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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Mon. Apr. 12 - 11:45 pm
Mon. 04/12/21
Springfield restaurant fined $18,430 for COVID-19 violations, including willfully exposing workers
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/12/21 4:47 PM
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DCBS logo
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(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined Twisted River Saloon in Springfield $18,430 for violating three standards designed to protect employees from the coronavirus disease. In one of the violations, the employer willfully continued to potentially expose workers to the virus, despite a public health order limiting the capacity of indoor dining to zero in an “extreme risk” county.

The citation resulted from an inspection launched in response to multiple complaints about Twisted River Saloon (its legal name is JGB Enterprises LLC). The inspection documented the fact that the company, operating in Lane County, willfully began allowing indoor dining beginning on or around Jan. 4, 2021, and continuing until Feb. 26, 2021. During that time, Lane County was designated an “extreme risk” for transmission of the disease.

During the inspection, the business owner, James Butt, said he chose to reopen the restaurant, even though he was aware that it went against workplace health requirements.

Using his discretionary authority under state law, Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood imposed a $17,800 penalty for the willful violation. That is twice the minimum penalty for such a violation. The decision reflects the need to ensure a more appropriate deterrent effect where employers insist on disregarding health and safety standards.

Such willful behavior puts employees at risk and enables the employer to achieve a competitive advantage over businesses that comply with the requirements.

“Most employers in Oregon are striving to do the right thing by following on-the-job safety standards designed to reduce the risk to workers of COVID-19. We thank them for their efforts as part of a project we all share to defeat this virus,” said Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “As for those employers that insist on disregarding standards and putting workers at risk, we will continue to take enforcement action where appropriate.”

Altogether, Oregon OSHA cited three violations of the division’s temporary rule to address COVID-19 risks in the workplace:

  • In allowing indoor dining, Twisted River Saloon knowingly chose to disregard capacity limitations imposed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for such establishments in a county designated as extreme risk. It was a willful violation, carrying a discretionary penalty of $17,800.
  • The company failed to develop and implement an infection control plan. Such a plan could include redesigning the workspace to enable physical distancing and reducing the use of shared surfaces and tools. It was a serious violation, carrying a penalty of $315.
  • The company did not conduct any COVID-19 risk assessment to identify potential employee exposure to the virus and to address how to reduce such exposure. It was a serious violation, carrying a penalty of $315.

Ongoing refusals to correct violations and come into compliance with workplace health and safety standards can lead to additional higher penalties. Meanwhile, if an Oregon OSHA inspection documents violations while a county is at extreme risk, but the county’s risk level drops before the citation is issued, the citation will still be issued. The change in risk levels may affect how the violation needs to be corrected, but not whether it is cited.

Employers have 30 days to appeal citations.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers a variety of consultation, information, and education resources addressing COVID-19.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Black Bear Diner sites in Deschutes County fined more than $35,000 for willfully violating COVID-19 rules
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/12/21 4:43 PM
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DCBS logo
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(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined two Black Bear Diner sites – one in Bend and one in Redmond – more than $35,000 for violating standards designed to protect employees from the coronavirus disease. Both sites, under the same ownership, willfully continued to potentially expose workers to the virus, despite a public health order limiting the capacity of indoor dining to zero in an “extreme risk” county.

The citations, totaling $35,600 in fines, resulted from inspections launched in response to multiple complaints about the restaurants at Northeast Third Street in Bend and at West Cedar Avenue in Redmond.

The inspections found each site – operating under the legal name Bucc’N Dulge Inc. – willfully allowing indoor dining beginning on or around Jan. 13, 2021, and continuing through Feb. 11, 2021. During that time, Deschutes County was designated an “extreme risk” for transmission of the disease.

During an interview, the owner of the restaurants, Kathy Degree, said she was aware that indoor dining was not allowed in Deschutes County during that time.

Altogether, the inspections documented a total of four violations of workplace health and safety standards at both restaurants. As a result, the following citations were issued:

  • In allowing indoor dining at both Black Bear Diner sites, the owner knowingly chose to disregard capacity limitations imposed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for such establishments in a county that was designated as extreme risk. Each restaurant was cited for a willful violation, carrying a penalty of $17,800, under Oregon OSHA’s temporary rule addressing COVID-19 risks in the workplace.
  • The owner failed to establish and maintain a safety committee for the restaurants. Safety committees enable workers to regularly participate in addressing potential on-the-job hazards, including discussing such issues with managers. The other-than-serious violation was cited at each location.  

Using his discretionary authority under state law, Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood imposed a $17,800 penalty for each of the willful violations. That is twice the minimum penalty for such a violation. The decision reflects the need to ensure a more appropriate deterrent effect where employers insist on disregarding public health measures.

Such willful behavior puts employees at risk and enables the employer to achieve a competitive advantage over businesses that comply with workplace health and safety standards.

“Most employers continue to follow worker health and safety standards as part of our ongoing work to defeat this disease. And we continue to make progress,” Wood said. “Unfortunately, some employers are choosing to defy standards and to put their workers at risk. As a result, we will continue to bring our enforcement tools to bear where appropriate.”

Ongoing refusals to correct violations and come into compliance with workplace health and safety standards can lead to additional higher penalties. Meanwhile, if an Oregon OSHA inspection documents violations while a county is at extreme risk, but the county’s risk level drops before the citation is issued, the citation will still be issued. The change in risk levels may affect how the violation needs to be corrected, but not whether it is cited.

Employers have 30 days to appeal citations.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers a variety of consultation, information, and education resources addressing COVID-19.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Reminder: Tax filing deadline postponed until May 17
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 04/12/21 4:11 PM

SALEM, OR—With April 15 approaching, the Department of Revenue reminds taxpayers that the deadline for filing individual income tax returns for the 2020 tax year has been postponed to May 17, 2021. The IRS and Oregon both announced the postponements last month.

Individual taxpayers, including those who pay self-employment tax, can also postpone state income tax payments due on their 2020 tax year return until May 17, 2021. Individual taxpayers will automatically avoid interest and penalties as long as they pay all taxes due by the postponed deadline. Penalties and interest will begin to accrue on any unpaid balances as of May 18, 2021.

Oregon has not postponed the due date for first-quarter estimated income tax payments for 2021. Estimated tax payments are still due April 15, 2021. Taxpayers may choose to pay directly from their bank account or by credit card using Revenue Online. More information about the postponement of the individual income tax filing and payment due dates is available in a list of frequently asked questions the department’s website.

Update on 2020 unemployment benefits tax relief
Revenue has started adjusting 2020 income tax returns for Oregon taxpayers who paid taxes on exempted unemployment benefits, and thousands of refunds have already been issued. The manual process began March 30 and is on track to be completed over the next several weeks. The American Rescue Plan, signed into law March 11, exempts up to $10,200 of unemployment benefits received in 2020 per individual from taxes for households with less than $150,000 in modified adjusted gross income.

The change affects thousands of Oregon taxpayers who had already filed their state income tax returns, paying taxes on 2020 unemployment benefits before Congress made the change to the tax code. The department is adjusting the returns for those taxpayers. Affected taxpayers will receive refunds or have a lower tax bill.

Oregon taxpayers, who received unemployment in 2020 and have not yet filed their tax returns, can do so now following the instructions the IRS recently provided. Most e-file software providers have indicated they have the necessary software updates in place. Taxpayers should check with their tax preparer or software provider if they have questions about the updates.

E-filing and free filing
The department reminds taxpayers that e-filing your return and using direct deposit is the fastest way to get your Oregon tax refund. On average, taxpayers who e-file their returns and request their refund via direct deposit receive their refund sooner than those who file paper returns and request paper refund checks. More information about e-filing can be found on the agency’s website.

All Oregon taxpayers preparing their own returns can file electronically at no cost using Oregon’s free fillable forms. There are many free or low-cost preparation options available for both federal and Oregon tax returns. Some software companies offer free software use and e-filing for eligible taxpayers. More free filing information is available on the department’s website.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You also can call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing- or speech-impaired), we accept all relay calls.
 


STEM Week Oregon to Host Events as Part of Remake Learning Days Across America!
Future School Lab - 04/12/21 3:44 PM
STEM Oregon partners with Remake Learning Days
STEM Oregon partners with Remake Learning Days
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The Nation’s Largest Interactive Learning festival will take place May 8 -16, 2021 in Oregon

Oregon, March 22nd, 2021 – After a most challenging year for education,STEM Week Oregon, in partnership with Remake Learning Days Across America (RLDAA) debuts this spring in 17+ regions, with family-friendly equitable learning events designed to engage caregivers, parents and kids around the country. The activities will tie to Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math. This integrated approach to learning creates problem-solvers, innovators, critical thinkers and collaborative team players.

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, [Art], and Math) Hubs across the state will host dozens of events during this learning festival between May 8-16, 2021. These events are designed for parents and caregivers to learn alongside their kids and offer relevant and engaging educational experiences for youth of all ages (pre-K through high school). The majority of events are free, and many will be virtual. 

STEM Week Oregon is actively recruiting hosts, activity leaders and participants. We are looking for ways to include multigenerational, diverse and underserved groups.

Any organization or individual hosting a public event during STEM Week may apply for Remake Learning Days mini-grant funding, totaling up to $250. Public events must be open to any and all participants (in-person or virtual), but may include event size limits. Public events that qualify for mini-grants include but are not limited to: academic clubs, arts organizations, community centers, early childhood learning centers, libraries, museums, non-government agencies, parks, post-secondary institutions, schools, science centers, etc. Mini-grant funding will be awarded on a rolling basis January 14 through May 1, 2021. Grant priority will be given to applicants that plan to engage underserved populations.

STEM Oregon’s festival of events will capture the theme(s) of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math and include events such as:

  • Science Skills Sunday! 

    • Join Science Works Hand-On Museum for an exploration with microscopes! During the event participants will explore observation skills culminating with a microscope investigation. 

  • Virtual Meet a Scientist

    • Interested in a career in the lab? Join the National Energy Laboratory to meet with scientists and engineers across the state! This event is targeted at High school students curious about becoming a scientist. 

  • LEGO Follies 

    • Join Dallas Public Library for a series of LEGO challenges. Test your LEGO skills by creating LEGO art, practicing your Blind Building and a Spin Challenge! 

  • Balloon Bonanza 

    • Discover hidden balloon messages with the power of baking soda and vinegar! This event focuses on hands-on experiments from home! 

Visit www.stemoregon.org/stemweek2021 to register your family, classroom, school, organization or yourself to host and lead a public or private event and/or to apply for a mini grant.

All entrants are eligible to win prizes donated by generous sponsors such as REI. The more activities planned means more chances to win!

Find a complete list of events and registration information here

Remake Learning Days Across America is led by Remake Learning (RL), a network that ignites engaging, relevant, and equitable learning practices in support of young people navigating rapid social and technological change. National partners of RLDAA include PBS Kids, Digital Promise, Common Sense Media, Learning Heroes and Noggin. RLDAA is generously supported by The Grable Foundation, The Hewlett Foundation, Schmidt Futures, Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Ford Foundation. Visit remakelearning.org for more information or follow RL on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. For more information specifically on Remake Learning Days Across America, visit remakelearningdays.org or follow RLDAA on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and the hashtag #RemakeDays. 

For high resolution images, please click here.




Attached Media Files: STEM Oregon partners with Remake Learning Days

Applicant Review Committee Meeting Canceled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/12/21 3:12 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

April 12, 2021

Contact: Mona Riesterer
                 503-378-2431

                 iesterer@state.or.us">Mona.riesterer@state.or.us

Notice of Meeting Canceled

The Applicant Review Committee meeting schedule for April 28, 2021 has been canceled. The next meeting is scheduled for May 26, 2021 @ 1:00 p.m.

 

 


Former Nike Marketing Manager Pleads Guilty to Wire Fraud, Money Laundering, and Making False Statements
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/12/21 3:06 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Errol Andam, 49, of Beaverton, Oregon, a former marketing manager at Nike, Inc., pleaded guilty today to wire fraud, money laundering, and making false statements on a loan application as part of a scheme to defraud his former employer, announced Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug.

According to court documents, from 2001 until his termination in 2018, Andam was employed by Nike at its headquarters in Beaverton. Most recently, Andam worked as a manager in the company’s North American Retail Brand Marketing division wherein he managed the design, build-out, and operation of “pop-up” retail venues, temporary Nike shops situated near and tailored to sports competitions and other special events around the U.S.

In the summer of 2016, Andam recruited a childhood friend to establish a company to design and build the pop-up venues as an independent contractor for Nike. Andam used his authority as a manager at Nike to ensure that his friend’s company was consistently awarded the contracts for these jobs. Though he had no formal role in his friend’s company, Andam assumed control of much of the company’s financial operations, managing financial accounts and issuing invoices to Nike.

To conceal his role in the scheme, Andam used an alter ego, “Frank Little,” to invoice Nike and manage the contract company’s account with Square, Inc., a California-based provider of mobile credit-card-processing services. In 2016, Andam also renewed the lapsed registration of an Oregon-based limited liability corporation (LLC) he owned so that he could use the defunct entity as a shell company to funnel the proceeds diverted from Nike and his friend’s company to accounts under his personal control.

Beginning in September 2016, Andam caused credit-card sales at various pop-up venues around the U.S. to be run through card readers associated with a Square account owned by his friend’s company. These proceeds were transferred to Square in California and then to Andam’s LLC bank account in Oregon. Andam represented to both Nike and his friend that the proceeds of these sales were credited against the total amount Nike owed to his friend’s company. In truth, Andam simply pocketed the proceeds and, as “Frank Little,” invoiced Nike for the full cost of the contracted services.

From September 2016 through December 2018, Andam diverted and embezzled nearly $1.5 million in Nike proceeds for his own use. In July 2018, Andam submitted a fake financial statement from his LLC in support of a residential mortgage loan application. The financial statement falsely reflected as revenue checks for $194,000 drawn on a bank account owned by his friend’s business. Andam forged his friend’s signature on one of the checks and withdrew much of that money without his friend’s knowledge.

On February 4, 2021, Andam was charged by criminal information with wire fraud, money laundering, and making false statements on a loan application.

Under the terms of Andam’s plea agreement, the U.S. Attorney’s Office will recommend a sentence of 37 months in federal prison when he is sentenced on July 12, 2021. Andam will ask for a sentence of not less than 24 months. He has also agreed to pay more than $1.6 million in restitution and forfeit $212,838 in criminally-derived proceeds.

This case was investigated by the FBI and IRS Criminal Investigation. It is being prosecuted by Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Portland Woman Sentenced for Selling Pangolin Scales Illegally Imported Into the U.S. (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 04/12/21 2:14 PM
Shark fin
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PORTLAND, Ore.—A Portland resident and purveyor of Chinese homeopathic remedies pleaded guilty and was sentenced today for selling pangolin scales illegally imported into the U.S., announced Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug.

Agnes Yu, 53, was sentenced to three years’ federal probation and a $5,000 fine.

“Illegal trafficking poses a grave and persistent threat to wildlife populations across the globe. The purchase or sale of these animals is a serious crime and priority for federal law enforcement,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Asphaug.

“We commend the Department of Justice and all other agencies that played a role in aiding this investigation and prosecution,” said James Ashburner, a Special Agent in Charge for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement. “Trafficking of pangolins, and other protected species, is a huge part of global illegal wildlife trade. The Service will continue to use every tool at its disposal to fight wildlife trafficking and bring to justice the individuals who are depriving our planet of these magnificent creatures for their own profit.”

According to court documents, Yu and her husband operated Wing Ming Herbs, a store selling Chinese homeopathic remedies and other merchandise in Southeast Portland. On December 7, 2003, U.S. Customs and Border Protection personnel screened Yu and her husband at the U.S.-Canada border. The inspection recovered 10 dried sea snakes and 49 dried big-toothed sea snakes. As a result of this encounter, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service sent the Yus a letter informing them about federal laws and regulations governing the import and export of wildlife into and out of the U.S, including the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). CITES lists each of the wildlife species whose trafficking it regulates under one of three appendices, with the most endangered and protected listed in Appendix I.

On November 14, 2017, an undercover Postal Inspector with the U.S. Postal Inspection Service went to Wing Ming and spoke with Yu in Chinese. The inspector covertly recorded and videotaped the meeting. In the course of their transaction, Yu sold the inspector thirty grams of pangolin scales for approximately $165. Personnel at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory later confirmed the scales had been taken from a pangolin, a species of scaled anteater-like mammals endemic to Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.  All species of pangolins (which form the genus Manis) are listed in CITES Appendix I, meaning that all commercial trafficking in pangolins is prohibited by the Convention.

Yu was aware of U.S. and foreign restrictions on the import, export, and sale of CITES-listed plants and wildlife but did not comply with those restrictions. Yu repeatedly exported American ginseng to customers in China in 2017 and 2018. American ginseng is listed on CITES appendix II, requiring exporters to obtain and ship such ginseng with a valid CITES certificate. Neither Yu nor Wing Ming Herbs procured such certificates.

On July 24, 2018, an undercover agent with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service went to Wing Ming Herbs and purchased giant sea horses, which are protected by CITES appendix II and fourteen shark fins, four of which originated from scalloped hammerhead sharks, which are protected by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). On the same date, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a search warrant at Wing Ming Herbs and seized additional pangolin scales, ground Asian elephant ivory which is protected by CITES Appendix I and ESA, eleven penises and fifteen gall bladders of red deer which are protected by ESA, and giant devil ray which is protected by CITES Appendix II. Yu agreed to abandon all the wildlife seized in the search warrant, which included thousands of additional wildlife items.

On March 22, 2021, Yu was charged by criminal information with recklessly selling pangolin illegally imported into the U.S. in violation of CITES.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement with assistance from the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Plant Protection Quarantine, and the Oregon State Police. It was prosecuted by Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is responsible for protecting America’s wildlife from poaching, illegal commercialization, and other kinds of wildlife crime. If you have information related to a wildlife crime, please call 1-844-FWS-TIPS (1-844-397-8477) or email fws_tips@fws.gov.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release (Simplified Chinese) , PDF Release , Shark fin , Sea horses , Fried pangolin scales , Asian elephant ivory powder

Rule Advisory Committee meets to discuss proposed changes to recreation grants
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/12/21 2:00 PM

SALEM, Oregon — Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) has formed a committee to review proposed changes to a federal grant program that funds outdoor recreation projects.

A Rule Advisory Committee will meet virtually April 19 to review and discuss proposed changes to the grant rules for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). LWCF grants are available for local jurisdictions to acquire or develop outdoor recreation facilities. OPRD administers the federally funded grant program.

The meeting starts at noon and is open to the public.  Anyone wishing to view the public meeting will need to register via https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_GVHmqTT7ToWIqGs1LQ_GaA.

After the committee review, the rule will open for public comment. Details will be posted on the OPRD Proposed OPRD Rules web page.

The meeting agenda will include discussions about proposed rule changes, including updating defined terms; expanding applicant eligibility to include public educational institutions; raising the minimum federal share on a project; and expanding the organizations from which OPRD can seek nominations for membership to the grant advisory committee. The committee will also discuss any financial or economic effects of the proposed rules on local governments or other applicants.

OPRD appointed committee members from statewide recreation, local government and education interests.

The LWCF typically awards about $1.5 million to qualified projects every other year. More information is on the LWCF web page: oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/Pages/GRA-lwcf.aspx.

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the meetings should contact Katie Gauthier at least three days in advance of the meeting at 503-510-96 78 or katie.gauthier@oregon.gov.


PacificSource Health Plans Welcomes Sabrina Coleman as Vice President and Corporate Compliance Officer
PacificSource Health Plans - 04/12/21 1:31 PM
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(Springfield, Ore.) April 12, 2021— PacificSource Health Plans welcomes Sabrina Coleman as its new vice president and corporate compliance officer. In this role Coleman will be responsible for administering and managing the enterprise's compliance program, ensuring that PacificSource maintains full compliance with all governmental agencies, including all Federal and State regulatory agencies. She will also serve as the company's privacy officer.

Coleman most recently served as the senior director of delegation oversight for L.A. Care Health Plan, as well as senior director of compliance and audit services in an earlier role with that same company. Prior to that she served in compliance roles with the New York-based organizations Public Consulting Group, Montefiore Medical Center and Living Life Home Care. 

“We’re excited to have Sabrina join us during a time of significant growth in the Medicaid area of our business,” said Ken Provencher, president and CEO of PacificSource. “Her rich background will be a strong addition to both our compliance and executive leadership teams.”

Coleman earned her Bachelor of Arts in political science and Japanese from Lincoln University and her Juris Doctorate in Law from Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law, both in Pennsylvania. Outside of work she enjoys outdoor activities, travel, and trying new foods.

Coleman will begin her new role April 26 and will work out of PacificSource’s Springfield office.

 

About PacificSource Health Plans:

PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource has local offices throughout Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Washington. The PacificSource family of companies employs more than 1,500 people and serves over 523,700 individuals throughout the Greater Northwest. For more information, visit PacificSource.com.

 

 

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Attached Media Files: 2021-04/2392/144020/Sabrina_Coleman-2.jpg

Oregon reports 294 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 04/12/21 12:46 PM

April 12, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 294 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — There is one new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,441, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 294 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 170,850.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 27,503 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 17,823 doses were administered on April 11 and 9,680 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 11.

The 7-day running average is now 38,420 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,176,173 doses of Pfizer, 1,027,792 doses of Moderna and 81,255 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 916,207 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,447,624 who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date,1,377,675 doses of Pfizer, 1,203,300 doses of Moderna and 203,200 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 177, which is two fewer than yesterday. There are 48 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (2), Clackamas (39), Clatsop (6), Columbia (5), Coos (2), Deschutes (23), Douglas (6), Jackson (11), Jefferson (4), Josephine (13), Lane (38), Lincoln (6), Linn (15), Marion (43), Morrow (1), Multnomah (54), Polk (4), Tillamook (3), Wasco (3), Washington (3) and Yamhill (7).

Oregon’s 2,441st COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on March 22 and died on April 7 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Oregon Community Foundation to Administer $41.2 Million in State-Funded Grants for Summer Academic and Enrichment Programs (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 04/12/21 11:00 AM
OCF Summer Learning Stock Photo
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EMBARGO until Tuesday, April 13, 2021

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Oregon Community Foundation to Administer $41.2 Million in State-Funded Grants for Summer Academic and Enrichment Programs

Program designed to address learning inequities with Oregon children and families

Portland, Ore. – Tuesday, April 13, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today that it will administer $40 million of state-funded grants for community organizations to provide summer enrichment activities for K-12 aged students, such as day camps and outdoor programs as well as $1.2 million earmarked for parent-child summer programming for families with young children. The move is part of a substantial investment by the State of Oregon to address learning inequities and help mitigate the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Oregon children and families.

“The pandemic has caused widespread learning loss and social-emotional setbacks with youth, while also amplifying learning disparities across racial and socioeconomic lines,” says Lisa Bermudez, Development & Marketing Director, Bend Science Station. “The expertise, training and connections of OCF will help organizations to successfully re-engage youth¾particularly marginalized youth¾and make up for lost learning this summer.”

OCF will administer grants for two different allocations of state-funding for summer educational and enrichment programs:

K-12 Summer Learning Grants $40 Million

The K-12 Summer Learning Grants will prioritize community-based programs for underserved youth and families that have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. The grants will be available to public and nonprofit organizations that provide community-based programming including:

  • Support enrichment programs for learning outside of the classroom
  • Support arts, sports, mentoring, workforce development, science, museum education and many other indoor and outdoor activities
  •  A priority to programs that serve K-12 aged youth from communities of color, youth from low-income families, and youth living in under-resourced rural communities.

“Oregon Community Foundation has a history of investing in community-based out of school time and summer programs across the state. National and local data shows that this programming helps build a sense of belonging, develop critical social emotional skills, and promote greater school attendance and engagement,” says Belle Cantor, Senior Program Officer for Education, OCF. “The trauma of school disruption as well as living with an elevated level of anxiety and uncertainty can have long-term negative impacts on children. This is magnified for children who already experience racial inequity.”

Grants are intended to be used towards ensuring youth and families have access to summer learning and enrichment programs. The pandemic has had wide and varied impacts on youth and families across the state and therefore these grants are intended to ensure youth and families have opportunities to help them address the educational, social, emotional, and other impacts of the pandemic.

OCF will accept, review, and award grants on a rolling basis throughout the spring to ensure programs have funds in hand to begin planning and implementation. OCF will seek the advice of a diverse, community-based advisory committee throughout the granting process to ensure that the program is meeting community priorities.

The application form can be found on the OCF website at: https://oregoncf.org/grants-and-scholarships/grants/k-12-summer-learning-grant-program

Early Childhood Summer Support Grants $1.2M

The Early Childhood Summer Support Grants will support enrichment programs for learning by providing services for approximately 600 children (from birth to 5 years of age) and families. These grants will help deliver 12 weeks of parent-child summer programming, including group classes and activities that offer social and learning opportunities for young children and their parents, play groups and kindergarten readiness programs.

“The birth to five years are the most critical years for the development of young brains, and parent-child relationships are the foundation of healthy development,” says Mary Louise McClintock, Senior Education Strategy and Policy Advisor, Oregon Community Foundation. “Through Early Childhood Summer Support grants OCF will support opportunities for young children and their parents – especially those disproportionately impacted by the trauma and isolation of the pandemic – to play and learn with other children and families.”

To apply for a grant or learn more about this program, please visit:

https://oregoncf.org/grants-and-scholarships/grants/early-childhood-summer-support-grants

About Oregon’s Summer Learning and Child Care Package for Kids

The state of Oregon is seeking to fund programs that build trusting relationships, connection and care for children over the summer months, in the critical time between the end of this school year and the beginning of the next. To learn more, please see:

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) puts donated money to work in Oregon – more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving–time, talent and resources from many generous Oregonians–creates measurable change. For more information about OCF, please visit: oregoncf.org.

###

EMBARGO until Tuesday, April 13, 2021




Attached Media Files: First Summer Programming News Release_FINAL_04 13 2021 , OCF Summer Learning Stock Photo , Photo Courtesy of Eugene Pavlov Photography and Family Building Blocks

Sun. 04/11/21
Oregon reports 499 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 04/11/21 12:00 PM

April 11, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 499 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, the state’s death toll remains at 2,440 the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 499 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 170,568.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 33,381 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 22,729 doses were administered on April 10 and 10,652 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 10.

The 7-day running average is now 37,256 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,156,392 doses of Pfizer, 1,021,822 doses of Moderna and 79,507 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 179, which is nine more than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is the same as yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (6), Clackamas (72), Clatsop (1), Columbia (9), Coos (6), Crook (3), Deschutes (35), Douglas (6), Grant (7), Jackson (22), Jefferson (8), Josephine (9), Klamath (35), Lane (46), Lincoln (7), Linn (11), Malheur (1), Marion (47), Morrow (1), Multnomah (99), Polk (11), Tillamook (2), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Washington (43) and Yamhill (9).

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

801

13

Benton

2,653

18

Clackamas

14,891

201

Clatsop

867

8

Columbia

1,495

25

Coos

1,934

30

Crook

839

19

Curry

575

9

Deschutes

6,741

72

Douglas

2,993

65

Gilliam

55

1

Grant

341

4

Harney

300

6

Hood River

1,099

29

Jackson

9,647

126

Jefferson

2,043

32

Josephine

2,961

62

Klamath

3,268

57

Lake

409

7

Lane

11,219

144

Lincoln

1,268

20

Linn

4,008

61

Malheur

3,416

58

Marion

19,759

298

Morrow

1,069

15

Multnomah

34,192

564

Polk

3,354

51

Sherman

56

0

Tillamook

564

2

Umatilla

7,917

83

Union

1,403

23

Wallowa

156

5

Wasco

1,258

28

Washington

22,964

229

Wheeler

25

1

Yamhill

4,028

74

Statewide

170,568

2,440

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

ELRs received 04/10/2021

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

142

4

146

2.7%

Benton

231

5

236

2.1%

Clackamas

976

92

1,068

8.6%

Clatsop

139

10

149

6.7%

Columbia

140

6

146

4.1%

Coos

90

13

103

12.6%

Crook

72

3

75

4.0%

Curry

63

3

66

4.5%

Deschutes

394

35

429

8.2%

Douglas

143

4

147

2.7%

Gilliam

3

0

3

0.0%

Grant

5

4

9

44.4%

Hood River

85

10

95

10.5%

Jackson

353

34

387

8.8%

Jefferson

38

4

42

9.5%

Josephine

150

7

157

4.5%

Klamath

88

14

102

13.7%

Lake

6

1

7

14.3%

Lane

950

53

1,003

5.3%

Lincoln

80

2

82

2.4%

Linn

360

19

379

5.0%

Malheur

39

3

42

7.1%

Marion

719

49

768

6.4%

Morrow

18

0

18

0.0%

Multnomah

2,396

110

2,506

4.4%

Polk

150

7

157

4.5%

Sherman

2

0

2

0.0%

Tillamook

58

4

62

6.5%

Umatilla

92

6

98

6.1%

Union

26

1

27

3.7%

Wallowa

10

1

11

9.1%

Wasco

39

5

44

11.4%

Washington

1,410

70

1,480

4.7%

Yamhill

271

8

279

2.9%

Statewide

9,738

587

10,325

5.7%

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

10,649

1,729

12,378

14.0%

Benton

126,140

4,157

130,297

3.2%

Clackamas

405,343

22,849

428,192

5.3%

Clatsop

31,954

1,527

33,481

4.6%

Columbia

38,508

2,028

40,536

5.0%

Coos

42,245

2,370

44,615

5.3%

Crook

16,004

1,138

17,142

6.6%

Curry

10,550

502

11,052

4.5%

Deschutes

171,340

8,807

180,147

4.9%

Douglas

74,825

3,374

78,199

4.3%

Gilliam

1,122

43

1,165

3.7%

Grant

5,078

306

5,384

5.7%

Harney

3,876

343

4,219

8.1%

Hood River

29,920

1,545

31,465

4.9%

Jackson

201,406

14,478

215,884

6.7%

Jefferson

18,231

1,833

20,064

9.1%

Josephine

61,461

3,349

64,810

5.2%

Klamath

43,163

3,637

46,800

7.8%

Lake

4,900

402

5,302

7.6%

Lane

434,699

13,274

447,973

3.0%

Lincoln

39,913

2,533

42,446

6.0%

Linn

126,036

7,547

133,583

5.6%

Malheur

24,009

5,013

29,022

17.3%

Marion

319,269

29,552

348,821

8.5%

Morrow

6,824

1,286

8,110

15.9%

Multnomah

953,486

51,026

1,004,512

5.1%

Polk

64,679

4,368

69,047

6.3%

Sherman

1,313

64

1,377

4.6%

Tillamook

13,656

549

14,205

3.9%

Umatilla

61,266

8,812

70,078

12.6%

Union

18,782

1,754

20,536

8.5%

Wallowa

2,903

149

3,052

4.9%

Wasco

31,960

1,556

33,516

4.6%

Washington

587,081

37,850

624,931

6.1%

Wheeler

645

24

669

3.6%

Yamhill

125,906

6,514

132,420

4.9%

Statewide

4,109,142

246,288

4,355,430

5.7%

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Fatal Fire
Medford Police Dept. - 04/11/21 8:57 AM

On April 10th, 2021 at about 1813 hours, Medford Fire and Medford Police personnel responded to a report of a fire in the 2100 block of Kings Highway. Upon arrival, responders found a small, older RV on the property fully engulfed. Once the fire was contained, a body was discovered inside. Police and fire personnel are working to determine the cause of the fire. The initial investigation does not indicate signs of foul play. The decedent’s identity is not being released pending confirmation. 


Sat. 04/10/21
UPDATE - Fatal Crash on I-5 - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 04/10/21 2:11 PM

The pedestrian is being identified as Michael Stacey (55) of Gervais.

On Saturday, April 10, 2021 at approximately 1:45 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a collision involving a pedestrian on Interstate 5 near milepost 270. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Mazda M23,  operated by Cassidy Schmidt (19) of Albany, was southbound when it struck a pedestrian in the roadway. 

It is unknown at this time why the pedestrian was in the roadway. 

The pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.  His name will be released when appropriate. 

OSP was assisted by the Woodburn Fire Department, Woodburn Ambulance and ODOT.  


Oregon reports 761 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 04/10/21 1:37 PM

April 10, 2021

Oregon reports 761 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 0 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, the state’s death toll remains at 2,440 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 761 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 170,085.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 54,790 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 30,068 doses were administered on April 9 and 24,722 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 9.

The 7-day running average is now 37,239 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,139,331 doses of Pfizer, 1,012,176 doses of Moderna and 72,833 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 170, which is 12 more than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 7 more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (9), Clackamas (82), Columbia (16), Coos (4), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (74), Douglas (9), Grant (3), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (57), Jefferson (2), Josephine (20), Klamath (48), Lane (67), Lincoln (4), Linn (17), Malheur (3), Marion (57), Multnomah (132), Polk (11), Tillamook (6), Umatilla (3), Union (4), Wasco (6), Washington (98), Yamhill (9).

 

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

800

13

Benton

2,646

18

Clackamas

14,821

201

Clatsop

866

8

Columbia

1,486

25

Coos

1,928

30

Crook

836

19

Curry

575

9

Deschutes

6,706

72

Douglas

2,985

65

Gilliam

55

1

Grant

334

4

Harney

300

6

Hood River

1,099

29

Jackson

9,625

126

Jefferson

2,036

32

Josephine

2,954

62

Klamath

3,233

57

Lake

409

7

Lane

11,173

144

Lincoln

1,261

20

Linn

3,998

61

Malheur

3,415

58

Marion

19,713

298

Morrow

1,068

15

Multnomah

34,095

564

Polk

3,343

51

Sherman

56

0

Tillamook

562

2

Umatilla

7,917

83

Union

1,402

23

Wallowa

155

5

Wasco

1,258

28

Washington

22,931

229

Wheeler

25

1

Yamhill

4,019

74

Statewide

170,085

2,440

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

Additional laboratory reports for Douglas and Jackson counties

Due to a delay in laboratory reporting, OHA received a large quantity of ~9,000 electronic laboratory reports (ELRs) on April 9, 2021 for Douglas and Jackson counties. The reports are from April 2020 to April 2021. As a result, daily ELR totals are higher and percent positivity is lower for April 9 than anticipated for these two counties.

ELRs received 04/09/2021

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

62

9

71

12.7%

Benton

819

11

830

1.3%

Clackamas

1,159

87

1,246

7.0%

Clatsop

58

2

60

3.3%

Columbia

181

24

205

11.7%

Coos

292

6

298

2.0%

Crook

93

4

97

4.1%

Curry

126

7

133

5.3%

Deschutes

714

64

778

8.2%

Douglas

3,686

40

3,726

1.1%

Gilliam

1

1

2

50.0%

Grant

24

10

34

29.4%

Harney

3

1

4

25.0%

Hood River

112

5

117

4.3%

Jackson

5,009

167

5,176

3.2%

Jefferson

68

8

76

10.5%

Josephine

485

28

513

5.5%

Klamath

273

53

326

16.3%

Lake

11

0

11

0.0%

Lane

2,918

82

3,000

2.7%

Lincoln

172

8

180

4.4%

Linn

642

24

666

3.6%

Malheur

106

18

124

14.5%

Marion

1,072

84

1,156

7.3%

Morrow

22

0

22

0.0%

Multnomah

3,275

104

3,379

3.1%

Polk

294

14

308

4.5%

Sherman

1

0

1

0.0%

Tillamook

64

6

70

8.6%

Umatilla

175

3

178

1.7%

Union

69

4

73

5.5%

Wallowa

13

0

13

0.0%

Wasco

76

4

80

5.0%

Washington

2,260

98

2,358

4.2%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

309

15

324

4.6%

Statewide

24,645

991

25,636

3.9%

 

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

10,507

1,725

12,232

14.1%

Benton

125,909

4,152

130,061

3.2%

Clackamas

404,367

22,757

427,124

5.3%

Clatsop

31,815

1,517

33,332

4.6%

Columbia

38,368

2,022

40,390

5.0%

Coos

42,155

2,357

44,512

5.3%

Crook

15,932

1,135

17,067

6.7%

Curry

10,487

499

10,986

4.5%

Deschutes

170,946

8,772

179,718

4.9%

Douglas

74,682

3,370

78,052

4.3%

Gilliam

1,119

43

1,162

3.7%

Grant

5,073

302

5,375

5.6%

Harney

3,876

343

4,219

8.1%

Hood River

29,835

1,535

31,370

4.9%

Jackson

201,053

14,444

215,497

6.7%

Jefferson

18,193

1,829

20,022

9.1%

Josephine

61,311

3,342

64,653

5.2%

Klamath

43,075

3,623

46,698

7.8%

Lake

4,894

401

5,295

7.6%

Lane

433,749

13,221

446,970

3.0%

Lincoln

39,833

2,531

42,364

6.0%

Linn

125,676

7,528

133,204

5.7%

Malheur

23,970

5,010

28,980

17.3%

Marion

318,550

29,503

348,053

8.5%

Morrow

6,806

1,286

8,092

15.9%

Multnomah

951,090

50,916

1,002,006

5.1%

Polk

64,529

4,361

68,890

6.3%

Sherman

1,311

64

1,375

4.7%

Tillamook

13,598

545

14,143

3.9%

Umatilla

61,174

8,806

69,980

12.6%

Union

18,756

1,753

20,509

8.5%

Wallowa

2,893

148

3,041

4.9%

Wasco

31,921

1,551

33,472

4.6%

Washington

585,671

37,780

623,451

6.1%

Wheeler

645

24

669

3.6%

Yamhill

125,635

6,506

132,141

4.9%

Statewide

4,099,404

245,701

4,345,105

5.7%

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Fri. 04/09/21
Sheriff Hanlin Announces Line of Duty Death of Retired Deputy Stanley "Allen" Burdic
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/09/21 9:25 PM
Deputy S. Allen Burdic
Deputy S. Allen Burdic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-04/5204/143987/thumb_Burdic.jpg

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - Sheriff John Hanlin is saddened to announce the line-of-duty death of retired Deputy Stanley "Allen" Burdic from duty-related wounds suffered in 1980.
 
In October 1976, Allen Burdic was hired by the Canyonville Police Department where he served until July 1979 when he accepted a Deputy Sheriff position with the Douglas County Sheriff's Office.
 
On August 12, 1980, Deputy Burdic responded to a reported shooting at the Nutshell Tavern in Myrtle Creek. Sometime in the early morning hours of August 13, Deputy Burdic located the suspect at a gravel turnout north of the Myrtle Creek Bridge near Interstate 5. The suspect opened fire on Deputy Burdic, striking him twice. The suspect then stole the deputy’s patrol car. As the suspect left in the stolen patrol car, he ran over Deputy Burdic’s legs. 
 
Deputy Burdic sustained serious injuries from the gunshot wounds, which prevented his return to his position as a deputy. He medically retired from the Sheriff's Office in 1982.
 
He briefly returned to the Canyonville Police Department as a Police Officer from July 1984 to November 1985.
 
Deputy Burdic passed away at his home on March 11, 2021 from complications of the injuries he sustained in the line of duty working for the Douglas County Sheriff's Office in 1980.
 
"Deputy Burdic's sacrifice while in service to the citizens of Douglas County, no matter the span of time between the shooting and his death, cannot go unmentioned. We will honor him, his family and his memory and never forget what happened to this deputy on August 13, 1980," Sheriff Hanlin said. 
 
Deputy Burdic's memorial service is scheduled for Saturday, April 17, 2021, at 2:00 p.m. at the Tri-City Baptist Church. Deputy Burdic will be afforded law enforcement honors at the service.
 
Deputy Burdic's Family and the Douglas County Sheriff's Office are being assisted by the Oregon Fallen Badge Foundation. Anyone wishing to make financial contributions to support the Burdic family may do so through the Oregon Fallen Badge Foundation 
 
Online:
www.oregonfallenbadge.com
Click on the "Donate to OFBF" link on the home page and then enter "For the Burdic Family" into the memo line of the PayPal donation page.
 
US Mail:  
Oregon Fallen Badge Foundation
818 SW 3rd Ave #347
Portland, OR 97204
 
Checks can be made payable to the Oregon Fallen Badge Foundation with "For the Burdic Family" in the memo line.
 




Attached Media Files: Deputy S. Allen Burdic

Oregon State Police is Asking for Public's Assistance with Unlawful Killing of Tundra Swans - Harney County
Oregon State Police - 04/09/21 7:16 PM
2021-04/1002/143984/Swan_2_closeup.jpg
2021-04/1002/143984/Swan_2_closeup.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-04/1002/143984/thumb_Swan_2_closeup.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help to identify the person(s) responsible for the unlawful taking of two Tundra Swans in Harney County. 

On April 1, 2021 a  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Officer discovered two deceased Tundra Swans off of Embree Bridge Road near Oil Well Road in the East Fork of the Silvies River.

The U.S. F&W Officer notified the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division which are now assisting in the investigation.

The U.S. F&W Officer determined the Tundra Swans had been shot with a small caliber bullet sometime between March 31 and April 1.  

If you have any information regarding this incident please contact the Turn In Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or 541-589-2547.

Poaching  wildlife and damaging habitats affects present and future generations of wildlife, impacts communities and the economy, and creates enforcement challenges. 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain (Bighorn) Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-04/1002/143984/Swan_2_closeup.jpg , 2021-04/1002/143984/Swan1_closeup.jpg

Conference of Local Health Officials meets April 15 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 04/09/21 5:07 PM

April 9, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets April 15 via Zoom

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Approve Program Element 51 bridge funding; hear update on COVID after-action reports and COVID vaccine event planning; discuss Fiscal Year ’22 and Program Element carryover.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, April 15, 9:30-11 a.m.

Where: Via Zoom meeting.  All attendees MUST register at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607711675?pwd=S2pzRlErUUE0SjNyenhDTTlCcm1rQT09

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766 711 TTY or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Correction: Oregon reports 560 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 04/09/21 4:23 PM

Two numbers have been updated: people who have completed a vaccine series and people who have had at least one dose.

April 9, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Correction: Oregon reports 560 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — There is one new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,440, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 560 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 169,338.

Vaccination data for counties now available

Vaccination data showing the status of COVID-19 vaccinations at the county level is now available on OHA’s vaccination dashboard. It was temporarily disabled last week. OHA resolved an issue with its geocoding process, which had previously miscategorized the location of certain vaccinated individuals.

OHA continually analyzes all its data and performs ongoing data quality checks. Vaccination data requests that included county of residence were delayed due to this issue.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 53,121 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 33,410 doses were administered on April 8 and 19,711 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 8.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,108,731 doses of Pfizer, 993,824 doses of Moderna and 67,071 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 859,912 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,374,408 people who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 1,363,635 doses of Pfizer, 1,215,300 doses of Moderna and 193,200 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 158, which is 10 fewer than yesterday. There are 39 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (3), Clackamas (51), Clatsop (6), Columbia (7), Curry (7), Deschutes (51), Douglas (8), Grant (24), Harney (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (27), Jefferson (6), Josephine (18), Klamath (25), Lake (2), Lane (47), Lincoln (9), Linn (17), Malheur (2), Marion (33), Multnomah (97), Polk (11), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (10), Union (3), Wallowa (1), Wasco (1), Washington (83) and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 2,440th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Clatsop County who tested positive on March 25 and died on April 5 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Youth Experiencing Homelessness Will Benefit from Investments in Youth Voice and Service Expansion Opportunities
Oregon Department of Human Services - 04/09/21 4:10 PM

Organizations serving Oregon youth experiencing homelessness are getting an infusion of over $1 million in order to maintain service delivery during the pandemic, expand capacity to serve more areas of the state, and better incorporate youth voice in their programs. The funds are made available by federal COVID-19 relief funds and state relief spending and were recently approved by the Oregon Legislature.

Youth experiencing homelessness face barriers meeting basic needs – access to food, clean clothes, a place to shower, a location to access resources, and safe and stable housing. The COVID-19 crisis has had an especially negative effect on impacted youth who are Black, Oregon Tribal Nations, and youth of color. Organizations providing services to this vulnerable population have also experienced serious pandemic-related hardships.

To address this, Oregon’s Legislative Emergency Board approved $1 million of funding in January 2021 to support current ODHS’ Runaway Homeless Youth (RHY) grant providers who faced service delivery challenges due to the global pandemic. Providers will begin receiving relief funding in April 2021.

To improve the services available to youth, the RHY program is also providing $130,000 in short-term, equity-focused grants to 12 direct service providers. In part funded by Federal CARES Act funding, these grant awards expand RHY service into six new counties. Each provider is a new grantee of the RHY program:

  • Youth Era (Lane County)
  • The Living Room (Clackamas County)
  • Lincoln County Shelter (Lincoln County)
  • Youth Rising (Klamath County)
  • Parrott Creek Child & Family Services (Clackamas Creek)
  • St. Vincent de Paul (Lane County)
  • Alternative Youth Activities (Coos County)
  • Integral Youth Services (Klamath County)
  • Alba Collaborative (Multnomah County)
  • AntFarm (Clackamas County)
  • Family Faith and Relationship Advocates (Douglas County)
  • The Next Door (Hood River/Wasco County)

To ensure the voice of youth is lifted in the process of planning, design, and delivery of youth-focused service, ODHS has awarded $50,000 in Youth Engagement grants. Grants are focused on supporting young people’s involvement on Youth Advisory Boards, including the provision of appropriate compensation for their experience and expertise. Youth Advisory Boards are made up of youth, young adults and stakeholders and are key in the decision-making process that implements housing and services to end youth homelessness. This funding is being awarded with intention to engage Black, Oregon Tribal Nations, and youth of color in Youth Advisory Boards.

10 service providers have been awarded grants:

  • Lincoln County Shelter (Lincoln County)
  • Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon / Second Home (Washington County)
  • Oregon Social Learning Center / 15th Night (Lane County)
  • Clackamas Workforce Partnership / Clackamas Youth Action Board (Clackamas County)
  • HOME Youth Services (Marion/Polk County)
  • Hearts with a Mission (Jackson/Josephine County)
  • J Bar J Youth Services (Deschutes County)
  • Jackson Street Youth Services (Linn/Benton County)
  • New Avenues for Youth (Multnomah County)
  • Yamhill Community Action Partnership (Yamhill County)

To learn more about youth experiencing homelessness visit ODHS’ homeless youth webpage.


CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet April 16
Oregon Health Authority - 04/09/21 2:52 PM

April 9, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet April 16

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: April 16, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, minutes approval, and general updates (9:00-9:15); Public testimony (9:15-9:30); Transformative measures survey summary results (9:30-10:00); Transformative measure survey results discussion (10:00-10:45); Transformative measure survey results discussion continued (11:00-12:00); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at, 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Listening sessions on statewide SUD treatment provider accreditation
Oregon Health Authority - 04/09/21 1:24 PM

April 9, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Listening sessions on statewide SUD treatment provider accreditation

What: Listening sessions to receive public comments on recommendations for potential national accreditation for substance use disorder (SUD) treatment providers.

Agenda: Receive public comments on HB2257 advisory group recommendations.

When: Friday, April 16, 2021, 9:30-11 a.m., and Wednesday, April 21, 2021, 5-6:30 p.m. The meetings are open to the public.

Where: Zoom.Gov Meeting

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1613803828?pwd=ZE8vWFVLS1h2aTFtZXV4Y0htd1gwdz09

Meeting ID: 161 380 3828

Passcode: 514219

Join by phone: 669-254-5252

Background: In 2019, Oregon passed HB 2257, which required OHA to convene an advisory group to make recommendations for the potential accreditation of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment providers. If implemented, the accreditation requirements will impact every SUD services provider in Oregon and potentially require providers to make significant changes to their practices. The advisory group’s recommendations will also impact the compliance and quality assurance practices of CCO’s and OHA, and may require providers to change their internal quality assurance processes.

Program contact: Greg Bledsoe, 503-975-2025, egory.b.bledsoe@dhsoha.state.or.us">gregory.b.bledsoe@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provided free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Greg Bledsoe at 503-975-2025, 711 TTY, or egory.b.bledsoe@dhsoha.state.or.us">gregory.b.bledsoe@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board -- Research Subcommittee meets April 14
Oregon Health Authority - 04/09/21 1:13 PM

April 9, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board – Research Subcommittee meets April 14

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board Research Subcommittee

Agenda: TBD

When: Wednesday, April 14, 2-3 p.m. No public comment period available.

Where: Via Zoom meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16051729334

Meeting ID: 160 5172 9334

Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon expands addiction treatment services for Oregon Health Plan members
Oregon Health Authority - 04/09/21 12:06 PM

April 9, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, ia.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us, 503-535-9134

Program contact: Joanna Johnson, sud.waiver@dhsoha.state.or.us, 503-753-6160

Oregon expands addiction treatment services for Oregon Health Plan members

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is pleased to announce expanded care for addiction services. On April 8, 2021, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approved Oregon’s application for a five-year Medicaid 1115 Demonstration Waiver, which will increase access to treatment services for people with substance use disorders (SUD) who are covered by the Oregon Health Plan.

Prior to the approval of the SUD waiver, any Institutions for Mental Disease (IMD) could not bill services to Medicaid. IMDs are settings of more than 16 beds that are primarily engaged in providing diagnosis, treatment, or care of persons with mental diseases, including medical attention, nursing care, and related services.  The waiver now allows federal funds to match state funds for substance use treatment for Medicaid members in an IMD. 

The waiver, which is effective April 8, 2021, through March 31, 2026, will allow Oregon to:

  • Expand the continuum of care for people with substance use disorders.
  • Improve access to care for substance use disorders, including outreach, initiation, treatment and recovery.
  • Reduce use of emergency departments and inpatient hospital settings for treatment.
  • Reduce readmissions to the same or higher level of care when the readmission is preventable or medically inappropriate.
  • Increase rates of identification, initiation, and engagement in treatment for substance use disorders.
  • Include housing support services in the treatment care plan.

“The new federal funding, in addition to the investment provided in the Governor’s Budget for 2021-23, will allow Oregon to accomplish our vision to prevent and identify substance use disorder and support people in sustaining long-term recovery,” said Oregon Health Authority Behavioral Program Director Steve Allen.

While the additional covered services will help more Oregonians, the state’s application to support people with ongoing, post-treatment, and peer recovery services with Medicaid funding was not approved. Oregon will continue to find other ways to fund this crucial component of effective treatment.

Oregon Health Authority Medicaid Director Lori Coyner said, “We are excited and hopeful about the opportunities to improve access for Oregon Health Plan members to important substance use treatment services.”

OHA will begin working with Coordinated Care Organizations to implement activities immediately, with the goal of implementing all new activities by January 2023.

To learn more:

More information about Oregon’s SUD 1115 Waiver, including special terms and conditions for the full waiver, can be found at: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/Medicaid-Policy/Pages/SUD-Waiver.aspx

For additional information or inquiries, please contact Substance Use Systems Coordinator and SUD 1115 Waiver Manager Joanna Johnson at sud.waiver@dhsoha.state.or.us.


2021 'CONVERSATIONS WITH FUNDERS and PARTNERS' GOES VIRTUAL APRIL 26
Oregon Cultural Trust - 04/09/21 10:18 AM
Trust Manager Aili Schreiner (second from right) meets with grant seekers at a pre-COVID Conversations event.
Trust Manager Aili Schreiner (second from right) meets with grant seekers at a pre-COVID Conversations event.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-04/1171/143964/thumb_Cultural_Trust_better.JPG

Salem, Ore. – Grant makers offering more than $5 million in funding for FY2022 will gather online for the Cultural Trust’s 2021 “Conversations with Funders and Partners” event from 4 to 6 p.m. on Monday, April 26. The free virtual event will enable grant seekers to learn about funding programs available and will include breakout rooms where they can discuss their projects and programming with specific funders. NOTE: Capacity is limited, so early registration is encouraged.

Participating with the Cultural Trust will be representatives from three of its Statewide Partners – the Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage and Oregon Humanities – as well as counterparts from the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation and Travel Oregon.

Organizations encouraged to attend “Conversations with Funders and Partners” include community development organizations, libraries, arts organizations, museums, cultural centers, parks and trails groups, historical societies, arts alliances, literary groups and heritage organizations. All cultural nonprofit organizations are welcome.

“There are more than 1,500 cultural nonprofits serving Oregonians,” said Aili Schreiner, Cultural Trust manager. “We want to make sure they know about the significant funding and programming resources that are here to support them.”

Oregon Cultural Trust Cultural Development Program

Among the funding opportunities discussed at the online Conversations event will be the Cultural Trust’s FY2022 Cultural Development Program (funds to be awarded summer of 2021).

The Cultural Development Program recognizes and supports significant projects through four program funded categories: Access; Preservation; Creativity; and Capacity.

In 2020 the Cultural Trust awarded more than $2.7 million in statewide grants. Cultural Development Program grants represent one third of the annual funding the Cultural Trust provides to Oregon’s cultural nonprofits. Other funding includes grants to the Trust’s five statewide partners – to support their mission goals and respective funding programs – and to 45 county and tribal cultural coalitions that fund local initiatives, projects and programs.

FY2022 Cultural Development Program grants are for projects and activities that will occur between Sept. 1, 2021, and Aug. 31, 2022.

Grant guidelines are now posted  for a Friday, May 7, application deadline.

For more information contact Schreiner at einer@oregon.gov">aili.schreiner@oregon.gov or 503- 428-0963.

# # #

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testimony to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was established 18 years ago by the Oregon Legislature as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, rappers, acrobats and dreamers who make Oregon, Oregon. In 2017 Oregonians gave $4.9 million to the Cultural Trust, our all-time record. Sixty percent of that went straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent helped grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners, 45 County and Tribal Coalitions and qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.

 




Attached Media Files: Trust Manager Aili Schreiner (second from right) meets with grant seekers at a pre-COVID Conversations event.

Updated: Oregon reports 678 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 04/09/21 9:07 AM

April 8, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Updated: Oregon reports 678 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are five new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,439, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 678 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 168,795.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 50,429 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 27,783 doses were administered on April 7 and 22,646 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 7.

The 50,429 doses submitted to the state’s immunization tracking system on April 7 was the highest number of COVID-19 vaccine doses entered into the database on a single day since the COVID-19 vaccines began to be administered in Oregon. The 7-day running average is now 34,733 doses per day.

As of today, 824,299 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 522,780 people who have had at least one dose.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,083,978 doses of Pfizer, 971,012 doses of Moderna and 61,539 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 1,340,235 doses of Pfizer, 1,212,800 doses of Moderna and 185,500 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 168, which is three fewer than yesterday. There are 38 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is four fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (4), Clackamas (65), Clatsop (6), Columbia (10), Coos (7), Crook (4), Curry (3), Deschutes (47), Douglas (14), Gilliam (1), Grant (7), Hood River (5), Jackson (88), Jefferson (5), Josephine (27), Klamath (42), Lane (47), Lincoln (8), Linn (18), Malheur (1), Marion (48), Morrow (1), Multnomah (108), Polk (14), Tillamook (8), Umatilla (6), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (69) and Yamhill (9).

Oregon’s 2,435th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Baker County who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 3 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,436th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on March 13 and died on April 5 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,437th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on March 16 and died on April 6 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,438th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Feb. 24 and died on March 4. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,439th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on April 1 and died on April 6 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

More information is known about Oregon’s 2,403rd death, an 83-year-old man in Douglas county. He tested positive on Jan. 29 and died on March 22 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. His date of positive test and location of death were originally reported in error.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Thu. 04/08/21
Oregon Cannabis Commission sets Zoom meeting for April 21
Oregon Health Authority - 04/08/21 4:33 PM

April 8, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission sets Zoom meeting for April 21

What: A Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: Wednesday, April 21, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Conference call line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 161 280 7157.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Some SNAP recipients may see an increase in benefits in April
Oregon Department of Human Services - 04/08/21 3:37 PM

In April, some SNAP households will see a change to their benefit amount for emergency allotments (EA). The federal government has provided emergency allotments since March 2020, to give SNAP recipients additional support during the COVID-19 pandemic. SNAP households have received EA in an amount equal to the maximum benefit for the household size, minus their monthly base benefit. But this means households that are at or near the maximum SNAP benefit were receiving little or no additional support.

The April 2021 changes provide an increase in benefits to those who were previously receiving little or no EA. For example:

  • Households not currently receiving an emergency allotment will now receive an additional $95 per month.
  • Households currently receiving an emergency allotment that is less than $95 will receive an additional allotment for the difference.
  • Households currently receiving an emergency allotment of more than $95 will not see a change in their benefits.

EA benefits will be dispersed on April 13 for current SNAP households and April 30 for SNAP households who did not receive the first EA payment or who are now eligible for a minimum $95 EA payment.

SNAP recipients do not have to take any action to receive these supplemental benefits as they will be issued directly on their EBT cards. Total benefits will be different based on each household's regular monthly allotment for the month of March.

The maximum monthly SNAP benefit amounts by household size are listed below.

More information about emergency allotments is available at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/About-SNAP.aspx.

Questions about your SNAP benefits should be directed to your local office or by calling the ONE customer service center at 1-800-699-9075.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.


COVID-19 Vaccine Breakthrough Cases in Oregon
Oregon Health Authority - 04/08/21 3:02 PM

April 8, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

COVID-19 Vaccine Breakthrough Cases in Oregon

Oregon Health Authority has identified 168 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases—when vaccinated individuals test positive for the virus—through April 2, including three deaths.

OHA public health officials say it’s a reminder that while the Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines are all highly effective at preventing severe COVID-19 illness and death, no vaccine is 100% effective, and vaccine breakthrough cases will occur.

These cases have been reported in 25 counties and all health care preparedness regions (Region 1: 76; Region 2: 29; Region 3: 27; Region 5: 9; Region 6: 4; Region 7: 17; Region 9: 6). OHA is not reporting the regions in which the deaths took place.

Vaccine breakthrough cases are defined as instances in which an individual received a positive COVID-19 test result at least 14 days after the final dose of any COVID-19 vaccine series. Vaccine breakthrough cases can be prevented by basic public health interventions, such as masking, physical distancing and avoiding social gatherings.

The number of vaccine breakthrough cases identified in Oregon represents a very small proportion of the more than 700,000 people in Oregon who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Many of the vaccine breakthrough cases identified experienced asymptomatic infection and were tested for other reasons. Eleven percent (n=19) of the vaccine breakthrough cases were hospitalized within the 30 days following their positive test, and most occurred in people older than 65 or with underlying health conditions. The three deaths represent fewer than 2% of the vaccine breakthrough cases, and none of the vaccine breakthrough cases were associated with a COVID-19 variant.

State and local epidemiologists are continuing to track and investigate vaccine breakthrough cases and are working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to collect information that may provide insight into characteristics associated with vaccine breakthrough.

Healthcare preparedness regions map


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets April 14, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 04/08/21 10:52 AM

April 8, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets April 14, 2021

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: Lines for Life will present on the status of the temporary telephone ARC. The council will discuss subcommittee structure and next steps on policy development of the ARCs and Access to Care Grants.

When: Wednesday, April 14, 2021, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Where: Virtual. YouTube link with live captions (English and Spanish) https://youtu.be/Tr0bzGPmxCU

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Addiction Recovery Centers throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the centers.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brandy L. Hemsley at 971-239-2942 711 TTY or RANDY.L.HEMSLEY@dhsoha.state.or.us">brandy.l.hemsley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Portland company fined $104,000 for multiple fall protection safety violations
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/08/21 10:44 AM
Department of Consumer and Business Services logo
Department of Consumer and Business Services logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-04/1073/143942/thumb_DCBS_Logo_-_RGB.jpg

(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined a roofing and painting company in Portland $104,000 for six job safety violations, including repeatedly failing to follow the minimum requirements to protect workers from fall hazards that could kill them.

The division cited West Coast Roofing and Painting Inc. following an inspection. The inspection included an examination of work activity at a residential construction site in Portland, interviews of employees and a supervisor, and a review of the company’s recordkeeping practices.

Of the six violations Oregon OSHA cited the company for, five were repeat violations.

In one violation, the company failed to follow requirements to implement adequate fall protection systems – such as a personal fall arrest system – where workers are exposed to falling six feet or more to a lower level. The company left four employees in danger of potentially falling between approximately 11 feet and 22 feet.

The failure to comply with Oregon OSHA’s six-foot trigger-height requirements was a repeat violation by West Coast Roofing and Painting. In fact, it was the seventh such violation committed by the company since May 2018.

Under Oregon OSHA’s rules, penalties multiply when employers commit repeat offenses. In this case, the division cited West Coast Roofing and Painting $75,000 for not ensuring employees are protected from falling when working six feet or more above a lower level.

Oregon OSHA also cited the company for not ensuring that the side rails of a ladder extended at least three feet above an upper landing surface to which the ladder was used to gain access. It was the fourth violation of this rule since May 2018. Proposed penalty: $24,000.

Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry.

“There is absolutely no good reason to violate clear and time-tested fall protection standards that we know are effective at protecting employees against fall hazards,” said Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “To repeatedly fail at implementing those standards serves just one purpose: to increase the risk to workers of serious injury or death.”

The other repeat violations were the following:

  • The employer did not ensure that employees who operated or were in close proximity to an employee operating a staple gun used proper eye protection. This was the third violation since June 2019. Proposed penalty: $1,400.
  • The employer did not verify in writing that employees were trained in fall protection systems. This was the fourth violation since May 2018. Proposed penalty: $1,000.
  • The employer did not maintain proper injury and illness documents for 2019. This was the second violation. Proposed penalty: $200.

The citation also included a serious violation for not properly installing personal fall arrest system anchors. Specifically, the anchors were secured by an insufficient number of fasteners according to the manufacturer’s installation requirements. The proposed penalty is $2,400. This violation was complied with at the time of the inspection.

The citation issued against West Coast Roofing and Painting reflects appropriate penalty reductions based on the small size of the company, as well as upward adjustments based on the repeat violations.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers resources to help improve workplace safety and health. These resources include the division’s Fall Protection Suite of online video training and its A-to-Z topic page about fall protection.

Learn more about help provided by Oregon OSHA’s consultation services, technical staff, and additional education and training services.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Department of Consumer and Business Services logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Oregon Board of Forestry hosts virtual public meeting on April 21
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/08/21 9:57 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, April 21. In compliance with Gov. Kate Brown’s directive on social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19, this will be a virtual public meeting.

The meeting will be a set of information sessions. The morning session will serve as an orientation for the Board’s new members, while the afternoon will include a tour collaboration with Port Blakely, family-owned forest products company, and Bauman Tree Farm in Lane County.

The Board business agenda includes:

  • New Board member introductions
  • Department executive team, division overview, and major Board topics for 2021
  • Forestry program for Oregon goals and planning cycles

The Board virtual tour includes:

  • Forest practices incentives – Stewardship Agreements
  • Port Blakely: A stewardship story
  • Advancing shared stewardship

View the agenda for additional topics to be discussed at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Members of the public are invited to view the meeting and virtual field tour online at the link below. There will not be a live public comment opportunity, but you are welcome to send written comments to oardofForestry@oregon.gov" target="_blank">BoardofForestry@oregon.gov.   

The board packet and livestream option are available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/aboutbof.aspx.


Historic cemeteries commission to meet April 23
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/08/21 9:53 AM

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet via online meeting on April 23 at 1:00 p.m. The agenda includes discussion of historic cemetery legislation, update of online materials, and other updates. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment. 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


Hillsboro Man Wins $3.9 Million Megabucks Jackpot
Oregon Lottery - 04/08/21 9:36 AM
Oregon's Game Megabucks logo
Oregon's Game Megabucks logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-04/4939/143938/thumb_OGM_no-state.png

April 8, 2021 - Salem, Ore. – A Hillsboro man is the latest Oregon’s Game Megabucks jackpot winner, taking home a $3.9 million jackpot. Melvin Date matched all six numbers for the April 3 Megabucks drawing to win the $3.9 million jackpot.

A long-time player, Date routinely checks his tickets the day following the drawing. Using the Lottery’s mobile app, Date checked his tickets and learned he’d matched all the numbers drawn - 2-8-13-21-23-34.

Date split his prize with his son, giving his son $1 million and Date getting $2.9 million. Both Date and his son chose the one-time lump sum amount, which is one-half of each man’s total prize. The $2.9 million portion, after taxes, is $986,000. While his son’s lump sum amount is $340,000, after taxes.

Date bought his winning ticket at Beaverton Safeway on Tualatin Valley Highway.

To protect the health and safety of its employees and the public, the Oregon Lottery has temporarily closed the Salem and Wilsonville Lottery offices. Officials with the Lottery continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation closely.

Players who have winning tickets of $50,000 or more, will need to make an appointment to come to the Oregon Lottery office in Salem. Call 503-540-1000 for assistance. The Lottery also offers a drop box at the Lottery office in Salem. Players can use the drop box to submit prize claims and will receive their winnings in the mail once the claim has been processed.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org 

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Attached Media Files: Oregon's Game Megabucks logo

Wed. 04/07/21
Correction: Oregon reports 481 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 04/07/21 6:26 PM

Corrected link to the Tableau dashboard is provided.

April 7, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Correction: Oregon reports 481 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are seven new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,434, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 481 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 168,128.

Oregon Health Authority publishes COVID-19 variant dashboard

Starting today, the Oregon Health Authority is publishing a Tableau dashboard showing the cumulative count of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern or variants of interest in Oregon. (For additional information on COVID-19 variants, go here.)

The dashboard will include a map of variant cases broken down by Oregon’s seven Hospital Preparedness Program Regions, along with a time series showing variant cases in Oregon by collection date. The dashboard will be updated weekly on Wednesdays and include data through the previous Saturday. 

In order to provide a more comprehensive picture of variant circulation in Oregon, OHA will update its variant counts on the new dashboard using data from the GISAID Initiative — a publicly available scientific database for genetic sequences. This will allow OHA to rapidly report historical data whenever definitions of variants of concern or variants of interest are updated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

On March 16, the CDC reclassified the B.1.427 and B.1.429 variants as variants of concern. These variants have been circulating in Oregon since late 2020 and had not been previously reportable.

Oregon will continue to ask all laboratory partners to promptly report all variants of concern (B.1.1.7, B.1.351, P.1, B.1.427 and B.1.429) and variants of interest (B.1.525, B.1.526 and P.2) to public health authorities in order to inform case investigation and contact tracing.

OHA to report COVID-19 vaccine spoilage, mishaps

Starting this week, Oregon Health Authority began publishing weekly reports with a table representing vaccination shipping mishaps, refrigeration fluctuations, breakage and/or vaccination expiration. Updates to the table, featured below, will occur every Tuesday and be featured in this daily media release. Vaccine providers report this information to OHA through the ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

“We believe that our health system partners are managing their vaccine responsibly and doing everything that they can to minimize waste,” said OHA Chief Financial Officer Dave Baden. “At this point, considering the logistical complexity of operating large-scale vaccination programs, the small amount of wasted vaccine in Oregon is expected and not surprising. This amount is a small fraction of the more than 2 million doses that have been safely delivered, managed and injected in the arms of Oregonians.”

Oregon Update Vaccine Waste Disclosure1,2,3

Vaccine Type

Doses Recalled

Wasted/Spoiled/Expired

Grand Total

Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine

 

42

42

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

 

544

544

Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine

 

70

70

Grand Total

0

656

656

1Updated: 4/6/21 2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS) 3Data is preliminary and subject to change

Definitions

Recalled doses: Examples of recalled doses include doses that have been recalled by the manufacturer or FDA.

Wasted doses: Examples of wasted doses include doses that have been destroyed due to breakage of vials, or improperly discarded doses.

Spoiled doses: Examples of spoiled doses include doses that have been left out too long or doses involved in a refrigeration or freezer failure.

Expired doses: Examples of expired doses include doses that are past their labeled expiration dates.

It is important to remember that vaccine wastage is a normal part of distributing vaccine and occurs infrequently.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 36,104 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 24,097 doses were administered on April 6 and 12,007 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 6.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,057,696 doses of Pfizer, 952,957 doses of Moderna and 55,505 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 802,090 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,313,016 people who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 1,340,235 doses of Pfizer, 1,198,000 doses of Moderna and 170,400 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 171, which is eight more than yesterday. There are 42 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is unchanged from yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (9), Clackamas (55), Clatsop (4), Columbia (13), Coos (5), Crook (1), Deschutes (32), Douglas (11), Harney (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (23), Jefferson (1), Josephine (17), Klamath (11), Lake (2), Lane (40), Lincoln (3), Linn (21), Malheur (3), Marion (29), Morrow (3), Multnomah (92), Polk (11), Sherman (2), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (5), Union (1), Wallowa (3), Wasco (3), Washington (61) and Yamhill (10).  

Oregon’s 2,428th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on March 29 and died on April 6 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,429th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Feb. 22 and died on March 25 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,430th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on March 29 and died on March 30 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,431st COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on April 5 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,432nd COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on March 9 and died on March 30 at Kaiser Sunnyside Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,433rd COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on March 6 and died on April 5 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,434th COVID-19 death is a 48-year-old man in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on March 23 at Legacy Emanuel Hospital. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had no underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - April 7, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 04/07/21 6:10 PM
2021-04/3986/143928/50856689283_e30ecf2b3f_o.jpg
2021-04/3986/143928/50856689283_e30ecf2b3f_o.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-04/3986/143928/thumb_50856689283_e30ecf2b3f_o.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for April 7, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

Photo Captions:

White City, Ore. - April 1, 2021 - A bus transports children to and from school at Willow Estates, FEMA housing site in White City, Ore., as Lance “Duke” Davis (left), FEMA Federal Coordinating Officer, and Andrew Phelps (right), Director of Oregon Office of Emergency Management, participate in an update briefing on the Almeda Fire recovery efforts in Jackson County. Photo by FEMA 
File: DSC00309.jpg

Oregon Office of Emergency Management Wildfire Recovery Logo: Oregon Rising - Stronger Together.                                        File: OEM RISING LOGO W SUN

Phoenix, Ore. - January 20, 2021 - Crews remove ash and debris from Bear Lakes Estates Mobile Home Park. Ensuring safe housing for the Phoenix community is a big step in the recovery process. Photo by Oregon Department of Transportation          File: 50856689283_e30ecf2b3f_o.jpg




Attached Media Files: 2021-04/3986/143928/50856689283_e30ecf2b3f_o.jpg , 2021-04/3986/143928/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png , 2021-04/3986/143928/DSC00309.jpg

Weekly COVID-19 cases increase; deaths and hospitalizations rise
Oregon Health Authority - 04/07/21 4:22 PM

April 7, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Weekly COVID-19 cases increase; deaths and hospitalizations rise

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows increased daily cases and increases in hospitalizations and deaths from the previous week.

OHA reported 2,964 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, March 29 through Sunday, April 4. That represents a 21% increase from the previous week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations rose to 150, up from 137 last week.

Reported COVID-19 related deaths rose to 19, up from 10 last week.

There were 93,357 tests for COVID-19 for the week of March 28 through April 4 — an 1.4% increase from last week. The percentage of positive tests rose from 3.7% to 4.5%.

People 70 years of age and older have accounted for 40% of COVID-19 related hospitalizations and 77% of COVID-19 related deaths.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 21 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.


Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Cancellation Notice
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/07/21 3:45 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

April 7, 2021

Contact:    Mona Riesterer
                 503-378-2431

                  

                                                Notice of Meeting Canceled

The Telecommunication Policy Committee meeting scheduled for May 5, 2021 has been canceled. The next Telecommunications Policy Committee meeting is scheduled for August 4, 2021 at 9:00 a.m.


Basic Telecommunications Field Training Manual Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/07/21 3:37 PM

                                                         BT FTM Workgroup

                                                      MEETING SCHEDULED

For Immediate Release                                        

April 6, 2021

Contact:   Sara Stewart
                503-378-2424

                sara.stewart@state.or.us

Notice of Special Meeting

The BT FTM Workgroup, a subgroup of the Telecommunications Curriculum Committee, will hold a regular meeting on April 20, 2021 from 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.  The overall purpose of this meeting is to continue the revision process on the Basic Telecommunications Field Training Manual to align it with the recent revision of the BT Academy and needs in the field.  The meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.  For a link, please contact Sara Stewart at the email address listed above.  A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

  1. Check In
  2. FTM Review – Modules 7-12
  3. Modules Exercise
  4. Next Steps

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Curriculum Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Immunization Policy Advisory Team (IPAT) meets April 13 via MS Teams
Oregon Health Authority - 04/07/21 3:14 PM

April 7, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Immunization Policy Advisory Team (IPAT) meets April 13 via MS Teams

What: A meeting of the Immunization Policy Advisory Team (IPAT).

Agenda: Agenda will be available at meeting or via email request three days prior to the meeting date by contacting imm.info@state.or.us.

When: Tuesday, April 13, 2-3:30 p.m.

Where: Virtually via MS Teams meeting—see end of this announcement for more information. Register in advance at https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form/abb84a80b7be4f76a1d379eccaaca794. Registration closes at noon Monday, April 12. After registering, participants will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

For this meeting, public comment can be submitted in writing, and will be used to inform IPAT members; there will be no public comment during the meeting. Public comment will be accepted in writing until 5 p.m. April 15, 2021. Public comments will be shared with all committee members. Email comments to imm.info@state.or.us. Receipt will be confirmed, and all comments will be shared with voting members of the team.

Background: The Oregon Immunization Program works to reduce the incidence of vaccine-preventable disease in Oregon.  Our staff members seek to identify and promote evidence-based public health best practices to both the public and health care professionals throughout the state. For more information, visit the program’s website: www.healthoregon.org/IMM.

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact 711 TTY or imm.info@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting


Public Health Advisory Board meets April 15
Oregon Health Authority - 04/07/21 3:10 PM

April 7, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets April 15

What: The Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Approve March meeting minutes; discuss PHAB subcommittees; discuss Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant; discuss equity in COVID-19 response and vaccine delivery.

When: Thursday, April 15, 2-4 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call: (669) 254-5252, participant code 1609889971#.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Meth Arrest
Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) - 04/07/21 11:41 AM
2021-04/6255/143902/IMG_6414.jpg
2021-04/6255/143902/IMG_6414.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-04/6255/143902/thumb_IMG_6414.jpg

On April 6th, 2021, detectives with the Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) arrested 60 year old Robert Paul Muniain of Oakdale, California, for drug crimes related to large quantities of methamphetamine.

 

DINT detectives were following Muniain as part of an ongoing drug investigation, and with the help of the Douglas County Sheriff's Office, attempted a traffic stop on Muniain as he was driving Northbound on I-5 near Myrtle Creek.  Muniain slowed, but refused to stop initially, exiting the freeway in Myrtle Creek.  Muniain continued, traveling into the city of Myrtle Creek and as he was crossing the bridge over the South Umpqua River he threw a bag out of the vehicle window into the river below.  After throwing the item out the window Muniain complied and stopped the vehicle.  

 

A DINT detective, fearing Muniain had thrown drugs into the river, scrambled down the river bank and saw the bag floating down the river.  The detective dove into the water and swam to the bag which was still floating when he got to it.  He retrieved the bag and continued swimming to the opposite side of the river.  The bag contained approximately 472 grams of methamphetamine, which is more than 1 pound.  That is a very large amount of methamphetamine which is not a personal use amount.  For context, the typical addict would use only approximately one gram per day, on average.  

 

The detective emerged very wet and cold, but otherwise uninjured.  

 

Muniain was arrested and lodged at the Douglas County Jail on charges of Unlawful Possession and Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine.  The investigation is continuing and more charges are pending.




Attached Media Files: 2021-04/6255/143902/IMG_6414.jpg , 2021-04/6255/143902/IMG_6417.jpg , 2021-04/6255/143902/Muniain.jpeg

Updated: Oregon reports 544 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 33 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 04/07/21 10:48 AM

April 6, 2021

Oregon reports 544 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 33 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. There are 33 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,427, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 544 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 167,658.

Oregon pausing exposure notification app

This week OHA decided to pause the ongoing planning of the Exposure Notification (EN) application project rollout for Oregon to focus on vaccinations and other priority efforts to end the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the past six months, OHA has benefitted from discussions with local public health departments and other partners, which highlighted the benefits and costs of any early notification app, including the intensive efforts state and local health officials would need to undertake to promote the app and address likely gaps in its adoption across Oregon’s diverse communities, as well as the added contact tracing demands full adoption would place on county public health staff.

OHA appreciates the feedback agency staff heard from our partners working in local communities. State health officials reached the decision after consultation with Gov. Kate Brown’s office. OHA Public Health Director Rachael Banks said: “Approximately two dozen states have chosen not to deploy smartphone-based apps at this time and instead to rely on other tools to stop the spread of COVID-19. Oregon is focused on building trust with people in communities across the state to get all Oregonians vaccinated and sustain the other COVID-19 prevention practices, such as wearing a mask, staying physically distant and limiting the size and frequency of indoor social get-togethers. These strategies have prevented more than 4,000 COVID-19 deaths in our state. We’ll continue to prioritize these approaches because they remain our best bet to end the pandemic.”

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 32,955 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 21,170 doses were administered on April 5 and 11,785 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 5

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,040,314 doses of Pfizer, 938,182 doses of Moderna and 51,618 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 784,476 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,290,755 people who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 1,306,305 doses of Pfizer, 1,187,500 doses of Moderna and 168,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 163, which is 14 fewer than yesterday. There are 42 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is unchanged from yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (11), Clackamas (86), Clatsop (1), Columbia (5), Coos (10), Crook (2), Curry (2), Deschutes (35), Douglas (7), Grant (9), Harney (3), Hood River (2), Jackson (33), Jefferson (2), Josephine (12), Klamath (21), Lane (41), Lincoln (3), Linn (17), Malheur (4), Marion (36), Multnomah (68), Polk (10), Sherman (1), Tillamook (7), Umatilla (8), Union (4), Wasco (1), Washington (97) and Yamhill (2).   

Oregon’s 2,395th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 28 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,396th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Feb. 28 and died on March 15 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,397th COVID-19 death is a 36-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 5 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,398th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 5 at Bay Area Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,399th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Columbia County who tested positive on Dec. 7 and died on March 29 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,400th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Crook County who tested positive on Jan. 8 and died on March 5 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,401st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Deschutes County who tested positive on Feb. 16 and died on March 15 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,402nd COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on March 21 and died on April 3 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,403rd COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on March 21 and died on April 3 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,404th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Jan. 24 and died on Feb. 9 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,405th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Jan. 19 and died on Feb. 10 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,406th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on March 12 and died on March 17 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,407th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old woman in Josephine County who tested positive on March 10 and died on March 19 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,408th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Jefferson County who tested positive on Jan. 9 and died on Feb. 11 at St. Charles Bend hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,409th COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Jan. 1 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,410th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Feb. 22 and died on March 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,411st COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on March 23 and died on March 28 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,412nd COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 24 and died on Feb. 11 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,413rd COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 15 and died on March 8 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,414th COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on March 8 and died on March 22 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,415th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on March 10 and died on March 20 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,416th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Jan. 19 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,417th COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old woman in Polk County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on March 14 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,418th COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Feb. 2 and died on April 3 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,419th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Wasco County who tested positive on Jan. 20 and died on Jan. 27 at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,420th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on March 27 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,421st COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Feb. 25 and died on March 2 at OHSU Health Hillsboro Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,422nd COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Washington County who died on March 23 at Providence Portland Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,423rd COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Washington County who died on March 22 at Providence Portland Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,424th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Feb. 26 and died on March 21 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,425th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Feb. 26 and died on March 6 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,426th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Yamhill County who tested positive on Feb. 26 and died on March 18 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,427th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Yamhill County who tested positive on Nov. 19 and died on Jan. 26 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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PPAO Welcomes An Do as Executive Director
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 04/07/21 8:58 AM
2021-04/3856/143897/An_Do.jpg
2021-04/3856/143897/An_Do.jpg
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The Board of Directors for Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon (PPAO) is pleased to announce that An Do (she/her) will be the organization’s next Executive Director. She has served PPAO in an interim capacity since January.

“We are thrilled that An Do will lead the organization as we begin a new chapter toward full control of our bodies, our rights, our democracy and our futures,” says PPAO Board Chair Beverly Pearman. “Access to sexual and reproductive health care are inextricably tied to health and safety during the pandemic, and Oregonians are fortunate to have a champion for social justice in this role. We must continue to expand access to sexual and reproductive health care, to combat inequities and to fight for the next generation.”

Do previously served as PPAO’s Political Director, most recently getting abortion, family planning and gender-affiming care defined as essential services during the COVID-19 pandemic and leading a successful 2020 election cycle that unseated right-wing legislators in Bend and Salem and flipped the Secretary of State’s seat to a pro-sexual and reproductive healthcare champion. Before that, she directed communications for No Cuts to Care, the campaign that decisively defeated the anti-abortion Ballot Measure 106. She has volunteered as a Planned Parenthood clinic escort, as a PPAO Legislative and Policy Fellow and as a member of the Multnomah County Leadership & Advocacy Team. In 2018, she received PPAO’s highest honor for volunteer excellence.

Prior to her political and advocacy work, Do worked in direct services as a social worker in alternative high schools in Brooklyn and Portland supporting young people at risk of aging out of the public education system. She also has extensive private-sector experience in business development, recruiting and operations. Do holds a master’s degree in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University and a bachelor’s degree in English from University of California at Berkeley. 

“Planned Parenthood is not just a place where people go to be empowered to take care of their bodies, it is the place people come to be empowered through their bodies,” Do says. “Whether it is choosing a method of birth control, getting aboriton care or accessing gender-affirming care, the ability to claim and actualize one’s bodily autonomy is a potent form of agency and reclamation of power.

“As the daughter of Vienamese refugees, my family lived at the intersection of the social, racial, gender, economic and reproductive justice issues that I fight for. I am honored to be entrusted with leading this organization in this movement to go beyond reproductive freedom toward liberation and a future where every person has the rights, recognition and resources to be the authors of their own destiny — to chart and live their fullest lives in safe and thriving communities.”




Attached Media Files: 2021-04/3856/143897/An_Do.jpg

Milwaukie is named Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2021
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/07/21 8:07 AM
Milwaukie has been honored for its commitment to urban forestry by being named Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2021.
Milwaukie has been honored for its commitment to urban forestry by being named Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2021.
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MILWAUKIE, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) in partnership with Oregon Community Trees (OCT) has named Milwaukie as Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2021. Each year, ODF and OCT select one of Oregon’s nationally recognized Tree City USA communities statewide to award for that city’s commitment to its urban forest. Last year’s Oregon Tree City of the Year was Grants Pass.

OCT President Samantha Wolf said the award is intended to highlight communities delivering best urban forestry practices to their residents. “Residents of Milwaukie have an improved quality of life because they live in a healthy urban forest. This award recognizes the efforts the City of Milwaukie makes to ensure its urban forest continues providing a wide range of social, health and ecological benefits far into the future.”

Milwaukie Mayor Mark Gamba said of his city receiving the honor, "It's deeply gratifying that all the hard work that Peter Passarelli, our public works director, Julian Lawrence, our urban forester, and our tree board have done to preserve our existing trees and meet our goal of nearly doubling our tree canopy, has been recognized with this important award.”

According to ODF’s Urban and Community Forestry Assistance Program Manager Kristin Ramstad, “Milwaukie is a fine example of what a Tree City USA can be. They have only been a Tree City USA for five years and already they’ve earned two Tree City USA Growth Awards for building their community forestry program. For example, the Milwaukie Public Works Department created a dedicated natural resource team, including an International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Certified Arborist, to provide technical expertise and guidance. The team closely collaborates with the Milwaukie Tree Board, a community member-staffed advisory committee created in 2017 to assist the city council on tree actions.”

Ramstad said Milwaukie’s urban forest team has worked nonstop in recent years to reach Milwaukie’s canopy goal. “The city has developed new urban forest webpages to provide resources and educational materials on trees to the community, and to connect interested volunteers with local organizations improving habitat and ecosystems in Milwaukie.”

She said the city’s urban forest team hosts a popular Arbor Day celebration each year, featuring tree giveaways, ceremonial tree plantings, and community plantings with local organizations, such as Friends of Trees.

“Also popular on Arbor Day are tours of the city’s new greenhouses, where Milwaukie’s urban forester grows experimental tree species whose seeds he collected on a trip to California in search of climate-change adapted trees,” Ramstad said.

Especially important has been the amount of work the city has done to put tree preservation and planting at the forefront of planning documents.  All of these efforts contributed to Milwaukie being named Oregon Tree City of the Year.

“Milwaukie has prioritized trees in our city vision, our Climate Action Plan and our recently passed Comprehensive Plan,” said Mayor Gamba. “We recognize that trees increase property values, reduce heat island effect, absorb storm water, store carbon and improve human health and well-being.  We are investing, at unprecedented levels, in our tree canopy for future generations of the residents of Milwaukie.

“I'd like to thank Oregon Community Trees and the Oregon Department of Forestry for this recognition," Mayor Gamba said.

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Attached Media Files: Milwaukie has been honored for its commitment to urban forestry by being named Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2021.

Tue. 04/06/21
Housing Stability Council Meeting - April 6, 2021
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 04/06/21 2:27 PM

April 6, 2021

The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be today Tuesday, April 6th, 2021 from 4:00 PM to 4:30 PM. The meeting will be held electronically due to the current COVID-19 health crisis. Please register for access link.

 

Webinar Meeting Only

Public register in advance for this webinar:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_86jvcAXwQ56pq0A2GtqMgQ

 

AGENDA:

4:00 Meeting Called to Order - Roll Call 

4:05 Affordable Rental Housing Division

  • MF Housing Transactions

4:30 Meeting Adjourned


Grants Pass restaurant fined $17,900 for COVID-19 violations, including willfully exposing workers
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 04/06/21 12:25 PM
Department of Consumer and Business Services logo
Department of Consumer and Business Services logo
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(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined Gold Miner Restaurant in Grants Pass $17,900 for violating two standards designed to protect employees from the coronavirus disease. In one of the infractions, the employer willfully continued to potentially expose workers to the virus, despite a public health order limiting the capacity of indoor dining to zero in an “extreme risk” county.

The citation resulted from an inspection launched in response to multiple complaints and a referral from Josephine County Public Health. The inspection documented the fact that Gold Miner Restaurant was willfully allowing indoor dining on or about Feb. 14 and continuing to do so afterward until March 12.

During that time, Josephine County was designated an “extreme risk” for transmission of the coronavirus disease. On March 12, the county’s risk level was lowered from “extreme” to “high.” During the inspection, the restaurant’s owner, Nancie Bowers, said she was aware that allowing indoor dining during the extreme risk period went against workplace health requirements.

Using his discretionary authority under state law, Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood imposed a $17,800 penalty for the willful violation. That is twice the minimum penalty for such a violation. The decision reflects the need to ensure a more appropriate deterrent effect where employers insist on disregarding health and safety standards.

Such willful behavior puts employees at risk and enables the employer to achieve a competitive advantage over businesses that comply with the requirements.

“Most employers continue to comply with workplace health and safety standards that are specifically designed to reduce the risk of COVID-19. Yet, some have insisted on a different path, one that potentially puts workers at risk,” said Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “In those cases, we will continue to seek accountability through our enforcement work.”

Altogether, Oregon OSHA cited two violations of the division’s temporary rule to address COVID-19 risks in the workplace:

  • In allowing indoor dining, Gold Miner Restaurant knowingly chose to disregard capacity limitations imposed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for such establishments in a county designated as extreme risk. The willful violation carried a discretionary penalty of $17,800.
  • The employer failed to follow OHA requirements to ensure that all workers inside the establishment wore a source control device, such as a mask, face covering, or face shield. It was a serious violation, carrying a $100 penalty.

Ongoing refusals to correct violations and come into compliance with workplace health and safety standards can lead to additional higher penalties. Meanwhile, if an Oregon OSHA inspection documents violations while a county is at extreme risk, but the county’s risk level drops before the citation is issued, the citation will still be issued. The change in risk levels may affect how the violation needs to be corrected, but not whether it is cited.

Employers have 30 days to appeal citations.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers a variety of consultation, information, and education resources addressing COVID-19.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Department of Consumer and Business Services logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Know what's below before you hoe
Pacific Power - 04/06/21 9:52 AM

Media hotline: 503-813-6018                                                            

 

Know what’s below before you hoe
Be safe during April’s National Safe Digging Month and call 8-1-1 first to find any underground utilities that could endanger you

 

PORTLAND, Ore. April 6, 2021— Every six seconds in America someone risks their life by striking an underground utility line. Pacific Power urges customers to protect themselves and their families and change this alarming statistic with one simple act: dialing 8-1-1 two days before doing any digging.

 

“Installing a mailbox or post for a deck or planting a tree are among the many commonplace projects that should trigger a call to 8-1-1,” said Joe Cissna, Pacific Power’s director of safety and training, referring to the national toll-free Call Before You Dig phone number. “Those may seem like simple, harmless maintenance projects, but the hazards are very real. Hitting a buried electric line could even be fatal. It’s that simple.”

 

A national survey recently found that 45%of residents planning a digging project fail to call 8-1-1. That means thousands will put themselves and their communities at risk by not calling 8-1-1 a few days beforehand to learn the approximate location of underground utilities.

 

According to a national survey of homeowners conducted in March by Common Ground Alliance (CGA), an association dedicated to promoting public safety related to excavation issues, the most popular planned projects by homeowners who plan to dig include:

 

  • Planting a tree or shrub (47%)
  • Building a patio or deck (24%)
  • Building a fence (21%)
  • Installing a mailbox (8%)

 

Pacific Power and its sister utility in the mountain states have approximately 20,000 miles of underground cable in the West. In the United States nearly 20 million miles of underground utility lines exist, including gas, water, sewer, cable TV, high-speed Internet, and landline telephone lines. But if you don’t know where they are buried before you dig, you are in danger. Even if you are lucky enough to not be harmed, you could be responsible for causing a service outage in your neighborhood—and potentially be responsible for the substantial repair cost

If you are planning a job that requires digging, even if hiring a professional, a call to 8-1-1 is required before work begins. The 8-1-1 service is free and couldn’t be easier. It’s a Federal Communications Commission-designated national one-call number that connects a caller from anywhere in the country to the appropriate local one-call center. The one-call center then alerts local underground facility owners so they can mark the approximate location of their lines with paint or flags.

 

To learn more about electrical safety or to order free electrical safety materials, visit pacificpower.net/safety.
 

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About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 770,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. Our goal is to provide our customers with value for their energy dollar, and safe, reliable electricity. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 1.9 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.


Missing person UPDATE (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 04/06/21 9:30 AM
Rear of vehicle
Rear of vehicle
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-04/6530/143861/thumb_MERZ_2.JPG

UPDATE

Nanci Dean has been located and is safe. Thank you for your assistance. 

The Grants Pass Police Department is requesting assistance from the public in locating Nanci M. Dean.  Nanci has dementia and was last seen in the area of Verizon on Union Ave. in Grants Pass.  Nanci left in a brown 2015 Mercedes Benz, Oregon plates of 852HZS.  Photos of Nanci are attached, as well as the vehicle she is believed to be operating. If you have seen Nanci, please contact this agency at 541-450-6260.  




Attached Media Files: Rear of vehicle , 2015 MB brown , 2019 FB photo , N. Dean DMV Photo

Marine Board Meeting Virtually April 14
Oregon Marine Board - 04/06/21 9:27 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board will be meeting virtually using Microsoft Teams on April 14, beginning at 8:30 am.

Agenda items include:

  • Director’s Agency Report
  • Facilities Grant 1672, Westport: for Board approval
  • Facilities Grant 1640, Port of Arlington Cost Increase: for Board approval
  • Marine Law Enforcement Program: informational
  • Veterans Outreach: informational
  • Consideration for Rulemaking OAR 250-020-0204, Boat Operations in Klamath County, creates a slow no-wake zone in a small cove of Crescent Lake: option to adopt rules
  • Maintenance Assistance Program Grant Rules: for Board approval

Written public comment will be accepted until the end of day on April 12, 2021 and can be emailed to .cooper@oregon.gov">jennifer.cooper@oregon.gov or by U.S. Mail to Oregon State Marine Board, Attn: Jennifer Cooper, 435 Commercial St NE Ste 400 Salem, OR 97301.

Verbal comments will be accepted during the public comment portion at the beginning of the virtual meeting. If you would like to provide oral testimony during the meeting, register with Jennifer Cooper, .cooper@oregon.gov">jennifer.cooper@oregon.gov, no later than 8:00 am on April 12, 2021.

To view the agenda and Board materials, visit https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx. Viewing on Teams may require the installation of a free Teams app for mobile devices.

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The Marine Board is directly funded by boaters in the form of registration, title, and permit fees, as well as through marine fuel taxes. No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees support the boating public through boating safety services (on-the-water law enforcement, training, and equipment), boating safety education, grants for the construction and maintenance of boating access facilities, and environmental protection programs. For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit boat.oregon.gov.


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Crypto Investment Scams
FBI - Oregon - 04/06/21 9:00 AM
TT - Crypto investment scams - GRAPHIC - April 6, 2021
TT - Crypto investment scams - GRAPHIC - April 6, 2021
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against cryptocurrency investment scams. 

Cryptocurrency itself is perfectly legal to buy and use in the U.S. In fact, many mainstream companies are now accepting cryptocurrency for goods and services. What we are seeing, though, is an increase in bad actors who are using old style scams to steal this new-style virtual asset. 

In recent months, we’ve had more people report to us that they are losing anywhere from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of dollars in investment scams. Here are some scenarios: 

You see the value of cryptocurrencies going up and decide you want to invest, but don’t know how. You find a “trader” online who offers to exchange your cash for whatever brand of crypto you want to buy. He says you just need to pay a commission. When you see the value go up, you try to withdraw the funds… but your “trader” demands a new out-of-pocket commission or just quits responding to you all together. 

In another scenario, someone approaches you posing as a currency investor. He says he will help you get started – but instead of transferring your initial investment into a legitimate trading account, he sends you the link to his own digital wallet. You basically just transferred your money into his personal account. He demands an even bigger payment if you want to ever see your initial “investment” back. 

In a third scenario, the investor is running a Ponzi scheme. You get regular reports of incredibly high returns and increasing wealth. You might even get a partial payout occasionally, but there are always more requests for additional loans or investments. There are often promises of payments in a few weeks or months, but in the end, you end up losing almost everything. 

How to protect yourself: 

  • Do your research. Look for reputable sources to explain what cryptocurrency is, how to buy it, how to trade it, and how to use it. 

  • Don’t respond to unsolicited offers or click on links you may receive through email, texts, or social media. 

  • Never share your private wallet key with anyone. This key is all that is standing between you and someone trying to take your money. 

Of importance, you need to understand that if you lose funds through a cryptocurrency investment scam, it will be difficult – if not impossible – to recover your funds.  

If you believe are a victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at?www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.?? 

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Attached Media Files: TT - Crypto investment scams - AUDIO - April 6, 2021 , TT - Crypto investment scams - GRAPHIC - April 6, 2021

Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee meeting on April 9 canceled
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/06/21 8:50 AM

The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee’s scheduled meeting for April 9 has been canceled by Chair David Yamamoto.

The next meeting of the FTLAC is scheduled for May 28, and is set to be held virtually.


Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee meeting on April 9 canceled
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/06/21 8:36 AM

The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee’s scheduled meeting for April 9 has been canceled by Chair David Yamamoto.

The next meeting of the FTLAC is scheduled for May 28, and is set to be held virtually.