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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Thu. Sep. 23 - 10:11 am
Thu. 09/23/21
UPDATE: Oregon reports 2,312 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 26 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/21 9:35 AM

September 22, 2021

This news release is an updated version to include case and death information.

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,312 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 26 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 26 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,649 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,312 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 317,107.

OHA updates reporting for schools in weekly Outbreak Report

Starting today, the weekly Outbreak Report is updating how school outbreaks will be reported.

The Outbreak Report will continue to report the number of cases in school by student and staff or volunteer status. Active and resolved outbreaks will now include all cases linked to the outbreak and will no longer differentiate cases among students and staff cases. 

Outbreaks in K-12 schools are defined as having two or more cases identified, where there is evidence of transmission, at school. Outbreaks may include cases who were not at school but are close contacts of those exposed at school. This provides a more accurate picture of the scale of K-12 related outbreaks and how they may link to other cases in the community.

Schools should continue to notify their local public health authority of all positive cases identified among students and staff, including those who are reporting a positive at-home COVID-19 test.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 939, which is five fewer than yesterday. There are 270 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is six more than yesterday.

9/22/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

39 (6%)

22 (6%)

1 (1%)

7 (16%)

7 (12%)

0 (0%)

2 (4%)

0 (0%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

315 (7%)

84 (4%)

20 (3%)

78 (13%)

38 (9%)

3 (6%)

45 (11%)

47 (41%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are 39 available adult ICU beds out of 649 total (6% availability) and 315 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,272 (7% availability).

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 9,765 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 21. Of this total, 3,965 were administered on Sept. 21: 1,774 were initial doses, 1,712 were second doses and 451 were third doses. The remaining 5,800 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 21.

The seven-day running average is now 7,763 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,931,592 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,891,669 doses of Moderna and 211,673 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,714,604 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,479,317 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (19), Benton (41), Clackamas (218), Clatsop (14), Columbia (33), Coos (53), Crook (12), Curry (4), Deschutes (169), Douglas (59), Gilliam (1), Grant (68), Harney (27), Hood River (9), Jackson (106), Jefferson (21), Josephine (33), Klamath (39), Lake (9), Lane (143), Lincoln (28), Linn (119), Malheur (41), Marion (266), Morrow (7), Multnomah (319), Polk (45), Sherman (1), Tillamook (12), Umatilla (72), Union (16), Wallowa (13), Wasco (18), Washington (224) and Yamhill (53).

Oregon’s 3,624th COVID-19 related death is a 47-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive on Aug. 23 and died on Sept. 20 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,625th COVID-19 related death is a 60-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive on Aug. 19 and died on Sept. 18 at Oregon Health and Science University Hospital. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,626th COVID-19 related death is a 65-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive on Aug. 11 and died on Sept. 17 at Oregon Health and Science University Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,627th COVID-19 related death is a 20-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 20 at St. Alphonsus Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,628th COVID-19 related death is an 84-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 15 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,629th COVID-19 related death is a 56-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Sept. 15 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,630th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 19 and died on Sept. 21 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,631st COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old woman from Deschutes County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 18 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,632nd COVID-19 related death is a 54-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 16 and died on Sept. 17 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,633rd COVID-19 related death is a 66-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 15 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,634th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 15 and died on Sept. 16 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,635th COVID-19 related death is a 50-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 16 and died on Sept. 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,636th COVID-19 related death is a 96-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 16 and died on Sept. 20 at her residence. She had no underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,637th COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 20 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,638th COVID-19 related death is a 56-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 19 at Ashland Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3.639th COVID-19 related death is a 47-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 14 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,640th COVID-19 related death is an 89-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 20 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,641st COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 17 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,642nd COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 23 and died on Sept. 18 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,643rd COVID-19 related death is a 54-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 7 and died on Aug. 31 at Oregon Health and Science University Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,644th COVID-19 related death is an 88-year-old man from Polk County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 17 at Salem Hospital.  Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,645th COVID-19 related death is a 35-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Sept. 19 at Oregon Health and Science University Hospital. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,646th COVID-19 related death is a 43-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 17 and died on Sept. 16. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,647th COVID-19 related death is a 50-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 18 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,648th COVID-19 related death is a 66-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 20 at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,649th COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 22 and died on Sept. 18 at PeaceHealth Sacred Health Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information

# # #


Board of Forestry hosts a virtual planning retreat on Oct. 6 and 7
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/23/21 9:17 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet virtually on Oct. 6 and 7 for a planning retreat. The retreat offers the board and department leadership the opportunity to connect and explore policy issues in an informal setting. No public comment or testimony will be accepted during the retreat, but the public can observe both days of the retreat via a livestream on the department’s YouTube page.

During this informal annual retreat, board members will: 

  • Connect with each other and discuss leadership effectiveness and desired working relationships in support of sound public policy decision making, 
  • Discuss reviewing and updating the Forest Program for Oregon, 
  • Engage with ODF’s executive team on current and future strategic initiatives for the department, and
  • Discuss board priorities and work plan items for the upcoming two years and provide thoughts to inform the 2023-2025 biennium.

View the agenda and meeting details. 

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at estryinformation@oregon.gov">forestryinformation@oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.


Wed. 09/22/21
Federal Employee Who Accessed Child Pornography Aboard Government Research Vessel Sentenced to Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/22/21 4:50 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A federal government employee who accessed and possessed child pornography while working aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientific research vessel was sentenced to federal prison today.

Johnny Dale Hale, 44, was sentenced to 24 months in prison and five years’ supervised release.  He was also ordered to pay $4,000 in restitution to his victims.

According to court documents, in late 2016, Hale, a decorated veteran, was working as a crew member aboard the Bell M. Shimada, a NOAA scientific research vessel.  On or about November 15, 2016, the vessel was experiencing technical connectivity issues and the information technology team began running diagnostics. While troubleshooting, an electronics technician discovered two new folders on the ship’s server containing what he believed to be child pornography.

Diagnostics showed that Hale’s unique employee access card was associated with the time and date the folders were initially accessed. Additionally, Hale used two different vessel workstations to access the server at the exact time the folders were created. The vessel’s senior security engineer alerted the U.S. Department of Commerce to the discovery.

Special agents and a forensic analyst reviewed the suspect folders and discovered 109 pornographic web links and confirmed the presence of child pornography. Approximately 33 images of child pornography were in one of the suspect folders, with images from at least four series of photographs of previously-identified child pornography victims.

On June 21, 2017, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned an indictment charging Hale with possession of child pornography. On April 23, 2021, he pleaded guilty to that charge.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Department of Commerce Office of Inspector General, NOAA Office of Law Enforcement, and the FBI. Assistant U.S. Attorney William M. McLaren prosecuted the case.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov.

Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct involving a minor. It is important to remember child sexual abuse material depicts actual crimes being committed against children. Not only do these images and videos document victims’ exploitation and abuse, but when shared across the internet, child victims suffer re-victimization each time the image of their abuse is viewed. To learn more, please visit the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children’s website at www.missingkids.org.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

COVID-19 weekly cases and hospitalizations decline, deaths rise
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/21 4:40 PM

September 22, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

COVID-19 weekly cases and hospitalizations decline, deaths rise

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows decreases in daily cases and hospitalizations and an increase in deaths.

OHA reported 11,655  new cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Sept. 13 through Sunday, Sept. 19. That represents a 10% decrease from the previous week.

There were 579 new COVID-19 hospitalizations, down slightly from 592 last week.

There were 148 reported COVID-19 related deaths, up from 120 reported the previous week.

There were 140,538 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Sept. 12 through Sept. 18.  The percentage of positive tests was 10.5%, down from 12% the previous week and the lowest level of test positivity in six weeks.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 187 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

####


BPA aligns people and strategy functions to drive its culture and competitiveness
Bonneville Power Administration - 09/22/21 3:26 PM

PR 13-21                                                                                                      BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
                                                            FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2021
                                                                                       CONTACT: Maryam Habibi, 503-230-4413
                                                                                                                                            or 503-230-5131

BPA aligns people and strategy functions to drive its culture and competitiveness 
New organization enhances strategic capabilities and workplace culture efforts

 

Portland, Ore. – The Bonneville Power Administration’s executive structure is changing. The realignment by Administrator and CEO John Hairston will strengthen the agency’s strategic capabilities and enhance its commitment to its workforce. 

The move recognizes ongoing challenges posed by the pandemic and concerns about workers’ mental health and wellbeing. It also comes as BPA prepares to refresh its agency strategy and negotiate new long-term wholesale power contracts with its public utility customers. 

“The Northwest depends on BPA to deliver reliable, affordable, carbon-free power every day. That job is only getting more and more complicated,” said Hairston. “It’s just good business to ensure we do all we can to attract and retain the best talent, and to provide a workplace that drives employee satisfaction and productivity. That’s the best way to ensure we succeed in performing our public service mission, meeting our responsibilities and providing excellent service to our customers.”   

Dan James, who joined BPA’s leadership team in 2016 as deputy administrator, will now direct the agency’s new Workforce and Strategy Office.

“Dan brings passion and compassion to our people and cultural awareness efforts, as well as a breadth of strategic planning experience,” said Hairston. “As our new chief workforce and strategy officer, he will ensure we’re effectively planning and executing our strategies and boosting our employee recruitment, retention and diversity and inclusion efforts.”

The realignment brings the agency’s people-related and strategy functions into the same executive portfolio and refocuses the deputy administrator role. BPA’s Workforce and Strategy Office will include the agency’s existing communications, human resources, and Civil Rights and Equal Employment Opportunity organizations. The agency will also add two new organizations:  

  • The new Technology Innovation and Strategy Office will bring together strategic planning, technology research and development programs. Staff in this new office will report to the deputy chief workforce and strategy officer, Shana Kuhn. Kuhn, who recently served as chief supply chain officer, was selected as the first deputy chief workforce and strategy officer.
  • The new Culture Office will focus on the agency’s culture strategy, employee engagement, and diversity and inclusion functions. The new organization will be overseen by a new chief culture officer.

“People and intellectual and social capital are all essential elements of BPA’s competitiveness,” said Chief Workforce and Strategy Officer Dan James. “I’m excited to lead this new organization and support our strategic and workplace goals to ensure BPA’s success in a fast-changing industry and dynamic job market.” 

Under the new structure, the agency’s government affairs and compliance, audit and risk functions will now report to the administrator.

BPA’s chief operating officer will continue to advise on mission operations and the chief administrative officer will continue to oversee the agency’s support and business services missions, including BPA’s industry leading Safety organization. The new organizational changes go into effect on Sept. 26.

 

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov 

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Attached Media Files: 2021-09/1236/148701/BPA-Organizational-Chart-Aug2021.pdf

Missing Person: Brian Moore (Photo)
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/22/21 2:57 PM
Brian Moore Photo
Brian Moore Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/6607/148703/thumb_Brian_Moore_photo_2.jpg

Name: Brian Moore

Age: 38

Sex: Male            

Race: White

Height: 5’9          

Weight: 165

Hair: Brown        

Eyes: Hazel

Case #: 21001842

Details:

The last contact Brian’s family had with him was on August 24th, 2021.  A broad phone ping at the time of the report showed him to be in the Glendale/Wolf Creek area.  There are no bank or phone records since the date of the report.

Please contact the Josephine County Sheriff's Office at 541-474-5123 with any information.  Please reference case #21001842.




Attached Media Files: Missing Person Flier , Brian Moore Photo , Brian Moore Photo

Sept. 22 Oregon Employment Department Media Statement
Oregon Employment Department - 09/22/21 2:37 PM

Our next media briefing is scheduled for 1 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 29. 

Employment

Yesterday, the Employment Department released the jobs numbers and unemployment rates for Oregon’s counties and metropolitan areas in August. 

Oregon’s eight metropolitan areas have collectively regained three out of five (or 62%) of the jobs lost during the pandemic recession. Salem and Albany rank the highest among metropolitan areas. They’ve each regained nine out of 10 jobs lost in spring 2020.

Portland, Eugene and Corvallis are further from a full jobs recovery. Each of these metropolitan areas have regained about two-thirds of the jobs lost during the recession.

Within the Portland metro area, Multnomah County in particular has struggled to recover jobs. Less than half the jobs lost during the recession were regained by August. This is meaningful for Oregon’s overall recovery, as Multnomah has the most jobs of any county in Oregon and also the largest deficit to get back to its February 2020 employment level.

Oregon’s rural areas continue to outpace metro areas in this recovery. Taken together, Oregon’s 23 rural counties have regained three out of four jobs (75%) lost in the COVID recession. Wallowa, Crook, and Harney counties each had more total nonfarm jobs in August than they did before the pandemic recession.

Back to Work Update 

The Employment Department continues to focus on helping people find jobs or new careers and employers find talented workers with our Back To Work Campaign in partnership with WorkSource Oregon.

There is an ongoing and urgent statewide need to fill health care and other positions that support the health care industry, like food service, facilities and business administration.

The Employment Department is reaching out to claimants with health care experience to let them know about job openings in their field. Our first health care hiring event is at the Clackamas Town Center today, Wed., Sept. 22

As part of the Governor’s health care initiative, the Employment Department has also scheduled a statewide virtual Hiring Heroes for Health care event from 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Wed., Oct. 6, so job seekers can explore career opportunities and meet employers hiring across Oregon. People can register for the virtual event online and visit our LinkedIn page for details.

All WorkSource Oregon events will follow the state and CDC guidance to make sure everyone is safe during these events. To ensure the safety of our visitors and employees and prevent further spread of COVID-19, all customers and employees must wear masks.

Online Scheduling through WorkSourceOregon.org

The new online scheduling tool is live in Spanish and English! People can go to WorkSource.org and click on the Contact button for either language page. The tool has options to schedule virtual and in-person appointments with an employment specialist at one of the WorkSource Oregon (WSO) centers throughout the state. Job seekers can also schedule time to use a WorkSource Oregon computer for job search activities. Translation work is in progress to make the new scheduling tool available in all 12 languages that we are making available on the WorkSource site.

People filing new claims must complete a one-on-one orientation to receive their benefits, and they can this tool to schedule this required orientation.

Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance (PFMLI)

PFMLI will conduct a Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) meeting from 9 a.m. – noon on Wed., Sept. 29, to review the first batch of PFMLI's administrative rules. This meeting is open to the public and gives people an opportunity to provide input and offer suggestions on the proposed rules. These “batch one rules” are available for review our website.

The first batch of PFMLI rules relate specifically to wages, contributions, employer size, assistance grants, equivalent plans, self-employed and the agency’s outreach plan. The RAC meeting is one of many opportunities the public will have to provide comments on these proposed rules throughout the rulemaking process.

Unemployment Insurance Benefits

Resuming Able and Available for Work Requirements, new temporary rule

Starting this Sunday, Sept. 26, OED is resuming able and available to work requirements for people claiming unemployment insurance (UI) benefits. This means people filing for initial and weekly claims for benefits must be able to work and available for suitable work for at least 40 hours per week OR one shift, if their work is shift based. 

Being able to work and available for work were both requirement for receiving UI benefits before the pandemic; however, there is a new temporary rule in place that applies to the available to work requirement. Under the new rule, if someone has barriers preventing them from returning to their work, they may still be eligible to receive unemployment insurance benefits if they are willing to seek an alternate type of work for which they are available at least one shift per day and 40 hours per week. 

With this change to availability requirements, the rule will better reflect the current workforce and economy. Some people who would have otherwise been denied benefits as a result of a limited availability would be able to receive them under the temporary rule changes. This change also may help provide economic stability to local communities where there are a large number of people whose work schedules have been restricted, including individuals with underlying conditions who may need to limit their exposure to COVID-19.

OED is notifying claimants to make sure people know about this rule change. They also may visit our online Temporary Eligibility Rule FAQs for more information. The department is scheduling six listening sessions for business, labor, community organizations and others to give us feedback on these new temporary rules before we work on permanent availability rule changes. Simultaneous interpretation will be available in Spanish, Vietnamese, Russian and Cantonese. Listening session dates and times will be posted on our webinar page.

Benefit Numbers

The Employment Department previously reported that, when the federal pandemic-related unemployment benefits expired over Labor Day weekend, as many as 81,000 people could see their Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) and Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) benefits end in Oregon. Here is some more information about how this is impacting the people of Oregon.

OED has identified geographic information for nearly 78,000 of the 81,000 people – 46,500 who were receiving Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) benefits in Oregon and 31,500 who were receiving Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

Statewide, those with Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) benefits ending made up about 2% of the labor force. By county, the highest share of the labor force losing PEUC benefits (3% in each) occurred in Curry, Josephine, Lincoln, and Multnomah counties.

Those with Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits ending also made up another 2% of the state’s labor force. By county, the highest share of the labor force with PUA benefits ending (3% in each) occurred in Coos, Curry, and Josephine counties.

In addition to geographic impact, OED found that the end of the federal pandemic unemployment programs also had slightly more impact on women than on men. Prior to the pandemic, women made up 47% of the state’s labor force. As the PEUC benefits expired, women comprised 52% of those claims. Women also had a slight majority (51%) of PUA claims as the program drew to a close.

Backdating Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) Claims

The PUA program expired September 4, 2021; however, people have until Oct. 6 to file their initial claim for benefits and to file for retroactive weeks. This only applies to people who have a COVID-19 impact reason for being unemployed prior to Sep. 4, 2021. We encourage people to file using the Online Claim System. After Oct. 6, no one can make any changes or backdate weeks of a PUA claim.

Updated Dashboard

At next week’s media briefing, OED will present the new dashboard tool that will reflect that pandemic-related benefit programs have expired and highlight other Employment Department activities. 

Customer Service 

OED has promised throughout the pandemic to be transparent. Current data show that more than 94 percent of Contact Us inquiries are now resolved within seven days. The department is experiencing a delay with its call data information reporting and hopes to provide an update on call wait times during our next media briefing. 

Benefits Paid

OED paid $10.9 billion in benefits to more than 617,000 people from March 15, 2020 – Sept. 21, 2021. This is the last week OED will report on this data in the media briefing; however, this information will still be available upon request.

Last week, we paid approximately $29 million to more than 32,000 people. Detailed information is on the media dashboard.

###

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: 971-673-6400. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-09/930/148695/09.22.21_media_statement_FINAL.pdf

Oregon reports 2,312 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 26 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/21 2:28 PM

September 22, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,312 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 26 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 26 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,649 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,312 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 317,107.

OHA updates reporting for schools in weekly Outbreak Report

Starting today, the weekly Outbreak Report is updating how school outbreaks will be reported.

The Outbreak Report will continue to report the number of cases in school by student and staff or volunteer status. Active and resolved outbreaks will now include all cases linked to the outbreak and will no longer differentiate cases among students and staff cases. 

Outbreaks in K-12 schools are defined as having two or more cases identified, where there is evidence of transmission, at school. Outbreaks may include cases who were not at school but are close contacts of those exposed at school. This provides a more accurate picture of the scale of K-12 related outbreaks and how they may link to other cases in the community.

Schools should continue to notify their local public health authority of all positive cases identified among students and staff, including those who are reporting a positive at-home COVID-19 test.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 939, which is five fewer than yesterday. There are 270 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is six more than yesterday.

9/22/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

39 (6%)

22 (6%)

1 (1%)

7 (16%)

7 (12%)

0 (0%)

2 (4%)

0 (0%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

315 (7%)

84 (4%)

20 (3%)

78 (13%)

38 (9%)

3 (6%)

45 (11%)

47 (41%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are 39 available adult ICU beds out of 649 total (6% availability) and 315 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,272 (7% availability).

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 9,765 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 21. Of this total, 3,965 were administered on Sept. 21: 1,774 were initial doses, 1,712 were second doses and 451 were third doses. The remaining 5,800 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 21.

The seven-day running average is now 7,763 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,931,592 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,891,669 doses of Moderna and 211,673 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,714,604 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,479,317 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (19), Benton (41), Clackamas (218), Clatsop (14), Columbia (33), Coos (53), Crook (12), Curry (4), Deschutes (169), Douglas (59), Gilliam (1), Grant (68), Harney (27), Hood River (9), Jackson (106), Jefferson (21), Josephine (33), Klamath (39), Lake (9), Lane (143), Lincoln (28), Linn (119), Malheur (41), Marion (266), Morrow (7), Multnomah (319), Polk (45), Sherman (1), Tillamook (12), Umatilla (72), Union (16), Wallowa (13), Wasco (18), Washington (224) and Yamhill (53).

Note: More information about the cases and deaths will be provided in an updated news release. 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information

# # #


Update***OSP Requesting Assistance with Fatal Hit and run Crash-Jackson County
Oregon State Police - 09/22/21 12:35 PM

Oregon State Police is requesting public assistance with this case.  OSP is releasing a video of three vehicles that were in the area near the time of a fatal hit and run crash that killed bicyclist Geoffry Sterling (44) of Ashland. The Oregon State Police would like to speak to the occupants of the first 3 vehicles seen in this video as they may have information related to the crash. https://bit.ly/3nYYC3e 

•           Silver/light-colored Truck seen at 9:45:35 P.M.

•           White SUV seen at 9:45:40 P.M.

•           White Sedan seen at 9:46:24 P.M.

The video was obtained from the intersection of E Rapp Road and Hwy 99, approximately .25 miles to the south of the crash site of Hwy 99 and West Valley View Road in Talent, Oregon. 

Anyone with information may contact the Oregon State Police-Southern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP from your mobile and refer to Case #: SP21-268789.

On Sunday, September 19, 2021, at approximately 9:53 PM, Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a vehicle vs bicyclist on Highway 99 near West Valley View Road in Talent. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a driver of a vehicle struck a bicycle, being ridden by Geoffry Sterling (44) of Ashland. The involved vehicle did not stay at the scene. 

Sterling sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

Northbound traffic on Highway 99 was closed for approximately 3 hours.

OSP was assisted on scene by Jackson County Fire, Talent PD, Phoenix PD, and ODOT. 

OSP is requesting anyone with information regarding the crash or any information regarding the suspect vehicle to contact the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP and refer to Case #: SP21-268789.

OSP was assisted on scene by Jackson County Fire, Talent PD, Phoenix PD, and ODOT. 


Oregon reports 1,707 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 29 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/21 10:09 AM

This news release is an updated version to include case and death information and an updated number of deaths.

September 21, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,707 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 29 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 29 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,623, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,707 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 314,841.

Public Health Indicators Dashboard update

Today, OHA updated the summary tables for the Public Health Indicators Dashboard to include counts in addition to percentages for 1) emergency department visits for COVID-19-like illness visits, 2) timely case follow-up by local public health departments, and 3) cases traced to a known source. These dashboards are published weekly on Tuesdays with the most recent full week’s data. An error was identified and corrected in the percentage of COVID-19-like illness calculation, bringing the Public Health Indicators Dashboard into alignment with the emergency department data published daily in Oregon’s COVID-19 Update.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 944, which is 24 fewer than yesterday. There are 264 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 14 fewer than yesterday.

There are 59 available adult ICU beds out of 655 total (9% availability) and 347 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,280 (8% availability).

9/21/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

59 (9%)

26 (7%)

3 (3%)

5 (11%)

7 (12%)

1 (10%)

14 (26%)

3 (12%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

347 (8%)

84 (4%)

12 (2%)

78 (13%)

41 (9%)

7 (14%)

78 (19%)

47 (41%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 7,500 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 20. Of this total, 3,206 were administered on Sept. 20: 1,322 were initial doses, 1,293 were second doses and 563 were third doses. The remaining 4,294 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 20.

The seven-day running average is now 7,754 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,925,018 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,889,267 doses of Moderna and 211,054 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,710,562 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,474,067 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 related data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (18), Benton (18), Clackamas (110), Clatsop (15), Columbia (12), Coos (86), Crook (13), Curry (11), Deschutes (80), Douglas (85), Grant (29), Harney (34), Hood River (4), Jackson (76), Jefferson (17), Josephine (25), Klamath (83), Lake (22), Lane (157), Lincoln (19), Linn (46), Malheur (60), Marion (173), Morrow (7), Multnomah (86), Polk (56), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (134), Union (21), Wasco (34), Washington (100) and Yamhill (71).

Updated information is available on the number of COVID-19 deaths reported on Sept. 21. There was a total of 29 new deaths and 3,623 total deaths. COVID-19 data dashboards have been reflected to reflect this change.

Oregon’s 3,595th COVID-19 related death is a 93-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 16 at Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,596th COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 15 and died on Sept. 18 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,597th COVID-19 related death is a 63-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 10 and died on Sept. 17 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,598th COVID-19 related death is an 87-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on Sept. 12 and died on Sept. 17 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,599th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Baker County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 18 at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,600th COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Baker County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 16 at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,601st COVID-19 related death is a 91-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 20 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,602nd COVID-19 related death is a 47-year-old man from Columbia County who tested positive on Sept. 10 and died on Sept. 14. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,603rd COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Columbia County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 11 at PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center in Longview. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,604th COVID-19 related death is an 87-year-old woman from Crook County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 17 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,605th COVID-19 related death is a 94-year-old woman from Deschutes County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 16 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,606th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Harney County who tested positive on Sept. 12 and died on Sept. 18 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,607th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old woman from Harney County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 20 at Harney District Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,608th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 13 and died on Sept. 20 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,609th COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 19 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,610th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old man from Jefferson County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 18 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,611th COVID-19 related death is a 77-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 19 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,612nd COVID-19 related death is a 74-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 17 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,613rd COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 14 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,614th COVID-19 related death is an 88-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 23 and died on Sept. 17 at OHSU Health Hillsboro Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,615th COVID-19 related death is an 81-year-old woman from Union County who tested positive on Sept. 13 and died on Sept. 20 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,616th COVID-19 related death is an 81-year-old man from Polk County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 18 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,617th COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 9 and died on Sept. 18 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,618th COVID-19 related death is a 95-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 18 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,619th COVID-19 related death is a 55-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 15 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,620th COVID-19 related death is a 71-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 16 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,621st COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 19 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,622nd COVID-19 related death is a 92-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Sept. 18 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,623rd COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 9 and died on Sept. 17 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon updates non-viable vaccine disclosure1,2,3

OHA’s non-viable vaccine table has been moved to the Tableau dashboard. You can find the link to the weekly tab here. OHA reports updates on vaccines not being used each Tuesday in our daily media release.

Vaccine type

Doses recalled

Non-viable, spoiled or expired

Grand total

Janssen COVID-19 vaccine

 

24,729

24,729

Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

 

114,547

114,547

Pfizer Comirnaty

 

57,298

57,298

Grand total

0

196,574

196,574

1Updated: 09/21/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS)

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Fatal Crash on Hwy 36-Lane County
Oregon State Police - 09/22/21 9:49 AM

On Tuesday, September 21, 2021 at approximately 4:27 PM, Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 36 near milepost 48.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Polaris ATV, operated by Robert Nelson (88) of Junction City was crossing Hwy 36 and was struck by a Honda Motorcycle, operated by Jesse Hayworth (34) of Springfield. 

Hayworth sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Nelson and his passenger, Marjorie Nelson (87) were transported to Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend with injuries. 

Hwy 36 was closed for approximately 3 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Junction City Police Department, Junction City Fire and ODOT. 


Reminder: Public hearings this week on rule defining Wildland-urban interface
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/22/21 8:30 AM

SALEM, Ore.—Public hearings are scheduled this week to gather feedback on the proposed administrative rule defining the “wildland-urban interface” (WUI) in Oregon. 

This proposed rule sets the definition of the WUI and provides the framework for the additional rulemaking needed to establish boundary criteria required by Senate Bill 762.

Public comment can be made by joining any of the public meetings at the specified time through the Zoom meeting links:

Public input on the proposed rule will also be accepted by email until Oct. 1 at 762.rulemaking@oregon.gov">sb762.rulemaking@oregon.gov.

The department received input on the proposed WUI definition from a diverse group of stakeholders through a rulemaking advisory committee. The Board of Forestry approved the proposed administrative rule during a special meeting on August 24. 

General comments or questions the department’s implementation of Senate Bill 762 can be emailed to 762.rulemaking@oregon.gov">sb762.rulemaking@oregon.gov. Additionally, all RAC meetings have time set aside for public input. Meeting schedules and links to virtual meetings can be found on the ODF webpage for Senate Bill 762.


Tue. 09/21/21
Drug Law (Photo)
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/21 4:03 PM
Search Warrant Photo
Search Warrant Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/6607/148671/thumb_Search_Warrant_Photo.JPG

CASE NUMBER:  21002057

INCIDENT DATE AND TIME:  September 19, 2021 at 4:09 am

REPORTING DEPUTY:  Lieutenant Jim Geiger

DETAILS: 

On September 19, 2021 at 4:09 am, Deputies from the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to the intersection of Camp Joy Road and Saratoga Way for a motor vehicle crash involving one vehicle. 

Upon arrival, Deputies found the vehicle unoccupied.  Witnesses stated two males fled the scene prior to law enforcement arrival.  Upon inspection of the vehicle, Deputies observed several bullet holes which had penetrated the occupant compartment.  Also in plain sight within the vehicle, Deputies observed firearms and a large amount of processed packaged marijuana. 

The vehicle was seized and a search warrant was obtained and subsequently executed.  Located inside the vehicle were two firearms and 380 pounds of processed packaged marijuana with a street value of approximately $760,000.

If you have information regarding this incident or wish to claim the firearms and marijuana, please contact the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office and we will gladly assist you.         




Attached Media Files: Search Warrant Photo

Search Warrant Served for an Illegal Marijuana Operation
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/21 3:58 PM

INCIDENT DATE AND TIME: September 21, 2021

REPORTING DEPUTY: Josephine Marijuana Enforcement Team

DETAILS:

On Tuesday, September 21, 2021, members of the Josephine Marijuana Enforcement Team (JMET) in partnership with Oregon State Police, Rogue Area Drug Enforcement (Grants Pass DPS, OSP, Josephine County Parole and Probation) and Josephine County Code Enforcement; served a search warrant relating to an illegal marijuana grow operation in the 300 block of Mountain Greens Lane, Grants Pass. This is the site of the former Red Mountain Golf Course.

During the execution of the search warrant, 4,537 illegal marijuana plants were seized and destroyed.

Chen Shu-Momg, 34, and Qike Wen, 36, were arrested and lodged in the Josephine County Jail for Unlawful Manufacture of a Marijuana Item. Additionally, five other subjects were detained due to safety concerns. At the time of this press release, the investigation is ongoing and no further details are being released.


Sheriff's Office Announces Passing of K9 Grim (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/21 2:17 PM
K9 Grim - 2013
K9 Grim - 2013
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/5204/148664/thumb_Grim_2013.jpg

ROSEBURG, Ore. – The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office is saddened to announce the sudden and unexpected passing of K9 Grim.

Grim, a German Shepherd born in the Czech Republic on October 3, 2011, was acquired by the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office in June 2013 after receiving a generous donation from an anonymous community member. Grim actively served the community faithfully until the day of his passing.

Initially, Grim was partnered with then Deputy Jon Dorland. Following Dorland’s promotion, Grim was partnered with Deputy Oscar Rosas. Grim was successful with both handlers and paved the way for the Sheriff’s Office to expand its K9 program.

During the course of his career, Grim had 111 finds and captures and assisted in 114 other incidents and arrests. Grim earned the title of “Top Dog” two years in a row at the Springfield K9 Competition. 
Last Friday, Grim was taken to Bailey’s Veterinary Clinic in Roseburg when he began to display some lethargy. Doctors determined that Grim had developed cancer and one of the masses had ruptured causing internal bleeding, sparking the need for emergency surgery. Following surgery, the difficult decision was made that it was in Grim’s best interest to be put to sleep.

“We’ve all experienced the loyalty of our canine family members.  That same loyalty and bond between a well-trained police K9 and its handler is immeasurable,” remarked Sheriff John Hanlin. “K9 Grim was a beloved officer of the Sheriff’s Office and will be greatly missed”.  

The Sheriff’s Office would like to express its deep gratitude and thanks to all who have supported Grim over the years. The support the community provides is invaluable to the success of our K9 program. A special note of gratitude goes to the anonymous community donor, Bailey’s Veterinary Clinic, Friends of Umpqua Valley Police K9 Programs, Coastal Farm and Feed and Roseburg Pet Crematorium for their unwavering support.

Anyone wishing to make a tax-deductible donation in Grim’s memory may do so by mailing it to:

Friends of UV K9 Programs
PO Box 213 
Roseburg, OR 97470

Checks should be made payable to Friends of UV K9 Programs with “K9 Grim” in the memo line. 
 




Attached Media Files: K9 Grim - 2013 , K9 Grim and Deputy Jon Dorland , K9 Grim and Deputy Oscar Rosas , K9 Grim - 2021

Oregon reports 1,707 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 30 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/21/21 1:57 PM

September 21, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,707 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 30 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 30 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,624, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,707 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 314,841.

Public Health Indicators Dashboard update

Today, OHA updated the summary tables for the Public Health Indicators Dashboard to include counts in addition to percentages for 1) emergency department visits for COVID-19-like illness visits, 2) timely case follow-up by local public health departments, and 3) cases traced to a known source. These dashboards are published weekly on Tuesdays with the most recent full week’s data. An error was identified and corrected in the percentage of COVID-19-like illness calculation, bringing the Public Health Indicators Dashboard into alignment with the emergency department data published daily in Oregon’s COVID-19 Update.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 944, which is 24 fewer than yesterday. There are 264 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 14 fewer than yesterday.

There are 59 available adult ICU beds out of 655 total (9% availability) and 347 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,280 (8% availability).

9/21/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

59 (9%)

26 (7%)

3 (3%)

5 (11%)

7 (12%)

1 (10%)

14 (26%)

3 (12%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

347 (8%)

84 (4%)

12 (2%)

78 (13%)

41 (9%)

7 (14%)

78 (19%)

47 (41%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 7,500 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 20. Of this total, 3,206 were administered on Sept. 20: 1,322 were initial doses, 1,293 were second doses and 563 were third doses. The remaining 4,294 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 20.

The seven-day running average is now 7,754 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,925,018 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,889,267 doses of Moderna and 211,054 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,710,562 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,474,067 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 related data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (18), Benton (18), Clackamas (110), Clatsop (15), Columbia (12), Coos (86), Crook (13), Curry (11), Deschutes (80), Douglas (85), Grant (29), Harney (34), Hood River (4), Jackson (76), Jefferson (17), Josephine (25), Klamath (83), Lake (22), Lane (157), Lincoln (19), Linn (46), Malheur (60), Marion (173), Morrow (7), Multnomah (86), Polk (56), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (134), Union (21), Wasco (34), Washington (100) and Yamhill (71).

Note: More information about the cases and deaths will be provided in an updated news release.

Oregon updates non-viable vaccine disclosure1,2,3

OHA’s non-viable vaccine table has been moved to the Tableau dashboard. You can find the link to the weekly tab here. OHA reports updates on vaccines not being used each Tuesday in our daily media release.

Vaccine type

Doses recalled

Non-viable, spoiled or expired

Grand total

Janssen COVID-19 vaccine

 

24,729

24,729

Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

 

114,547

114,547

Pfizer Comirnaty

 

57,298

57,298

Grand total

0

196,574

196,574

1Updated: 09/21/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS)

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Five ways to help young adults get financially ready for college
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/21/21 10:07 AM

Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021

Salem – Heading off to college is an exciting time for many young adults. As colleges and universities across the state welcome students back to campus, the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation is sharing five ways young adults and their parents can financially prepare for the adventure.

  1. Insure your belongings – Check with your insurance company about covering your belongings. Ask about renters insurance, and use the division’s shopping guide to find the right insurance coverage for you.
  2. Understand how you are paying for college – Make sure you understand the financial aid offer and terms of your student loans. Make a plan, and update it regularly, to ensure you graduate with debt you can afford.
  3. Take credit cards seriously – Credit cards can help build your credit profile, but charges can add up fast. Before applying to get that free gift, review the fine print and weigh the pros and cons. You may need a co-signer, or you could be an authorized user on someone else’s card, if they also manage their credit well. Remember, pay the balance in full each month; don’t pay interest for that late-night pizza.   
  4. Start a budget – Map out a monthly budget to make sure you have enough money for important expenses, such as books, loans, food, and rent. This will also help you see how much you have available for fun activities and building up your savings.
  5. Find a bank or credit union – If you are going to be opening new checking and savings accounts, do some research to choose the one that provides the best rates and perks. Bank On Oregon lists some financial institutions with low-cost accounts. If you already have a bank or credit union, check to see if it has a branch close to campus or make sure it has the apps and tools to meet your needs online. Banks and credit unions are federally insured and protect your deposits, unlike Venmo and PayPal accounts.

In addition to these five steps, the division encourages young adults and their parents to consider these additional ways to financially prepare for college. 

  • Review health insurance – Students can remain on their parents’ health insurance plans until age 26. Make sure there are in-network providers available near the campus. If the health plan does not offer adequate in-network coverage in the area, see if the school has a student health plan that may provide better coverage. Remember, a cheaper premium does not always mean comprehensive health coverage. 
  • Review auto insurance – Make sure your auto insurance will cover the student as the primary driver and that the physical address of the car is updated. Be sure to double check the auto coverages on the car and that you have the right deductible amounts on your policy to make sure they fit your needs. 
  • Prepare for disaster – Disasters can happen anywhere. Take time to prepare for a disaster at your new location. A few simple tasks, such as building an emergency kit, creating a home inventory and making copies of important documents, will help save time, money, and stress when disaster strikes. Use this guide to help you prepare.

There are several ways to get financially ready for college. Starting with these steps will prepare you for your time away from home and help build a financial foundation you can build on for a lifetime. 

If you have questions about your insurance or financial accounts, talk with your company representative, agent, or broker. If you still have questions or concerns, free help is available from the Division of Financial Regulation’s consumer advocates: 

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The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov.


Oregon reports 3,359 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/21/21 10:00 AM

September 20, 2021

This news release is an updated version to include case and death information.

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 3,359 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 25 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,594 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 3,359 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 313,161.

The 25 new deaths and 3,349 new cases reported today include data recorded by counties for the 3-day period between Friday, Sept. 17 and Sunday, Sept. 19.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 7,996 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 19. Of this total, 558 were administered on Sept. 19: 262 were initial doses, 273 were second doses and 20 were third doses. The remaining 4,400 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 19.

The seven-day running average is now 7,996 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,919,890 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,887,420 doses of Moderna and 210,541 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,707,467 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,470,161 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 related data dashboards and have been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 968, which is one fewer than yesterday. There are 278 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

There are 63 available adult ICU beds out of 651 total (10% availability) and 330 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,246 (8% availability).

9/20/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

63 (10%)

31 (9%)

0 (0%)

10 (22%)

4 (7%)

0 (0%)

16 (30%)

2 (8%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

330 (8%)

65 (3%)

4 (1%)

92 (15%)

31 (7%)

8 (16%)

77 (19%)

53 (46%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (26), Benton (74), Clackamas (258), Clatsop (15), Columbia (40), Coos (59), Crook (3), Curry (5), Deschutes (225), Douglas (115), Gilliam (1), Grant (3), Harney (18), Hood River (15), Jackson (226), Jefferson (32), Josephine (127), Klamath (56), Lake (16), Lane (363), Lincoln (35), Linn (171), Malheur (38), Marion (398), Morrow (14), Multnomah (413), Polk (55), Tillamook (19), Umatilla (49), Union (67), Wallowa (7), Wasco (23), Washington (313) and Yamhill (80).

Oregon reports 1,597 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept. 17, 996 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept.18, and 766 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept.19.

Oregon’s 3,570th COVID-19 related death is a 91-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 14 at St Charles Bend Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,571st COVID-19 related death is an 88-year-old man from Crook County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 17 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,572nd COVID-19 related death is a 91-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 15 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,573rd COVID-19 related death is a 62-year-old man from Baker County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 12 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,574th COVID-19 related death is a 77-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on Aug. 27 and died on Sept. 18 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,575th COVID-19 related death is a 50-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 17 and died on Sept. 17 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,576th COVID-19 related death is a 46-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 30 and died on Sept. 17 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,577th COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Aug. 25 and died on Sept. 17 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,578th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Lincoln County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 4. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,579th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old man from Josephine County who first had symptoms on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 12 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,580th COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 15 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,581st COVID-19 related death is an 81-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 5 and died on Sept. 16 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,582nd COVID-19 related death is a 57-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 17 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,583rd COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old man from Harney County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 18 at Harney District Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,584th COVID-19 related death is a 58-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 14 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,585th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 15 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,586th COVID-19 related death is a 45-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 16 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,587th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 13 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,588th COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 24 and died on Sept. 14 at Silverton Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,589th COVID-19 related death is a 67-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 13 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,590th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old man from Union County who tested positive on Sept. 10 and died on Sept. 17 at Grande Ronde Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,591st COVID-19 related death is a 94-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 23 and died on Aug. 28 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,592nd COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on July 26 and died on July 31 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,593rd COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on July 24 and died on Sept. 11 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,594th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 30 and died on July 1 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information

# # #


Nurse Staffing Advisory Board, Civil Monetary Penalties Committee meets virtually Oct. 1
Oregon Health Authority - 09/21/21 9:28 AM

September 21, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board, Civil Monetary Penalties Committee meets virtually Oct. 1

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board’s Civil Monetary Penalties Committee is holding its third meeting.

Agenda:

  • Review the meeting agenda and summary from Sept. 10 meeting and review status of action items from last meeting.
  • Discuss Table 1 – Civil Penalty Assessments and advise on objective measurements for Table elements.
  • Advise on factors that may impact size of CMP imposed.
  • Summarize action items and next steps.

The agenda will be available on www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Oct. 1, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Where: ZoomGov meeting. Dial : +1 669 254 5252 (PST)

Meeting ID: 161 973 4416

Passcode: 151930

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker

ox.nursestaffing@state.or.us">Mailbox.nursestaffing@state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker, MPH, at 971-803-0914, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Wildfires Explored through Art in Exhibit (Photo)
High Desert Museum - 09/21/21 9:20 AM
2021-09/6924/148654/Impermanence-of-Forests.jpg
2021-09/6924/148654/Impermanence-of-Forests.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/6924/148654/thumb_Impermanence-of-Forests.jpg

BEND, OR — Across the American West, drought, dense forests and extreme weather exacerbated by climate change are contributing to catastrophic fires. The wildfire season is getting longer, and fires are becoming more intense and frequent.

Artist Bryan David Griffith found inspiration in fires to pose valuable questions. His artistic works will come to the High Desert Museum starting Saturday, October 16 in the exhibition Rethinking Fire.

Dualities in nature–life and death, forest and fire–are at the heart of Griffith’s artwork. The exhibition includes encaustic beeswax paintings, fire studies on paper and large-scale burned wood sculptures.

Griffith investigates opposing forces in nature by using fire itself as a medium alongside other materials including wood and beeswax. His work reveals the human desire to control natural processes, often with unintended consequences. Rethinking Fire fosters a space where viewers can experience their own discoveries and pose their own questions. 

Griffith’s journey into artwork began while studying engineering at the University of Michigan. After stumbling on a copy of Henry Horenstein’s Black and White Photography: A Basic Manual, he built a makeshift darkroom. He began a career with an international management consulting firm after graduation. However, Griffith was troubled by the environmental impact of his clients. He ultimately resigned to pursue photography full-time, adopting a nomadic life and saving every dime for film and gas. The experience led to a personal connection with America’s public lands, reflected in his first collection of images, Listen to the Wild

In 2014, Griffith’s home and studio were threatened by the Slide Fire in Sedona, Arizona. Coming out of the experience, he received a grant to study fire in the field with scientists as part of a group project called Fires of Change, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Joint Fire Science Consortium. The work from the project earned the 2016 Viola Award from the Flagstaff Arts Council and sparked the solo exhibition Rethinking Fire at the Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum in Arizona. Griffith currently lives in the mountain town of Flagstaff, Arizona with his wife, Tasha.

“We are experiencing landscape-altering wildfires more frequently in the High Desert,” said Museum Executive Director Dana Whitelaw, Ph.D. “Rethinking Fire offers a different vantage point through art, demonstrating that a force like wildfire that can be intensely destructive can also create awareness, resilience and a call to action.”

Griffith’s work is in public collections at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; University of Michigan Museum of Art; Center for Creative Photography and Fort Wayne Museum of Art. He has exhibited extensively throughout the United States.

Rethinking Fire (highdesertmuseum.org/rethinking-fire) will be on display through January 9, 2022.

The exhibit is possible with support from Alex Hodge Construction, Cascade A&E, Land Rover Portland, Tonkon Torp, Vernam Crane Services and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:

THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and is a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-09/6924/148654/Impermanence-of-Forests.jpg , 2021-09/6924/148654/Broken-Equilibrium.jpg , 2021-09/6924/148654/Bryan_David_Griffith_at_work.jpg

Se extiende la inscripción abierta para la cobertura médica de 2022: del 1 de noviembre al 15 de enero (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/21/21 9:17 AM
OHIM logo
OHIM logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/1073/148655/thumb_OHIM_logo-center_text.png

(Salem) – El viernes, el gobierno federal anunció la extensión del período anual de inscripción abierta para comprar un seguro médico privado para el año del plan 2022 del 1 de noviembre al 15 de enero.

Junto con la extensión, los habitantes de Oregón tendrán la oportunidad de acceder más ahorros financieros que hayan estado disponibles en el pasado a través del Mercado de Seguros de Salud de Oregón debido al Plan de Rescate Americano. El Plan de Rescate Americano inició ahorros adicionales al eliminar el límite superior de ingresos para calificar para la asistencia financiera, y también disminuyó el monto de la prima que los consumidores son responsables de pagar antes de que estén disponibles los créditos fiscales.

  • Se ha determinado que más del 80 por ciento de los habitantes de Oregón son elegibles para recibir ayuda financiera a través del Mercado desde el 1 de abril, cuando entraron en vigencia las disposiciones del Plan de Rescate Americano.
  • Los habitantes de Oregon están recibiendo un promedio de $437 por mes en créditos fiscales para la prima para reducir su prima mensual gracias a la elegibilidad ampliada.

El Mercado de Seguros Médicos de Oregón ofrece un resumen de los planes y ahorros para los habitantes de Oregón elegibles. La herramienta, disponible en OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop, se ha actualizado para calcular correctamente los ahorros adicionales que ahora están disponibles para las personas que compran a través del Mercado. La herramienta se mejorará nuevamente este otoño para permitir a los habitantes de Oregón determinar si sus proveedores preferidos están cubiertos por cada plan. Los residentes de Oregon también podrán ver si sus medicamentos recetados están cubiertos y cuáles serán los costos estimados para los medicamentos recetados en cada plan. Los cambios estarán disponibles en la herramienta en octubre.

¿Aún necesita cobertura médica para 2021? Es posible que pueda inscribirse en un período de inscripción especial. Comience en CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov para llegar a la solicitud correcta o para encontrar un agente de seguros o una organización comunitaria asociada que lo ayude a completar la solicitud e inscribirse. Los agentes de seguros y los socios comunitarios brindan asistencia local personalizada sin cargo. Esta ayuda está disponible virtualmente, por teléfono y en persona siguiendo protocolos de seguridad.

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El Mercado de Seguros Médicos de Oregon, una parte del gobierno estatal, ayuda a las personas a conseguir seguro médico cuando no tienen cobertura a través de su trabajo, y no califican para el Plan de Salud de Oregon u otro programa. El Mercado es el socio al nivel estatal a CuidadoDeSalud.gov. Para obtener más información, visite CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: OHIM logo

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Coin Cons (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/21/21 9:00 AM
TT - Coin Cons - GRAPHIC - September 21, 2021
TT - Coin Cons - GRAPHIC - September 21, 2021
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/3585/148651/thumb_TT_-_coin_cons_-_GRAPHIC_-_September_21_2021.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against coin cons.

The FBI and the Department of Treasury have a warning today about fraudsters who are targeting coin collectors and investors through online auction, social media, and retail websites.

There are three types of counterfeit coins: transactional coins (quarters, dimes, etc.), numismatics (high value collectables), and bullion (precious metals). The scammers are using online ads, claiming the coins are authentic; however, consumers are receiving fake coins and precious metals.

Online estimates reveal that consumers spend millions of dollars buying valuable or rare coins, but most receive near-worthless foreign-made counterfeits. The U.S. government is seizing an increasing number of counterfeit coins at US ports-of-entry. For example, in April 2021, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at Chicago’s international mail facility seized 279 shipments from China containing counterfeit coins and currency. In 2020, CBP seized more $1.64 million in counterfeit cash and coins at Chicago O’Hare International Airport.

Scammers capitalized on the financial uncertainty and nationwide coin shortage brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic to take advantage of amateur investors online. Many victims find purchasing online an easy method to make investments, as they can easily find what they are looking for, pay cheaper prices, and have their investments delivered right to their door. It’s a great option, if you find a legitimate vendor.

Here’s how to protect yourself:

  • Only make purchases from reputable, registered coin dealers. 
  • If you decide to purchase outside this venue, ensure that the coins are tested by a certified organization before making a purchase.
  • Research online sellers before buying coins and precious metals online. Check online reviews and Better Business Bureau complaints before making a purchase.
  • If you believe that you are the victim of a counterfeit coin scheme, immediately report the activity to the online payment provider or credit card company used for the transaction. 

If you end up with counterfeit coins involving U.S. currency, you should file a report with your local U.S. Secret Service office. You can also file a complaint with the U.S. Treasury Office of Inspector General. All non-currency coins and bullion should be reported to the Anti-Counterfeiting Task Force.

If you are the victim of an online fraud, you should also report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

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Attached Media Files: TT - Coin Cons - AUDIO - September 21, 2021 , TT - Coin Cons - GRAPHIC - September 21, 2021

Fatal Crash on Hwy 212-Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 09/21/21 8:23 AM

On Monday, September 20, 2021 at approximately 12:45 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 212 near milepost 5. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Focus, operated by an unidentified female, was eastbound when it crossed into the westbound lane and struck a Dodge Ram 1500, operated by Cameron Ellet (19) of Boring. 

The unidentified operator of the Ford Focus sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.  Ellet was wearing a seatbelt and sustained minor injuries. 

Hwy 212 was closed for approximately 3.5 hours.

OSP was assisted by Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, AMR and ODOT. 


Open enrollment for 2022 health coverage extended: Nov. 1 to Jan. 15 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/21/21 4:00 AM
OHIM logo
OHIM logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/1073/148637/thumb_OHIM_logo-center_text.png

(Salem) – On Friday, the federal government announced the extension of the annual open enrollment period to purchase private health insurance for the 2022 plan year from Nov. 1 to Jan. 15.

Along with the extension, Oregonians will have the opportunity to access the most amount of financial savings that have ever been available through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace due to the American Rescue Plan. The American Rescue Plan initiated additional savings by removing the upper income limit to qualify for financial assistance, and also decreased the amount of premium that consumers are responsible to pay before tax credits are available.

  • More than 80 percent of Oregonians have been determined to be eligible for financial help through the Marketplace since April 1 when American Rescue Plan provisions took effect.
  • Oregonians are receiving an average of $437 per month in premium tax credits to reduce their monthly premium under the expanded eligibility.

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace offers a quick snapshot of the plans and savings to eligible Oregonians. The tool, available at OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop, has been updated to correctly calculate additional savings now available to people shopping through the Marketplace. The window shopping tool will be enhanced again this Fall to allow Oregonians to determine if their preferred providers are covered by each plan. Oregonians will also be able to see if their prescription drugs are covered and what the estimated costs will be for prescriptions on each plan. Enhancements will be live in the tool in October.

Still need health coverage for 2021? You may be able to enroll under a special enrollment period. Start at OregonHealthCare.gov to get to the right application or to find an insurance agent or community partner organization to help complete the application and enroll. Insurance agents and community partners provide local, one-on-one assistance at no charge. This help is available virtually, on the phone, and in person following safety protocols.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov. For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: OHIM logo

Mon. 09/20/21
Fatal Crash on Hwy 164-Marion County
Oregon State Police - 09/20/21 4:35 PM

On Monday, September 20, 2021 at approximately 11:28 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single motor vehicle crash on Hwy 164 near milepost 1. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Nissan Frontier, operated by Michelle Duclos (58) of Jefferson, was northbound when it left the roadway and struck a cement bridge abutment. 

Duclos sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Hwy 164 was closed for approximately 3.5 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Jefferson Fire Department and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 126W-Lane County
Oregon State Police - 09/20/21 4:25 PM

On Monday, September 20, 2021 at approximately 7:14 AM, Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a four-vehicle crash on Hwy 126W near milepost 37. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Kenworth log truck, operated by Shane McVay (64) of Eugene, was eastbound when the loaded trailer tipped over. The trailer struck a westbound Toyota Prius, operated by Sarah Susman (25) of Springfield and a Dodge Ram towing a boat, operated by Randall Tokich (70) of Eugene. The Dodge Ram then struck an eastbound Ford Mustang, operated by Jordyn Tippett (20) of Coquille.

Susman sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. McVay and Tippett were transported to Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend with injuries. Tokich had minor injuries. 

Hwy 126W is still currently closed. 

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT. 


Elliott State Forest Reopens for Most Uses
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/20/21 4:24 PM

Campfires remain prohibited

The Department of State Lands and Oregon Department of Forestry today announced visitors may once more access the Elliott State Forest for most activities, effective immediately.

The announcement lifts wildfire restrictions on overnight camping, use of firearms, and motor vehicle travel on roads. Campfires remain prohibited until further notice.

Visitors should review fire danger levels and any additional use restrictions on the Coos Forest Protective Association website before coming to the Elliott. For the latest status updates on recreation at the Elliott State Forest, visit www.oregon.gov/DSL.

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http://www.oregon.gov/dsl


Oregon reports 3,359 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/20/21 2:28 PM

September 20, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 3,359 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 25 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,594 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 3,359 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 313,161.

The 25 new deaths and 3,349 new cases reported today include data recorded by counties for the 3-day period between Friday, Sept. 17 and Sunday, Sept. 19.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 7,996 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 9. Of this total, 558 were administered on Sept. 9: 262 were initial doses, 273 were second doses and 20 were third doses. The remaining 4,400 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 19.

The seven-day running average is now 7,996 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,919,890 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,887,420 doses of Moderna and 210,541 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,707,467 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,470,161 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 968, which is one fewer than yesterday. There are 278 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

There are 63 available adult ICU beds out of 651 total (10% availability) and 330 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,246 (8% availability).

9/20/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

63 (10%)

31 (9%)

0 (0%)

10 (22%)

4 (7%)

0 (0%)

16 (30%)

2 (8%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

330 (8%)

65 (3%)

4 (1%)

92 (15%)

31 (7%)

8 (16%)

77 (19%)

53 (46%)

 

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (26), Benton (74), Clackamas (258), Clatsop (15), Columbia (40), Coos (59), Crook (3), Curry (5), Deschutes (225), Douglas (115), Gilliam (1), Grant (3), Harney (18), Hood River (15), Jackson (226), Jefferson (32), Josephine (127), Klamath (56), Lake (16), Lane (363), Lincoln (35), Linn (171), Malheur (38), Marion (398), Morrow (14), Multnomah (413), Polk (55), Tillamook (19), Umatilla (49), Union (67), Wallowa (7), Wasco (23), Washington (313) and Yamhill (80).

Oregon reports 1,597 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept. 17, 996 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept.18, and 766 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Sept.19.

Note: More information about the cases and deaths will be provided in an updated news release.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information

# # #


HERC's Behavioral Health Advisory Panel meets October 18, virtually
Oregon Health Authority - 09/20/21 11:17 AM

September 20, 2021

Contacts: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dshoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Daphne Peck, 503-580-9792, c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

HERC’s Behavioral Health Advisory Panel meets October 18, virtually

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Behavioral Health Advisory Panel

When: October 18, 3:00-5:00 p.m.

Where: Virtual meeting https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1616565370?pwd=NUx6TFF3SXdCaUJLOUtheHUyOXYzUT09 

Meeting ID: 161 656 5370 | Passcode: 162790 
One tap mobile: +16692545252,,1616565370#,,,,162790#

Note: Unscheduled testimony will not be allowed at the meeting. If you think you may want to testify, please complete the survey to sign up at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/herc-public-comment by Thursday, 10/14/2021, noon. If you decide not to testify, you can always decline later. If you need assistance in signing up for public testimony, please call Daphne Peck at 503-503-580-9792.

Written testimony (up to 1,000 words per sender per topic) will be accepted until 10/14/21, noon. Please email C.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us">HERC.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us

Items scheduled for discussion could include, but may not be limited to, the following topics: 

  • 2022 CPT code changes related to behavioral health or substance use disorder
  • Adjustment disorders line update 
  • Nightmare disorder 
  • Screening for adverse childhood events (ACEs)
  • Changes to the Prioritized List related to the OHA SUD waiver

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting. 

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-580-9792, 711 TTY or c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us.


Burn Permits - Fall 2021 (Photo)
Roseburg Fire Dept. - 09/20/21 10:47 AM
Image 1
Image 1
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/5568/148625/thumb_Burn_Pile.png

The City of Roseburg Fire Department will begin issuing residential burn permits, beginning on October 1, 2021 and ending on October 31, 2021.

These permits are issued for seven (7) days at a cost of $75.00.  Residential yard waste is the only material that may be burned. Prohibited items include standing berry vines, paper, wood, plastics, tires, standing grass, weeds, construction material, and material from lot clearing.  Burning may not be done on vacant lots or the property of another.  Fires must be monitored by a competent adult and extinguished prior to darkness. Tools to control or extinguish the fire must be on-site whenever there is material burning.

Burn barrels are never allowed inside City limits, and anyone burning trash or burning without a permit may be subject to a fine and/or legal action.  Additionally, due diligence must be exercised while burning, even with a permit, as fire can quickly get out of control, and the person responsible for the fire may be subject to fines, legal action, or restitution.

If possible, residents are urged to utilize alternatives to burning, such as composting, chipping, mulching, or transporting the debris to the Douglas County Landfill.  More information on these options can be found at http://www.recyclepower.org/wood.asp.

To request a burning permit in the City of Roseburg, call (541) 492-6770 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.  This information, as well as the burn permit request form is also available on the city website at https://www.cityofroseburg.org/departments/fire/permits-and-forms




Attached Media Files: Image 1 , Image 2

Discounted or Free Phone or High-Speed Internet Service For Eligible Oregonians
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 09/20/21 10:23 AM

DISCOUNTED OR FREE PHONE OR HIGH-SPEED INTERNET SERVICE FOR ELIGIBLE OREGONIANS
National Lifeline Awareness Week runs September 20-24, 2021

SALEM, Ore. – In celebration of National Lifeline Awareness Week, the Oregon Public Utility Commission is reminding Oregonians about Lifeline, a federal and state government program that provides discounted or free phone or high speed internet service to qualifying low-income households. 

Oregon Lifeline is currently offering a monthly discount up to $15.25 for phone service or $19.25 per month for high-speed internet service through participating service providers.  Lifeline also offers free wireless voice minutes and data service from Access Wireless, Assurance Wireless, or enTouch Wireless. Oregon residents on federally-recognized Tribal lands may qualify for an additional $25 discount each month.

“We want to encourage all eligible Oregonians to take advantage of Oregon Lifeline services,” said Megan Decker, PUC Chair. “This program helps eligible residents stay connected and provides access to local emergency services, healthcare, jobs, education, and other important resources.”

Oregonians receiving benefits from select public assistance programs such as Medicaid or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) may qualify for Oregon Lifeline, which is limited to one person per household for either the discounted or free service.

For additional information about the Oregon Lifeline program, call 1-800-848-4442, weekdays between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., or view details online at: https://www.oregon.gov/puc/Pages/Oregon-Lifeline.aspx

# # #

The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities, as well as select water companies.  The PUC mission is to ensure Oregon utility customers have access to safe, reliable, and high quality utility services at just and reasonable rates, which is accomplished through thorough analysis and independent decision-making conducted in an open and fair process.


DAS Publishes Annual Maximum Rent Increase for 2022
State of Oregon - 09/20/21 9:18 AM

Salem, OR - The Oregon Department of Administrative Services last week published the annual maximum rent increase allowed by statute for calendar year 2022. The DAS Office of Economic Analysis has calculated the maximum percentage as 9.9%.

Following the passage of SB 608 in the 2019 legislative session, Oregon law requires DAS to calculate and post to its website, by September 30 of each year, the maximum annual rent increase percentage allowed by statute for the following calendar year. Per statute, OEA calculates this amount as 7% plus the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, West Region (All Items), as most recently published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The allowable rent increase percentage for the 2022 calendar year is 9.9%. DAS will calculate and post the percentage for the 2023 calendar year by Sept. 30, 2022.

Information about the maximum annual rent increase percentage, as well as the provisions of ORS 90.323 and 90.600 (statutes governing rent increases), can be found on the OEA website.  

For information on the new law, please see the full text of SB 608 at the link below. DAS does not provide legal advice regarding other provisions of SB 608.

Links


Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's HB 3016 Rules Committee meets Sept. 30
Oregon Health Authority - 09/20/21 9:12 AM

September 20, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board’s HB 3016 Rules Committee meets Sept. 30

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board’s HB 3016 Rules Committee is holding its first meeting.

Agenda:

  • Welcome, housekeeping, introductions.
  • Review meeting agenda.
  • HB 3016 Rules Committee overview and scope.
  • Administrative rule review.
  • Summarize action items and next steps.

The agenda will be available on www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing

When: Sept. 30, 3-4:30 p.m.

Where:

ZoomGov Meeting, Dial : +1 669 254 5252 (PST)

Meeting ID: 161 695 4448

Passcode: 266666

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker

ox.nursestaffing@state.or.us">Mailbox.nursestaffing@state.or.us

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker, MPH, at 971-803-0914, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Widespread Rain Allows for Decrease in Fire Restrictions (Photo)
Grants Pass Fire/Rescue - 09/20/21 7:42 AM
2021-09/6917/148615/Closure_peacock_mod.jpg
2021-09/6917/148615/Closure_peacock_mod.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/6917/148615/thumb_Closure_peacock_mod.jpg

A combination of widespread rain and a steady drop in temperatures has made it possible to ease off on some fire prevention regulations in the City of Grants Pass. Effective Sunday, September 19, 2021, at 12:01 a.m., the public fire danger level will decrease to “moderate” (blue) in the City of Grants Pass. 

For public use, restrictions on chain saws, brush cutters, and other power-driven or spark-emitting machinery are being slightly relaxed, allowing the use of equipment until 1:00 p.m. and after 8 p.m.

Open fires are still prohibited during fire season.  This includes campfires, cooking fires, and warming fires.  Smoking in areas of flammable vegetation is also still prohibited. 




Attached Media Files: 2021-09/6917/148615/Closure_peacock_mod.jpg

OSP Fish & Wildlife cite poacher for unlawful take of a Bull Elk- Douglas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/20/21 7:00 AM
Poached Bull Elk- Douglas County
Poached Bull Elk- Douglas County
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/1002/148614/thumb_bull_and_rifle.jpg

On September 2, 2021, Sr. Trooper Baimbridge responded to a report of a dead bull elk in the 2800 Block of Mehl Creek Road, Elkton, Oregon.  The bull had the head removed and the meat removed.  The elk had been shot by a rifle during the bow season.  The investigation revealed that Jase Billman (20) shot the bull from the roadway with a .270 caliber rifle then enlisted the help of 3 friends and family to pack it out.  Jase was issued a citation for Unlawful Take of Bull Elk and his rifle was seized along with the antlers and meat from the bull. The meat was able to be salvaged. Two other individuals were issued citations for Aiding in a Wildlife Offense.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677) TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us 

The Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

Cash Rewards:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 

$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s) 

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 

$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

 




Attached Media Files: Poached Bull Elk- Douglas County

Sun. 09/19/21
Level 3 Dropped to Level 2 for Some Tiller Residents
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/19/21 10:20 AM

TILLER, Ore. - After consultation with the Devils Knob Fire Managers, the Sheriff's Office is announcing changes to evacuation orders previously issued for some homeowners in Tiller.

Based on current weather conditions and fire activity, the following homes are now under a Level 2 “BE SET” evacuation advisory: 

  • All homes on Ash Valley Road
  • All homes on South Umpqua Road starting at Dumont Creek Campground to the 28000 block of South Umpqua Road.

These homes are no longer under the previously issued Level 3 “GO!” order. 

Level 2 “BE SET” means: You must prepare to leave at a moments notice. This level indicates there is significant danger to your area, and residents should either voluntarily relocate to a shelter or with family/friends outside of the affected area, or if choosing to remain, to be ready to evacuate at a moments notice. Residents MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at their own risk. THIS MAY BE THE ONLY NOTICE YOU RECEIVE. Emergency services cannot guarantee that they will be able to notify you if conditions rapidly deteriorate.

Residents can opt in to receive emergency alerts based on their address by registering at www.dcso.com/alerts.

An interactive evacuation map can be found at www.dcso.com/evacuations

Fire activity information can be found at the following locations:

Devils Knob Complex Fires:
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/2021-Devils-Knob-Complex-112079071131008 
Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7771 
Fire Information: (541) 900-6133 (8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.)
Email: 2021.DevilsKnob@firenet.gov


Sat. 09/18/21
RV Fire off of Kerby Mainline (Photo)
Illinois Valley Fire District - 09/18/21 4:57 PM
2021-09/6947/148599/20210918_143712.jpg
2021-09/6947/148599/20210918_143712.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/6947/148599/thumb_20210918_143712.jpg

9/18/2021, at 13:54 hours, IVFD and ODF responded to an abandoned RV fire off Kerby Main Line and Service Road 39-8-3. Minimal spread to the wildland. Fire has been controlled and under investigation. This will be checked through the night. Good job all, fast response kept this to a small incident. The one photo was taken from the side road by the dump.




Attached Media Files: 2021-09/6947/148599/20210918_143712.jpg

Fri. 09/17/21
OHA releases statement on FDA booster dose recommendation
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 5:07 PM

September 17, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA releases statement on FDA booster dose recommendation

Today, officials from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) convened medical experts to discuss whether to recommend that people who’ve previously been fully vaccinated with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine should receive a booster shot to help maintain the effectiveness of their vaccinations over time.

At today’s hearing, the committee recommended that people age 65 and older and those considered at high risk of severe COVID-19 receive a booster dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at least six months after the second dose. The FDA is reviewing this recommendation to determine whether to add this use to the Emergency Use Authorization for the Pfizer vaccine.

Booster doses have not been recommended for people who received the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccine. It is expected that federal officials will consider booster doses for people who’ve received these vaccines in coming weeks.

The recommendations that came from today’s meeting are just the first steps in the process. No boosters will be available to Oregonians until the remaining steps in the process are completed next week. Here’s what’s next:

  • The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will review the FDA’s recommendation Sept. 22-23. The CDC Director then considers the ACIP recommendation and makes any official CDC recommendation for use of boosters. It is anticipated that ACIP will provide additional guidance on who is considered at high risk of severe COVID-19.
  • After FDA and CDC decisions, the Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup meets on Sept. 24 to consider federal recommendations for implementation in California, Nevada, Washington and Oregon. Once Western States issues a recommendation, the Oregon Health Authority will support implementation.

Booster doses are expected to be widely available through pharmacies, doctor’s offices and clinics, as COVID-19 vaccine is today.

For older adults and others who live in skilled nursing facilities, their residences are equipped to provide booster doses once they are fully authorized.

Medical evidence shows that the COVID-19 vaccines remain highly effective in preventing COVID-19 associated hospitalizations and deaths.  The boosters were recommended because there was some evidence to show that the immune response the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine produces to protect against COVID-19 disease could begin to wane many months after a person was first immunized, especially in older adults. As with other vaccines, a booster shot will strengthen the body’s ability to prevent disease from the virus that causes COVID-19.

“Today’s federal review underscores the consistently rigorous scientific scrutiny that medical experts and health officials have used to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines,” said Dr. Dean Sidelinger, State Health Officer and State Epidemiologist. “While we wait for today’s recommendations to be reviewed by the next panel of medical experts, we want to urge every Oregonian who hasn’t been vaccinated to get immunized against COVID-19 today. Oregon has enough vaccine in place to vaccinate people who are unvaccinated and we’re ready to provide boosters when federal and Western States officials finalize their recommendations.”

#####


Fatal Crash on Interstate 84-Umatilla County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/21 4:03 PM

On Thursday, September 16, 2021 at approximately 8:15 pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Interstate 84 near milepost 193. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Volkswagen Jetta, operated by Jate Frost (20) of Randlett, UT, was traveling eastbound when it rear-ended a commercial motor vehicle, operated by Ediberto Ramirez Carrillo (31) of Hermiston.

Frost sustained serious injuries and was flown via Life Flight to Kadlec Medical Center in Richland, WA. The right front passenger in the Jetta, Richard Schleicher (24) of Stockton, OK, sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. The rear seat passenger in the Jetta, Jesse Hopper (21) of Magnum, OK sustained serious injuries and was transported to OHSU in Portland.  Ramirez Carrillo was not injured. 

All three occupants of the Jetta were contestants at the Pendleton Roundup. The CMV was fully loaded with potatoes. 

OSP was assisted by Echo Fire Department, Umatilla County Fire District #1, Umatilla County Sheriff’s Department, Stanfield Police Department and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 26-Clatsop County
Oregon State Police - 09/17/21 3:40 PM

On Friday September 17, 2021 at about 7:20 am, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 26 near milepost 11. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a black 1998 Ford Explorer, operated by Leah Brown(30) of Garibaldi, was travelling westbound on Hwy 26 when for unknown reasons the Explorer crossed the centerline and struck an eastbound 2016 Volvo, Albertson's Semi truck, operated by Joseph Danmyer (33) of Estacada. 

BROWN suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. DANMYER was not injured. 

Hwy 26 was closed for 4 hours following the crash.

 OSP was assisted by Hamlet Fire Department, Seaside Fire Department, and ODOT.


Oregon reports 2,099 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 22 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 3:40 PM

September 17, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,099 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 22 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 22 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,569, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,099 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 309,841.

Newest COVID-19 modeling report projects decrease in daily cases and hospitalizations

Today, OHA released its latest COVID-19 forecast showing a projected decline in daily cases and hospitalizations through late September.

According to the report, the effective reproduction rate — the expected number of secondary cases that a single case generates — was estimated at .79 on Sept. 1, projecting a decline in the estimated growth of new cases and hospitalizations over last week’s modeling scenario.

At that level of transmission, the report estimates 280 cases per 100,000 people, or an average of 830 daily cases and 41 hospitalizations for the two-week period between Sept. 22 and Oct. 5.

The modeling report labeled that projection “optimistic” because the projection was based on the lowest point of transmission.

The report proposed an alternative scenario factoring in assumptions around the impacts of reopening schools and many public events scheduled during the next month. In that scenario, new cases are estimated at 350 per 100,000 people or an average of 1,060 daily cases and 51 hospitalizations over the same period.

Vaccinations remain the most effective tool for slowing the spread of COVID-19. Oregonians should wear masks when in indoor public spaces and when outdoors among crowds.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 1,002, which is 25 fewer than yesterday. There are 287 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

There are 58 available adult ICU beds out of 658 total (9% availability) and 369 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,246 (9% availability).

9/17/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

58

(9%)

22

(6%)

5

(5%)

19

(40%)

4

(7%)

0

(0%)

1

(2%)

7

(28%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

369

(9%)

70

(4%)

15

(2%)

137

(22%)

36

(8%)

9

(18%)

45

(12%)

57

(44%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.  

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.  

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 8,696 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Sept. 16. Of this total, 3,979 were administered on Sept. 16: 1,874 were initial doses, 1,697 were second doses and 358 were third doses. The remaining 4,717 were administered on previous days, but were entered into the vaccine registry on Sept. 16.

The seven-day running average is now 8,535 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,905,173 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 1,882,388 doses of Moderna and 209,164 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,698,924 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,458,176 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (28), Benton (25), Clackamas (252), Clatsop (12), Columbia (22), Coos (40), Crook (17), Curry (2), Deschutes (128), Douglas (59), Gilliam (3), Harney (11), Hood River (12), Jackson (115), Jefferson (14), Josephine (48), Klamath (59), Lake (12), Lane (176), Lincoln (25), Linn (128), Malheur (36), Marion (157), Morrow (3), Multnomah (218), Polk (57), Sherman (2), Tillamook (16), Umatilla (63), Union (8), Wallowa (7), Wasco (29), Washington (188) and Yamhill (127).

Oregon’s 3,548th COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old woman from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 28 and died on Sept. 5 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,549th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 22 and died on Aug. 31 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,550th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive on Sept. 8 and died on Sept. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,551st COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 16 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,552nd COVID-19 related death is a 53-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Sept. 15 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,553rd COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 12 and died on Aug. 19 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,554th COVID-19 related death is a 55-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 4 and died on Aug. 24 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,555th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Harney County who tested positive on Sept. 7 and died on Sept. 16 at his residence. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,556th COVID-19 related death is a 77-year-old woman from Harney County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Aug. 28 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,557th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on Sept. 13 and died on Sept. 15 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,558th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Sept. 15 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,559th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 13 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,560th death is a 95-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on Aug. 19 and died on Sept. 6 at his residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,561st COVID-19 related death is a 43-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 16 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,562nd COVID-19 related death is a 57-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Sept. 15 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,563rd COVID-19 related death is a 53-year-old woman from Polk County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Sept. 14 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3564th COVID-19 related death is a 65-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 14 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 3,565th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 2 and died on Sept. 13 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,566th COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 16 at Willamette Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,567th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 18 and died on Sept. 16 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,568th COVID-19 related death is a 63-year-old man from Umatilla County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Sept. 10 at CHI St. Anthony Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 3,569th COVID-19 related death is a 93-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 14 at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Updated information is known about Oregon’s 3,497th death: a 36-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on Aug. 14 and died on Sept. 12 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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Secretary Haaland Outlines Next Steps to Rebuild Bureau of Land Management
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/17/21 1:47 PM

Announces plans to restore national headquarters to Washington, D.C.; Western headquarters will be expanded

WASHINGTON — Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland today outlined steps that the Department plans to take to rebuild and strengthen the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) following years of transition and upheaval among the workforce. These changes, which will be done in coordination with Congress, will improve the function of the bureau, help provide clarity for the BLM’s more than 7,000 employees across the country, maintain and increase access for stakeholders, and enable the bureau to better serve the American public and fulfill its mission as the steward of nearly one-fifth of the nation’s public lands.

In a meeting with BLM employees today, Secretary Haaland announced her intention to restore the BLM national headquarters to Washington, D.C., ensuring the bureau has a presence in the nation’s capital. Under this plan, the BLM’s current presence in Grand Junction, Colo., will grow and expand as the bureau’s official Western headquarters. This office will reinforce western perspectives in decision-making and have an important role to play in the bureau’s clean energy, outdoor recreation, conservation, and scientific missions, among other important work as a leadership center in the West.

“The Bureau of Land Management is critical to the nation’s efforts to address the climate crisis, expand public access to our public lands, and preserve our nation’s shared outdoor heritage. It is imperative that the bureau have the appropriate structure and resources to serve the American public,” said Secretary Haaland. “There’s no doubt that the BLM should have a leadership presence in Washington, D.C. – like all the other land management agencies – to ensure that it has access to the policy-, budget-, and decision-making levers to best carry out its mission. In addition, the BLM’s robust presence in Colorado and across the West will continue to grow.”

“The past several years have been incredibly disruptive to the organization, to our public servants, and to their families. As we move forward, my priority is to revitalize and rebuild the BLM so that it can meet the pressing challenges of our time, and to look out for our employees’ well-being,” added Secretary Haaland. “I look forward to continuing to work with Congress, Tribes, elected officials and the many stakeholders who care about the stewardship of our shared public lands and healthy communities."

The Department intends to locate the Bureau Director and other key leadership positions in the national headquarters where they can ensure coordination with Congress, other federal agencies, and stakeholders that visit Washington, D.C. Additional senior personnel will operate from the Western headquarters, as part of the more than 95 percent of BLM employees that are already located outside of Washington, D.C.

The Secretary’s vision for the BLM comes after substantive engagement with employees, Tribal consultations, and meetings with local, state, and federal leaders. The Secretary visited Grand Junction in July, and pledged to provide clarity and direction. Additional logistics and planning will occur in the months to come in close coordination with BLM employees, Congress, Tribes, and elected leaders.

The Department plans to take a number of additional steps, in coordination with leaders in Congress, to ensure that the BLM is best positioned to serve the American public. This includes establishing a new BLM Foundation – as authorized in legislation – to support the bureau’s efforts and to help build new partnerships. The BLM will strengthen the government-to-government relationship with Indian Tribes by supporting Tribal Liaisons in each state. The BLM will also seek to improve coordination and capacity to implement clean energy projects.

The previous administration relocated the BLM headquarters to Grand Junction, Colo., a move that failed to deliver promised jobs across the West and drove hundreds of people out of the agency. Of the 328 positions moved out of Washington, D.C., only 41 of the affected people relocated, with 3 moving to Grand Junction. This led to a significant loss of institutional memory and talent. The headquarters transition will be conducted with a goal of minimizing further disruption to employees and their families. Outside of the aforementioned core leadership positions, the BLM does not plan to require employees to relocate.

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U.S. Department of the Interior: The Department of the Interior (DOI) conserves and manages the Nation’s natural resources and cultural heritage for the benefit and enjoyment of the American people, provides scientific and other information about natural resources and natural hazards to address societal challenges and create opportunities for the American people, and honors the Nation’s trust responsibilities or special commitments to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and affiliated island communities to help them prosper.

Bureau of Land Management: This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people. The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 

 

 

 


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet September 23
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 12:36 PM

September 17, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet September 23

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: September 23, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome and introductions (1:00-1:10); Updates (1:10-1:25); Metrics & Scoring Committee decisions (1:25-1:40); CAHPS results (1:50-2:30); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


OHA recognizes Preparedness Month by focusing on emotional health needs from disasters
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 11:40 AM

September 17, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA recognizes Preparedness Month by focusing on emotional health needs from disasters

Oregonians invited to continue ‘Honor with Action’ in face of emergencies

PORTLAND, Ore.--Oregon Health Authority joins the national observation of Preparedness Month during September, with special emphasis on emotional health resources for communities, and building social connections as public health emergencies like the COVID-19 pandemic and wildfires continue.

Like many of its emergency management partners, OHA encourages people in Oregon to start or continue their journey toward being prepared for emergencies. OHA’s emphasis is on helping people prepare for their health needs during and after a disaster, including reminding people to review their plans and kits to make sure they address their household’s health and medical needs.

OHA recommends:

  • Families with infants consider essential items like diapers, special items or food.
  • People who rely on regular medical care like dialysis discuss their facilities’ emergency plans.
  • People who use medical devices plan to take them as part of their evacuation kit and know how to replace them if the devices are lost during a disaster.
  • People learn about other ways to prepare for health needs during a disaster at HealthOregon.org/preparedness.

“The anniversary of the devastating wildfires that affected so many Oregonians last year falls during Preparedness Month and on top of the continuing COVID-19 pandemic,” says Steve Allen, OHA’s behavioral health director. “People often experience heightened distress surrounding the anniversary of a disaster event, so it’s a good time to recognize and work to support ourselves, our families and our community’s emotional health needs right along with our other preparedness activities.” 

Allen says Preparedness Month is a good time to empower community members to take action by preparing for the next public health emergency. That preparation can displace fear of disasters.

“Kits and plans are a starting point and what we put in them can save lives and also bring comfort,” says Allen, noting how including a few fun activities or toys can make a difference for kids.  “When it comes to protecting our emotional health, sometimes it’s about having healthy coping strategies.”

Some of these coping strategies include taking care of your body through sleep, exercise and healthy eating; taking lots of breaks to unwind or help strong feelings fade; staying informed while still avoiding exposure to too much news; and reaching out for help when needed.

Children and youth can be especially vulnerable to stress during and after emergencies. Communities can support them by encouraging them to participate in their families’ preparedness activities in age-appropriate ways. After a disaster, adults can help kids by encouraging them to share what they’re thinking, answer their questions, limit their exposure to media coverage of disasters, keep to routines, and get them support when they need it.

Emergency management professionals around the country chose the theme “Honor with Action” for this year’s Preparedness Month. After the wide range of disasters this past year, it fits well with OHA’s emphasis on emotional health preparedness and recovery.

“Our social connections are an important part of what make us resilient,” Allen says. “The pandemic, along with the wildfires disaster, has made it hard to stay connected, but it is more important than ever to re-establish connections or build new ones. Take time to honor the losses of the past year by reaching out to loved ones and neighbors. Also, reach out to survivors and see what help they need.”

If you or someone you know is thinking of harming themselves or needs help because of drug or alcohol use, call Lines for Life which is a 24/7 crisis line at 800-273-8255. Lines for Life also offers specialized support for seniors, military members, youth and those facing racial equity concerns. In addition, it provides specialized services through its COVID-19 & Oregon Wildfire Outreach Program. Find more information at www.linesforlife.org.

Other services:

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D River Beach health advisory lifted Sept. 17
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/21 10:57 AM

September 17, 2021

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

D River Beach health advisory lifted Sept. 17

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a public health advisory for contact with ocean water at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County. 

The health authority issued the advisory Sept. 14 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from follow-up tests taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the ocean water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. Officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter. 

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. 

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Fatal Motorcycle Crash
Grants Pass Police Department - 09/17/21 8:34 AM

On September 16, 2021, at about 2046 hours, dispatchers for the Grants Pass Police Department received reports of a motorcycle striking a fence.  Responding police officers located a single rider in the roadway in the 1200 block of Fruitdale Drive.  Personnel from Grants Pass Fire/Rescue and AMR also responded to the crash scene.

From the investigation, it is believed the motorcycle had been traveling eastbound on Fruitdale Drive when it failed to negotiate the corner.  The deceased rider was identified as 66-year-old Robert Alan Lee.

Grants Pass Police Detectives and Traffic Team members assisted with the investigation.  Anyone with information about the crash is encouraged to call the Grants Pass Police Department at 541-450-6260.