 

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Any comments or concerns must be submitted in writing. You can email comments or concerns to johnholmes@ivfire.com or send to Illinois Valley Fire District 681 Caves Hwy., Cave Junction OR 97523 Attention: John Holmes.

 

 

Published on the following venues beginning 02/13/2023:


State issues order to revoke licenses of Lake Oswego investment adviser (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/02/23 2:19 PM
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2023-02/1073/160919/DFR_Logo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/1073/160919/thumb_DFR_Logo.jpg

SALEM – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation (DFR) has issued an order to revoke the investment adviser and insurance licenses of David D. Swanson, Sr., a Lake Oswego-based investment adviser, effective March 1, 2023, for violations of the state’s securities and insurance laws arising out of Swanson’s unlawful sale of promissory notes to his clients. Swanson did not tell his clients he was borrowing the money to pay other clients. The delay in the effective date of the revocation allows for an orderly wind-down of his business. Swanson has also been under a cease-and-desist order since 2020.

The division’s order will permanently revoke the investment adviser representative and state investment adviser licenses of Swanson and his company, Swanson Financial Services, Inc., as well as Swanson’s resident insurance producer and resident insurance consultant licenses. The order also assessed civil penalties of up to $160,000 against Swanson and his companies.

The division’s investigation found that Swanson, acting through another of his companies, SF Commercial, LLC, sold promissory notes totaling more than $1.5 million to five clients ages 64 to 77 years old in 2018 and 2019. The clients’ investments ranged from $50,000 to $755,000. As an investment adviser, Swanson was prohibited from borrowing money from his clients. Swanson and his companies also failed to make meaningful disclosures about the true nature and purpose of the investments, including that the money invested by some clients would be used to pay back other clients. Swanson eventually paid back those loans.

“We will not stand for anyone taking advantage of others, especially our vulnerable populations,” said DFR Administrator TK Keen. “Investment advisers must put their clients’ needs and interests ahead of their own. If you have questions about your financial adviser, or believe you may have been taken advantage of in an investment scheme, you can contact our consumer advocates for help.”

The division’s consumer advocates can be reached at 888-877-4894 (toll-free). The division’s consumer advocate webpage also has information about how to file a complaint, check licenses, find resources, or contact an advocate.

DFR has resources available for people who need help with financial services, student loans, payday loans, choosing a financial professional, and more. There are also tips on how to manage finances, find loan help, get out of debt, and more on our financial help page.

The division – part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services – regulates, among others, financial service institutions (including banks and credit unions), investment services, and insurance companies to make sure they are licensed properly and following the law.

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About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and www.dcbs.oregon.gov.​​




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1073/160919/DFR_Logo.jpg

Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment
Pacific Power - 02/02/23 1:50 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

 

 

Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment 

Funding helps local community organizations working to strengthen livability 

in the Rogue Valley 

 

MEDFORD, Ore. (Feb. 2, 2023)Every day, organizations throughout the Rogue Valley are putting their hearts into projects and programs to nurture our local communities and care for the environment. These efforts weave together to create a stronger, more resilient future for the region. 

 

The Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $164,000 in new grant funding across the three states it serves to support organizations committed to community enhancement and environmental respect. From improving access to affordable housing and workforce training to restoring watersheds and caring for neighborhood trees that bring environmental benefits to urban areas, this round of grants will underwrite a wide range of efforts that meet critical needs and improve local livability. 

 

“We are inspired by these organizations, in towns large and small, that are working hard to lift up people in their communities and take care of the environment,” said Cooper Whitman, Pacific Power regional business manager. “It is an honor to support this indispensable work, while helping to boost the growth and vitality of the communities we serve.” 

 

This round of grants, focused on community enhancement and environmental respect, is one of the four grant cycles offered by the foundation annually.

 

The following four grants totaling $17,000 were given to Rogue Valley organizations:

 

Illinois Valley Wellness Resources for the Adopt-A-Senior program that uses community volunteers to assist low-income seniors and residents with disabilities in need of food, socialization, transportation and home assistance. 

 

Jackson County Community Long-Term Recovery Group to support ongoing recovery work in the wake of wildfires that caused catastrophic damage to 2,600 households in Jackson County.

 

Prospect Community Club to help renovate and make ADA safety improvements to the community center that serves as a hub for essential services and programs. 

 

Rogue Valley Family YMCA to develop the Eagle Point School District fitness and wellness center that will be accessible to school district employees and the larger community. 

 

 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 

2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington, and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

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OHCS to join the Governor's newly established Housing Production Advisory Council
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 02/02/23 1:34 PM

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) to join Governor Tina Kotek’s 25-member Housing Production Advisory Council (HPAC) that will play a pivotal role in meeting the state’s housing production targets. Governor Kotek’s Executive Order NO. 23-04 established a production target of 36,000 homes per year for the next ten years. Currently the state is recruiting a diverse membership to join the statewide Housing Production Council.   

“This moment in time requires us to act with urgency and humanity to pursue solutions that meet the moment to address this housing crisis,” said Director Andrea Bell. “Housing is intersectional to everything. Economic justice, closing the racial wealth gap, improving public health outcomes and meeting our climate goals are dependent upon us, collectively, addressing this crisis.”  

“Governor Kotek’s commitment to solving the affordable housing crisis emboldens our pursuit of solutions that matter most to the people of Oregon in real ways. At the local, state and federal levels we must take every action necessary to work towards ensuring everyone has access to a safe and affordable place to call home. That is our commitment and collective responsibility.” 

HPAC’s main function is to recommend an action plan that includes concrete executive actions, policies and investments needed to meet the production target. People interested in the opportunity to help shape the state’s housing policies, are encouraged to apply to join the HPAC

About Oregon Housing and Community Services

Oregon Housing and Community Services provides resources for Oregonians to reduce poverty and increase access to stable housing. Our intentional focus on both housing and community services allows us to serve Oregonians holistically across the housing continuum, including preventing and ending homelessness, assisting with utilities, providing housing stability support, financing multifamily affordable housing and encouraging homeownership.

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Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment
Pacific Power - 02/02/23 12:00 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

 

 

Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment 

Funding helps local community organizations working to strengthen livability 

in the Klamath Falls and Lakeview area

 

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. (Feb.2, 2023)Every day, organizations across the Klamath area are putting their hearts into projects and programs to nurture our local communities and care for the environment. These efforts weave together to create a stronger, more resilient future for the region. 

 

The Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $164,000 in new grant funding across the three states it serves to support organizations committed to community enhancement and environmental respect. From improving access to affordable housing and workforce training to restoring watersheds and caring for neighborhood trees that bring environmental benefits to urban areas, this round of grants will underwrite a wide range of efforts that meet critical needs and improve local livability. 

 

“We are inspired by these organizations, in towns large and small, that are working hard to lift up people in their communities and take care of the environment,” said Todd Andres, Pacific Power regional business manager. “It is an honor to support this indispensable work, while helping to boost the growth and vitality of the communities we serve.” 

 

This round of grants, focused on community enhancement and environmental respect, is one of the four grant cycles offered by the foundation annually.

 

The following grants totaling $5,000 were given to local organizations in the Klamath Falls area:

 

Assistance League of Klamath Basin for Operation School Bell which provides new jackets and clothing for school children in need. 

 

Town of Lakeview for a large art mural installation at the town park. 

 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 

2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington, and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

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Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment
Pacific Power - 02/02/23 11:55 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

 

 

Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment 

Funding helps local community organizations working to strengthen livability 

in Northern California

 

YREKACalif. (Feb. 2, 2023)Every day, organizations across Northern California are putting their hearts into projects and programs to nurture our local communities and care for the environment. These efforts weave together to create a stronger, more resilient future for the region. 

 

The Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $164,000 in new grant funding across the three states it serves to support organizations committed to community enhancement and environmental respect. From improving access to affordable housing and workforce training to restoring watersheds and caring for neighborhood trees that bring environmental benefits to urban areas, this round of grants will underwrite a wide range of efforts that meet critical needs and improve local livability. 

 

“We are inspired by these organizations, in towns large and small, that are working hard to lift up people in their communities and take care of the environment,” said Todd Andres, Pacific Power regional business manager. “It is an honor to support this indispensable work, while helping to boost the growth and vitality of the communities we serve.” 

 

This round of grants, focused on community enhancement and environmental respect, is one of the four grant cycles offered by the foundation annually.

 

The following grants totaling $7,500 were given to Northern California organizations:

 

Del Norte County Library District for exterior maintenance and beautification of the Crescent City branch, including pressure washing, landscaping and grounds cleanup. 

 

Fire Safe Council of Siskiyou County for the creation of wildfire evacuation go-bags, including first aid kits, flashlights and other emergency supplies, for at-risk residents. 

 

 

 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 

2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington, and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

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Governor Tina Kotek to host demobilization ceremony to welcome home Citizen-Soldiers from Poland
Oregon Military Department - 02/02/23 11:30 AM

MEDIA ADVISORY

February 2, 2023


 

CONTACT

Lt. Col. Stephen Bomar

stephen.s.bomar.mil@army.mil

503-990-9508

 

Governor Tina Kotek to host demobilization ceremony to welcome home Citizen-Soldiers from Poland

 

What: Oregon Governor Tina Kotek, U.S. Senator Ron Wyden along with Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, are scheduled to serve as the official hosts for a demobilization ceremony welcoming home more than 120 members of the Oregon Army National Guard Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment. The event is to acknowledge the unit’s efforts supporting United States NATO Allies while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland.  It is also to recognize the sacrifice and support from loved ones, family, friends, co-workers, and employers, which make the mission a success. The unit was mobilized for this deployment in early January of 2022. The event will be livestreamed via YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/live/ubB_dHG1nBs?feature=share

For more information on Atlantic resolve click here:https://www.europeafrica.army.mil/AtlanticResolve/

 

Where: RSVP by replying to omar.mil@army.mil/">Stephen.s.Bomar.mil@army.mil

When:  Saturday, February 4, at 10:00 a.m. 

 


Detectives Investigating Suspicious Death (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/02/23 10:53 AM
2023-02/6186/160897/7D2A2E87-84CE-44A0-AD58-03DEFA205901.jpeg
2023-02/6186/160897/7D2A2E87-84CE-44A0-AD58-03DEFA205901.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/6186/160897/thumb_7D2A2E87-84CE-44A0-AD58-03DEFA205901.jpeg

JCSO Case 23-0627


 

MEDFORD, Ore. - Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) detectives are investigating a suspicious death that occurred at a residence in the 2400 block of Finley Lane in Medford. JCSO Medical Examiner detectives are on scene along with Central Point Police Department. Investigations are active and ongoing. Medford Police Department detectives are assisting. Further information to follow.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/6186/160897/7D2A2E87-84CE-44A0-AD58-03DEFA205901.jpeg

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Feb. 15
Oregon Health Authority - 02/02/23 8:59 AM

February 2, 2023

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Feb. 15

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee.

Agenda:  Program updates; legislative bill review; exemptions/rules update; emergency preparedness/response/incident overviews.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 15, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Teams Meeting: Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 971-277-2343; Passcode: 749 557 401#

Background: Per Oregon Revised Statute, the Radiation Advisory Committee (RAC) is comprised of eight members representative of Radiation Protection Services (RPS) registrants and licensees who use radiation devices/sources. RAC members advise RPS staff on radiation use and safety, including budgetary and administrative rule matters.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Patty Thompson at 503-509-2622, or at icia.A.Thompson@dhsoha.state.or.us">Patricia.A.Thompson@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Health Care Workforce Committee to meet February 8, 2023, via Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 02/02/23 8:59 AM

February 2, 2023

Contact:

Amy Bacher, acher2@oha.oregon.gov">Amy.Bacher2@oha.oregon.gov (media inquiries)

Jaime Taylor 503-689-7926 jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us  (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet February 8, 2023, via Zoom meeting

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, February 8, 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Public comment will be taken at 9:05-9:15 a.m.

Where: Virtual Meeting. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line.

To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1603934523?pwd=dFEyKzFYMGY1c1cyMHpYd0ZxeU1ndz09

To join via audio:

+1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose) Meeting ID: 160 393 4523  Passcode: 660661

Agenda: Convene HCWF Meeting, Public Comment, Review of Member Survey Results; Discussion, Adjourn, Next Meeting – March 8, 2023

For more information, please visit the Workforce Committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/hp-hcw/pages/index.aspx

The Workforce Committee welcomes hearing from community members on the matters discussed by the committee and its other bodies, and other topics the public wishes the committee to consider.  If you wish to offer public comment, we appreciate you letting Marc Overbeck know in advance of the meeting, at c.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us">marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us. Advance notice is not required in order to offer public comment at the meeting.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503.689.7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Cannabis Commission's Health Equity Subcommittee sets Feb. 8 Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 02/02/23 8:58 AM

February 2, 2023

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Health Equity Subcommittee sets Feb. 8 Zoom meeting

What: A public Zoom meeting of the Health Equity Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD. The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 8, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public can join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 161 147 5011 Passcode: 681007.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers. Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Deputies Participate in Click It or Ticket Enforcement Campaign (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/02/23 7:23 AM
Click-It-Or-Ticket Logo
Click-It-Or-Ticket Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/5204/160885/thumb_ciot_558640_7.png

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. – The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office is partnering with other law enforcement agencies in a Click It or Ticket seatbelt campaign which began Monday, January 30th and runs through Sunday February 12th. 

Assigned deputies will specifically be looking for seat belt violations, including child restraint law violations. 

Funding for the enhanced patrols is obtained through grants administered by the Oregon Department of Transportation.

According to NHTSA, in 2020, there were 10,893 unbuckled passenger vehicle occupants killed in crashes in the United States. In that same year, 58% of passenger vehicle occupants killed at night (6 p.m.–5:59 a.m.) were not wearing their seat belts.

“Our goal is to educate members of our community about the seatbelt and child restraint laws in an attempt to prevent serious injuries and senseless deaths,” Lt. Brad O’Dell said. 

For more information on the Click It or Ticket mobilization, please visit https://www.nhtsa.gov/book/countermeasures/countermeasures-work/seat-belts-and-child-restraints

 




Attached Media Files: Click-It-Or-Ticket Logo

Wed. 02/01/23
Quadruple Fatal Crash - HWY 226 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 02/01/23 5:23 PM

Correction: The Sorrento operator's name is spelled Petrime and she was from Scio.

On Monday, January 30, 2023, at approximately 7:26 P.M., the Oregon State Police responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 226, near Fish Hatchery Dr., in Linn County.

 

The preliminary investigation indicated a silver Hyundai Elantra, operated by Travis O. Longo (20) of Albany, was traveling westbound on Hwy 226, near MP 4. While negotiating a curve at a high rate of speed, the Hyundai crossed into the eastbound traffic lane and struck a white Kia Sorrento, operated by Jessica M. Petrine (29), head-on. The collision caused the Elantra to roll and come to a rest on its roof. 

 

As a result of the collision, Jessica M. Petrime was pronounced deceased at the scene. An 8 month old female passenger, of the Sorrento, was transported to the Lebanon Community Hospital with reportedly non-life threatening injuries. 

 

Travis O. Longo was also pronounced deceased at the scene, as well as both of his passengers: Chloe L. Richmond (18) of Lebanon and Skye R. Huskey (18) of Lebanon.

 

Excessive speed is considered to be the greatest contributing factor to this crash. The Elantra was observed, just prior to the crash, traveling eastbound on Hwy 226, in reported speeds in excess of 100mph.

 

The highway was closed for approximately 6 hours while the on-scene investigation was conducted.

 

OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriffs’ Office, Scio Fire, and ODOT.


Combined Measure 110 providers served more than 60,000 people during early implementation, preliminary reporting shows
Oregon Health Authority - 02/01/23 5:01 PM

February 1, 2023

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459, timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

Combined Measure 110 providers served more than 60,000 people during early implementation, preliminary reporting shows

SALEM, Ore. — Combined Measure 110 funding reached more than 60,000 Oregonians during the earliest phases of implementation, according to financial and operational reports filed with Oregon Health Authority (OHA).

The reporting shows that Measure 110 providers served more than 18,000 over the first three months of operation from June 1 through Sept. 30 — during a time when the service networks were still being established statewide.

That first round of reporting shows that the early Behavioral Health Resource Network (BHRN) providers spent over $10 million on network infrastructure in that early phase. The reporting largely encompasses smaller networks almost exclusively in rural areas of the state that were funded during the early implementation.

An earlier round of Measure 110-related funding called Access to Care grants — $34.5 million in bridge funding to approximately 70 statewide service providers before the formal Measure 110 rollout — ultimately reached more than 42,000 people who received substance use disorder treatment and additional support ranging from harm reduction to temporary housing.

The early financial reporting provides a preliminary account of services and spending. Measure 110 providers receive their funding on a quarterly basis. Because of this, many had not received their first quarterly payment during that first reporting period. OHA is continuing to work with providers to ensure that all data is collected.

As of July 1, the Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC), which is responsible for awarding Measure 110 grants, had approved 19 BHRNs and $72 million in funding.

The first BHRN was approved last May. The last, in Jackson County, was approved Aug. 31.

In all, the OAC obligated $265 million to 42 BHRNs and 11 tribal partners.

These service networks now exist in every Oregon county. Each offers a comprehensive array of community-based and culturally specific services for anyone seeking treatment, regardless of their ability to pay.

The initial data reflects the logistical and operational challenges that many providers confronted in building this first-in-the-nation system of care for substance use and addiction. Some of the reporting organizations were startup collaboratives; many others had to quickly accelerate and expand their existing operations to meet the required service demands of Measure 110 funding.

The data shows that BHRN providers spent approximately $3.1 million for hiring employees and other ramp-up expenses, and about $4.8 million for building construction and other necessary foundational investments to build and sustain a long-term drug treatment infrastructure in Oregon.

Over the next year, as the service networks are fully realized, these long-term investments will shift toward maintaining treatment services and supports, providing a more comprehensive assessment of Measure 110’s effectiveness.

“These preliminary reports show that local programs are putting Measure 110 funds to use and giving people who are using drugs access to life-saving treatment, harm reduction, housing and other supports,” said OHA Director James Schroeder. “While these are still early and partial reports, Measure 110 services are beginning to ramp up across the state. We’ll continue to share these progress reports each quarter.”

“The previous system that existed to address substance use was in place for 50 years, and our new system is moving as quickly as possible to become fully operational,” said OAC Tri-Chair Blue Valentine.

“Measure 110 funding has provided innovative ways for behavioral health providers in our communities to provide trauma-informed and culturally specificservices to thousands of people seeking these services, “said OAC Tri-Chair LaKeesha Dumas.

The reports yielded several examples of Measure 110 dollars making an immediate impact for communities and for people in need.

  • OnTrack, Inc., in Medford, an organization that provides support services for youth, adults and families, is renovating a home to provide transitional housing for people who are transitioning from residential treatment settings and are awaiting full-time housing placement. Once complete, the home will provide housing for five to seven adults for up to six months.
  • Faith, Hope, and Charity, which is based in Corvallis but serves Linn County, hired three peer support specialists who provide outreach and support for houseless people. As a result, they were able to assist 25 additional clients with services ranging from applying for health insurance, temporary housing, food, employment, and drivers’ licenses.
  • The Marie Equi Institute in Portland purchased and distributed harm reduction supplies for houseless people and others who work or live close to people at high risk for overdose. They have also used the additional funding for online and in-person classes on how to administer naloxone to people experiencing overdoses.

The deadline for the next round of reporting is in April for expenditures and clients served from October through December 2022.

More about the early data reports can be found on the Measure 110 web page.

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable health-based and effective approach to substance use disorder.

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Updated fish habitat map available now
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 02/01/23 4:34 PM

The map identifies streams where removal-fill permits are often required to help protect critical habitat for salmon species

The State of Oregon today released the 2023 essential salmonid habitat map, which shows streams where activities like building docks or adding riprap usually require a removal-fill permit.   

The map identifies streams that are critical habitat for Chinook salmon, steelhead trout, and other sensitive, threatened or endangered fish species. Oregon law protects these streams by requiring a removal-fill permit for most projects that remove or add any materials. View the 2023 map and learn more

The map is updated as often as yearly to reflect current Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife data. These regular updates keep habitat information accurate, which in turn helps property owners do their part to protect fish, said Oregon Department of State Lands Director Vicki Walker. 

“Anyone who lives along a river or stream should check the map,” Walker said. “The first step in protecting fish populations is knowing whether a waterway is essential habitat.” 

The 2023 update added approximately 53 miles of essential habitat. Approximately 30 stream miles are no longer essential habitat. See the draft map to view 2023 changes.

The annual map update process includes Tribal engagement and a public review and comment period. The updated map goes into effect February 1 of each year. 

Stay informed about future map updates by joining DSL’s email list for essential salmonid habitat map information. Sign up to receive emails.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Prevent a blood shortage -- donate in February
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 02/01/23 3:59 PM

Keep blood on the shelves for patients like young Noelle who had 3 transfusions during open-heart surgery

 

Portland, Ore. (February 1, 2023) — Spring is close, but February often brings unpredictable winter weather that can cause blood drive cancellations and make it difficult for donors to make it to their appointments safely. As the American Red Cross continues to monitor seasonal challenges that could impact the blood supply, donors are urged to make and keep appointments to help prevent a shortage in the weeks to come. Donors of all blood types – particularly type O blood donors, the most needed blood group by hospitals – and platelet donors are needed daily to meet the needs of patients like 3-year-old Noelle of Forest Grove, Oregon, who needed three transfusions during an open-heart surgery. Her grandmother, Pamela Richardson of Eugene, has dedicated herself to donating blood as a thank you to those who saved her granddaughter’s life.

 

“They had to replace her blood three times. The whole surgical team thought they were going to lose this baby on the operating table. They just kept pumping her full of blood,” recalls Pamela. “She survived because people had donated blood that she could have.” Pamela adds, “Donating once every eight weeks is the least I can do to thank people and the health care community for saving her life.”

 

Click here to see the complete video interview with Pamela Richardson. 

 

In thanks for helping keep hospital shelves stocked, all who come to give in February will get a $10 Amazon.com Gift Card by email, thanks to Amazon. Those who come to donate this month will also automatically be entered to win a trip for two to Clearwater Beach, Florida. Details are available at RedCrossBlood.org/heart.

 

Protect the blood supply from dropping – book a time to give blood or platelets by visiting RedCrossBlood.org, downloading the Red Cross Blood Donor App, or calling 1-800-RED CROSS. 

 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities Feb. 2-14

February 2

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 16317 SE Bluff Rd., Sandy, OR, 1:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

 

February 3

Lloyd Center Mall, 2201 Lloyd Center, Portland, OR, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Banks Fire District 13, 13430 NW Main St., Banks, OR, 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Bend Blood Donation Center, 815 SW Bond St. Suite 110, Bend, OR, 7:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 

 

February 6

Reedwood Friends Church, 2901 SE Steele St., Portland, OR, 8:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Kingpins PDX, 3550 SE 92nd Ave., Portland, OR, 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Talent Community Center, 104 E Main St., Talent, OR, 12:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

 

February 8

Clear Auto Center, 4000 SW Hocken Ave., Beaverton, OR, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Trinity Lutheran Church, 2194 SE Minter Bridge Rd., Hillsboro, OR, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Elks Lodge, 350 Belton Rd., Saint Helens, OR, 10:00 a.m. – 2:45 p.m.

Mountain View High School, 1500 SE Blairmont, Vancouver, WA, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

 

February 14

Bank of America, 121 SW Morrison, Portland, OR, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

River View Cemetery, 306 S. Taylor Ferry Rd., Portland, OR, 11:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 10509 SE 5th St., Vancouver, WA, 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

 

Visit RedCrossBlood.org and put in your zip code to find a donation site near you. 

Click here for b-roll of people giving blood.

 

How to donate blood

Simply download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit RedCrossBlood.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or enable the Blood Donor Skill on any Alexa Echo device to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

 

Blood and platelet donors can save time at their next donation by using RapidPass® to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, before arriving at the blood drive. To get started, follow the instructions at RedCrossBlood.org/RapidPass or use the Blood Donor App.

 

Oregon and Washington still require face masks be worn at all blood drives and donation sites.

 

Amplify your impact − volunteer! 

Another way to support the lifesaving mission of the Red Cross is to become a volunteer blood donor ambassador at Red Cross blood drives. Blood donor ambassadors help greet, check-in and thank blood donors to ensure they have a positive donation experience. 

 

Volunteers can also serve as transportation specialists, playing a vital role in ensuring lifesaving blood products are delivered to nearby hospitals. For more information and to apply for either position, visit redcross.org/volunteertoday

 

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 

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State releases reports on health insurance company compliance with Oregon Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA) (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/01/23 2:45 PM
Division of Financial Regulation logo
Division of Financial Regulation logo
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SALEM – All 12 health insurance companies in the individual, small group, and large group markets in Oregon failed to comply fully with the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA) at varying levels, according to reports released today by the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services’ (DCBS) Division of Financial Regulation (DFR). The agency found that most noncompliance involved improperly charging copays, coinsurance, and deductibles or failing to cover mandated benefits.

The division examined Aetna Life Insurance Company, BridgeSpan Health Company, Cigna Health and Life Insurance Company, HealthNet Health Plan of Oregon, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest, Moda Health Plan, PacificSource Health Plans, Providence Health Plan, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon, Samaritan Health Plans, UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company, and UnitedHealthcare of Oregon.

The examinations found that each of the 12 insurers failed to pay all eligible claims according to RHEA requirements. They applied copays, coinsurance, and deductibles, which are prohibited under RHEA for reproductive health and preventive care services. In some cases, insurers improperly denied claims for RHEA covered services.

In addition, the reports found that three insurers – Aetna, BridgeSpan, and Regence – failed to cover certain types of contraceptives or applied improper limitations on the amount or timing of when a member could refill a prescription.

Finally, examiners found that Cigna, HealthNet, Kaiser, and Samaritan each failed to properly resolve all consumer complaints and maintain adequate records demonstrating that they timely and adequately resolved member complaints, appeals, and grievances. 

“RHEA is a critically important tool in the state’s effort to remove barriers to reproductive health care,” said Oregon Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi, who is also the DCBS director. “As with every law, our insurers had an obligation to fully and timely implement each aspect of RHEA across all of their systems. It is disappointing to see that this did not happen. We will continue to monitor each insurer until they fully comply with RHEA and make whole any consumer harmed by these failures.”

Throughout the examination process, the division identified issues for each insurance company to immediately address to ensure members receive benefits mandated under the law, and progress towards full implementation of RHEA was observed and noted in several reports. Completion of these reports, which are similar to audits, is one of many steps the division takes in monitoring and addressing insurer compliance with the law.

Next steps include implementation of corrective action plans and ongoing data reporting and compliance monitoring with each insurer, as well as issuing regulatory guidance to clarify expectations. The DFR enforcement team will also now review the reports to determine appropriate penalties, restitution, and other action for each company. Finally, the division plans to continue working with community partners to raise awareness of benefits available under RHEA and other reproductive health laws. Consumers who believe they have not received the services or benefits they are owed under the law are encouraged to contact their insurer or the division’s consumer advocacy team at 888-877-4894 (toll-free) or go to the DFR help page

The Oregon Legislature passed House Bill 3391 (RHEA) in 2017. Starting in 2019, health insurance companies were required to provide, with no cost share, a specified list of reproductive health, sexual health, preventive care, and other health care services, including contraception and abortion.  

For more information on available benefits and to find a list of health insurance plans subject to RHEA, visit DFR’s reproductive health benefits webpage.

For more information on the RHEA examination process, findings, and recommendations, visit the division’s RHEA webpage.

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About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and www.dcbs.oregon.gov.​​




Attached Media Files: Division of Financial Regulation logo

Oregon employers, workers invited to take a 'Safety Break' May 10 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/01/23 11:25 AM
DCBS logo
DCBS logo
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Salem – It’s a day to recognize employer and worker successes in cultivating safe and healthy jobsites. It’s a day to engage in direct conversations – including employee feedback – about what’s working and what can be improved. It’s a day to pause and reflect on future challenges and to forge new plans to minimize or eliminate worksite hazards.

Employers and workers across the state are invited to take part in Safety Break for Oregon, coordinated by Oregon OSHA. The annual event – now in its 20th year – calls on employers, supervisors, and workers across Oregon to take the time to celebrate their safety and health achievements, and to examine and renew their efforts to shield people from harm while on the job. 

Will you take the Wednesday, May 10, stand-down as an opportunity to refresh your knowledge and training? Will you conduct a clear-eyed assessment of where safety and health could be improved at your worksite? Or will you celebrate your successes and recognize emerging safety leaders? 

The choice of activity is yours. Sign up now. You could even win a $100 prize.

“Employers across all types of industries can use this statewide stand-down as an opportunity to remind everyone at their business or organization about the importance of health and safety in the workplace,” said Renee Stapleton, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “Not merely symbolic, Safety Break for Oregon is a time to carefully consider on-the-job safety and health, and to bring employers and employees together to talk about hazards, protective methods, and expectations – all with an emphasis on preventing injury and illness in the workplace.”

Oregon OSHA encourages employers and workers to share their Safety Break activities on social media; tag Oregon OSHA on Facebook and LinkedIn with #SafetyBreak.

As you plan your Safety Break event, make sure to follow the current COVID-19 guidance and workplace rules. If you have questions about how to apply Oregon OSHA rules to your workplace, contact our technical specialists for free. If you want free and confidential help reviewing and improving your safety and health program, contact our consultation services. Moreover, Oregon OSHA offers many free education and training resources that you may find helpful as you plan your Safety Break for Oregon activity.

Employers that sign up online by Friday, May 5, and participate in Safety Break for Oregon will be entered to win one of three $100 checks to be used for a luncheon of their choice.

The prizes will go to participating companies as part of a random drawing. The Oregon SHARP Alliance sponsors the contest. The nonprofit group promotes safety and health management by encouraging teamwork and cooperation among people, employers, and organizations to improve workplace health and safety for Oregon workers.

For more information, ideas on how to host an event, or to download graphics, visit the Safety Break for Oregon website

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs.

 

 

 


 

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo , Safety Break for Oregon logo

Structure Fire Exposes Suspected Cannabis Processing Lab (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/01/23 10:38 AM
2023-02/6186/160859/IMG_1389~photo.jpg
2023-02/6186/160859/IMG_1389~photo.jpg
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Video available for download: https://vimeo.com/794971383

 

JCSO Case 23-0562

 

MEDFORD, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) uncovered a suspected Butane Honey Oil (BHO) cannabis concentrate laboratory when responding to assist Medford Fire Department with a structure fire on Monday. ECSO received a call for a fire burning a warehouse barn in the 500 block of Arnold Lane in rural Medford at 1:15 p.m. Minutes later a responding JCSO detective spotted and detained two males attempting to leave the scene. Medford Police Department (MPD) officers responded to assist. After the barn was mostly destroyed in the fire, a large amount of marijuana and BHO processing equipment could be seen from the perimeter of the barn. There was no licensing for any type of cannabis growing, handling, or processing at this location.

 

Illegal Marijuana Enforcement Team (IMET) detectives took over the investigation and applied for a search warrant for the premises. During IMET’s investigation detectives located 1,000 lbs. of processed marijuana and the remains of a suspected BHO lab. IMET interviewed both suspects about their involvement. Tarlon Smith, 34, of Massachusetts is charged with felony first-degree arson incident to the manufacture of a cannabinoid extract, felony unlawful manufacture of a marijuana item, and felony unlawful possession. He was lodged in the Jackson County Jail. The second suspect was released pending charges. 

 

BHO is an extracted cannabis product similar to hash. Most of the solvents used in the creation of BHO vaporize quickly and are flammable, making the extraction process dangerous. Medford Fire is investigating the cause of the fire. 

 

While regulatory agencies investigate permitted cannabis operations, IMET is focusing on the black-market marijuana trade in the Rogue Valley. IMET is a multi-agency task force funded by a grant from the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission. The task force includes personnel from JCSO, MPD, Homeland Security Enforcement, Jackson County Code Enforcement, Oregon Water Resources Department District 13 Watermasters, and the Jackson County District Attorney’s office.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2023-02/6186/160859/IMG_1389~photo.jpg , 2023-02/6186/160859/IMG_1388~photo.jpg , 2023-02/6186/160859/IMG_1381~photo.jpg

Victim in Critical Condition as Grants Pass Police Search for Attempted Murder Suspect (Photo)
Grants Pass Police Department - 02/01/23 10:00 AM
Suspect
Suspect
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UPDATE – February 1, 2023 – Grants Pass Police Chief Warren Hensman will be holding a joint press conference today at 1:00 PM at the Grants Pass Police Department located at 726 NE 7th Street in Grants Pass, Oregon to discuss the resolution to the Benjamin Foster Case. Representatives from the Oregon State Police, Josephine County Sheriff’s Office, and the Josephine County District Attorney’s Office will also be available for comment.

The press conference will stream live at https://www.facebook.com/grantspassoregon.

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UPDATE JANUARY 30TH. 

After a several hour long standoff, Benjamin Foster is in custody. A press conference will be held tomorrow with additional information.

 

                  

UPDATE January 29, 2023 - Grants Pass, Ore – Benjamin Obadiah Foster, an extremely dangerous suspect wanted for Attempted Murder, Kidnapping, and Assault, remains on the run. Detectives and Fugitive Apprehension Teams are continuing to follow investigative leads.

It is possible that Benjamin Foster may attempt to change his appearance by shaving his beard and hair or by changing his hair color. The Grants Pass Police Department asks the public to pay particular attention to Foster’s facial structure and eyes since those features are very difficult to change. Additional photos of Foster, as they become available, will be released to assist in his identification.

Tips regarding sightings of Benjamin Foster continue to flood into the department, and we are confident this dangerous criminal will soon be captured with the assistance of a concerned citizen. The Grants Pass Police Department appreciates the engagement of the community in this investigation, as well as the extensive media coverage from across the nation.

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UPDATE - January 27, 2023 - Grants Pass Police Offer Reward for Information Leading to Arrest and Capture of Attempted Murder Suspect

Grants Pass, Ore. – Yesterday evening, the Grants Pass Police Department, with the assistance of Oregon State Police SWAT, the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office, and Federal partners, served a search warrant in the 1300 block of Sunny Valley Loop in Wolf Creek in an effort to arrest Benjamin Obadiah Foster for Attempted Murder. Following a lengthy manhunt, Foster evaded capture and likely received assistance in fleeing the area. Numerous items of evidence, including Foster’s 2008 Nissan Sentra, were seized during the search.

During the search, investigators arrested 68-year-old Tina Marie Jones of Wolf Creek for Hindering Prosecution. She was lodged at the Josephine County Jail.

The investigation has revealed that the suspect is actively using online dating applications to contact unsuspecting individuals who may be lured into assisting with the suspect’s escape or potentially as additional victims. The Grants Pass Police Department wants the community to be extra safe while this predator is still at large and also advises that anyone assisting Ben Foster with his escape will face potential prosecution.

The Grants Pass Police Department has established a Tip-Line and is offering a $2,500.00 reward for information leading to the arrest and prosecution of Benjamin Obadiah Foster. Anyone with information is asked to call the Grants Pass Police Tip-Line at 541-237-5607. Citizens should not approach this extremely dangerous suspect and call 9-1-1.

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UPDATE - Grants Pass, Ore. - Chief Warren Hensman will be holding a press conference regarding this Attempted Murder case today (January 26, 2023) at 2:00 PM. The conference will be held in the Training Room of the Grants Pass Police Department located at 726 NE 7th Street, Grants Pass, OR 97526. 

Updated Suspect photos have been added. Benjamin Obadiah Foster is described as a 36-year-old white male, approximately 6'0" tall, weighing approximately 180 pounds, with Brown hair, possibly worn in a bun, and blue eyes. Foster is believed to be in possession of a handgun and is considered extremely dangerous.

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Grants Pass, Ore. – On Tuesday at 6:52 PM, Grants Pass Police Officers responded to a residence in the 2100 block of Shane Way regarding an assault. Upon arrival, officers found a female victim who had been bound and severely beaten into unconsciousness. The victim was transported to an area hospital in critical condition.

The suspect fled the scene before officers arrived but was positively identified as Benjamin Obadiah Foster, 36 years old, of Wolf Creek. Foster was last known to be driving a dark blue 2008 Nissan Sentra 4-door with Oregon license 407EDX. Foster is known to be armed and should be considered extremely dangerous. Foster is wanted by the police for Kidnapping, Attempted Murder, and Assault. Anyone seeing Foster or knowing his whereabouts should immediately call 9-1-1 and reference Grants Pass case #23-3570. 

The Grants Pass Police Department and partner agencies are actively investigating this case and thank the citizens who have assisted thus far. Further details will be released as they become available.

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Attached Media Files: Suspect , Updated Suspect Photo , Updated Suspect Photo , Jones arrested for hindering , Suspect , Suspect

State Land Board to meet February 7 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 02/01/23 9:57 AM

Agenda items include initiating rulemaking for use restrictions at Crump Lake to protect cultural resources and annual reports on management of school lands and forests

SALEM, Ore. – The State Land Board will meet on Tuesday, February 7 at 10 a.m. at the Department of State Lands building in Salem.

Agenda items the Land Board will consider include:   

  • Easement in city of Prineville to expand the water system to meet community needs. The city of Prineville applied for a permanent easement on school lands to maintain the access road, waterline, and water holding tanks to expand its water system to meet the needs of the growing city.
  • Easement to address erosion and safety at Clatskanie River bridge crossing. The Oregon Department of Transportation applied for a permanent easement to reinforce protection against erosion for the US30 Clatskanie River bridge crossing.
  • Easement in Tillamook County to improve native fish passage on Illingsworth Creek. Tillamook County Public Works applied for a permanent easement to replace an undersized culvert across Illingsworth Creek. Part of the Salmon SuperHwy in partnership with Trout Unlimited, this project will replace the culvert with a 46-foot bridge to restore full passage for native fish.
  • Sale of 123 acres of subsurface rights in Yamhill County to advance wildlife habitat conservation project. The Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) applied to purchase 123.54 acres of subsurface mineral and geothermal rights located east of the city of Sheridan. The Yamhill SWCD is seeking federal grants to purchase the surface rights, intending to manage the property exclusively for wildlife habitat and conservation. Ownership of subsurface rights is a requirement of the federal grant to ensure the conservation easement.
  • Rulemaking to protect cultural and natural resources at Crump Lake. Frequent droughts have dried up the lakebed of Crump Lake during the summer and increasingly extending into dry years. Since 2014 DSL has received reports from State Police and local Tribes regarding vandalism of and looting of significant cultural artifacts, enabled by the low water conditions which expose the lakebed. DSL Directors have implemented multiple emergency closures of the lake to all public uses during low water conditions, most recently in July of 2022. Those temporary closures have helped to reduce negative impacts. DSL is requesting the Land Board initiate a rulemaking process for consideration of a permanent rule to close the lake during low water conditions as an effective method of protecting natural and cultural resources surrounding property, and the environment around Crump Lake.

The Land Board will also hear annual reports on the Common School Fund audit, the management and performance of school lands, and DSL Strategic Plan progress.

Meeting Details and Agenda 

Tuesday, February 7, 2023, at 10 a.m. 
Department of State Lands
Land Board Room
775 Summer St. NE, Salem

The full meeting agenda and materials are available on the DSL website. The meeting will be livestreamed to the DSL YouTube channel

The public may submit written testimony or sign up to provide spoken testimony (in person, by video, or phone) during the meeting. Advanced sign-up is required, and the deadline is by 10 a.m. on Monday, February 6.

If you need assistance to participate in this meeting due to a disability, please contact Arin Smith at 503-986-5224 or in.n.smith@dsl.oregon.gov">arin.n.smith@dsl.oregon.gov at least two working days prior to the meeting. 

Visitors are not permitted to bring backpacks, bags, or large purses into the Department of State Lands building prior to, during, or following Land Board meetings. Purses, medical bags, and diaper bags are permitted, but may be subject to inspection by the Oregon State Police.

State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Tina Kotek, Secretary of State Shemia Fagan and State Treasurer Tobias Read. Established by the Oregon Constitution in 1859, the Land Board oversees the state’s Common School Fund. The Department of State Lands is the Land Board’s administrative agency, managing the lands and resources that help fund Oregon’s public schools and protecting the state’s waterways and wetlands for the many benefits they provide.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Triple Your Impact: Pacific Power Will Match Your Contribution to Oregon Energy Fund 2-for-1
Pacific Power - 02/01/23 9:10 AM

Triple Your Impact: Pacific Power Will Match Your Contribution to Oregon Energy Fund 2-for-1

PORTLAND, Ore — Feb. 1, 2023 -- Helping your neighbors and their families stay warm just got easier. Pacific Power will match every dollar you donate to the Oregon Energy Fund with $2 more.

Pacific Power customers who receive their bills by mail will find an Oregon Energy Fund contribution envelope included in February. Customers who pay their bills electronically can send a check or enroll in the fixed donation program. 

This program allows customers to donate any dollar amount, starting at $1 per month, which is then incorporated into their monthly bill. Fixed donations will also be matched 2-for-1 by Pacific Power. To enroll in the fixed donation program, call Pacific Power toll-free at 1-888-221-7070.

Donations may be tax-deductible and are forwarded directly to the Oregon Energy Fund, which verifies eligibility and allocates funds to those in need. All funds donated are used to assist families in need from the same county in which the donor resides.

Customers who need bill assistance themselves can talk to Pacific Power representatives who can help with payment plans that work for their individual needs and direct them to agencies that may be able to help. Pacific Power's customer service number is 1-888-221-7070.

About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 764,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company supplies customers with electricity from a diverse portfolio of generating plants including hydroelectric, thermal, wind, geothermal and solar resources. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 2 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.

 


Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board to Meet
State of Oregon - 02/01/23 9:09 AM

Salem, Oregon-The Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board (EPAB) will meet at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 7, 2023. The meeting will take place remotely via the internet on Microsoft Teams and is open to the public. The agenda and handouts will be posted on the advisory board’s website: (https://www.oregon.gov/epab/Pages/Meeting-Documents.aspx

What:        Meeting of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board  

When:       Tuesday, February 7, 2023, 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Where:      Microsoft Teams (Click here to join the meeting)

Call Toll free: 1-503-446-4951 | Participant pin code: 711413499#

Who:         Members of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board 

The Legislature established the advisory board with enactment of ORS 276A.270-276. The board will advise the State Chief Information Officer (CIO) on key decisions and strategic choices about how the state CIO manages and operates the state’s web portal services.

The Oregon.gov portal is the connection point for citizens to access state agency services and information on the internet. The board provides oversight to specific websites, services and online payments where agencies choose to utilize the State Chief Information Officer’s E-Government Program as their service provider.

With the board’s advice, the state CIO wants to make the Oregon web portal services and their operation as effective as they can be for Oregonians to interact with state government.  


Triple Your Impact: Pacific Power will match your contribution to Project HELP 2-for-1
Pacific Power - 02/01/23 9:07 AM

Media Hotline:                                                            

503-813-6018                                                                                                                                               

                                                                        

Triple Your Impact: Pacific Power will match your contribution to Project HELP 2-for-1

YREKA, Calif. — Feb. 1, 2023 — Recent months have magnified the need in our communities, but helping your neighbors and their families stay warm just got easier. Pacific Power will match every dollar you donate to Project HELP with $2 more.

Project HELP is a nonprofit program providing energy assistance through donated funds. Pacific Power customers who receive their bills by mail will find a Project HELP contribution envelope included in February. Customers who pay their bills electronically can send a check or enroll in the fixed donation program. 

This program allows customers to donate any dollar amount, starting at $1 per month, which is then incorporated into their monthly bill. Fixed donations will also be matched 2-for-1 by Pacific Power. To enroll in the fixed donation program, call Pacific Power toll-free at 1-888-221-7070.

Donations may be tax-deductible and will be forwarded directly to Project HELP, which is administered by The Salvation Army, which verifies eligibility and allocates funds to those in need. All funds donated are used to assist families in northern California.

Customers who need bill assistance themselves can talk to Pacific Power representatives who can help with payment plans that work for their individual needs and direct them to agencies that may be able to help. Pacific Power's customer service number is 1-888-221-7070.

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About Pacific Power

Pacific Power is headquartered in Portland and provides electric service to more than 764,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. It is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, providing 2 million customers with value for their energy dollar and safe, reliable electricity. For more information, visit pacificpower.net. 


Commercial Structure Fire in the Illinois Valley - 01/31/.2023 (Photo)
Illinois Valley Fire District - 02/01/23 12:14 AM
2023-02/6947/160845/328035653_681926867060709_130609673455919611_n.jpg
2023-02/6947/160845/328035653_681926867060709_130609673455919611_n.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/6947/160845/thumb_328035653_681926867060709_130609673455919611_n.jpg

1/31/2023 call time 1924 hours IVFD received a report of a suspicious open burn behind the old Radio Shack Building.

First units quickly upgraded this to a Commercial Structure Fire.

After suppression efforts were underway, a Second Alarm was initiated with more apparatus and personnel dispatched to respond to the scene

Units responding were Illinois Valley Fire District, AMR-Josephine County, Rural Metro Fire - Josephine County, Grants Pass Fire Rescue, Rogue River Fire District, ODOT, PP&L, Josephine County Sheriff's Office, Oregon State Police, and Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal.

The fire is under investigation and will monitored throughout the night.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/6947/160845/328035653_681926867060709_130609673455919611_n.jpg , 2023-02/6947/160845/327609910_979168609728667_3283008072451258846_n.jpg , 2023-02/6947/160845/327737492_882341073190529_5885760845252113444_n.jpg

Tue. 01/31/23
OHCS Director Andrea Bell elevates Governor Kotek's proposed housing investments as a collective path forward
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 01/31/23 3:01 PM

SALEM, Ore. — OHCS Executive Director Andrea Bell released the following statement to commend Gov. Tina Kotek for her mission-focused budget recommendation investments in housing:  

“In her first day of office, Gov. Kotek took swift action to pursue progress on issues of shared concern across the state,” Bell said. “Today, the governor released her budget, which lays out the path forward to meet our state’s greatest housing challenges not only for the year ahead, but for years to come.  

“As we are in community with our partners, we continue to see leaders relentlessly working toward meaningful change that will be felt in the lives of the people they serve. We know the way forward will require all of us and investments at the scale needed to tackle these important issues. For what we know is that our economies and our communities are stronger when all people have access to their basic needs to which housing is fundamental. 

“We know budgets are moral documents and today marks an important day. I am grateful to Gov. Kotek for having the foresight to call for sizeable investments in housing and homelessness solutions. Our state is at an inflection point. Oregonians across the state have increasingly called for more affordable housing. The Governor’s Recommended Budget reflects this priority to increase housing options and access to homeownership not just with words but with action. The work ahead requires statewide galvanization, and we invite you to be part of it.” 

About Oregon Housing and Community Services

Oregon Housing and Community Services provides resources for Oregonians to reduce poverty and increase access to stable housing. Our intentional focus on both housing and community services allows us to serve Oregonians holistically across the housing continuum, including preventing and ending homelessness, assisting with utilities, providing housing stability support, financing multifamily affordable housing and encouraging homeownership.

 

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Fatal Crash - HWY 86 - Baker County
Oregon State Police - 01/31/23 1:57 PM

Correction: This crash occurred on January 30.

On Monday, January 30, 2023, at approximately 4:33 A.M., the Oregon State Police responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 86, near milepost 57, in Baker County.

 

The preliminary investigation indicated a 2015 Ford Edge, operated by Amber Hampton (30) of Halfway, failed to negotiate a curve and crashed into a rock feature. The operator, who was the solo occupant, was ejected from the vehicle during the crash. The highway was closed and the operator was transported to a hospital via Lifeflight. The operator was later pronounced deceased at the hospital. The cause of the crash is currently under investigation.

 

The Highway was closed for approximately five hours during the course of the investigation.

 

OSP was assisted by the Baker County Sheriffs' Office, Halfway Rural Ambulance, and ODOT.


Fatal Crash - HWY 18 - Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 01/31/23 1:55 PM

On Monday, January 30, 2023, at approximately 4:25 P.M., the Oregon State Police responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 18, near milepost 52, in Yamhill County.

 

The preliminary investigation indicated a gray 2003 Dodge Durango, operated by Eric Hall (52) of Newberg, was traveling westbound on HWY 18 when, for unknown reasons, the Durango crossed into the oncoming lane, hitting an eastbound Freightliner tractor-trailer, operated by David Ambriz Jacuinde (34) of Woodburn, head-on. Hall suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. Jacuinde was uninjured during the collision.

 

The roadway was closed for approximately 4 hours during the on-scene investigation.  The cause of the crash is still being investigated.

 

OSP was assisted by the Yamhill County Sheriffs' Office, McMinnville Fire, and ODOT.


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to hold a special meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 01/31/23 12:08 PM

January 31, 2023

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to hold a special meeting

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: Topics covered include an update on Access to Care data reporting and the Secretary of State’s recent audit of Measure 110. A final agenda will be posted on the Oversight and Accountability Council web page prior to the meeting.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 1 from 1:30 to 3:30

Where: Virtual. You Tube link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJcTWLMzkNk

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

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Nine Legislators form first-ever Oregon Arts and Cultural Caucus; Public launch event scheduled for Monday, Feb. 27 (Photo)
Oregon Arts and Culture Caucus - 01/31/23 11:17 AM
Harlen Springer, vice chair of the Oregon Arts Commission
Harlen Springer, vice chair of the Oregon Arts Commission
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Salem, Oregon – Recognizing the vital role arts and culture play in the livability and prosperity of Oregon communities – and in enriching the lives of Oregonians – nine members of the Oregon Legislature have come together in a bi-partisan fashion to form the state’s first-ever Arts and Culture Caucus. The public is invited to meet Caucus members at a launch event scheduled from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 27, at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art in Salem.

Coordinated by Rep. Rob Nosse (D-Portland), the Arts and Culture Caucus’ inaugural membership includes Sen. Dick Anderson (R-Lincoln City); Rep. Janelle Bynum (D-Clackamas); Rep. Maxine Dexter (D-Portland); Rep. David Gomberg (D-Otis); Sen. Bill Hansell (R-Athena); Rep. John Lively (D-Springfield); Rep. Pam Marsh (D-Ashland); and Sen. Deb Patterson (D-Salem). Caucus membership is expected to expand. 

“Arts and culture are so important to Oregon,” said Rep. Nosse. “All around our state, every day there are concerts, comedy events, public hearings, podcasts, theatrical performances, debates and community events that bring the people of our state together. We must support the cultural and community hubs in our neighborhoods and I hope this caucus will continue to ensure arts and culture thrive in this state.” 

The Caucus will serve as a resource to the Oregon Legislature on key issues impacting the arts and culture sector. Its members will work closely with stakeholders including the Oregon Arts Commission, the Oregon Cultural Trust (and its Statewide Partners) and the Cultural Advocacy Coalition of Oregon to stay informed on the latest research and issues. It will also set an agenda on priorities for arts and culture legislation, including a sustainable and robust funding mechanism for arts and cultural initiatives.

Rep. Nosse and other members of the Caucus were instrumental in designating more than $100 million in Coronavirus Relief Funds and American Rescue Plan funds to sustain Oregon arts, heritage and humanities organizations during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to a survey conducted by Business Oregon, Travel Oregon and the Small Business Development Center Network, only the accommodation industry suffered greater losses. Large cultural organizations continue to feel the impact, with many reporting that ticket sales remain only about 50 percent of pre-pandemic levels. 

Members of the Arts and Culture Caucus are currently considering legislative concepts and bills put forward by the Arts Commission, the Cultural Trust and the Cultural Advocacy Coalition. 

The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis reports that the arts and culture sector contributed $8 billion to Oregon’s economy in 2020, representing 3.3 percent of the state’s GDP, 60,994 jobs and total compensation of $4.8 billion. Oregon nonprofit cultural organizations alone contribute at least $687 million and support 22,299 jobs. This adds $53 million to local and state government revenue. 

“Public funding for arts and creativity is a high-return investment that benefits every Oregonian in every city, town and rural community across the state,” said Harlen Springer, vice chair of the Arts Commission. Springer collaborated with members of the Arts Commission Advancement Committee, including Chair Jenny Green, as well as Cultural Trust Chair Niki Price and Sue Hildick, senior advisor to the Cultural Advocacy Coalition of Oregon, to support formation of the Arts and Culture Caucus.

“This is a momentous occasion for Oregon’s 1,500+ arts, heritage and humanities organizations, and all who support them,” said Niki Price, chair of the Oregon Cultural Trust. “We applaud the Legislators who immediately signed up, and the Arts Commissioners who initiated the concept.” 

“This year could be transformational for arts and culture in Oregon, making sure every Oregonian has access to creativity in their local community,” added J.S. May, president of the Cultural Advocacy Coalition of Oregon. “We are honored that the caucus policymakers are elevating the needs of the creative sector both short-term and long-term to help our economy, our mental health and our healing from the pandemic.”

The Hallie Ford Museum of Art is located on the Willamette University campus at 700 State St. in Salem. RSVP for the Feb. 27 launch event.

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Attached Media Files: Harlen Springer, vice chair of the Oregon Arts Commission , Rep. Rob Nosse (D-Portland) , A recent performance at the Sisters Folk Festival, which received $194,998 in Coronavirus Relief Funds for Cultural Support made possible by the Oregon Legislature.

UPDATE: Located: Oldridge, Donna
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/31/23 9:38 AM

UPDATE:  Subject has been located 

NAME: Oldridge, Donna 

AGE: 72 

SEX: Female 

RACE: Caucasian 

HEIGHT: 5’08” 

WEIGHT: 200 lbs 

HAIR: Blonde or Brown 

EYES: Blue


INFORMATION:
Donna was last seen Saturday, January 14, 2023, at her residence off Board Shanty Road by her roommate. She drives a green and brown 2005 Ford Expedition. Donna is said to frequent Grants Pass and may have a small white dog with her.

If you have any information as to her whereabouts, please contact the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office. 

Please contact the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office with any information. Please reference case # 23000132 Office: 541-474-5123




Attached Media Files: 2023-01/6607/160808/LOCATED_-_Oldridge_Missing.pdf

Reminder: Western Oregon State Forests Management Plan and Habitat Conservation Plan update meeting set for Feb. 7
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/31/23 9:25 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry will hold a virtual meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 7, to learn about forest management planning for state forestlands west of the Cascades. 

This meeting is open to the public and primarily intended for those with an interest in management of Oregon’s state forests. RSVP is requested.

This meeting will provide updates on the Forest Management Plan (FMP), the Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP), and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process focused on that HCP. 

As part of our public engagement process, we invite you to this meeting to hear updates on the Western Oregon State Forests management planning efforts and ask questions. The meeting will be an opportunity to:  

  • Learn about the FMP development process
  • Hear updates on the Western Oregon State Forests HCP 
  • Hear updates on the HCP NEPA process

This meeting is one of many anticipated future opportunities to engage in state forests planning and is meant to provide an update to the process. 

Meeting Documents: The meeting agenda and materials are posted on the FMP project website.

Date and time: Tuesday, Feb. 7 from 1-4 p.m. The meeting will include: 

  • 1 – 3 p.m.: Background information, process updates, presentations, and an opportunity for Questions & Answers discussion.
  • 3 – 4 p.m.: An informal discussion period to provide participants with an open discussion on any topics presented during the meeting. 

     

Where: Virtual only by Zoom or call-in. We ask that you join the meeting a few minutes early to troubleshoot any issues and to ensure the meeting starts on time. View the meeting instructions, tips, and protocols

  • To view and participate in the meeting, go to: https://odf.zoom.us/j/94877694967
  • Use computer audio or call-in from your phone using the following call-in information: 
    • Dial: 1 (253) 215-8782
    • Meeting ID: 948 7769 4967

 

Meeting Recording: A post-meeting recording will be posted on the ODF YouTube channel.

Background: 

State Forests are sustainably managed to provide social, economic, and environmental benefits to all Oregonians. In October of 2020, the Board of Forestry (BOF) directed the State Forests Division to begin the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for the draft Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) and continue developing an associated Forest Management Plan (FMP). These parallel planning processes have been closely coordinated to ensure alignment and consistency in management goals, objectives, and strategies. ODF recognizes that public engagement is a key element in developing an HCP and FMP that reflect the values of all Oregonians, and is committed to providing information and engaging in dialogue with those who have an interest in these important planning efforts. 

Please note, the February 7 FMP HCP Meeting Open to the Public will provide updates on the Western State Forests FMP and HCP. This meeting is separate from the February 2 Implementation Plan Public Workshop which will provide an opportunity for the public to learn more about the Implementation Plan revisions for six state forest districts. 

More information: More information is available by contacting the project leaders or online: 

Western Oregon Forest Management Plan & Implementation Plans

Jennifer McAdoo

503-855-7060 

.McAdoo@icf.com">jennifer.mcadoo@icf.com

Western Oregon Habitat Conservation Plan

Cindy Kolomechuk 

503-945-7731 

cindy.kolomechuk@odf.oregon.gov

Online resources:


Mon. 01/30/23
Scenic Bikeways Committee to meet Feb. 8
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/30/23 4:08 PM

SALEM, Ore—The Scenic Bikeways Committee will meet Feb. 8 to discuss membership updates, rulemaking updates and route updates in a virtual meeting from 1 to 4 p.m. 

The meeting is open to the public. The agenda and link for the meeting is posted on the Scenic Bikeways website at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/BWT/Documents/BW-Committee-Agenda-Feb-2023.pdf.

The Scenic Bikeways program was established in 2009 by Cycle Oregon, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Travel Oregon and the Oregon Department of Transportation. It now includes 17 of the state’s best designated mostly-roadway bicycle routes that showcase Oregon’s breathtaking landscapes, cultural treasures and western hospitality. The program is currently managed under a partnership agreement between Cycle Oregon and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. 

The Scenic Bikeways committee is an advisory group for the management and designation of routes nominated by the public for state scenic bikeways designation. Its members include citizen representatives, tourism organization, local governments and state agencies involved in bicycle recreation or transportation. 

For more information, contact program manager Clint Culpepper at 971-235-5994 or clint@cycleoregon.com


New round of Electric Mobility Grants connects more Oregonians to EVs and their benefits
Pacific Power - 01/30/23 3:22 PM

More than $2 million in funding will help bring EV charging stations, electric trucks and work vehicles, e-bikes and more to rural and underserved communities 

 

PortlandOre. (January 30, 2023) — Pacific Power recently awarded more than $2 million to 18 cities, small towns, community colleges and nonprofits throughout the state for projects that will connect more Oregonians to the cost-saving, clean-air benefits of electric vehicles and electric mobility — including residents of underserved and rural communities that Pacific Power serves. 

For example, in Sweet Home, Pendleton and Grass Valley, Pacific Power Electric Mobility Grants will help bring EV charging stations to places where few or none exist. In Central Oregon, low-income residents in Bend may receive vouchers for e-bikes, and a community-driven coalition will map out the first EV charging and car share plan for the region. In Multnomah County, the public library, as well as nonprofits that repair homes and improve energy efficiency in diverse and historically underserved communities, will be able to purchase electric trucks and vans to deliver services.

“Pacific Power is hard at work building a safe, reliable, affordable clean energy future. A critical part of that work is helping to ensure that Oregonians at all income levels, in all kinds of communities, have access to electric transportation and the economic growth and vitality it can bring,” says Kate Hawley, electric transportation senior product manager for Pacific Power. “These Electric Mobility Grants are an important way that we can strengthen the communities we serve and help them thrive.” 

Since 2020, Pacific Power has distributed more than $4.5 million in Electric Mobility Grants to Oregon communities. Funding is made possible by the Oregon Clean Fuels Program, which is administered by the state Department of Environmental Quality and aims to reduce the carbon  intensity of Oregon’s transportation fuels. Pacific Power raises funds for the Electric Mobility Grants through the sale of Clean Fuels Program credits. 

 

Grants are part of bigger e-mobility picture

In addition to electric mobility Grants, Pacific Power is helping Oregonians plug into the benefits of electric mobility by offering valuable customer rebates and other incentives for homeowners, businesses and multifamily property owners who install EV chargers. A free technical assistance program is available for businesses, property owners, and organizations, which provides a feasibility analysis for EV charging options, costs, rates and best practices for siting, installing and managing equipment.

Pacific Power is also expanding Oregon’s EV charging infrastructure beyond big cities with the installation of public fast-charging stations in Klamath Falls, Madras, Otis and Mill City. 

These efforts to help more Oregon drivers choose electric are also helping communities improve air quality by reducing vehicle emissions. Gas-engine cars and trucks are the number one source of air pollution in Oregon, according to the Department of Environmental Quality’s 2022 Biennial Energy Report. EVs with zero tailpipe emissions are key to improving air quality over the long term.

 

E-mobility: More than electric cars

Previous rounds of Pacific Power Electric Mobility Grants have helped communities purchase electric tractors in Prineville, an electric school bus in Bend, an EV and charger for a Portland health clinic, and a traveling EV educational exhibit that visits rural parts of the state. 

The 2022 grant recipients and projects are similarly creative and wide-ranging:

  • Chiloquin Visions in Progress (Klamath County). Funds will be used to install a Level 2 charger and DC fast charger in downtown Chiloquin, a rural area with few charging options. Chargers will help draw visitors to a business district with an art center, grocery store and county library. 
  • Oregon Environmental Council (multiple locations). In a partnership between Oregon Environmental Council and Oregon State University’s Agricultural Research/Extension, funds will be used to purchase four utility EVs to test and promote the viability of electric farm equipment to agricultural students and communities, through workshops, visits and field day demonstrations. 
  • Genesis XXI LLC (Medford). At Genesis XXI, a workforce housing development in downtown Medford expected to open in 2023, funds will be used to install four Level 2 chargers and to purchase one EV that residents may use via the GoForth CarShare platform. 
  • Umpqua Community College (Roseburg). Funds will be used to install the first EV chargers on the campus. The two Level 2 chargers will be available at no cost to students and staff. 

For information about the Electric Mobility Grant program and customer rebates for installing EV chargers, please visit pacificpower.net/ev.


2023 Josephine County Search & Rescue Academy
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/30/23 12:58 PM

REPORTING DEPUTY: M. Valdez

DETAILS:

The Josephine County Sheriff’s Office Search & Rescue Division will hold its annual Search & Rescue Academy to train citizens interested in becoming Search & Rescue volunteers. The academy training will take place at Josephine County Search & Rescue located at 250 Tech Way, Grants Pass, OR.

The academy training consists of Basic Survival Skills, First Aid/CPR, Land Navigation, Search Techniques, Legal Issues and other search & rescue related topics. Completion of the Academy and related testing and background check will qualify an attendee as a SAR volunteer.                   

The cost for the academy is $50 per student, which covers training materials and the compass used by SAR. The $50 fee can be paid in cash or a check made out to Friends of SAR (a 501(c)3, non-profit).

The Academy begins Tuesday, February 21 and continues every Tuesday and Thursday evening (6-9 PM) and Saturday (8 AM-5 PM) until March 18th.  After a break for the schools’ spring break and the Easter holiday, a final exercise will be held on Saturday/Sunday April 15-16. 

Register online at https://bit.ly/3QqTctX or email sar@josephinecounty.gov for registration link. 
 

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: February 16, 2023. 


OSP Traffic Stop Leads to Arrest and Drug Seizure -- Klamath County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 01/30/23 10:29 AM
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On January 18, 2023, around 11:26 a.m., an Oregon State Police Senior Trooper stopped an SUV for a lane usage violation on Highway 97, milepost 276, near Klamath Falls.

During the traffic stop, the Sr. Trooper noticed signs of criminal activity, and a search of the vehicle was conducted.  During the search of the vehicle, the Sr. Trooper located approximately 10 pounds of suspected methamphetamine, 3 pounds of suspected heroin, and 1.4 pounds of suspected counterfeit pills containing fentanyl- all concealed within the vehicle. 

The driver was identified as Sergio Luis Salazar-Mercado (30) of Wapato, Washington.  Salazar-Mercado was taken into custody and lodged in the Klamath County Jail.

OSP Troopers were assisted during the investigation by Detectives from the Basin Interagency Narcotics Enforcement Team (BINET) and Detectives from the OSP-Criminal Investigations Division-Drug Enforcement Section (Domestic Highway Enforcement Initiative). 

The Oregon State Police-Domestic Highway Enforcement Initiative is supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA).

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates with and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement initiatives, including the OSP-DHE Initiative.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2023-01/1002/160801/IMG_3169_20230118_154550_(003).JPG

Project Turnkey 2.0 Delivers Hope and Housing Relief to the Coastal Community of Lincoln City, Oregon; State-funded grant program will stand up approximately a dozen emergency shelters in Oregon in 2023 (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 01/30/23 10:06 AM
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Project Turnkey 2.0 Delivers Hope and Housing Relief to the Coastal Community of Lincoln City, Oregon 

State-funded grant program will stand up approximately a dozen emergency shelters in Oregon in 2023 

 

Portland, Ore. – January 30, 2023 – Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) and Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today the first emergency housing site for Project Turnkey 2.0, the second iteration of the state-funded grant program administered by OCF which aims to increase the state’s supply of emergency and transitional housing.  

 

Helping Hands Reentry Outreach Centers (Helping Hands) has been awarded $977,000 in Project Turnkey 2.0 grant funding to complete the final phase of renovation to a building donated by the City of Lincoln City in 2019 for the purpose of creating emergency shelter and transitional housing.  

 

“These services are so vital in every community when addressing the needs of those that are experiencing homelessness,” said Alan Evans, Founder and President of Helping Hands, “It is because of partnerships, that we are able to bring this facility to Lincoln City.”  Mike Davis, CEO of Helping Hands adds “Thank you, Oregon Community Foundation, for selecting Helping Hands to receive the final funds needed to complete this project.” 

 

Helping Hands will renovate the property to create both emergency shelter space and longer-term transitional housing units. When complete, the “Lincoln City HOPE Center at the LeRoy Benham campus” will provide 69 beds, including 12-14 emergency beds and 55 transitional housing in dormitory style rooms for 3-4 people per room. There are also 2 rooms for participants with children.  

 

The total cost of renovation is estimated at $1.9 million, with the remaining $600,000 being provided through a 0% interest loan over 20 years from the City of Lincoln City, and $325,000 in grants from foundations.  

 

This is a unique grant in that it is for the final phase of renovation only, as Helping Hands has already been gifted the building from the City of Lincoln City.  

 

Project Turnkey 2.0 aims to stand up approximately 10 emergency shelters in the state by identifying appropriate properties. To help meet the unique needs of specific communities, allowable property types expanded in the legislative language ¾ it is no longer just the conversion of hotels and motels. “We are seeing many creative proposals for repurposing existing properties. These include duplexes and triplexes, vacant apartment complexes, and even vacant commercial buildings,” said Megan LoebSenior Program Officer, Economic Vitality and Housing, Oregon Community Foundation. “The flexibility provided in this round of state funding helps to better address some of the unique housing needs of specific communities, including rural places.”  

 

Properties will be owned and operated by local nonprofit organizations and entities (such as cities, counties, or tribes) that will provide safe housing as well as critical support, including access to medical and social services, computers, laundry facilities, meals and more. Additional Project Turnkey 2.0 sites are expected to be announced in mid-February 2023. 

 

About Helping Hands Reentry Outreach Centers (Helping Hands) 

The mission of Helping Hands Reentry Outreach Centers (Helping Hands) is to provide a helping hand to a sustainable life through Resources, Recovery, and Reentry. Helping Hands provides trauma-informed, data-driven, person-centered homeless services within locations in Clatsop, Lincoln, Multnomah, Tillamook and Yamhill counties in Oregon. To learn more, please visit: https://helpinghandsreentry.org/shelter-services

 

About Project Turnkey 2.0 (2022-2023) 

Based on the success of the Project Turnkey 1.0, and in the face on ongoing need for emergency shelter, on March 4, 2022, the Oregon Legislature allocated $50 million in new funding for more emergency shelters around the state for Project Turnkey 2.0.  

 

“Project Turnkey 2.0 is an innovative solution that will help address one of Oregon’s most prolonged challenges — our housing crisis,” said OHCS Director Andrea Bell.  “Our commitment and collective responsibility to the people of Oregon is to find solutions that are real and are proven to work.” 

 

To learn more: Oregon Community Foundation and Oregon Housing and Community Services Poised to Launch Project Turnkey 2.0 with $50M in State Funding.  

 

OCF and OHCS Roles 

Oregon Community Foundation serves as the grantor and fiduciary, administering state-funded Project Turnkey 2.0 grants with guidance from a diverse statewide Advisory Committee. OCF offers support for Oregon’s housing needs along a continuum — from shelter to supportive housing to affordable housing to equitable home ownership — through a variety of tools, including research, grants, advocacy, and low-interest loans. OCF’s administration of Project Turnkey 2.0 is one example of the innovative, collaborative approaches launched to help more Oregonians find stable, affordable housing. 

 

Oregon Housing and Community Services provides advice and support for OCF as the State’s Housing Finance Agency. Additionally, OHCS has received resources to administer funds to the recipients of Project Turnkey 2.0 grants. This includes ongoing monitoring and oversight of these funds and the projects they support. 

 

Background 

In 2020 the Oregon Legislature allocated a total of $65 million for Project Turnkey (1.0), for the purpose of acquiring motels/hotels for use as safe shelter for people experiencing homelessness, at-risk of homelessness or displaced by wildfires. In less than seven months, Project Turnkey 1.0 created 19 new shelters in 13 counties, leading to a 20% increase in the state supply of shelter beds. Each property is locally owned and operated by a local nonprofit organization or entity (such as city or county).  

 

To learn more, please visit: https://oregoncf.org/assets/PDFs-and-Docs/PDFs/project-turnkey-report.pdf  

 

About Oregon Housing and Community Services 

Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) provides resources for Oregonians to reduce poverty and increase access to stable housing. OHCS focuses on both housing and community services to serve Oregonians holistically across the housing continuum, including preventing and ending homelessness, assisting with utilities, providing housing stability support, financing multifamily affordable housing and encouraging homeownership. To learn more, please visit: oregon.gov/ohcs

 

About Oregon Community Foundation 

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) was founded in 1973 with a big mission: to improve the lives of all Oregonians through the power of philanthropy. In partnership with donors and volunteers, OCF works to strengthen communities in every county in Oregon through research, grantmaking and scholarships. In 2022, OCF distributed more than $180 million, supporting 3,500 grantees and awarding more than 3,000 scholarships. With OCF, individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds that meet the needs of diverse communities statewide. 

 

2023 marks OCF’s 50th anniversary. Since its founding, OCF has distributed more than $2.2 billion in community investments, including grants to 10,850 nonprofits and 53,375 scholarships to students. Individuals, families, businesses and organizations can work with OCF to create charitable funds to support causes important to them. To learn more, please visit: oregoncf.org. 

 

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Attached Media Files: Project Turnkey 2_First PT 2 Site_OCF_OHCS_FINAL Joint News Release_01 30 2023.pdf , OC50-full-logo-orange-line-blue-type-web.png , Pile Driving Foundation_Helping Hands_Hope Center_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg , OHCS Logo.png , Helping Hands Image 2_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.PNG , Helping Hands Image 1_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.PNG

LOCATED: Missing - Attempt to locate: Chatelain, Kevin
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/30/23 9:01 AM

UPDATE: LOCATED

MISSING PERSON - ATTEMPT TO LOCATE

CASE #: 23000117

Name: Chatelain, Kevin

AGE:    44             

SEX:     MALE        

RACE:    CAUCASIAN  

HEIGHT:   6’00”    

WEIGHT: 185 LBS  

HAIR:   BROWN    

EYES:   BROWN

INFORMATION:

Family has not heard from Kevin since December, 2022.  Kevin is known to stay on public lands or “up in the woods” and has for several years.  Kevin does not have a phone nor any other communication devices.  Please contact the Sheriff’s Office with information regarding Kevin’s location. The provided photo is roughly a year old. 

Please contact the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office with any information. 

Please reference case #23000117

Office: 541-474-5123 




Attached Media Files: 2023-01/6607/160770/Chatelain_missing.pdf , 2023-01/6607/160770/LOCATED_Chatelain_missing.pdf

142nd Wing to conduct night flying training (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 01/30/23 8:59 AM
2023-01/962/160595/220421-Z-SP755-2004.jpg
2023-01/962/160595/220421-Z-SP755-2004.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-01/962/160595/thumb_220421-Z-SP755-2004.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Oregon Air National Guard’s 142nd Wing will conduct routine F-15 Eagle night training missions on January 30 to February 3 and February 7 to 9.

Night training allows the Citizen-Airmen pilots based at the Portland Air National Guard Base to stay current with mandatory Air Force requirements. Night flying is conducted as an essential training requirement for nighttime maneuvers to support mission and contingency response. Training flights will be completed each evening before 10:00 p.m.

“We must train to defend our state and nation in all types of conditions. While there is an increase of noise and activity during the evening hours, we will do everything possible to minimize the impact on our community,” said 142nd Wing Commander, Col. Todd Hofford. “As citizens of the Portland Metro area, we value your support and patience during this nighttime phase of our training. The safety and security of our nation is our top priority.”

For more information contact Master Sgt. Steph Sawyer, 503-335-4351

-30-

FILE PHOTO: 220421-Z-SP755-2004 A 123rd Fighter Squadron F-15C Eagle prepares for take-off during night flying operations at Portland Air National Guard Base, Ore., April 21, 2022. Night flying is an essential training requirement for Oregon Air National Guard pilot's nighttime competency maneuvers. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Steph Sawyer)

About the 142nd Wing:

The Portland Air National Guard Base employs around 1,500 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $500 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from Northern California to the Canadian border, as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.




Attached Media Files: 2023-01/962/160595/220421-Z-SP755-2004.jpg

Sun. 01/29/23
Medford Police Respond to Early Morning Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash
Medford Police Dept. - 01/29/23 10:26 AM

On Sunday, January 29th, 2023 at approximately 5:15 a.m. Medford Police officers and medical personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash near Crater Lake Ave. and E. Main St. Upon arrival, officers found the vehicle had crashed into a tree and was on fire. Witnesses pulled the driver out of the vehicle and officers on scene were able to get the passenger and a dog out. The Medford Fire Department extinguished the vehicle fire. The driver was seriously injured and was pronounced deceased at scene. The sole passenger was transported to Rogue Regional Medical Center and is currently in critical condition.  

The driver has been identified as 23-year-old Christian Picon and next of kin have been notified.

Members of the Serious Traffic Accident Reconstruction (STAR) Team responded and were able to determine the vehicle was heading southbound on Crater Lake Avenue when it was unable to navigate a turn. Further crash details are under investigation.  




Attached Media Files: 2023-01/6231/160792/Fatal_Accident_-_January_29_2023.HEIC

Sat. 01/28/23
Residential Structure Fire - 2071 NE Stephens Street, Space #A3 - 1-28-23 (Photo)
Roseburg Fire Dept. - 01/28/23 4:01 PM
Image 1
Image 1
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-01/5568/160788/thumb_Image_1.jpg

At 6:01 a.m. on January 28, 2023, Roseburg Fire Department personnel responded to a reported residential structure fire at 2071 NE Stephens Street, Space #A3.  Douglas County Dispatch received a report of a living room on fire with smoke and flames seen.  The reporting party stated all residents had evacuated the residential structure.   

Firefighters arrived on scene to find a fully involved doublewide manufactured home with fire venting from the roof and porch area.  Firefighters made an aggressive exterior attack of the structure and quickly extinguished the fire.  They also completed a primary and secondary search as well as overhaul.  Sadly, two family dogs passed away inside the structure.  The primary home sustained extensive structural and water damage.  Two adults and two children were displaced due to the fire; however, none of the adults or children were injured in the fire.  The American Red Cross was notified and is assisting the family.

The cause of the fire is under investigation but believed to be caused by a space heater that was located in the living room of the residenceThirteen firefighters assisted with firefighting operations.  Other agencies assisting with the fire included Douglas County Fire District #2, Umpqua Valley Ambulance, Avista Utilities, Pacific Power, Roseburg Police Department, and the American Red Cross.

The Roseburg Fire Department would like to remind everyone of the following heating safety tips:                      

  • Keep anything that can burn at least three feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable space heater.
  • Have a three-foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters.
  • Never use your oven to heat your home.
  • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified company. 
  • Check the cord on portable heaters to make sure it is not cracked, frayed, or getting hot when in use. Extension cords should never be used with portable heaters as they can overload the circuit and cause a fire.
  • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.
  • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.
  • Test smoke alarms monthly.

Additional images are available on the Roseburg Fire Department Facebook page at www.facebook.com/roseburgfire

For the latest information regarding the City of Roseburg Fire Department, please visit our website at www.cityofroseburg.org or like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/roseburgfire




Attached Media Files: Image 1 , Image 2 , Image 3 , Image 4

Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/28/23 11:10 AM
Duval
Duval
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-01/1070/160784/thumb_Duval.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, John Anthony Duval Jr., passed away January 27, 2023. Duval was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) in Salem and passed away at the facility. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the State Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. 

Duval entered DOC custody on September 7, 2021, from Jackson County, with an earliest release date of September 19, 2023. Duval was 44 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 12,000 men and women who are incarcerated in 12 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses approximately 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

 

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Attached Media Files: Duval

Fri. 01/27/23
Housing Stability Council Monthly Meeting - February 3, 2023
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 01/27/23 4:19 PM

Jan. 27, 2022

The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be from 9:00 a.m. to 1:20 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3, 2023. The meeting will be held electronically due to the current COVID-19 health crisis. You can find all updated meeting materials on our website.

 

Webinar Meeting Only

Register in advance for this webinar:

Webinar Registration - Zoom

AGENDA: 

9:00: Meeting Called to Order - Roll Call 

9:05: Public Comment

9:15: Report of the Chair

9:30: Report of the Director

9:45: Affordable Rental Housing Division 

           Natasha Detweiler-Daby, Director, Affordable Rental Housing

  • MF Housing Transaction Recommendations: Tai Dunson-Strane, Production Manager
    • Glisan Family Apartments
  • Preservation Pool Recommendations: Martin Jarvis, Program Analyst; Amy Cole, Manager State Development Resources
  • Manufactured Park Preservation Recommendations:  Edward Brown, Program Analyst; Amy Cole, Manager State Development Resources 
  • LIFT Rental Metro Project Recommendations; Becky Isom, Senior Program Analyst; Amy Cole, Manager State Development Resources
  • Warm Springs Update Request; Amy Cole, Manager State Development Resources
  • Affordable Rental Housing MWESB Update Report: Claudia Cantu, MWESB Program Analyst; Roberto Franco, Assistant Director of Development Resources and Production
  • Reference Memo in packet (not prioritized for discussion)
    • Market Cost Offset Fund Update  

11:00: Break

11:15: Homeownership Division 

           Emeses Perfecto, Director, Homeownership

  • Flex Rules:  Talia Kahn-Kravis, Operations & Policy Analyst
  • Homeownership Market Cost Offset Fund (HMCOF): Talia Kahn-Kravis, Operations & Policy Analyst

11:45: Housing Stabilization Division  

          Jill Smith, Director, Housing Stabilization

  • IDA Initiative Administered by Neighborhood Partnerships: Jill Smith, Housing Stabilization Director; Alena Pollak, Assistant Director of Housing Retention; Chad Caubin, OHCS Grant Manager for the IDA Initiative; Amy Stuczynski, Manager, Data & Evaluation Neighborhood Partnerships; Holly McGuire, Director of Economic Opportunity Neighborhood Partnerships

12:05: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion 

          Chelsea Bunch, Director, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion 

  • OHCS Racial Equity Analysis Tool (REAT) Presentation: Chelsea Bunch, Director of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion; Megan Bolton, Assistant Director of Research

1:05: Central Services Division 

          Sarah Roth, Central Services Administrator

  • HR Report: Laura DeLeon, HR Director; Christopher Henderson, Workday Administration and Operations Manager

1:20: Meeting Adjourned




Attached Media Files: 2023-01/1810/160772/2023-FEB-03-HSC-Meeting-Agenda.pdf

Former Fugitive Wanted in Oregon for Real Estate Scam Pleads Guilty
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/27/23 2:49 PM

SAN DIEGO—On January 26, 2023, a California man who evaded federal authorities for more than two decades after being convicted at trial and who was wanted in District of Oregon for perpetrating a real estate scam while a fugitive pleaded guilty in San Diego.

Robin James McPherson, a former resident of San Diego, pleaded guilty to failing to appear, willfully attempting to evade income taxes, and wire fraud, resolving three separate pending criminal cases.

According to court documents, in December 2000, McPherson and two co-conspirators were found guilty at trial in the Southern District of California of conspiring to defraud the IRS and tax evasion. Prior to being sentenced in March 2001, McPherson fled the U.S.

In early August 2019, special agents from FBI’s office in Eugene, Oregon began investigating McPherson after several individuals reported being the victims of a Costa Rican real estate fraud scheme with ties to the Eugene area. McPherson used a variety of marketing techniques, including cold calls, promotional websites, and Facebook advertisements, to find potential investors for an alleged Costa Rican real estate development opportunity called the Carara Parque Resort Corporation. After victims showed interest in the faux investment opportunity, McPherson would conduct sales calls, from Costa Rica, to explain the project.

McPherson directed victims to wire investment funds to a bank account in Oregon and then had the funds transferred to a bank account he controlled in Costa Rica. Between December 2015 and August 2019, approximately $1.2 million dollars were transmitted to the Oregon bank account. McPherson used many different excuses to explain to his investors why no resort villas had been constructed. He did not disclose to his investors that their contracts had not been honored and no villas were slated for construction. McPherson used his investors’ funds to pay for various personal expenses including his own mortgage.

On October 22, 2020, McPherson was charged by criminal complaint in the District of Oregon with wire fraud and money laundering. In May 2022, he was apprehended in Costa Rica and returned to San Diego.

Today, McPherson waived indictment and venue and pleaded guilty to wire fraud, a charge pending in the District of Oregon. He also pleaded guilty to failing to appear and willfully attempting to evade income taxes, charges pending in the Southern District of California. On April 28, 2023, McPherson will be sentenced in San Diego on all three charges of conviction.

Wire fraud is punishable by up to 20 years in federal prison. Tax evasion and failure to appear are each punishable by up to five years in federal prison. All three charges also carry maximum fines of up to $250,000 or twice a defendant’s gross gains or losses and three years’ supervised release.

This case was investigated by the FBI and IRS-Criminal Investigation. It was prosecuted in the District of Oregon by Assistant U.S. Attorney Gavin W. Bruce.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Health Information Technology Oversight Council to meet February 2
Oregon Health Authority - 01/27/23 2:09 PM

January 27, 2023

Contact:

Amy Bacher, 503.405.5403, acher2@oregon.gov">amy.bacher2@oregon.gov (media inquiries)

Kiari Chao, 503.931.3053, i.chao@dhsoha.state.or.us">kiari.chao@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Information Technology Oversight Council to meet February 2

What: The regular public meeting of Health Information Technology Oversight Council.

When: February 2, 12:30pm to 3:30pm

Where: By webinar and conference line. The public may join remotely through a webinar or conference line:

Agenda: Welcome, Introductions and HITOC Business (12:30-12:45); 2022-2027 Medicaid 1115 Demonstration Waiver (12:45-1:40); HITOC Member Panel on Waiver Implications (1:40-2:10); 10-Minute Break (2:10-2:20); Strategic Plan Update (2:20-2:40); Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup Updates (2:40-2:55); House Bill 4150 Final Report (2:55-3:05); Legislative Update (3:05-3:15); HIT Policy & Program Updates (3:15-3:20); Public Comment (3:20-3:25); Closing Remarks and Meeting Adjourn (3:25-3:30)

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/OHIT-HITOC/Pages/index.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact HITOC.INFO@odhsoha.oregon.gov or call 503.373.7859 at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.


MPD Welcomes Newest Member to K9 Unit (Photo)
Medford Police Dept. - 01/27/23 11:08 AM
MPD K9 Bruno 1
MPD K9 Bruno 1
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-01/6231/160752/thumb_MPD_K9_Bruno_1.jpg

The Medford Police Department is pleased to introduce K-9 Bruno as the newest police service dog to join the department’s K9 team.

18-month-old Belgian Malinois, Bruno, is trained in tracking, criminal apprehension, evidence recovery, as well as building and area searches. 

Bruno started training with his handler, MPD Officer Zach Mailand in September 2022 for six weeks at a police canine academy before graduating and becoming certified through the Oregon Police Canine Association. He now works in the field and continues to train weekly with Officer Mailand.

“We’re excited to add Bruno to our team,” said Lieutenant Rebecca Pietila. “He will be a great asset in helping promote safety throughout our community.”

Police K9’s serve a variety of functions that help to protect the public, and our officers, from dangerous individuals and situations.

MPD's K9 program was formed in May 1992. There are currently four K9's in the program -- two specializing in apprehension and two specializing in drug detection. All MPD K9 Officers are members of the Oregon Police Canine Association and undergo a certification process annually.




Attached Media Files: MPD K9 Bruno 2 , MPD K9 Bruno 1

System of Care Advisory Council to meet remotely February 7th
Oregon Health Authority - 01/27/23 10:14 AM

Jan 27, 2023

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459, timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

Program contact: Anna Williams, 971-720-9654, anna.k.williams@dhsoha.state.or.us

System of Care Advisory Council to meet remotely February 7th

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council

When: Tuesday February 7, from 12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Where: By webinar at ZoomGov

Meeting ID: 160 988 8607, Passcode: 797793

Dial by your location +1 669 254 5252, US (San Jose)

Agenda: The Council will receive diversity, equity and inclusion training from an external facilitator, get an update about the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) Program and discuss contract revisions to local system of care, among other topics. There will be time set aside for public comment.

The full agenda can be found at here.

Background: In 2019 the Legislature established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Christy Hudson at 971-678-4347, 711 TTY, or isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us, at least two business days prior to the meeting.

##


Public Health Advisory Board meets on Feb. 9, 2023
Oregon Health Authority - 01/27/23 8:58 AM

January 27, 2023

Contact: Erica Heartquist, (503) 871-8843, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets on Feb. 9, 2023

What: The Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Approve January meeting minutes; discuss PHAB subcommittees and workgroups; hear legislative updates; plan for public health vision development; hear from local public health authorities about public health modernization implementation.

When: Thursday, Feb. 9, 2023 from 3:00-5:30p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1614044266?pwd=ekpYekxaMm92SHN0dngzTW9ZeldsUT09 or conference call: (669) 254-5252, participant code 1614044266#.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at (971) 673-2284, 711 TTY, or lichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">publichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.