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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Wed. Nov. 13 - 8:46 am
Wed. 11/13/19
Forest Stewardship Coordinating Committee meets Nov. 18 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/13/19 7:41 AM

SALEM, Ore. – The Forest Stewardship Coordinating Committee will meet Monday, Nov. 18, from 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. in the Tillamook Room, Building C on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Salem headquarters campus, 2600 State Street.

The committee will discuss the following topics:

  • Forest Legacy Program updates
  • Updates from the Private Forests Division
  • State Forest Action Plan updates
  • Stewardship Program updates
  • Coordinating with the Committee for Family Forestlands

This is a public meeting, everyone is welcome. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. For more information about attending the meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The Forest Stewardship Coordinating Committee advises the State Forester on policy and procedures for the U.S. Forest Service State and Private Forestry programs, such as Forest Legacy and Forest Stewardship. The committee consists of representatives from state and federal natural resource agencies, private forest landowners, consulting foresters, and forest industry and conservation organizations. You can find more information at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SCC.aspx.

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Parking fee waived at Oregon State Parks Nov. 29 for annual Green Friday event
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/13/19 7:00 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians to ditch the shopping bags and lace up their hiking boots to celebrate “Green Friday” Nov. 29. OPRD will waive day-use parking fees that day in 25 state parks across Oregon. 

“Fall weather brings a different flavor to many state parks and we’re encouraging folks to get outside and explore,” said Lisa Sumption, OPRD director. “This is our fifth year celebrating Green Friday and we’re excited to continue the post-holiday tradition.”

Parking is free year-round at almost all state parks; the waiver applies to the 25 parks that charge $5 daily for parking. The waiver applies from open to close on Nov. 29, except at Shore Acres State Park, where it expires at 3 p.m. for the Holiday Lights event that runs Thanksgiving through New Year's Eve. A list of parks that charge the $5 parking fee is available online.

Learn more about Oregon State Parks on oregonstateparks.org.

Editors: follow the link for an online gallery of fall photos from Oregon State Parks: link. Feel free to download and use any photos; credit Oregon State Parks.


Tue. 11/12/19
Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee meets November 14
Oregon Health Authority - 11/12/19 4:40 PM

November 12, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee meets November 14

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee (HPQMC).

When: November 14, 1-3:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center, Loop E., Wilsonville. The public also may join remotely through a webinar and listen-only conference line at 877-336-1828, access code 9657836.

Agenda: Welcome and roll call/introductions; review agenda and approve minutes; discussion: extend meeting time to three hours beginning in December; public comment 1:20-1:30 p.m.; update from obesity evidence-based measure development workgroup; update on health equity measure development work; Oregon’s health system transformation; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

 

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.u">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.u, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets November 15
Oregon Health Authority - 11/12/19 4:30 PM

November 12, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets November 15

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: November 15, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 775, Transformation Training Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. The public also may join remotely through a webinar and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; committee feedback on HPQMC new and innovative measures criteria; public testimony (10-10:10 a.m.); performance improvement projects (PIPs); 2020 continuous enrollment specifications; kindergarten readiness strategy update; equity measure update; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.u, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Umatilla Man Sentenced to 37 Months in Federal Prison for Brutal Assault of Significant Other
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/12/19 4:20 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Jared Elias Case, 26, of Umatilla, Oregon, was sentenced today to 37 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release after repeatedly assaulting his significant other.

According to court documents, on July 19, 2018, Case punched his then-significant other in the face, breaking her nose and causing other injuries. Case was charged and later convicted of fourth-degree misdemeanor assault in Umatilla County Circuit Court and a domestic abuse protection order was issued by the Umatilla Tribal Court. The protection order prohibited Case from having contact with the crime victim pending a full hearing.

One month later, on August 22, 2018, Case went to a party with the crime victim in violation of the protection order. He began drinking and started arguing with her. While she was seated in a chair, Case put his hands around her neck and strangled her until she blacked out. When she regained consciousness, she got up to leave. Case followed her outside, grabbed her by the shoulders and repeatedly punched her in the face until she again lost consciousness. Case fled, abandoning the crime victim who was lying unconscious in a driveway. He later turned himself in to the Umatilla Tribal Police Department.

On July 9, 2019, Case pleaded guilty to one count of assault by strangulation. As part of his plea agreement, Case will pay restitution his victim as ordered by the court. A restitution hearing has been scheduled for February 10, 2020.

This case was investigated by the Umatilla Tribal Police Department and FBI Portland’s Safe Trails Task Force. It was prosecuted by Jennifer Martin, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Domestic violence is a serious violent crime that includes both physical and emotional abuse. It is frequently hidden from public view. Many survivors suffer in silence, afraid to seek help or not knowing where to turn. The traumatic effects of domestic violence also extend beyond the abused person, impacting family members and communities.

If you or someone you know are in immediate danger, please call 911.

If you need assistance or know someone who needs help, please contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233). Many communities throughout the country have developed support networks to assist survivors in the process of recovery.

The StrongHearts Native Helpline offers culturally specific support and advocacy for American Indian and Alaska Native survivors of domestic violence. Please call 1-844-762-8483 or visit www.strongheartshelpline.org for more information.

The Safe Trails Task Force (STTF) unites FBI and federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies in a collaborative effort to combat the growth of crime in Indian Country. STTF allows participating agencies to combine limited resources and increase investigative coordination in Indian Country to target violent crime, drugs, gangs and gaming violations.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Governor's Task Force on the Outdoors meets Nov. 15 in Klamath Falls
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/12/19 2:23 PM

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. – The Governor’s Task Force on the Outdoors will hold their fifth meeting of the year 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Nov. 15 at Running Y Ranch, 5500 Running Y Road, Klamath Falls. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: agreeing on a process timeline, including an overview of outcomes from future meetings; refining strategic plan framework and reviewing actions; consideration of adding a fourth strategic goal; and time for public comments. View the full agenda online.

The meeting is the latest in a planned series; subsequent meetings will be held throughout Oregon. The group met for their inaugural meeting in May at Silver Falls State Park, near Silverton. 

Gov. Brown established the task force earlier this year, with the directive to explore long-term strategies for elevating outdoor recreation in the state. Task force members were appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. The governor tapped the Office of Outdoor Recreation, established in 2017 within the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), to guide the task force.

The task force is composed of private and public sector representatives and is chaired by Commissioner Jon Blasher of the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. Cailin O'Brien-Feeney, director of the Office of Outdoor Recreation, will manage the task force. View the full membership list online: oregon.gov/orec/Pages/Governors-Task-Force.aspx.

Building on and uniting other statewide outdoor recreation efforts, the task force will deliver its final report in April 2020 on recommendations for legislation, investment of existing public and private resources, future funding, and high-level management strategies. Top recommendations will be presented to the governor, state legislature and the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Carrie Lovellette, OPRD support specialist, Carrie.Lovellette@oregon.gov or 503-986-0733 at least three days in advance.


DPSST Criminal Justice Background Investigation Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 11/12/19 1:39 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

November 12, 2019

Contact:  Linsay Hale   
               (503) 378-2427

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Criminal Justice Background Investigation Workgroup will hold a meeting on November 19, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Linsay Hale at (503) 378-2427.

Teleconference Information:

Call-In: 888-273-3658

Access Code: 4711910

Agenda Items:

  1. Issues/Discussion Points (Continued)

  Presented by Linsay Hale

  • Establishing/Defining Moral Fitness for Applicants
  • Process for Reviewing Professional Standards Cases involving Applicants
  • Fingerprint-Based Criminal History Checks: Employment vs. Certification
  • Disclosing Records from Previous Employment – CA/CO Laws

2. Next Workgroup Meeting: TBD

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by the Criminal Justice Background Investigation Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have -disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Boat Registration Renewal Notices Mailed (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 11/12/19 9:22 AM
Options and instructions to renew your boat registration
Options and instructions to renew your boat registration
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/4139/129221/thumb_RenewalInstructions2021.jpg

The Oregon State Marine Board mailed approximately 37,000 boat registration renewal notices to boaters whose motorboat registration expires on December 31, 2019.  Each renewal notice is unique to the owner and their boat. Additionally, registration renewals will also be sent electronically to 38,000 boat owners with emails on file in an effort to encourage online renewal.      

Renewing online using the Marine Board’s online store is fast and easy.  After completing the transaction, boat owners can print a temporary permit and go boating right away.  There is no transaction fee when using a credit or debit card online.  Another option is to mail the payment and coupon to the Marine Board. Registration decals are mailed within 7-10 business days from the date of receipt but may take an additional 2-4 weeks to arrive by US Mail.

Any watercraft with a motor or sailboats 12 feet or longer are required to title and register with the Marine Board. Registration fees vary based on boat length. The average boat length in Oregon is 16 feet, so the cost of a two-year registration is $100.20. 

Boat owners who renew their boat registration online receive their registration decals through the mail, faster. This method is also more cost-efficient, allowing the agency to leverage registration dollars toward boating facility improvement projects and on-water marine law enforcement services. Fees also support the aquatic invasive species prevention and abandoned derelict vessel programs

Access the online store directly at https://www.boatoregon.com/store. View the registration fee table at https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/Pages/Boat-Fees.aspx.

###

The Marine Board is directly funded by boaters in the form of registration, title, and permit fees, as well as through marine fuel taxes. No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees support the boating public through boating safety services (on-the-water law enforcement, training, and equipment), boating safety education, grants for the construction and maintenance of boating access facilities, and environmental protection programs. For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.




Attached Media Files: Options and instructions to renew your boat registration

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense for Military Families (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 11/12/19 9:00 AM
TT - Veterans Scams - November 23, 2019 - GRAPHIC
TT - Veterans Scams - November 23, 2019 - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3585/129214/thumb_Slide1.jpeg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment.? Today:? Building a digital defense ?for those who have given so much to defend our country.? 

Veterans Day allows us to celebrate the service of U.S. military members and honor the sacrifices that they – and their families – have made. It is also a time to educate military families about those who wish to profit off their service.  

Unfortunately, military families may be more vulnerable to scams than the average American. A 2018 study by the Federal Trade Commission showed service members lost more than $25 million to just imposter scams over the course of a year. The median loss for a military member: about $700… $200 more than the median loss for the average person. 

Imposter fraud is a pretty simple scam. The bad guy pretends to be someone else, gains your trust, and convinces you to send money. He can pose as a potential employer offering a much-needed job, a lottery official promising a big prize, or even a government agent threatening arrest. No matter who he impersonates, his goal is to always get you to pay up. 

What can you do to protect yourself? 

  • Be wary of any call from someone claiming to be from the government who requests personal info or money. 

  • Think twice before paying any supposed debt or fee with a wire transfer or gift card.  

  • Don’t trust caller ID or the name on the email address or user ID. All can be faked. 

  • If in doubt, call the business or agency back from a publicly-available number to confirm what you’ve been offered or threatened with. 

Finally – some good news for veterans. Our friends at the FTC announced just a few weeks ago that the three major U.S. consumer reporting agencies will soon start offering free credit monitoring to active duty U.S. military members and members of the National Guard. To qualify as an active duty member – you must be assigned away from your usual duty station. All members of the National Guard will qualify regardless of where you are stationed. 

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at? www.IC3.gov ?or call your local FBI office.? 

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These are the links service members can use to access the credit reporting agencies' military programs:

https://www.experian.com/lp/military.html 

https://www.equifax.com/personal/military-credit-monitoring/ 

https://www.transunion.com/active-duty-military-credit-monitoring 




Attached Media Files: TT - Veterans Scams - November 12, 2019 - AUDIO , TT - Veterans Scams - November 23, 2019 - GRAPHIC

Single Vehicle versus Pedestrian Fatal Crash on I-84- Sherman County
Oregon State Police - 11/12/19 8:53 AM

On Monday, November 11, 2019 at approximately 5:45 pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash involving a pedestiran on I-84 near MP 104.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a red and white 2016 Peterbilt Commerical Motor Vehicle, operated by Keith Allen Hille, age 31, of Moscow Mills, Missouri, was traveling westbound on I-84 in the slow lane, when he noticed a reflective vest moving around in the lane of travel. He initially thought the vest was blowing around then realized the vest was being worn by a pedestrian, identified as Alejandro Lozano Rivas, age 33, of Biggs Junction, Oregon. Hille swerved to avoid Lozano Rivas, but was unable to avoid striking him. Lozano Rivas suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. Hille stopped immediately after the collison and is cooperating with the investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Sherman County Sheriff's Office, the Sherman County District Attorney's Office and ODOT.  


Mon. 11/11/19
Oregon National Guardsmen participate in Veterans Day events (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 11/11/19 5:35 PM
2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-PL933-003.jpg
2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-PL933-003.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/962/129210/thumb_191111-Z-PL933-003.jpg

SALEM, Ore. - Members of the Oregon National Guard participated in Veterans Day ceremonies and special events around the State of Oregon, honoring the service of military veterans of the armed forces, Nov. 11, 2019. 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

191111-Z-CM403: Oregon Army National Guard Col. Alan Gronewold, Director of Aviation and Safety for the Oregon National Guard, delivers remarks to veterans and guest attending the Vietnams Day ceremony held at the Vietnam Era Veterans Memorial, Canby, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. Gronewold served as the guest speaker for the ceremony. (National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-CM403-170: Two U.S. Air Force F-15 Eagle fighter jets, assigned to the 142nd Fighter Wing base at the Portland Air National Guard Base, perform a Veterans Day ceremonial flyover at the Vietnam Era Veterans Memorial, Canby, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. (National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-LM216-001: Veterans, and members of Mt. Angel American Legion Post #89 color guard post the colors during a Veterans Day celebration hosted by post #89, Mt. Angel, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. Veterans Day began 100 years ago as "Armistice Day" on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. (National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Zach Holden, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-LM216-002: Veterans observe as the colors are posted during a Veterans Day celebration hosted by the Mt. Angel American Legion post #89, Mt. Angel, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. Veterans Day began 100 years ago as "Armistice Day" on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. (National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Zach Holden, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-LM216-003: Oregon Air National Guard Lt. Col James E. McDonald (left), deputy director of the Oregon National Guard's State Partnership Program, speaks with Col. (ret.) William Mercer Harris IV, during a Veterans Day celebration hosted by the Mt. Angel American Legion post #89, Mt. Angel, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. Mercer, a veteran with 40 years of service, started flying bombers with the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II, and later flew fighter jets with the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War. (National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Zach Holden, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-PL933-002: Oregon National Guard Full-time Support Chaplain, Maj. Cody Roach, leads a crowd of gathered veterans, family members and others during the traditional moment of silence and playing of taps during the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs ceremonial wreath laying on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2019. (National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-PL933-003: Oregon National Guard Full-time Support Chaplain, Maj. Cody Roach, leads a crowd of gathered veterans, family members and others during the traditional moment of silence and playing of taps during the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs ceremonial wreath laying on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2019. (National Guard photo by, Tech. Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-AJ128-1001: 2nd Battalion, 218th Field Artillery, Oregon Army National Guard perform a gun salute during the Albany Veterans Day Memorial Service at Timber-Linn Park on Nov. 11, 2019. The Service consisted of guest speakers; Albany Mayor Sharon Konopa and Oregon Army National Guard Col. Karl Pond, laying of the Gold Star and POW/MIA wreaths, and a detachment of "Oregon's Own" 234th Band Army National Guard playing all the military service songs. (National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)

191111-Z-AJ128-1002: A Color Guard team and members of the Oregon Army National Guard assemble and stand ready to participate and march in the Albany Veterans Day Parade in Albany, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. The Parade is largest Veterans Day Parade ‘West of the Mississippi River,’ and the third largest in the country. The first Albany Veterans Parade stated in 1951 and the Oregon National Guard has been a part a central part from the beginning. (National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)

191111-Z-AJ128-1003: A team member of the 102nd Civil Support Team (WMD) Oregon National Guard “High-Fives” many of the spectators watching the Albany Veterans Day Parade, Albany, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. The mission of the 102nd Civil Support Team is to support civil authorities at domestic chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive (CBRNE) incident sites by identifying, assessing, advising and assisting during incidents involving the intentional or unintentional release of CBRNE. (National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-PL933-003.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-PL933-002.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-LM216-003.jpeg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-LM216-002.jpeg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-LM216-001.jpeg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-CM403-170.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-CM403-122.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-AJ128-1003.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-AJ128-1002.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-AJ128-1001.jpg

OHA reassigns Oregon Health Plan members in 5 counties to new coordinated care organizations for 2020 to preserve access to care
Oregon Health Authority - 11/11/19 3:28 PM

November 11, 2020

Contact: Robb Cowie, 503-421-7684; obb.cowie@dhsoha.state.or.us"> robb.cowie@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA reassigns Oregon Health Plan members in 5 counties to new coordinated care organizations for 2020 to preserve access to care

Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members in 5 counties will be reassigned to different coordinated care organizations (CCOs), when new contracts for Medicaid health plans begin on January 1, 2020. The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is moving members because the CCOs to which some OHP members were originally assigned (or members had chosen during the current member choice period) do not have health care provider contracts in place to serve them.

The changes include:

  • Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties: Trillium Community Health Plan will be ineligible to enroll members until at least April 1, 2020. All members currently slated to be enrolled in Trillium beginning January 1, 2020 (approximately 40,000 members) will be reassigned to Health Share of Oregon, the other CCO that is contracted to operate in the tri-counties at the start of 2020. The Oregon Health Authority is taking this action because Trillium Community Health Plan does not have a hospital in its provider network.
    • On November 8, 2019, the Oregon Health Authority notified Trillium Community Health Plan that the CCO will have until June 30, 2020 to contract with a hospital and meet other network requirements. If not, the CCO would lose its ability to serve the tri-county region over the next 5 years.
  • Jackson County: More than 10,000 members of AllCare CCO will be reassigned to Jackson Care Connect CCO, starting January 1, 2020. Members will be shifted between CCOs to preserve their current provider relationships: the provider network that currently serves the AllCare members affected by this change will no longer have a primary care contract with AllCare at the start of the new year, but will continue to contract with Jackson Care Connect. AllCare will retain OHP members who are served by other providers in Jackson County.
  • Lane County: Members of Trillium Community Health Plan who are served by a primary care provider network, which will no longer have a contract with the CCO in 2020, will be moved to Pacific Source of Lane County. The move is effective January 1, 2020. This change will ensure members continue to have access to their current providers. Trillium will continue to serve other OHP members in Lane County who are not affected by this change in Trillium’s Lane county network.

OHA will notify all affected members of changes in their enrollment in coming weeks, before new CCO contracts take effect on January 1, 2020.

OHA Director Patrick Allen said, “Our top priority during the transition to new CCO contracts has been to make sure OHP members continue to have access to high-quality, well-coordinated health care. OHP members depend on their CCOs to offer the doctors, counselors and other providers they need to ensure health and well-being for themselves, their families and their communities. We are doing everything we can to make sure nothing disrupts those vital provider relationships.”

On July 9, 2019, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced its intent to award 15 organizations contracts to serve as coordinated care organizations (CCOs) for the Oregon Health Plan’s nearly 1 million members. CCOs have been undergoing “readiness review,” which includes examination of their updated provider networks, since the summer. CCOs signed new contracts, totaling more than $6 billion for the 2020 contract year, prior to October 1, 2020. Contracts remain contingent on successful completion of the readiness review process.

About coordinated care organizations: Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures.


M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Honors Standout Educators and Students in Science Fields
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 11/11/19 11:13 AM

Contact: Colby Reade, APR

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

yr@murdocktrust.org">colbyr@murdocktrust.org

360.694.8415

 

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Honors Standout Educators and Students in Science Fields

 

Pacific Lutheran and Reed professors headline awards given for outstanding efforts in science research and education

Students from Whitworth University, University of Puget Sound, Walla Walla University, University of Portland, George Fox University, Whitman College, Trinity Western University, Pacific Lutheran University, Eastern Washington University, Willamette University and University of Alaska Anchorage recognized for outstanding research

 

For Immediate Release

 

November 11, 2019 – This week, the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust continued its commitment to support and honor the important work of scientific research at predominantly undergraduate Pacific Northwest Universities at the twenty-eighth annual Murdock College Science Research Program Conference.

 

This year’s conference, themed “Collaboration–A Key to Success in Undergraduate Research,” included multiple awards for outstanding college and university educators as well as exciting news about a new program designed to increase collaboration among scientific institutions.

 

“Our benefactor, Jack Murdock, believed deeply in the importance of scientific research as a source of innovation and inspiration to help improve the lives of all individuals, families and communities,” said Dr. Steve Moore, executive director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “We are grateful to have the opportunity to recognize, honor and celebrate the tireless work of the outstanding researchers and educators who seek to serve the common good of our region through science.”

 

Pacific Lutheran and Reed Professors Honored

 

Dr. Dean Waldow, Professor of Chemistry, Pacific Lutheran University received the Lynwood W. Swanson Scientific Research Award for his exemplary research in the field of polymer chemistry and his commitment as a mentor to students over more than 25 years. Dr. Alison Crocker, Assistant Professor of Physics, Reed College was honored with the Lynwood W. Swanson Promise for Scientific Research Award for her research regarding the relationship between star formation and galaxy structure and for her investment in involving undergraduate students in her work.

 

The prestigious honors were established in 2016 to recognize two exemplary educators from the Pacific Northwest. The “Swanson Award” highlights a senior faculty exemplar with an established, productive and nationally recognized research program, while the “Swanson Promise Award” calls out a junior faculty member who has demonstrated exceptional potential in these areas through early research and work with students. Both awards were named in honor of noted educator, researcher, entrepreneur, and former trustee, Dr. Lynwood Swanson, upon his retirement from the Murdock Trust.

 

“It is an honor to recognize the valuable work of both Dr. Waldow and Dr. Crocker,” said Dr. Moses Lee, Senior Program Director for Scientific Research and Enrichment Programs, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “Throughout his career, Dr. Swanson inspired and engaged students and young people through his own passion for science and discovery. He believes strongly in the ability of science to solve real world challenges and for educators to serve as mentors to the next generation of researchers. We are so proud to be able to honor Dr. Swanson’s legacy and recognize the outstanding work of those who seek to continue that effort, such as Dr. Waldow and Dr. Crocker.”

 

Dr. Dean Waldow will receive a $15,000 cash prize as part of his award and Dr. Alison Crocker will receive a $7,500 cash prize. A portion of each cash award is set aside specifically to help fund further student research and supplies.  

 

The awards were formally presented at the 2019 Murdock College Science Research Program (MCSRP) Conference in Vancouver, WA. The annual conference drew hundreds of college students and science educators from across the Pacific Northwest.

 

In addition to the two faculty awards, The Murdock Trust also honored several college students for research presentations delivered at the event. They include:

 

The 2019 John Van Zytveld Award in the Physical Sciences

A transparent UVA-1 biocompatible photoresin towards 3D printed lab-on-a-chip

Name: Samartha Shrestha and Christopher Roberts

Institution: Whitworth University

Mentor: Dr. Philip Measor

 

The 2019 John Van Zytveld Award in the Life Sciences

 “Song recognition and hybridization in a new secondary contact zone of white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys”

Name: Will Brooks

Institution: University of Puget Sound

Mentor: Dr. Peter Wimberger

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Ecology-Evolution-Biodiversity

“Potential Factors Impacting the Severity of Seagrass Wasting Disease in the Salish Sea”

Name: Kallan Richards (presenter) and Noah Cline

Institution: Walla Walla University

Mentor: Dr. Cecilia Brothers

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Ecology-Evolution-Biodiversity

“Structural and spatial characteristics of Acer macrophyllum influence epiphyte communities in the Hoh temperate rainforest”

Name: Kaela Hamilton

Institution: University of Puget Sound

Mentor: Dr. Carrie Woods

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Developmental Biology-physiology

“Identifying How Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Affects Cardiac Neural Crest Migration Following Fetal Alcohol Exposure”

Names: Pia Fornell

Institution: University of Portland

Mentor: Dr. Laura Dyer

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Molecular and Cell Biology

 “Regulation of Functional hERG Isoform Expression by Poly(A) Binding Protein N1”

Name: Laney Search and Rachel Drgastin (co-presenters)

Institution: George Fox University

Mentor: Dr. Matthew Stump

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Neuroscience-Psychology-Exercise Science

“'The Role of Endolysosomal Trafficking protein Rab7A in DLX 5/6 Interneuron Development”

Name: Andrew Neumann

Institution: George Fox University

Mentor: Dr. Jim Smart

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Biochemistry

“Quantitative NMR Analysis Reveals New Trends in Substrate Specificity of Benzoate Dioxygenase”

Name: James Bent

Institution: Whitman College

Mentor: Dr. Jon Collins

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Organic Chemistry

“A practical synthesis of fluorinated catechol derivatives using silver(I) fluoride”

Name: Alan Brooke

Institution: Trinity Western University

Mentor: Dr. Chadron Friesen

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Analytical-Inorganic-Physical Chemistry

“Physicochemical properties of 2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-quinones appended with phosphonato groups”

Names: Kailin Mooney

Institution: University of Portland

Mentor: Dr. Eugene Urnezius

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Analytical-Inorganic-Physical Chemistry

“Endothermic singlet fission in di-benzoic acid perylene oligomers”

Name: Jennica Kelm

Institution: Pacific Lutheran University

Mentor: Dr. Nadia Korovina

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Environmental Science-Geology

“sUAV Mapping of the Porcupine Bay Road Landslide Complex”

Names: Ethan Ducken

Institution: Eastern Washington University

Mentor: Dr. Chad Pritchard

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Microbiology

“Microbial community composition of Oregon marine sediment: In search of novel archaea”

Name: Helen Madeen (presenter), Cassie Cosler, Jamie Smith, Mayely Polanco, and Alexandra Bless

Institution: Willamette University

Mentor: Dr. Rosa Leon Zayas

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Physics and Engineering

PIC Simulations of Multipole Plasma Trap Diagnostics and Loading Methods

Name: Henrique Miller

Institution: University of Alaska Anchorage

Mentor: Dr. Nathaniel Hicks

 

Inspiring Collaboration

 

In addition to honoring work completed by faculty and students, the 2019 MCSR Conference introduced a renewed commitment to inspire and support new research that has yet to begin. Leaders from numerous scientific institutions joined together to unveil RAISE (Research Across Institutions for Scientific Empowerment).

 

Formerly known as the Collaborative Research Alliance, RAISE seeks to create opportunities for researchers at mainly private colleges and universities and a few public research-active, primarily undergraduate institutions around the Pacific Northwest to connect and collaborate on new projects.

 

“Science does not exist in a vacuum,” said Dr. Lee. “The best research and findings often come when teams working on similar areas of research are able to combine their efforts, share their findings, and inspire one another to pursue new and cutting-edge tracks of discovery. RAISE will present a variety of opportunities for educators and researchers around the Pacific Northwest to grow and expand their work.”

 

For more information about the MCSRP Conference and how the Murdock Trust invests in science education and research, please visit www.murdocktrust.org.

 

About the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 6,700 grants totaling more than $1 billion of which about $200 million supported projects in scientific research. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and on our website.

 

About Dr. Lynwood Swanson

After starting his career as a professor and administrator at Linfield College, Dr. Swanson moved to Oregon Graduate Institute before co-founding FEI, a world-leader in electron optics and focused ion beam technologies in scanning and transmission electron microscopies. In conjunction with his extensive career in science education and research, Dr. Swanson served as a tireless advocate for these fields as a trustee for thirty years.

 

#####


Sun. 11/10/19
Single Vehicle Fatal Crash on Hwy 38 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 11/10/19 2:34 PM

On Saturday, November 9, 2019, at approximately 2:45 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Hwy 38 near mile post 25 approximately 10 miles west of Elkton.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2016 GMC Canyon Pickup, operated by John Norlin (84) of Roseburg, was traveling on Hwy 38 when for unknown reasons left the roadway and struck a tree.

Norlin sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

One lane of Hwy 38 was closed for approximately four hours after the crash.

OSP was assisted Scottsburg FD, ODOT, and the Douglas County Sheriff's Office.

(No photos are available)

 


New Seasons Markets recalls fresh ground beef due to E. coli infection
Oregon Health Authority - 11/10/19 1:37 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—New Seasons Market is recalling fresh ground beef sold at meat counters in three of its stores because it may be contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7.

Three people in the Portland metro area have become ill with E. coli O157:H7 infection after having eaten ground beef purchased at different New Seasons outlets. All are recovering from the illness.

E. coli O157:H7 causes a diarrheal illness often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The condition is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly, and it can lead to serious kidney damage and even death.

The recalled fresh ground beef was sold at the company’s North Lombard, North Interstate and Cedar Hills locations. The product comes in 5%, 10% and 20% fat content varieties and is ground at the stores prior to sale. The products implicated were purchased between Oct. 19 and Oct. 23. OHA recommends customers who purchased the ground beef between these dates throw it away immediately.

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) identified the outbreak after laboratory tests conducted at the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory determined that an identical strain of E. coli O157:H7 was present in all three patients.

New Seasons Market has reported to OHA that it suspended the sale of the product while Oregon Department of Agriculture continues its investigation into the cause of the outbreak.

People who ate the product but did not get sick do not need to do anything. If you developed diarrhea after eating it, you should consult your health care provider and tell him or her about the exposure.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at talktous@newseasonsmarket.com.


Single Vehicle Fatal Crash on Hwy 97 - Klamath County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/10/19 8:11 AM
2019-11/1002/129197/IMG_6362.JPG
2019-11/1002/129197/IMG_6362.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1002/129197/thumb_IMG_6362.JPG

On Saturday, November 9, 2019, at approximately 10:48 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near mile post 281. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a red Honda Civic, operated by William Ogle (23) of Klamath Falls, was traveling north on Hwy 97 when for unknown reasons left the roadway and rolled several times.

Ogle sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Hwy 97 was reduced to one lane for approximately one hour following the crash.

OSP was assisted by Klamath County Fire District #1 and ODOT.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1002/129197/IMG_6362.JPG

Fri. 11/08/19
Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee to meet November 13 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 11/08/19 3:47 PM

November 8, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee to meet November 13 in Portland

What: Meeting of the Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee

When: November 13, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building; 800 NE Oregon St, Conf. Room 177 Portland, OR 97232

Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome; cost growth target introduction; committee charge; charter and operating procedures; process for developing committee recommendations; public meetings law; public comment; next steps

For more information on the meeting, visit the committee’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jennifer Uhlman at 503-739-5267, 711 TTY at least 48 hours before the meeting.


OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers Seeking Public's Assistance in Illegal Shooting of Bald Eagle Lower Cow Creek-- Douglas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/08/19 3:16 PM
2019-11/1002/129180/Eagle.jpg
2019-11/1002/129180/Eagle.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1002/129180/thumb_Eagle.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish and Wildlife troopers are seeking the public’s assistance regarding a bald eagle being illegally shot with a firearm on Lower Cow Creek Road near West Fork Cow Creek Road. 

On November 7, 2019 at about 9:00 AM, OSP Fish and Wildlife troopers responded to a reported bald eagle that was deceased in Lower Cow Creek.  Upon examination by Fish and Wildlife troopers and personnel from Umpqua Wildlife Rescue, it was determined that the bald eagle died from being shot by a firearm.  It is believed the bald eagle had been deceased for one to two days before being reported.

In conjunction with The TIP program and the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is offering a reward up to $2,500 for information leading to a criminal conviction of the person(s) responsible for the shooting.  The bald eagle is currently protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The killing or possession of a bald eagle or its parts is a violation of both Acts, punishable by imprisonment of up to one year and a fine of up to $100,000.

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Senior Trooper Kyle Bachmeier or Senior Trooper Curtis Weaver through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (mobile). 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose

 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s) 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 
 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1002/129180/Eagle.jpg

Historic Military Uniforms Display at Lottery (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 11/08/19 1:34 PM
Three of the six historic military uniforms on display at the Oregon Lottery's office in Salem.
Three of the six historic military uniforms on display at the Oregon Lottery's office in Salem.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/4939/129175/thumb_11-8_Uniform_display.jpg

The public has an opportunity to view six historic military uniforms next week, which were worn by Oregonians who served our armed forces. This is part of a month-long celebration at the Oregon Lottery to celebrate Veterans Day and the 85 veterans who work at the state agency.

This display was put in the lobby at the Oregon Lottery to help celebrate the fact it is providing millions in funding to assist all 36 counties across the state fund their local County Veteran Services Offices.

The six uniforms on display were provided by VFW Marion Post 661 in Salem are from a collection of over 1,900 uniforms. The uniforms are from different branches and eras of the military service.

Lottery Director Barry Pack and Oregon Dept. of Veteran Affairs Kelly Fitzpatrick addressed Lottery staff Thursday, Nov. 7 in what has become an annual event at the Lottery to honor veterans.

“With nearly 20 percent of Lottery staff being veterans, recognizing their service is so important,” said Lottery Director Pack. “And with the passage of Measure 96 in 2016, Lottery proceeds now benefit Oregon veterans by solidifying and expanding veteran services.”

The Oregon Lottery’s Salem headquarters will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday next week and is located at 500 Airport Road SE in Salem.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements, as well as Veteran Services and Outdoor School. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

 

 

###




Attached Media Files: Three of the six historic military uniforms on display at the Oregon Lottery's office in Salem.

Fatal Crash on Hwy 140W - Lake County
Oregon State Police - 11/08/19 12:48 PM

On Wednesday, November 8, 2019 at approximately 5:03 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 140W near milepost 74.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a green Chevrolet Suburban, operated by Nicholas Whitebread-Lanaro (19) of Bly, was eastbound when for unknown reasons left the roadway and rolled several times. 

Whitebread-Lanaro sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Lakeview Disaster Unit and ODOT


Beaverton Man Sentenced To 40 Years In Prison For Assaulting Federal Task Force Officers With Explosive Device
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/08/19 12:12 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Jason Paul Schaefer, 28, of Beaverton, Oregon, was sentenced today to 40 years in federal prison and 5 years’ supervised release for detonating an improvised explosive device on October 11, 2017, assaulting two members of the Portland Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF).

            In May 2019, Schaefer was convicted after a six-day trial of two counts of assaulting a federal officer and one count each of carrying and using a destructive device during and in relation to a crime of violence, carrying and using an explosive during the commission of a federal felony, unlawful transport of explosive materials, possession of an unregistered destructive device and being a felon in possession of explosives.

            “The government may never fully know why Mr. Schaefer amassed a large quantity of dangerous precursor chemicals and the components needed to make a large, remote-detonating bomb. What we do know is that on October 11, 2017, he tried to kill two federal task force officers attempting to make a lawful arrest,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “We owe a debt of gratitude to the JTTF agents and partners and our prosecutors for protecting our community by taking this violent criminal off the streets. This prosecution affirms the critical public safety mission of the JTTF and the need for continued and active participation of all federal, state and local partners.”

            “Jason Schaefer’s sentence is commensurate to the danger he posed to his neighbors in the community. The officers and agents of the FBI’s JTTF hope this sentence will serve as a deterrent to others who may consider dangerous or violent illegal actions,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

            “The Oregon State Police is proud of the collaboration among our local and federal partners on the JTTF, with our mutual goal to keep Oregon safe. We are grateful that our troopers and taskforce officers were not seriously injured during this rapidly developing event. OSP is also appreciative of the time and attention of the U.S. Attorney's Office to seek justice in this case,” said Travis Hampton, Superintendent of the Oregon State Police.

            “The Washington County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the JTTF and partnering agencies for their hard work in this investigation. We value these important public safety partnerships that work tirelessly to keep our communities safe,” said Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff.

            According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, on or about September 21, 2017, FBI Portland determined that Schaefer had purchased several items that could be used to make a bomb. Schaefer was known to federal investigators after an April 2017 incident where he threatened to kill his landlords and used mercury to deter people from entering an apartment garage he rented in Beaverton. The incident led to Schaefer being arrested and prosecuted for illegally possessing body armor.

            On October 11, 2017, federal agents and task force officers executed a search warrant on Schaefer’s Beaverton apartment. Schaefer arrived that morning at a meeting with his probation officer to find two federal agents there to meet him. They notified Schaefer of the warrant and asked if his property was booby trapped. Schaeffer told the agents that it was not and the search commenced.

            After a brief conversation with the agents, Schaefer departed in a white sport utility vehicle. The agents followed Schaefer, but lost him. Meanwhile, agents searching Schaefer’s apartment found several explosive precursors and electronic matches. While the search was ongoing, Schaefer returned to the apartment and threatened a task force officer before fleeing.

            Two task force officers pursued Schaefer who soon got stuck in traffic. The officers approached Schaefer on foot and ordered him out of the vehicle. Schaefer did not comply, threatened to kill the officers and ignited an explosive device concealed in a cigarette pack. The blast caused significant injury to Schaefer’s hand and sent debris flying into one of the officers, who suffered bodily injury. Following the explosion, Schaefer was arrested and officers found a second cigarette pack containing explosives in his vehicle.

            This case was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon. It was investigated by the Portland JTTF. The Portland JTTF includes FBI special agents and more than a dozen state and local law enforcement officers.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/6325/129167/SENTENCING-Schaefer-Final.pdf

Conference of Local Health Officials meets Nov. 21 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 11/08/19 12:12 PM

November 8, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets Nov. 21 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO).

Agenda: Potential changes to Public Health Accountability Metrics Process Measures; Public Health Modernization State/Local Learning Collaborative update; letter of support for Environmental Health Assessment Program grant application.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

When: Thursday, Nov. 21, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Where: Two locations – Portland State Office Building Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland OR 97232; Lane County Health and Human Services, 151 W. 7th Ave., Room 530, Eugene OR 97401. No conference call option is available.

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs, and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869, 711 TTY or um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


State-of-the-art recycling saves millions of dollars for Northwest electric customers
Bonneville Power Administration - 11/08/19 12:07 PM

MEDIA ADVISORY — Nov. 8, 2019

Who:   The Bonneville Power Administration

What:   Tour of BPA’s award-winning recycling program and mechanical laboratory in recognition of the upcoming National Recycling Day

Where: The Bonneville Power Administration’s Ross Complex, ABC parking lot located south of the Ross Complex at NE Ross St, Vancouver, WA 98663

When:  Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019

Time:    1 to 3 p.m.      

For security purposes, please RSVP to David Wilson at 503-230-5607 by noon Tuesday, Nov. 12.      

 

Vancouver, Wash. The Bonneville Power Administration’s innovative approach to recycling saved northwest electric ratepayers nearly $3 million in 2018, and the agency projects even more savings in 2019. The agency’s sustainability efforts – from recycling transmission conductor and tower parts to auctioning off used equipment – have won national awards.

On Thursday, Nov. 14, BPA invites members of the media to tour its Investment Recovery Center and the Mechanical Lab. Visitors will see a machine that uses choppers and magnets to separate and recover aluminum and steel from used transmission wire. Since March of 2018, the machine has recovered more than 750,000 pounds of aluminum valued at $700,000.

Those on tour will also experience a mechanical testing lab and a corona and arc flashover that ends with a boom. Visitors are also invited to watch BPA lab engineers test and break a piece of high-voltage transmission wire.

Background: In 2018, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency honored BPA with the Federal Green Challenge Materials Management Award. The EPA is honoring BPA again in 2019 for its outstanding sustainability efforts and care for the environment.

About BPA: The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 262 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 500 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov


Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/08/19 11:30 AM
Stephen Kessler
Stephen Kessler
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1070/129163/thumb_Kessler_S.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Stephen Kessler, died the evening of November 7, 2019.  Kessler was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) in Umatilla and passed away while on hospice at the facility. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Kessler entered DOC custody on October 1, 1982, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of October 1, 2052. Kessler was 76 years old. Next of kin has been notified.  

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 adults in custody. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include repair and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.

 

####




Attached Media Files: Stephen Kessler

173rd FW to conduct Veterans Day flyovers in Oregon
Oregon Military Department - 11/08/19 10:25 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov. 8, 2019

Contact: Master Sgt. Jefferson Thompson, 541-885-6677, son.j.thompson2.mil@mail.mil">jefferson.j.thompson2.mil@mail.mil

173rd FW to conduct Veterans Day flyovers in Oregon

KINGSLEY FIELD, Ore. – The 173rd Fighter Wing out of Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Ore. will conduct Veterans Day flyovers for ceremonies at locations throughout Oregon.

F-15 Eagle fighter jets are scheduled to conduct flyovers at the following community locations at, or around, the designated times on Monday, Nov. 11. 

11:00 a.m. Veterans Memorial Park, Klamath Falls, Ore.

11:15 a.m. Downtown Roseburg, Ore.

11:45 a.m. Downtown Albany, Ore.

All passes will be approximately 1,000 feet above ground level and about 400 mph airspeed. Flights could be canceled or times changed due to inclement weather or operational contingencies.

The Oregon Air National Guard has been an integral part of the nation's air defense since 1941.  The 173rd FW is home to the sole F-15C pilot training facility for the United States Air Force.

-30-


Department of Revenue Medford office closed today
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 11/08/19 10:09 AM

The Oregon Department of Revenue’s Medford district office will be closed Friday, November 8, 2019 due to a failure in the buildings mechanical systems.

The office will return to normal business hours, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., on Tuesday, November 12, 2019.

Taxpayers needing immediate assistance during this time can call the Tax Services Unit at (503) 378-4988.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax information, check the status of your refund, or make payments. You can also email questions.dor@oregon.gov or call (503) 378-4988 or (800) 356-4222 (toll-free). 


Male Arrested for Child Pornography Charges (Photo)
Medford Police Dept. - 11/08/19 8:46 AM
Hanson Mug Shot
Hanson Mug Shot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/6231/129154/thumb_HansonTimothy.jpg

In August of 2019, Medford Police Detectives opened an investigation into a local resident involved in the sharing of child pornography. While these images are not believed to be of local children, they were being shared and downloaded nationwide via the internet. Thanks to advancements in "Child Rescue Coalition Technology," Medford detectives were able to track these images to a computer inside a home in the 900 block of Mt. Pitt Street, Medford.

A search warrant for the residence was obtained and detectives executed the search warrant on Wednesday, November 6th, 2019.

Detectives found the suspect, Timothy Jay Hanson, 59 years old, at the residence, along with evidence of child pornography. Computers and electronic devices were seized during the search warrant. 

Hanson was arrested on 3 counts of Encouraging Child Sex Abuse 1st Degree, and 3 counts of Encouraging Child Sex Abuse 2nd Degree, bail $100,000.

 




Attached Media Files: Hanson Mug Shot

Serious Injury Crash on Interstate 84 - Morrow County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/08/19 7:50 AM
2019-11/1002/129146/20191107_044422.jpg
2019-11/1002/129146/20191107_044422.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1002/129146/thumb_20191107_044422.jpg

On Thursday, November 7, 2019, at approximately 2:00 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of single vehicle rollover crash on I-84 near milepost 151. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a light blue 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee, occupied by Jason Michael Gentilini (29) of Beaverton and Ariel Leigh Holien (28) of Hillsboro, was traveling eastbound on Interstate 84 when for unknown reasons the Jeep drifted off the interstate causing the vehicle to roll. OSP is still investigating which person was driving.   

Holien was flown by helicopter to Virginia Mason Medical Center then to Haborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington with serious injuries. 

Gentilini was transported to Good Shepherd Medical Center by ground Ambulance then to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center with serious injuries.  

OSP was assisted by Morrow County Sheriff’s Office, Gilliam County Sheriff’s Office, Boardman Police Department and ODOT. 

OSP is requesting anyone who witnessed the crash or the vehicle before the crash to contact the Oregon State Police at OSP and refer to Sergeant Placido Lopez.  

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1002/129146/20191107_044422.jpg , 2019-11/1002/129146/20191107_044241.jpg

Thu. 11/07/19
Photos_ODOT electricians work to get South Y signals on line (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 11/07/19 5:57 PM
2019-11/1202/129141/southYcrash_5_Nov7_2019.jpg
2019-11/1202/129141/southYcrash_5_Nov7_2019.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1202/129141/thumb_southYcrash_5_Nov7_2019.jpg

GRANTS PASS: ODOT electricians are currently working to rewire signals damaged in an earlier crash on U.S. 199 and Oregon 99 at the South Y intersection.

Estimated time of energizing signals is by 9 p.m.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1202/129141/southYcrash_5_Nov7_2019.jpg , 2019-11/1202/129141/southY_4_Nov7_2019.jpg , 2019-11/1202/129141/SouthYCrash_3_Nov7_2019.jpg

Photos_Signals out due to Grants Pass/ South Y multi-vehicle crash (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 11/07/19 4:33 PM
2019-11/1202/129137/SouthYCrash_2_Nov72019.jpg
2019-11/1202/129137/SouthYCrash_2_Nov72019.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1202/129137/thumb_SouthYCrash_2_Nov72019.jpg

GRANTS PASS: A three vehicle crash involving a semi truck is clogging traffic at the South Y in Grants Pass, at the intersection of U.S. 199 and Oregon 99. The crash damaged the traffic signal controller and all signals are dark. The southbound U.S. 199 slow lane is blocked as is the southbound slow lane on Oregon 99 (6th Street).

ODOT and Grants Pass Department of Public Safety are on scene for traffic control.

Expect delays during evening commute in this area of Grants Pass. 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1202/129137/SouthYCrash_2_Nov72019.jpg , 2019-11/1202/129137/SouthYCrash_1_Nov72019.jpg

Meeting on BLM Integrated Vegetation Management Effort
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 11/07/19 3:50 PM

Medford, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management, Medford District, will hold a public open house on Thursday, November 14, 2019, from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., at the Jackson County Expo.

The BLM will have displays to help explain the draft chapters and BLM staff specialists will be available to answer questions and provide information and gather feedback on the development of the Integrated Vegetation Management for Resilient Lands Programmatic Environmental Assessment.

This environmental assessment would assist the BLM in increasing the pace and scale of resiliency and restoration work. The integrated vegetation management represents a combination of methods the BLM could use to improve habitats, decrease catastrophic fire risk, and improve resilience. These methods include: silvicultural or other vegetation treatments, fire and fuels management activities, harvest methods, and restoration activities.

Many forest stands in southwest Oregon are overly dense and susceptible to loss from wildfire, drought, and insect infestations. In some areas, high quality habitat that supports recovery of threatened and endangered wildlife species is lacking. In other areas, conifer forest encroachment into meadows and oak woodlands threaten conservation of threatened, endangered, or sensitive botanical species.  The documents associated with the environmental assessment are available on the BLM's ePlanning website at: https://go.usa.gov/xmuJV

Jackson County Expo, Mace building

1 Peninger Rd

Central Point, OR 97502

The public will be able to submit written comments at this open house. Comments can also be submitted online at: https://go.usa.gov/xmuJV. The comment period for the Integrated Vegetation Management for Resilient Lands Programmatic Environmental Assessment closes on XXX

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.

 


Hoover Criminal Gang Member Lorenzo Jones Indicted for Racketeering Conspiracy
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/07/19 3:48 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, announced today that Lorenzo Laron Jones, 46, a Portland resident and senior member of the Hoover Criminal Gang, has been indicted for his role in a racketeering conspiracy that caused the shooting deaths of two Portland men.

Jones is charged with racketeering conspiracy and two counts each of murder in aid of racketeering, using and carrying a firearm during a crime of violence, and causing death through the use of a firearm.

The superseding indictment alleges that beginning in June 1989, Jones engaged in a 30-year pattern of violent racketeering activity for the purpose of maintaining and increasing his position in the Hoover Criminal Gang, a criminal enterprise engaged in racketeering in California, Oregon, Washington and elsewhere.

Jones is alleged to have murdered Ascensio Genchi Garcia on July 19, 1998 and Wilbert Butler on September 17, 2017, both in Portland. Additionally, he is accused of attempting to murder six other people, possessing stolen firearms, and distributing cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine.

Jones made his initial appearance in federal court today and was detained pending a four-week jury trial before U.S. Chief District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

Jones is named alongside fellow Hoover gang members Ronald Clayton Rhodes, 34, and Javier Fernando Hernandez, 23, both of Portland, in the superseding indictment unsealed today. Rhodes and Hernandez were previously charged with murder in aid of racketeering, using and carrying a firearm during a crime of violence, and causing death through the use of a firearm for the December 16, 2015 murder of Portland resident Kyle Polk.

Jones, Rhodes and Hernandez will be tried together and each face a maximum sentence of death or life in prison.

According to the indictment, the Hoovers are a criminal street gang operating in Oregon, and are known to engage in acts of violence including murder, assault, robbery, sex trafficking and the distribution of narcotics. The Hoovers originated in Los Angeles in the late 1960s and established a presence in Portland in the early 1980s. The gang has a loose hierarchical structure in which members have different amounts of power and influence based on age and gang activity. To maintain status and increase one’s position in the gang, members are expected to carry out violence on behalf of the enterprise.

This case was investigated by the FBI, the Portland Police Bureau, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department, and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts.  PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Timeline

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets November 12 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 11/07/19 11:41 AM

November 7, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets November 12 in Portland

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD.

When: Tuesday, Nov. 12, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B (main floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. For more information, please visit the commission's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets November 8
Oregon Health Authority - 11/07/19 11:20 AM

November 7, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets November 8

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup.

Agenda: Report on number of proposals submitted for review and review process; define the minimum criteria for proposal review star ratings to deem that a proposal adequately aligns with the project design criteria; discuss the role the workgroup wants to play in the implementation of the project.

When: November 8, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative (RBHC) brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, visit the RBHC website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 11/07/19 10:53 AM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 116th Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT116 Graduation will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, November 15, 2019, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  The guest speaker is 9-1-1 Operations Manager, Marcela Haack, of the City of Grants Pass.  DPSST would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Telecommunications #BT116 on their successful completion of basic training.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Reception immediately following.

Members of Basic Telecommunications Class #116:

 

Dispatcher Sarah Baley

Lincoln City Police Department

 

Dispatcher Autumn Barnes

Frontier Regional 9-1-1

 

Dispatcher Samantha Dee

Oregon State Police

 

Dispatcher Maycie Dibble

North Bend Police Department

 

Dispatcher Meredith Gegner

Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

 

Dispatcher Kimberli Goff

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Gina Gray

North Bend Police Department

 

Dispatcher Katelyn Gwin

Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

 

Dispatcher Rachael Haller

Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Amanda Harker-Owens

Prineville Police Department

 

Dispatcher Nikki Hepworth

Prineville Police Department

 

Dispatcher Taylor Hodson

Central Lane Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Amanda Iles

Coos Bay Police Department

 

Dispatcher Devinity Johnson

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Brittany Kleiven

Linn County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Katelynn Masters

Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

 

Dispatcher Nomarie Miro

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Amy Myers

Josephine County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Kylie Norton

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Benjamin Peters

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher April Potter

Douglas County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Angel Ray

Florence Police Department

 

Dispatcher Shannon Ross

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Communications Specialist Yosajandy Salgado

Central Lane Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Amber Sullivan

Central Lane Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Steven Susbauer

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Melissa Unrau

Albany Police Department

 

Supervisor Angie Vose

Oregon State Police

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public member, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Corvallis is honored as Oregon Tree City of the Year (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/07/19 10:51 AM
These Oregon white oaks are part of the healthy urban forest found in Corvallis. The Oregon Department of Forestry in partnership with Oregon Community Trees named Corvallis Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2019.
These Oregon white oaks are part of the healthy urban forest found in Corvallis. The Oregon Department of Forestry in partnership with Oregon Community Trees named Corvallis Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2019.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1072/129118/thumb_Quercus_garryana_on_OSU_campus_Corvallis_(2).JPG

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) in partnership with Oregon Community Trees (OCT) has named Corvallis as Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2019. Each year, ODF and OCT select one of Oregon’s 66 nationally recognized Tree City USA communities statewide to award for that city’s commitment to its urban forest. Last year’s Oregon Tree City of the Year was Lake Oswego.

OCT President Samantha Wolf said the award is intended to highlight communities delivering best urban forestry practices to their residents. “People who live in Corvallis have a better quality of life because they live in a healthy urban forest. We’re acknowledging the City of Corvallis with this award for the work it does to ensure its urban forests continues to provide those benefits long into the future.”

According to ODF’s Urban and Community Forestry Assistance Program Manager Kristin Ramstad, “Corvallis exemplifies what a great Tree City USA should be. They are always innovating. They have consistently good planning and significant citizen engagement, recently launching a Neighborhood Tree Steward program. This award recognizes their many years of outstanding work to care for and promote a healthy urban forest.”

Achievements that contributed to Corvallis being named Oregon Tree City of the Year include:

  • Having a robust urban forestry program and staff, along with the requisite management plans and inventories.
  • Being proactive about exploring ways to prepare for and manage a potential outbreak of emerald ash borer in native ash trees.
  • Launching a Neighborhood Tree Stewards program that recruits and trains community volunteers to help maintain and nurture urban trees.
  • Partnering with local businesses to salvage and mill city trees that must be removed due to disease or decline.
  • City Parks and Recreation staff holding positions on statewide boards and advisory committees.

Over the last two decades, Corvallis has met the Tree City USA program’s four minimum standards by:

  • maintaining a tree board (Parks and Natural Resources Advisory Board)
  • a tree ordinance
  • a minimum $2 per capita expenditure for tree planting and maintenance
  • an annual celebration and proclamation of Arbor Day

Urban Forestry Specialist Jennifer Killian said Corvallis Parks and Recreation staff felt honored by the Oregon Tree City of the Year award. “It was incredible to be recognized for all of the hard work we did last year, particularly developing the Neighborhood Tree Steward program. This was a great team effort between our arbor crew and Neighborhood Tree Stewards. We are eager to continue cultivating a robust urban forestry program to serve our community.”

Corvallis is a Sterling Tree City USA for having earned 10 years of Tree City USA Growth Awards.  Growth Awards are achieved when a Tree City USA completes additional urban forestry program activities that go beyond the basic minimum requirements of Tree City USA, an Arbor Day Foundation recognition program.

Visit www.arborday.org/programs/treecityusa/ to learn more.

                                                                        # # #




Attached Media Files: These Oregon white oaks are part of the healthy urban forest found in Corvallis. The Oregon Department of Forestry in partnership with Oregon Community Trees named Corvallis Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2019.

Corporate Activity Tax FAQs updated on Department of Revenue website
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 11/07/19 10:28 AM

Salem, OR— What is the Corporate Activity Tax (CAT)?  Who is subject to the CAT? When are the filing and payment deadlines?

The answers to these questions and others can be found on the Oregon Department of Revenue’s website in a newly updated list of frequently asked questions (FAQs).

“These are questions Oregon business taxpayers and tax preparers asked most often during our 12-city stakeholder input tour of the state, and a series of video and teleconferences,” said Nia Ray, director of the Department of Revenue. “The updated FAQs won’t answer every question about the CAT, but they do provide a thorough overview of the new law.”

Understanding what stakeholders needed to know helped members of the agency’s CAT team craft better, more complete answers to the most asked questions. Those questions and answers have now been made available to business taxpayers, tax preparers and the public.

The Corporate Activity Tax is imposed only after a taxpayer exceeds $1 million of taxable commercial activity. Once they pass that threshold, the tax is $250 plus 0.57% on gross receipts greater than $1 million after subtractions. Proceeds of the tax are directed by statute to boost funding for public schools.

Some of the other topics covered in the frequently asked questions include:

  • “What is commercial activity?”
  •  “Who is not subject to the CAT?”
  • “When do I need to register for the CAT?”

As a new tax, the CAT has generated a lot of questions. The FAQ section of the Corporate Activity Tax page on the Department of Revenue website is designed to provide a basic understanding of the tax for those who may be affected by it.

Those with additional questions are urged to email their questions to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov/dor.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


PGE wind farm earns workplace safety recognition (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/07/19 9:27 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1073/129112/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

(Salem) – Portland General Electric Co.’s Biglow Canyon wind farm has graduated from Oregon OSHA’s Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP), a significant milestone in growth and commitment to worker safety.

SHARP coaches companies on how to effectively manage workplace safety and health. It empowers employers to continuously improve. In turn, companies are recognized for their success in reaching specific benchmarks. An employer becomes a graduate when it completes five years of SHARP.

During its SHARP journey, Biglow Canyon – which encompasses 217 wind turbines covering 25,000 acres outside of Wasco – tackled a variety of safety improvements. Those included installing deflector plates to protect workers from permanent obstructions or clearance issues as they move up and down ladders inside wind towers; standardizing safety and health procedures across facilities; and setting up TV monitors to display safety trending reports.

In assessing Biglow Canyon’s safety culture, Oregon OSHA consultants noted that personnel at the site do not hesitate “to ensure the task at hand is being performed in the safest manner possible.”

“Biglow’s graduation from SHARP is a great example of what an employee-driven safety culture can achieve,” said Elizabeth Kokos, PGE senior wind technician. “Employees are more willing to be active contributors in a company’s safety programs when they own them. Biglow’s ability to attain SHARP graduate status is a prime example of what can be achieved when everyone pulls together for safety.”

SHARP encourages Oregon employers to work with their employees to identify and correct hazards, and develop and implement effective safety and health programs. The benefits of the program, which is part of Oregon OSHA’s consultation services, include lower injury and illness rates, decreased workers’ compensation costs, increased employee morale, and lower product losses.

Oregon employers that have been in business for more than one year are eligible to apply for SHARP. For information about the program, visit https://osha.oregon.gov/consult/sharp-vpp/Pages/SHARP.aspx.

For information about Oregon OSHA’s no-cost consultation services, visit https://osha.oregon.gov/consult/Pages/index.aspx.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , SHARP logo , (From left): Elizabeth Kokos, senior wind technician for PGE’s Biglow Canyon wind farm, Scott Elliot, wind asset manager for the company, and Trena VanDeHey, a field consultation manager for Oregon OSHA.

Notice of Press Conference
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/07/19 9:23 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, United States Attorney for the District of Oregon, will hold a press conference today with Portland law enforcement partners.

Date: Thursday, November 7, 2019

Time: Camera preset at 1:30PM. Conference to begin between 2:00-2:15PM. Last entry at 2:00PM.

Location:

U.S. Attorney’s Office – Sixth Floor – Main Conference Room

Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse

1000 SW Third Ave., Suite 600

Portland, OR 97204

Access:

All credentialed media are invited to attend and required to display valid photo identification to gain entry into the courthouse and the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

Please limit attendance to a maximum of three individuals from any one media outlet.

Photo/Video:

Credentialed media are invited to use camera and audio equipment during the press conference. Livestreaming is permitted, but public Wi-Fi is not available. Use of camera and audio equipment is otherwise prohibited in the federal courthouse.