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Medford/Klamath Falls/Grants Pass News Releases for Sun. Jul. 5 - 12:01 pm
Sun. 07/05/20
Grants Pass Wildland Fire Readiness Drill
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 07/05/20 9:00 AM

In preparation for the heat and dry conditions of summer, Grants Pass Fire Rescue, Rural Metro Fire Department and Oregon Department of Forestry are hosting a training exercise combating a fast-moving simulated wildfire in the northwest area of Grants Pass. The scheduled dates for the training are the mornings of July 6, 8 and 10th. The location will be in the NW area, Forest Hills neighborhood. On the above dates, between the hours of 9AM and 11AM, the public is asked to drive with caution as multiple fire apparatus will be moving through these areas.

Participants will include units from Grants Pass Fire Rescue, Rural Metro FD, Rogue River Fire District, Illinois Valley Fire District, Applegate Fire District, Williams Fire District and the Oregon Department of Forestry. These agencies combine resources to make up a Task Force to reinforce the efforts of the first responding fire departments in the event of a large wildfire. The Rogue Valley Fire Chiefs’ Association has established several of these Task Forces in both Josephine and Jackson Counties. As part of the training scenario, fire units will respond to a simulated fast-moving wildfire in the urban interface. No Live Fire will be present.  The objectives of this training exercise are to test and improve the participating agencies notification, response, coordination and communication systems used during a complex incident in addition to expanding participant’s knowledge and use of the Incident Command System.

On Monday, July 6th, the news media is invited to the News Media Staging location located on NW Caddis Pl.  Please arrive at 8:45 am if possible, for the incident briefing. Current COVID guidelines will be followed.  After the briefing, this location will provide a great spot for initial activity.   


Sat. 07/04/20
Green District Man Assaulted, Five Subjects Arrested
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/04/20 4:31 PM

On Friday, July 3, 2020 at approximately 2250 hours, Douglas County Emergency Communications Center (911) received a call that Kenneth Hale (63 yoa, Roseburg) had been assaulted by the neighbors while at Hale’s residence located at 4355 Depriest Street, Roseburg.

Kenneth Hale was transported to Mercy Medical Center with facial injuries and a severe injury to his eye. Hale was alert and responsive and stated that Aaron Pfannenstiel (31 yoa male, Roseburg) walked onto his porch and banged on the door after a verbal argument regarding fireworks. Hale said Pfannenstiel reached inside Hale’s home and grabbed Hale by the throat. Hale took Pfannenstiel to the ground to protect himself. Pfannenstiel yelled for assistance and Lynzey Pier (39 yoa female, Roseburg), Gaige Jackson (21 yoa male, Roseburg), and 2 juvenile males ran over and begain striking Hale in the face and body. After the assault the individuals involved fled to their residence and would not respond to law enforcement.

On Saturday, July 4th, Detectives executed a search warrant at 4364 Depriest Street, Roseburg. During the execution of the warrant Detectives arrested Aaron Pfannenstiel, Lynzey Pier, Gaige Jackson, and one of the juvenile males in conjunction with the assault to Kenneth Hale. The second juvenile male was arrested away from the residence. Aaron Pfannenstiel was charged and lodged on Burglary I and Assault II charges. Lynzey Pier and Gaige Jackson were charged with Assault II and lodged at the Douglas County Jail. The two male juveniles were arrested for Assault II and lodged at the Douglas County Juvenile Detention Center.

###


Drain Teen Found, No Longer Missing (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/04/20 2:30 PM
Taylor Cosby Missing Person Flyer
Taylor Cosby Missing Person Flyer
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/5204/135810/thumb_07022020_TAYLOR_COSBY_MISSING_PERSON.jpg

UPDATE 07/04/2020 2:30 PM

DRAIN, Ore. - On Friday, July 3, 2020, at approximately 10:00 pm, Douglas County Sheriff's Office Deputies were notified that Taylor Cosby had returned home. Deputies made contact with Cosby and determined she was in good health and unharmed. 

The Sheriff's Office thanks the community for their assistance and concern in locating Cosby.

###

ORIGINAL RELEASE 07/03/2020 10:00 AM

DRAIN, Ore. - Deputies are seeking information as to the whereabouts of a missing 15-year-old from Drain. 

On Thursday, July 2, 2020, deputies were contacted regarding 15-year-old Taylor Cosby who has been missing since June 25, 2020. Cosby reportedly ran away from her home in the 300-block of Highway 38 and has not been heard from since. Family suspects she is still in the Drain area.

Cosby is described as Caucasian, 5'2'' tall, weighing 130lbs, with blonde hair and blue eyes. She was last known to be wearing a black hat, green t-shirt and tall black gardening boots. 

Deputies ask anyone who has information about Cosby's whereabouts to call law enforcement immediately at (541) 440-4471. The Sheriff's Office is being assisted by Douglas County Search and Rescue. 

Case #20-2945

###




Attached Media Files: Taylor Cosby Missing Person Flyer , Taylor Cosby

CORRECTION: Oregon reports 303 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 07/04/20 12:47 PM

Corrected table to reflect total deaths as 213.

July 4, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 213, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 303 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 9,930.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (2), Clackamas (26), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Deschutes (11), Douglas (1), Gilliam (1), Jackson (7), Jefferson (1), Josephine (8), Klamath (5), Lake (1), Lane (12), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (31), Marion (18), Morrow (11), Multnomah (58), Polk (3), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (49), Wasco (4), and Washington (46).

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

Oregon’s 210th COVID-19 death is 93-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on June 27 and died on July 1, in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 211th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on June 21 and died on June 26, at Good Shepherd Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 212th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on June 16 and died on June 29, in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 213th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Lincoln County who tested positive on June 29. Her date and place of death, and underlying medical conditions are being confirmed.

County

Cases 1

Total deaths 2

Negative tests 3, 4

Baker

5

0

PENDING

Benton

93

5

PENDING

Clackamas

821

25

PENDING

Clatsop

51

0

PENDING

Columbia

36

0

PENDING

Coos

42

0

PENDING

Crook

12

0

PENDING

Curry

8

0

PENDING

Deschutes

211

0

PENDING

Douglas

46

0

PENDING

Gilliam

1

0

PENDING

Grant

1

0

PENDING

Harney

1

0

PENDING

Hood River

88

0

PENDING

Jackson

147

0

PENDING

Jefferson

132

0

PENDING

Josephine

52

1

PENDING

Klamath

130

1

PENDING

Lake

21

0

PENDING

Lane

208

3

PENDING

Lincoln

346

3

PENDING

Linn

157

9

PENDING

Malheur

191

1

PENDING

Marion

1,610

47

PENDING

Morrow

93

1

PENDING

Multnomah

2,417

69

PENDING

Polk

159

12

PENDING

Sherman

2

0

PENDING

Tillamook

14

0

PENDING

Umatilla

716

6

PENDING

Union

355

1

PENDING

Wallowa

10

0

PENDING

Wasco

88

1

PENDING

Washington

1,534

20

PENDING

Wheeler

0

0

PENDING

Yamhill

132

8

PENDING

Total

9,930

213

PENDING

1 - This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 - For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 - This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

4 - Negative test results are pending due to a technical issue with the test reporting database.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Fri. 07/03/20
Portland Protester Arrested, Facing Federal Charge After Overnight Attack on Hatfield Courthouse
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/03/20 6:11 PM

Please note the corrections below to the defendant's name and age. At the time of his arrest, Olsen presented officers with a false name (Kiefer Alan Moore) and date of birth.

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a Portland man has been arrested for his role in an overnight attack on the Hatfield Federal Courthouse.

“The lawless and violent acts of extremists across the political spectrum cannot continue. Violence directed at federal, state, and local law enforcement and property destruction is inconsistent with the aims of social justice,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “These are criminal acts and individuals who engage in them will be held accountable.”

Rowan M. Olsen, 19, aka Kiefer Alan Moore, was arrested by Federal Protective Service officers in the early morning hours of July 3, 2020, and a criminal complaint alleging destruction of government property is being presented to a U.S. Magistrate Judge. Olsen will remain in custody until his first appearance in federal court on July 6, 2020.

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Last night’s demonstration marked a significant escalation in violence against federal property in Portland. Officers from the Federal Protective Service and U.S. Customs and Border Protection, as well as U.S. Marshals, were assaulted with bottles, rocks, commercial-grade fireworks, and improvised explosives. Other incendiary devices were thrown into the Hatfield Federal Courthouse.

These actions are illegal and will not be tolerated. Perpetrators of violence against federal law enforcement officers and property will face arrest and prosecution.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Corrected PDF Release

Search Continued for Missing Kayaker Presumed Drowned (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/03/20 6:00 PM
Search crews continue efforts to locate Jared Boria, a kayaker who went missing Tuesday evening at Diamond Lake.
Search crews continue efforts to locate Jared Boria, a kayaker who went missing Tuesday evening at Diamond Lake.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/5204/135826/thumb_KFalls_Dive_Rescue_Boat.jpg

DIAMOND LAKE, Ore. - The search for Jared Bruce Boria, a missing kayaker presumed drowned, is still underway. 

The 37 year-old went missing Tuesday, June 30, 2020, after he launched his kayak from his camping space at Diamond Lake Campground and paddled out onto the lake. At approximately 10:20 PM, dispatchers began receiving reports of a male yelling for help from the water. Boria was later reported as missing by his wife. 

Search efforts are in the fourth day since the the initial report. Searchers have located his kayak, his paddle and shoes, but have not found Boria. 

"There are factors which make this a difficult search mission. The primary difficulty we are currently facing is that no one observed where Jared was on the lake when he was calling for help," said Sgt. Brad O'Dell. "Searches usually begin at the point where the individual was last seen. In this case, it was too dark and witnesses could only hear requests for help, therefore we are making assumptions as to where he may have became distressed". 

The Sheriff's Office is grateful for the assistance which has been provided to help locate Boria. Efforts to locate him have included marine deputies and searchers with specialized underwater scanning capabilities, dive team efforts, Search and Rescue crews from multiple counties and air assets. The following agencies have assisted in the search. 

  • DCSO Marine Division
  • DCSO Dive Team
  • Douglas County Search and Rescue
  • Coos County Search and Rescue
  • Klamath County Search and Rescue
  • Jackson County Search and Rescue
  • Diamond Lake Resort
  • Oregon State Police - Fish and Game Division
  • United States Forest Service Law Enforcement
  • REACH Air Medical Services

Search efforts are expected to continue over the holiday weekend. Anyone recreating in the area is asked to report any possible signs of Boria by dialing 9-1-1. 

###

ORIGINAL RELEASE 07/02/2020 - 7:00 AM

DIAMOND LAKE, Ore. - A Vancouver, Washington man is missing after taking his kayak onto the lake late Tuesday night. 

At approximately 10:20 PM, 9-1-1 dispatchers received reports of a man yelling for help from the water at Diamond Lake. No one was able to see the man, but reported he sounded as if he was in distress. 

Shortly after the initial report, dispatchers received a report of a missing person at Diamond Lake.

Deputies learned 37 year-old Jared Bruce Boria of Vancouver, Washington was camping at Diamond Lake Campground. Shortly before the 9-1-1 calls, Boria had put his kayak in the water and paddled into the lake. He was not wearing a life jacket at the time. 

Deputies spoke to several witnesses who reported hearing a male in distress yelling from the water, but were unable to see anyone. 

An initial search was conducted by Marine and Timber Deputies, Douglas County Fire District #2 and Diamond Lake First Responders, however they were unable to locate Boria or his kayak. 

On Wednesday, July 1, 2020, Marine Deputies, Sheriff's Office Divers, Search & Rescue Personnel from Douglas, Josephine and Coos Counties and Oregon State Police Fish and Game Troopers conducted an exhaustive search of the lake. Boria's kayak, paddle and his shoes were located during the search; however, Boria is still missing at this time.

Boria is described as a hispanic male approximately 6'0'' tall, 160lbs, with brown hair and brown eyes. 

Search efforts will resume Thursday, July 2nd. Anyone recreating in the area is asked to be aware of the missing person report and call 9-1-1 with any information which may help the search effort.

###




Attached Media Files: Search crews continue efforts to locate Jared Boria, a kayaker who went missing Tuesday evening at Diamond Lake.

Oregon Guardsmen return from overseas assignment in Jordan
Oregon Military Department - 07/03/20 2:30 PM

SALEM, Ore. - Soldiers from the Oregon National Guard’s 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment and the 2nd Battalion, 218th Field Artillery Regiment are due to arrive home from deployment on July 4, after serving in Jordan.

The 38 Oregon Soldiers returning home are members of the Scout platoon, Headquarters Company 2-162 Infantry and the 2-218 Field Artillery Fire Support Section. 

The Soldiers were part of the Jordanian Operational Engagement Program, deploying in various rotations from September 2019 to July of 2020. The Soldiers trained with the Jordanian Security Forces and Armed Forces, completing essential Soldier tasks such as basic rifle marksmanship, crew serves weapons and medical proficiency skills at the platoon and squadron level.

The Oregon Guardsmen had just come from Fort Bliss, in El Paso, Texas, where they were quarantined for 14 days, in accordance with COVID-19 federal guidelines, which included additional medical screening and current procedures as they return home to Oregon.

For media inquires and additional information regarding family homecomings with Soldiers returning; please contact Capt. Jessica Clarke at 503-584-3917. 

The Oregon Guardsmen from the 2-162 and 2-218 deployed with members of the 1st Squadron, 303rd Cavalry Regiment from the Washington Army National Guard, who started returning home on July 2nd.

###

 


Oregon reports 344 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths; provides Watch List data
Oregon Health Authority - 07/03/20 12:04 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 209, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 344 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 9,636.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (7), Clackamas (22), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (9), Douglas (1), Jackson (9), Jefferson (5), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (16), Lincoln (18), Linn (2), Malheur (20), Marion (32), Morrow (10), Multnomah (59), Polk (5), Sherman (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (49), Union (8), Wasco (10), Washington (46), and Yamhill (1).

The Health Authority also released a table showing recent trends in cases by county between mid-June and the beginning of July.

These trends show where the COVID-19 virus is spreading at the fastest rate and which counties have the highest rates of “sporadic” transmission – i.e., cases that do not have a clear epidemiological link to other outbreaks or clusters of infections and therefore indicate that the virus is spreading uncontained in a community.

Governor Kate Brown identified eight counties that will be placed on a “Watch List” based on these data: Jefferson, Lake, Lincoln, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union, Wasco. State and local health officials will closely monitor the situation in these counties in coming days and prioritize additional resources to suppress the virus in these hotspot communities.

 

Recent Data on COVID-19 Spread by County

(June 18, 2020-July 1, 2020)

 

 

Case Count

Case Rate / 100,000 population

Sporadic Case Rate / 100,000 population

Clatsop

3

7.78

5.19

Lane

89

24.13

5.42

Columbia

5

9.83

5.90

Douglas

15

13.85

6.46

Jackson

46

21.47

8.40

Benton

17

18.94

8.91

Crook

2

8.95

8.95

Coos

9

14.22

11.06

Linn

28

22.79

13.02

Deschutes

54

29.89

14.39

Yamhill

35

33.71

14.45

Josephine

15

17.55

16.38

Klamath

55

82.94

16.59

Hood River

4

17.29

17.29

Baker

3

18.77

18.77

Tillamook

6

23.01

19.17

Polk

21

25.79

20.88

Clackamas

234

57.67

22.43

Marion

320

95.36

30.99

Washington

473

81.30

32.83

Multnomah

640

80.14

36.56

Wallowa

6

86.66

43.33

Lincoln

98

204.67

50.12

Wasco

33

127.58

50.26

Lake

13

165.75

89.25

Jefferson

53

229.01

116.67

Union

102

391.89

138.31

Malheur

98

322.04

193.88

Umatilla

413

537.08

313.40

Morrow

51

454.75

338.83

 

See the table below for total cumulative cases, deaths, and negative tests by county, as of July 3, 2020.

 

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

4

0

512

Benton

91

5

6,241

Clackamas

795

24

23,851

Clatsop

49

0

2,462

Columbia

35

0

2,824

Coos

42

0

2,745

Crook

12

0

1,078

Curry

8

0

722

Deschutes

201

0

10,994

Douglas

45

0

5,121

Gilliam

0

0

97

Grant

1

0

194

Harney

1

0

415

Hood River

88

0

2,379

Jackson

140

0

12,509

Jefferson

131

0

2,020

Josephine

44

1

4,319

Klamath

125

1

5,081

Lake

20

0

251

Lane

196

3

24,379

Lincoln

345

2

4,734

Linn

156

9

6,979

Malheur

160

1

1,698

Marion

1,595

47

17,381

Morrow

82

1

520

Multnomah

2,361

69

53,268

Polk

154

12

2,946

Sherman

2

0

149

Tillamook

13

0

1,359

Umatilla

667

4

4,071

Union

355

1

1,712

Wallowa

10

0

436

Wasco

85

1

2,253

Washington

1,491

20

33,807

Wheeler

0

0

122

Yamhill

132

8

5,467

Total

9,636

209

245,096

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Marine Deputies to Focus Efforts on BUII Detection and Deterrence Over Holiday Weekend (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/03/20 11:42 AM
Douglas County Sheriff's Office Marine Deputies participate in Operation Dry Water to detect and deter boating under the influence this weekend.
Douglas County Sheriff's Office Marine Deputies participate in Operation Dry Water to detect and deter boating under the influence this weekend.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/5204/135812/thumb_Marine_Deputies.JPG

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - Deputies with the Douglas County Sheriff's Office Marine Division will be participating in a national campaign to combat boating under the influence of intoxicants this weekend. The campaign, Operation Dry Water, focuses efforts over the holiday weekend to detect and deter boaters who are operating while impaired. Operation Dry Water begins Friday, July 3, 2020 and runs through Sunday, July 5, 2020. 

While Marine Deputies are always looking for boaters who are impaired, this weekend's BUII patrols will be enhanced and specifically focused. The mission is to reduce the number of alcohol and drug related deaths on the water. The incidents that result from Boating Under the Influence of Intoxicants is 100% preventable. 

"We want those people recreating on the water to enjoy everything that Douglas County has to offer; but safely,", Marine Division Sergeant Brad O'Dell said. "Boating while intoxicated not only places your life at risk, but those in your boat and as well as those innocent people sharing the water with you. The Sheriff's Office will absolutely not tolerate impaired boating operation, ever."

As a reminder, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office Marine Division encourages boaters to always wear a life jacket. 




Attached Media Files: Douglas County Sheriff's Office Marine Deputies participate in Operation Dry Water to detect and deter boating under the influence this weekend.

Thu. 07/02/20
Fire Season Officially Starts (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/02/20 3:55 PM
Oregon Department of Forestry districts
Oregon Department of Forestry districts
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/1072/135794/thumb_odf_districts.jpg

SALEM, Ore – Fire season will officially be in effect on all Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) protected lands Monday, July 6. The North Cascade and West Oregon protection districts are the last two to declare fire season. ODF’s Southwest Oregon District was the first to declare fire season May 1.

Fire season is declared based on conditions at the local district level, with restrictions intended to help prevent human-caused wildfires. Fire season generally runs through mid-October and ends based on local conditions.

For residents within ODF’s 12 fire protection districts, the arrival of fire season means the end of unregulated outdoor debris burning, a leading cause of wildfires. While permits to burn may be issued in some areas, debris burning is generally prohibited throughout the summer due to increased wildfire risk. Violators burning without a permit will be cited and held liable for fire suppression costs.

Other public use fire restrictions are also in effect in several areas. The use of fireworks, tracer ammunition and exploding targets are illegal within ODF protection boundaries, as well as other state and federal lands. Campfires, the mowing of dry, cured grass, cutting and welding, power saw use and other spark-emitting activities are regulated at the local level, depending upon the conditions and fire danger. For example, during low fire danger, mowing may be allowed all day. However, during moderate, high and extreme fire danger mowing may be restricted to early morning or prohibited entirely until conditions improve.

ODF encourages the public to stay informed of current fire restrictions by visiting the agency’s Fire Restrictions & Closures website or calling their local ODF or protective association office. To learn more about preventing human-caused wildfires, visit Keep Oregon Green on the web at www.keeporegongreen.org.  

Forest operators are required to follow fire season requirements, including providing a water supply, fire tools, spark arresters on equipment, and fire watch. Similar to fire danger restrictions for the public, operators must follow rules under the four-tiered Industrial Fire Precaution Level (IFPL) system.  

ODF protects over 16 million acres of private, county, state and federal land.

###




Attached Media Files: Oregon Department of Forestry districts

Housing Stability Council meeting will be on Friday, July 10, 2020, Call-in Meeting ONLY
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/02/20 2:49 PM

July 2, 2020
  
The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be on Friday, July 10, 2020.  The meeting will be a call-in meeting only due to the current COVID-19 health crisis.
 
Call-In: 1-253-215-8782 or Toll Free: 1-888-788-0099
Meeting ID: 943 7928 6967 Password: 402403
 
AGENDA:
9:00 Meeting Called to Order - Roll Call 
9:05 Public Comment 
9:15 Meeting Minutes Approval - June 5, 2020
9:20 Report of the Director
10:00 Homeownership Division Updates
- Oregon Homeowner Stabilization Initiative Update
10:30 Affordable Rental Housing Division Updates 
- Orchards Plaza/Solhaven Preservation
- Glenhaven Park Apartments
- LIFT Homeownership NOFA Awards
- LIFT Rental NOFA Awards
- MWESB Final Report and Implementation Plan
11:45  Report of the Chair
12:00  Meeting Adjourned


Access the meeting materials packet at:

https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/OSHC/Documents/07-10-2020-HSC-Meeting-Packet.pdf


Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets July 6
Oregon Health Authority - 07/02/20 2:39 PM

July 2, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board's Incentives and Funding Subcommittee.

Agenda: Approve Feb. 3 meeting minutes; finalize recommendations for changes to funding principles; discuss changes to the funding formula for 2021-2023.

When: July 6, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Members of the public may join remotely via phone at 253-215-8782, meeting ID 968 1183 5805; or via computer, tablet or smartphone at https://zoom.us/j/96811835805.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Incentives and Funding Subcommittee develops recommendations for the board's consideration.

For more information, see the board's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/About/Pages/ophab.aspx.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.

Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Missing child alert -- Missing foster child Zion Gallaher is still missing, and is believed to be in serious danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/02/20 2:08 PM
Missing child Zion Gallaher 3
Missing child Zion Gallaher 3
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/973/135786/thumb_Zion_Gallaher_6.jpg

(Salem, Ore.) – Zion Gallaher, age 16, is a foster child who went missing from Portland, Oregon on June 7, 2020. is still missing He is believed to be in serious danger. Because of his mental health and behavioral challenges, he may present higher functioning than he actually is, or may behave erratically.

The Oregon Department of Human Services, Child Welfare Program, asks the public to help in the effort to find him and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see him. He knows the downtown Portland, Sandy and Independence, Oregon areas well.

Name: Zion Gallaher
Date of birth: Jan. 8, 2004
Height: 5’10
Weight: 180 pounds
Portland Police Case #20-185646
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1392960

Anyone who suspects they have information about Zion Gallaher’s location should call 911 or local law enforcement.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As DHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Attached Media Files: Missing child Zion Gallaher 3 , Missing child Zion Gallaher 2 , Missing child Zion Gallaher 1

Oregon State Police Major Crimes Detectives Asking for Public's Assistance in Locating Suspect in Homicide - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/02/20 1:55 PM
2020-07/1002/135781/Hagenno.png
2020-07/1002/135781/Hagenno.png
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On June 24, 2020 at approximately 3:45 P.M., a shooting occurred at Pinecrest Drive and Tiffany Way in Grants Pass OR. Detectives located Theodore Homer Robison (55) from Josephine County there shot several times and he was pronounced deceased..

Investigators have identified Bret Alan Hagenno as a suspect and believe he could be armed and dangerous.

Hagenno is described as 6 foot tall, approximately 250 pounds and balding. He may or may not have a beard and is known to frequent Josephine and Jackson Counties.

Oregon State Police Major Crimes Section Detectives are asking for the public’s help in locating Hagenno who is wanted for Murder II in Josephine County. If anyone has seen Hagenno or knows his whereabouts, they are asked to contact the Oregon State Police Southern Command Center at 541-664-4600 and reference case SP-20-173329.

Hagenno is considered to be armed and dangerous. If located, do not contact and call the police (911).

Previous Release from June 15, 2020

On June 24, 2020, at approximately 4:00 P.M., Josephine County law enforcement responded to the area of Pinecrest Drive and Tiffany Way for a homicide investigation. 

The deceased has been identified as Theodore Homer Robison (55) from Josephine County.

Investigators are asking for the public's assistance.  If anyone in the area of Pinecrest Drive and Plumtree Lane has video surveillance cameras, they are asked to contact investigators.  

The Oregon State Police are the lead investigators and are being assisted by the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety, Josephine County Sheriff's Office and the Josephine County District Attorney's Office.  

If anyone has any information they are asked to contact the Oregon State Police Dispatch Center at 541-664-4600. Reference case number SP20-173329.

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-07/1002/135781/Hagenno.png

Oregon reports 375 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 07/02/20 1:25 PM

July 2, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 375 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 209, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 375 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 9,294.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (22), Columbia (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (9), Douglas (2), Jackson (15), Jefferson (8), Josephine (8), Lane (15), Lincoln (3), Linn (3), Malheur (16), Marion (32), Morrow (8), Multnomah (64), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (88), Union (5), Wasco (2), Washington (67), and Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 209th COVID-19 death is 73-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on June 20 and died on June 30. Her place of death s being confirmed. She had underlying medical conditions.

Today’s case count is Oregon’s largest single day total since the beginning of the pandemic, following the previous largest on Wednesday.

Oregon has experienced five weeks of case growth and cases are rising faster in our rural communities and in central and eastern Oregon. The largest county case count today was in Umatilla County with 88 new cases attributed to outbreaks and community spread.

Earlier this week, Governor Kate Brown ordered face coverings to be worn in all indoor public places throughout the state. Masks and face coverings, along with maintaining 6-feet of distancing between people has been shown to contain the spread of COVID-19.

Note: Dr. Paul Cieslak will hold OHA’s regular weekly media briefing today at 3 p.m. To participate the media is invited to call 844-291-6358, participant code 2584655.

Slight data change to Public Health Indicators Dashboard

Due to technical issues in processing negative COVID-19 tests this week, many negative tests reported on June 25, were processed on later days, causing a spike in the percent positivity metric for that day on the Public Health Indicators Dashboard.

This week's trends in positive tests percentages should be interpreted with increased caution. To present more accurate information, the total percent over the last seven days is provided in parentheses.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


July 4th Reminder: No fireworks in parks, on beaches
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/02/20 12:00 PM

In advance of the July 4 holiday weekend, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) reminds visitors that fireworks are prohibited in state parks and on Oregon’s ocean beaches at all times, including the Independence Day holiday.

“Fireworks can hurt people, cause wildfires, harm wildlife and create litter and debris,” said OPRD Associate Director Chris Havel. “We are asking visitors to do their part and respect fireworks rules.”

Keeping fireworks out of state parks is critical for preventing human-caused wildfires. Dry conditions are already present in many areas of the state, and a few parks have campfire restrictions in place. Check stateparks.oregon.gov for information about restrictions in state parks.

“One of the best ways to prevent wildfires while enjoying the outdoors is to practice safe habits when building and extinguishing campfires,” Havel said. “This is critical now more than ever, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, when a revenue shortfall means fewer rangers are available to patrol and respond to incidents.”

Information about basic wildfire safety is at keeporegongreen.org.


Detectives Investigate Glide Shooting (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/02/20 11:29 AM
James Thomas Crayton
James Thomas Crayton
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GLIDE, Ore. - Detectives are investigating an incident where a man shot another man in the head Wednesday night. 

Shortly before 10:00 pm on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, 9-1-1 dispatchers received a call that a male had been shot in the head by 65-year-old James Thomas Crayton of Glide, at a residence in the 1500-block of Bar L Ranch Road in Glide. 

When deputies arrived, they found the victim, 48-year-old Christopher Lee Wagner, also of Glide, to be alert and responsive. He was transported by ambulance to a hospital where he is listed in stable condition. 

Deputies learned Crayton and Wagner had been involved in a brief argument before Crayton shot Wagner. Crayton then tried to discard the firearm prior to the arrival of law enforcement. 

Crayton was arrested and lodged in the Douglas County Jail for Assault II. The investigation is ongoing and additional charges may follow. 

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Attached Media Files: James Thomas Crayton

Historic cemeteries commission to meet July 16
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/02/20 10:41 AM

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet by conference call at 1 p.m. on July 16. Its agenda includes a heritage bulletin on marking unmarked graves, a position paper on the Confederate flags in historic cemeteries, and outreach efforts to support the preservation of historic cemeteries. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment.

 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

 

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


Search for Missing Kayaker at Diamond Lake (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/02/20 7:41 AM
Search Efforts for Missing Kayaker
Search Efforts for Missing Kayaker
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DIAMOND LAKE, Ore. - A Vancouver, Washington man is missing after taking his kayak onto the lake late Tuesday night. 

At approximately 10:20 PM, 9-1-1 dispatchers received reports of a man yelling for help from the water at Diamond Lake. No one was able to see the man, but reported he sounded as if he was in distress. 

Shortly after the initial report, dispatchers received a report of a missing person at Diamond Lake.

Deputies learned 37 year-old Jared Bruce Boria of Vancouver, Washington was camping at Diamond Lake Campground. Shortly before the 9-1-1 calls, Boria had put his kayak in the water and paddled into the lake. He was not wearing a life jacket at the time. 

Deputies spoke to several witnesses who reported hearing a male in distress yelling from the water, but were unable to see anyone. 

An initial search was conducted by Marine and Timber Deputies, Douglas County Fire District #2 and Diamond Lake First Responders, however they were unable to locate Boria or his kayak. 

On Wednesday, July 1, 2020, Marine Deputies, Sheriff's Office Divers, Search & Rescue Personnel from Douglas, Josephine and Coos Counties and Oregon State Police Fish and Game Troopers conducted an exhaustive search of the lake. Boria's kayak, paddle and his shoes were located during the search; however, Boria is still missing at this time.

Boria is described as a hispanic male approximately 6'0'' tall, 160lbs, with brown hair and brown eyes. 

Search efforts will resume Thursday, July 2nd. Anyone recreating in the area is asked to be aware of the missing person report and call 9-1-1 with any information which may help the search effort.

 




Attached Media Files: Search Efforts for Missing Kayaker , Search and Rescue K9 Searches Diamond Lake for Missing Kayaker , Jared Bruce Boria

Wed. 07/01/20
Water Rescue on the Rogue River
Josephine Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/01/20 6:25 PM

REPORTING:  Lieutenant Fields                                         

INCIDENT DATE AND TIME: June 29, 2020 at 6:00pm

DETAILS: 

On Monday June 29, 2020 the Oregon Department of Forestry was flagged down and advised of two male juveniles stuck on the rocks below Indian Mary Park. Rural Metro responded to the area and advised a boat would be needed to get the juveniles to safety.  

The Josephine County Sheriff’s Office Marine Patrol responded to the scene and was able to pick up the juveniles with the raft. The three juveniles were located 150 yards below the Indian Mary boat ramp on the opposite side of the river.  The juveniles were transported down river to Morrison’s Lodge where family members were waiting.  

Although no injuries were sustained, none of the juveniles were wearing life jackets while floating on pool toys. Swift water currents swept the boys downstream.

The Sheriff’s Office would like to encourage everyone to be vigilant around the water and not take any unnecessary chances. The Rogue River is very swift and unpredictable. It is recommend that life jackets be worn when swimming, floating or boating on the Rogue River. 


ICYMI: Critical Minerals: Securing America's Future Op-Ed by Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Casey Hammond
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 07/01/20 3:27 PM

WASHINGTON – One year ago, the Trump Administration released a strategic plan through the Departments of Commerce and the Interior designed to ensure the nation has a secure and reliable supply of critical minerals necessary for our economic and national security. In the year since, the Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Land Management have worked with partner agencies to identify prospective areas for critical mineral deposits on public lands, and to accelerate review and approval of critical mineral exploration and development projects.

Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management Casey Hammond highlighted some of the successes and milestones achieved over the past year in an op-ed published last week in the Elko, Nevada Daily Free Press. These include the approval of multiple critical minerals mining projects, and the expansion of many other operations. The full article is below.

Critical Minerals: Securing America’s Future

At no other time in recent memory has the United States needed to invest domestically and be less dependent on foreign products and natural resources. America’s manufacturing and technology sectors are among the highest-paying and fastest growing in the country, and their raw materials could and should be sourced from the United States by American workers. The impacts to consumers and the nation’s economy from the disruptions caused by the coronavirus illustrates the need for domestic production of critical minerals.

In response to President Trump’s Executive Order 13817, A Federal Strategy to Ensure Secure and Reliable Supplies of Critical Minerals, the Department of the Interior established a list of 35 minerals essential to the economic and national security of the United States. The list includes rare earth elements and other metals such as lithium, indium, tellurium, gallium, and platinum group elements. They are used in the smartphones in our pockets, the cars we drive, the computers and televisions we rely on for work and entertainment, alloys for the aerospace and defense industries, integrated circuits and optical devices, medical imaging and research, and hundreds of other applications.

In 2018, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated the total value of critical mineral resources produced to be $82.2 billion. Our nation is a major exporter of some of these minerals, however we rely on other countries for more than 50 percent of most of the minerals that are vital to our economy and security. In fact, the United States relies on imports to meet 50 percent or more of the domestic demand for 31 of the 35 designated critical minerals. We have no domestic production and rely completely on imports to supply the nation’s demand for 14 of those critical minerals, including rare earth minerals, manganese, and cesium – all vital for technology manufacturing and dozens of other applications. In 1984, this total was 11. Today, China dominates the market and supplies the largest number of critical minerals to the United States.

Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt and the Department of the Interior have been working to ensure the Nation has a reliable supply of critical minerals necessary for our economic prosperity and national security by identifying areas for discovery of new deposits of these minerals and accelerate their possible development on public lands. Other agencies are advancing research and development into recycling and reprocessing technologies for critical minerals, as well as enhancing the nation’s workforce and downstream manufacturing capabilities.

We are one of the few nations who will smartly and efficiently develop these resources responsibly and limit the environmental impact. We’ve made it a priority to streamline the review and approval of critical minerals development projects on BLM managed lands including:

  • Approving the Panamint Valley Lithium Exploration Project in Inyo County, California, which is drilling exploratory wells to locate lithium deposits last August.
  • Releasing the analysis of the proposed Thacker Pass Lithium Mine in Nevada in the next few weeks, which if approved, would employ over 300 employees and contribute approximately $145 million in combined tax revenues.

Full production capacity for the Thacker Pass mine is projected to be 60,000 metric tons per year – which, at current levels, would represent nearly 44 percent of global lithium production and become the second largest lithium project in the world. Global demand for lithium is skyrocketing due to its importance in high-capacity batteries for electric cars, laptops, smartphones and other products. As of now, almost 96 percent of production is concentrated in just four countries: Australia, Chile, Argentina and China.

  • Holding a virtual public meeting to discuss the development of an environmental analysis for a proposed dolomite quarry mine in Luna County, New Mexico. Dolomite, a form of Magnesium, is used for multiple applications, including in the construction, metal processing, and chemical industries, and as an ingredient in the production of glass, bricks, and ceramics.
  • Approving the expansion of the Lost Creek uranium in-situ recovery project in Sweetwater County, Wyoming in March. The decision allows the mine to expand uranium recovery into the next deeper layer of minerals and onto 5,751 additional surface acres ,for a total project area of 10,005 acres, enabling the company to expand operations and sustain employment for an additional six to eight years, until around 2032.

Through these projects and many others, we continue to champion investment in American industry and infrastructure, by encouraging innovation and responsible multiple use of our public lands. Projects like these underpin our nation’s strong and diverse minerals and energy portfolios, and their benefits will multiply as this Administration encourages new development of our natural resources to embolden American economic growth and national security.

Ending our dependence upon foreign sources for critical minerals will make America safer, more secure, and more prosperous in the years ahead. We are proud to help lead the way.

Casey Hammond is Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management.

--BLM--

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.

Follow the BLM on Twitter, Facebook, and Flickr @BLMNational


Oregon Historical Society Museum to Re-Open to Visitors on Saturday, July 11 (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 07/01/20 2:53 PM
Experience Oregon - credit Andie Petkus
Experience Oregon - credit Andie Petkus
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Portland, OR – After nearly four months closed, the Oregon Historical Society plans to re-open its museum to the public on Saturday, July 11, 2020 at 10am. Following re-opening, public museum and store hours will be Wednesdays – Saturdays from 10am – 5pm and Sundays from 12pm – 5pm. The OHS Research Library remains closed for renovations that began in January 2020. More information on library services that are available during the renovation can be found at ohs.org/libraryreno.

Following the guidance and requirements of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for cultural attractions and museums, the Oregon Historical Society has implemented important safety protocols for the health of our staff and visitors. New safety protocols are detailed at the bottom of this press release as well as at ohs.org/reopening.

When the Oregon Historical Society closed on Saturday, March 14, the museum was about to debut a new original exhibition, Nevertheless, They Persisted: Women’s Voting Rights and the 19th Amendment, which chronicles the complicated history of woman suffrage and broad voting rights and profiles the brave activists who fought for woman suffrage. Now extended through mid-2021, this exhibit shows the many ways Oregon history connects to the national history of woman suffrage and to the complex history of American democracy.

“In this election year, Nevertheless, They Persisted will prompt visitors to reflect on voting rights and the many ways that activists have fought to universalize this basic right of citizenship,” said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. “We were excited to open this exhibition in March, and four months later, the important messages of the power of activism shared in Nevertheless, They Persisted feel even more relevant today.”

Oregon women gained the right to vote in 1912, the initiative passing with a 52% majority after five prior failed attempts spanning nearly 30 years. It was not until the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920, however, that women across the country gained the right to vote in local and national elections. Even then, these rights did not extend to all women — restrictions on citizenship continued for Native Americans and first-generation Asian Americans well into the twentieth century, and frequently used voter-suppression methods were outlawed by the 1965 Voting Rights Act (itself weakened by the 2013 Supreme Court decision in Shelby County v. Holder).

Nevertheless, They Persisted, and the Oregon Historical Society’s recently renovated permanent exhibition, Experience Oregon, give visitors an honest, and often difficult, look at our state’s history. In a recent statement on racial justice and equality, Tymchuk and OHS Board President Mary Faulkner wrote, “The Oregon Historical Society recommits itself to being a valuable resource by documenting, preserving, and sharing our state’s history, from all perspectives, and in all its complexities. We hope that everyone will continue to help guide us in providing knowledge of the past and working to build a more just and equitable society in the future.”

The Oregon Historical Society is excited to re-open its museum to share these exhibitions with visitors, while continuing its efforts to provide programs and content virtually for those who are not able to visit in person. For a full schedule of upcoming virtual programs, visit ohs.org/events, and to read up on what has been keeping OHS staff-members busy during our closure, visit ohs.org/blog.

New Health and Safety Protocols

Visitors to the Oregon Historical Society will be asked to adhere to the following guidelines in an effort to keep our staff and visitors as safe as possible: 

Wear A Face Covering: Pursuant to the Governor’s executive order, all visitors age twelve and older are required to wear a face covering. In compliance with ADA requirements, guests who have a physical or mental health condition, including disability, that prevents them from putting on, taking off, or wearing a face covering or are unable to wear a face covering for medical reasons will be exempt. If visitors do not have a face covering, single-use face coverings will be provided at no charge.

Maintain Distance: Signage through the museum will remind visitors to keep six feet of distance between themselves and visitors outside of their party. Per OHA guidelines, groups of up to 10 within the same party are not required to maintain six feet of physical distance.

Modified Exhibit Access: For the safety of our visitors, high touch hands-on interactive features in open exhibitions are closed until further notice. Our History Hub exhibit will be closed due to the hands-on nature of this exhibition, as will our Photo Hallway gallery due to the inability for visitors to easily maintain six feet of distance. 

Museum Store: The Oregon Historical Society Museum Store will maintain the same public hours as the museum. During this time, there will be a limit of four customers in the store at one time. We are eager to welcome shoppers back to the museum store, as all sales in our store provide critical funding in support of our mission.

Other Safety Precautions Include:

  • Additional hand sanitizing stations installed at the museum’s entrance and throughout the building;
  • Plexiglas sneeze guards installed at point of sale stations;
  • Designated one-way paths to maintain required distancing as visitors enter, exit, and enjoy our exhibitions;
  • Limited contact transactions; at this time, we will be discouraging cash/check transactions; and
  • Limiting building capacity to a maximum of 150 visitors in the museum at one time.

About the Oregon Historical Society
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: Experience Oregon - credit Andie Petkus , Experience Oregon - credit Andie Petkus , Experience Oregon - credit Andie Petkus , Experience Oregon - credit Andie Petkus , Experience Oregon - credit Andie Petkus , Experience Oregon - credit Andie Petkus , Nevertheless, They Persisted , Nevertheless, They Persisted , Nevertheless, They Persisted , Nevertheless, They Persisted

Man Arrested for Attempting to Lure a Minor for Sex (Photo)
Ashland Police Dept. - 07/01/20 2:17 PM
Harvey, Benjamin
Harvey, Benjamin
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-07/6263/135744/thumb_Harvey.jpg

On June 30, 2020 Detectives from the Ashland Police Department arrested Benjamin Harvey, 32, an Ashland resident, on charges of Luring a Minor and Purchasing Sex From a Minor. The arrest resulted from APD being notified that Harvey had reached out to an underage member of the community and offered money in exchange for sex. The victim reported the information to the APD. APD wants to hear from any other community members that have been contacted by Harvey with similar illegal requests or any other concerns. Harvey remains in the Jackson County Jail as of Tuesday afternoon.




Attached Media Files: Harvey, Benjamin

9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/01/20 1:35 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 118th Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications Class #118 graduation will be held at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, July 3, 2020, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, in Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the need for social distancing, the graduation will be closed to the public.  However, we would like to publicly congratulate Basic Telecommunications Class #118 for a successful completion of their basic training.
 
Members of Basic Telecommunications Class #118:

Dispatcher Brooke Allen - Malheur County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Tera Asboe - Clackamas County Communications

Dispatcher Kelly Berkey - Warm Springs Police Department

Dispatcher Brie Blankenship - Yamhill Communications

Dispatcher Kathleen Clardy - Reedsport Police Department

Dispatcher Joseph Crawford - Emergency Communications of Southern Oregon

Dispatcher Dand'e Ennis - Willamette Valley Communications Center

Dispatcher Katie Frederick - Willamette Valley Communications Center

Dispatcher Alexandria Ishihara - Willamette Valley Communications Center

Dispatcher Ashley Larsen - Central Lane Communications Center

Dispatcher Jessica Lindley - Linn County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Moriah Mahoney - Brookings Police Department

Dispatcher Kristen McDonnell - METCOM 9-1-1

Dispatcher Rebecca McLaughlin - Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Bailey Nepean - Klamath 9-1-1 Communications District

Dispatcher Randee Randall - Linn County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Steve Reutov - Yamhill Communications

Dispatcher Arnold Sicairos - Emergency Communications of Southern Oregon

Dispatcher Katrina Sizer - Prineville Police Department

Dispatcher Michelle Stacey - Oregon State Police

Dispatcher Darian Storm - Grant County Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Hillary Trotter - Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Christine Turner - Clackamas County Communications

Dispatcher Kylee Welch - Springfield Police Department

Dispatcher Ashley Whitten - Portland State University DPS

Dispatcher Ashley Wolgast - Emergency Communications of Southern Oregon

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.




Attached Media Files: Class Photo Basic Police 118

Fatal Crash on Hwy 101 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 07/01/20 1:26 PM

On Wednesday, July 1, 2020 at approximately 10:46 A.M., a Douglas County Deputy attempted a traffic stop on a vehicle south of Reedsport on Hwy 101.  The vehicle fled and eventually crashed on Hwy 101 near milepost 217.  

The operator of the vehicle is deceased.  

What appeared to be explosive devices were located at the scene and the Oregon State Police Explosives Unit is heading to the scene.  

Oregon State Police is investigating the crash. 

Hwy 101 will be closed for several hours with no detour available.     

More information will be available when appropriate.


Oregon reports 281 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 07/01/20 12:52 PM

July 1, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 281 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 208, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 281 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 8,931. It is the highest daily case count since the beginning of the pandemic.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (2), Clackamas (20), Clatsop (1), Columbia (1), Deschutes (4), Douglas (2), Jackson (3), Jefferson (7), Klamath (4), Lake (2), Lane (12), Lincoln (12), Linn (7), Malheur (16), Marion (27), Morrow (2), Multnomah (38), Polk (8), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (42), Union (5), Wallowa (2), Wasco (4), Washington (48), and Yamhill (7).

Oregon’s 208th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on June 18 and died on June 29. Her place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying medical conditions.

More information is available about Oregon’s 192nd death, which was initially reported June 22. Oregon’s 192nd death is a 90-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on June 18 and died on June 21, in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.


OHA to report outbreaks in child care facilities

Starting today, the COVID-19 Weekly Report will include names and case counts for child care facilities that enroll 30 or more children and have five or more cases. The Weekly Report also will include the total number of facilities statewide—no matter how many children they enroll—that have five or more cases.

Today’s Weekly Report covers data from June 22-28. In the report, most indicators point to a resurgence in COVID-19 transmission. OHA recorded 1,402 new cases of COVID-19 infection, an 11 percent increase from the previous week (1,263 new cases). In addition, 12 Oregonians were reported to have died, the same number as the preceding week.

The number of COVID-19 tests reported (28,359) decreased by 11 percent and the percentage of tests positive increased to 4.2 percent from 3.7 percent in the preceding week. Meanwhile, large outbreaks have contributed a diminishing proportion of recent cases, and sporadic cases have increased consistent with diffuse community spread.

Lastly, the report notes that about 75 percent of recent cases have been diagnosed in people younger than 50 years old. Since hospitalization is less common among younger people with COVID-19 infection, statewide hospital capacity remains sufficient for now.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Bureau of Land Management Officials move to reduce wildfires
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 07/01/20 11:29 AM

Portland, Ore. – Bureau of Land Management (BLM) officials have updated the 2020 prohibitions regarding the use of fire-causing materials on BLM lands to include the prohibition of using metal targets throughout Oregon and Washington. This is in addition to the original prohibition of using fireworks, exploding targets, and tracer or incendiary devices. The prohibition is effective May 10, 2020, until October 31, 2020.

“We need everyone to take an active role in preventing human-caused wildfires this year since the Pacific Northwest is predicted to have an extremely dry summer. To prevent these fires, we all have to follow these prohibitions,” said Barry Bushue, State Director, BLM Oregon/Washington.

BLM Officials recommend the following fire safety precautions for recreational target shooting:

  • Avoid target shooting on days with hot, dry, and/or windy conditions.
  • Ensure target areas are clear of dry grass, vegetation, and rocks for at least 20 feet around the target.
  • Have a proper backstop.
  • Bring water, a fire extinguisher, and a shovel.
  • Do not use prohibited items:  metal targets, tracer or incendiary devices, and exploding targets.

For updated information on public use restrictions on BLM OR/WA public lands, please visit the BLM OR/WA fire restrictions page.

People violating these prohibitions can be fined up to $1,000 and/or receive a prison term of up to one year. In addition, people responsible for starting wildland fires on Federal lands can be billed for the cost of putting out the fire. An incendiary device is defined as any firebomb or device designed or specially adapted to cause physical harm to persons or property by means of fire, consisting of an incendiary substance or agent and a means to ignite it. Examples include, but are not limited to, flamethrowers, Molotov cocktails, or accelerants.

-BLM–
The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals. 




Attached Media Files: BLM Oregon/Washington Updated Fire Order

Oregon Department of Human Services statement regarding Secretary of State child welfare system audit
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/01/20 9:35 AM

Salem, OR – Today the Oregon Secretary of State released an audit report of the Oregon Department of Human Services, Child Welfare Division. The report concludes that effective preventive services can support child and family wellbeing by helping keep children at home safely.

“We appreciate the report and its acknowledgement that the work of supporting Oregon’s children and families is a community effort that depends on effective partnerships and preventive services,” said Rebecca Jones Gaston, director of the Oregon Child Welfare Program. “DHS Child Welfare is developing a Child Welfare Vision for Transformation. With contributions from partners, families and youth, our goal is to achieve true transformation built on core values and a belief that children do best growing up in a family. Our vision is for all children to experience safe, stable, healthy lives and grow up in the care of a nurturing family and community.”

DHS Child Welfare will achieve this Vision for Transformation through effective partnerships and shared responsibility within the child welfare system, including both the Oregon Health Authority and community partners. DHS Child Welfare and its partners are committed to providing services that support child and family wellbeing, prevent abuse and neglect of children, and reduce the use of foster care.

DHS Child Welfare will also:

  1. Ensure that when foster care is needed, it will be family-based, short-term and culturally responsive. Foster care should be designed to better stabilize families, rather than just serving as a placement for a child.
  2. Establish that children will be placed in the care of family, friends, and neighbors whenever possible, and help children maintain connections to their cultures, communities, and Tribes. 
  3. Support our workforce and provide the resources, training, coaching, and services needed to support our children, families and communities.

DHS agrees with nine of the ten recommendations and partially agrees with one. Work is already underway to implement five of the 10 recommendations. 

As of June 30, 2020 no Oregon children are placed in out-of-state treatment facilities, down from a high of 88 children placed out-of-state in March 2019.

Children in foster care in Oregon fell to 6,692 in June 2020, the lowest number in at least four years.

In May 2020 there were 4,983 screened reports of abuse or neglect that were documented and either closed at screening or assigned for assessment.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).

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Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee meeting for July 10 canceled
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/01/20 9:00 AM

The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee’s scheduled meeting for July 10 in Salem has been canceled by Chair David Yamamoto due to commissioners' ongoing responsibilities related to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The next meeting of the FTLAC is scheduled for August 28, 2020, in Salem.


Public comment period opens for updates to state rules for National Register Program
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/01/20 8:30 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on proposed changes to rules governing how the state protects important historical places.                                                  

The state is proposing updates to the Oregon Administrative Rules that govern how the state administers the federal National Register of Historic Places Program, which lists buildings, districts and other sites important to local, state or national history. The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) — an office of OPRD — administers the local program, which is run by the National Park Service.

In the last several years, proponents nominated several high-profile, controversial properties that exposed discrepancies between federal and state laws and rules governing the National Register Program and gaps in administrative processes. Proposed changes will better align state rules with the federal requirements.

“We’re moving to fix those issues and refine the state rules to work better for Oregonians,” said Ian Johnson, associate deputy state historic preservation officer.

OPRD developed draft rules with the help of a committee of appointed members from state, county and local governments; preservation and natural resource organizations; and citizens with an interest in the National Register program.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed changes through 5 p.m. August 14, 2020. Comments can be made online, in writing or via email:

After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

The full text of the proposed change is available online: oregon.gov/oprd/PRP/Pages/PRP-rulemaking.aspx

Learn more about the National Register of Historic Places program in Oregon at oregon.gov/oprd/OH/pages/national-register.aspx

 


ATV Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee meets July 7
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/01/20 7:00 AM

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s (OPRD) All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee will meet via conference call 10 a.m. - noon July 7 to discuss the proposed ATV access route designation for a segment of Spinreel Road, located West of Lakeside.

The call is open to the public, but there will not be time for public comments during the meeting. The committee will also give an overview of the proposed designation.

How to access the conference call:

  • Listen only: dial 1 (914) 614-3221, access code ID: 429-669-815.
  • Register online to listen and view the presentation via web browser.

The proposed segment of Spinreel Road is a ½ mile stretch that runs from the U.S. 101 overpass to Airport Way. If designated, the segment would provide ATV access between Lakeside and the Spinreel dunes.

A public comment period for the proposed designation is open through July 6. Send comments via email to ian.caldwell@oregon.gov and ic.S.LEAMING@odot.state.or.us">Eric.S.LEAMING@odot.state.or.us.

Individuals who need special accommodations to listen to the call, or to request information in alternative formats, should contact Ian Caldwell, OPRD grants and community programs representative, at 541-410-5512. 

Learn more about the Oregon ATV Program at www.OregonOHV.org


Tue. 06/30/20
Oregon Students Win First Prize at National History Day(R) Contest for Second Consecutive Year (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 06/30/20 9:33 PM
Kyler Wang and Alan Zhou at the 2019 National History Day contest.
Kyler Wang and Alan Zhou at the 2019 National History Day contest.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-06/2861/135555/thumb_DSC_1812.jpg

Portland, OR – For the second year running, Portland sophomores Kyler Wang and Alan Zhou won gold at the annual National History Day® contest in the Senior Group Documentary category for their film, Breaking the Curfew: The Story of Minoru Yasui. Wang and Zhou won first place in the same category in the 2019 contest for their documentary, Echo of Falling Water: The Inundation of Celilo Falls — the first time in several years that Oregon students have medaled at the national contest, which this year drew over 3,000 students from across the country.

Even amidst a pandemic, 141 students from across the state came together virtually to participate in Oregon History Day, the statewide qualifying competition for the annual National History Day® contest. Working from home, middle and high school students developed their research projects, in the forms of papers, documentaries, websites, performances, and exhibits, persevering through hurdles that the new virtual format presented. Fifty volunteer judges evaluated over 70 projects online, and 56 students advanced to the National History Day® contest, which took place online from June 14–20.

As veteran Oregon and National History Day® participants, the switch to a virtual format provided new hurdles for the documentarians, according to Zhou:

Competing virtually was definitely a change for us, as we had gotten used to flying to Maryland for the national competition the past two years. Fortunately, we were able to complete most of our research and personal interviews before the COVID-19 quarantine began. We did conduct a few interviews over the internet. Although this affected the visual quality, we still learned a lot from them. Our work process was also altered —we were unable to meet in-person to write our script and revise the project. Despite these challenges, the overall experience of participating in NHD and conducting historical research remained fulfilling. We are extremely grateful that Oregon History Day continued, as we would not have the chance to tell our story and view projects created by other students. 

While the students clearly persevered, Wang noted that he, “definitely missed some of the yearly traditions at Nationals, like exchanging state-themed buttons and the parade before the award ceremony.”

Breaking the Curfew profiles Hood River, Oregon, born Minoru Yasui, who intentionally violated the military curfew imposed on Japanese Americans during World War II. In 2015, President Barack Obama awarded a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom, America’s highest civilian honor, to Yasui for challenging the incarceration of Japanese Americans in concentration camps during World War II and for his leadership in civil and human rights. He is the first Oregonian to receive that Medal.

“Through our documentaries, we've always tried to give a voice to powerful stories that have been mostly untold or forgotten,” remarked Wang. “Even as Oregonians, Alan and I had never heard of Minoru Yasui, nor Celilo Falls.”

Zhou further shared:

We first came across Minoru Yasui during our visit to the Oregon Historical Society museum's Experience Oregon exhibition in September 2019. We were instantly captivated and inspired by his powerful story. Here was an Oregonian, born and raised just 60 miles east of our high schools, who dared to stand up against the full force of the United States government in his fight against the discriminatory military orders imposed on his community during World War II. After doing some more research, we knew that Minoru Yasui fit the theme of this year's National History Day competition (Breaking Barriers in History) perfectly. Mr. Yasui not only broke barriers by intentionally violating the curfew during WWII, but by serving as a champion of justice throughout his lifetime. He stands as an example of what it means to be an Oregonian —and an American. 

Other Oregon students recognized at National History Day® include Anja Jolin, now a student at St. Mary’s Academy in Portland, Oregon. Jolin first participated in the Oregon History Day program three years ago when she was a student at Laurelhurst K–8. Still mentored by her middle school teacher, Lindsay Gebbie, Jolin has won the Outstanding Oregon Entry for her projects three years running, this year recognized in the senior category for her paper, Chipping Away at the Bulletproof Glass Ceiling: Portland Women Breaking Barriers in Policing. When asked why she continues to participate in the program, Jolin says:

Oregon History Day has given me the chance to delve into topics that interest me and explore the intricate details and mysteries of historical events. I enjoy connecting local history to broader issues with national significance, such as immigration and systemic gender barriers. Oregon History Day has given me a chance to take my learning outside the classroom and learn about events and people in history and the impact that they have made to society as a whole.

Evelyn Chen, Flora Huan, and Rachel Wang from Beaverton, Oregon’s, Stoller Middle School won the Outstanding Oregon Junior Entry award for their Junior Group Documentary, Fighting for Change: The Integration of Women in the Armed Forces.

Other notable projects that represented Oregon at the National History Day® contest included:

For the first time, students can already begin working on their 2021 National History Day® projects, following the new annual theme, Communication in History: The Key to Understanding. National History Day® provides an excellent project-based learning opportunity for all middle and high school students; educators interested in bringing this program to the classroom should contact Oregon History Day Coordinator Kristen Pilgrim at isten.pilgrim@ohs.org">kristen.pilgrim@ohs.org.

---

About Oregon History Day:

Oregon History Day, part of National History Day®, is a renowned, evidence-based middle and high school program where students across the state develop historical research projects based on an annual theme. Facilitated by the Oregon Historical Society, Oregon History Day encourages students to nurture their curiosities by researching topics from any time period or place, and by analyzing a historical event that connects to the annual theme. Students present their work in one of five categories — paper, website, exhibit, documentary, or performance —that can be developed independently or in groups of up to five students for each category (except paper).

Open-ended topic selections and student-directed inquiries give participants ownership over their projects and give educators the flexibility to adapt the program to fit their curriculum. Educators can narrow the scope of topic selections to align with themes they are covering in the classroom, such as focusing on the diversity of the many people who have shaped Oregon’s history. As students move through the process, they learn to collect, organize, and analyze information through a historical lens by evaluating primary and secondary sources.

Over half a million students across the nation participate, and for the first time ever, the National History Day® office is allowing students to begin work on their 2021 projects now! The 2021 theme is Communication in History: The Key to Understanding. For more information on National History Day®, visit www.nhd.org.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: Kyler Wang and Alan Zhou at the 2019 National History Day contest. , Kyler Wang and Alan Zhou meeting Madeleine Albright at an Oregon Historical Society Lecture in 2019, where their documentary, Echo of Falling Water, was screened for 2,500. , Alexa Rose, Echo School , Anja Jolin, St. Mary's Academy, Portland , Jaiden Smith, Seven Peaks School in Bend , Kaylan Ma, South Salem High School

DPSST Posts WebEx Sessions from Police Use of Force, Basic Police Training, and Police Professional Standards on Web
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/30/20 5:31 PM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) serves two important roles in our state’s criminal justice system. The first, establishing minimum state standards for training and certification of more than 41,000 public and private safety professionals.  The second, providing a comprehensive basic training program for all newly hired law enforcement professionals, and supporting professional development by offering advanced and leadership training opportunities.  DPSST accomplishes its work in partnership with the 24-member Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (BPSST or Board) which is made-up of various public safety stakeholders including a citizen member.

The tragic death of George Floyd due to the actions of Minneapolis police officers has led to lots of discussions, both in Oregon and around the nation, regarding police training and accountability.  The actions of the Minneapolis police officers are inexcusable.  While DPSST has always actively engaged with stakeholders, it was of the utmost importance for us to pause our work as we mourned the death of Mr. Floyd and listened to the questions and concerns being raised about policing in our state and nation.  Many of the questions within our state have been regarding the training and accountability of Oregon law enforcement officers.

To address these questions, to share information, and to answer questions, over the past two weeks DPSST held a number of virtual sessions specifically for local community leaders, elected officials, state legislators, and media.  One session addressed Oregon’s criminal justice professional standards system.  Another focused specifically on police use of force training in Oregon offered by DPSST.  And the last covered the basic police training program offered at DPSST to all newly hired city, county, state, tribal, and university law enforcement professionals.  Participants had the ability to ask questions of DPSST staff during each of these sessions.

Each of the sessions were recorded and have been posted for viewing on the DPSST webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/CJ/Pages/InformationalFiles.aspx   While each of the presentations covered the same information, each generated different questions based on the background and specific interests of those participating.  We have also posted the responses to the questions that were asked and are in the process of completing this document as we gather the information for those questions that need an answer.

DPSST’s new and improved webpage now includes the content of the 16-week DPSST Basic Police Course. This link https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/CPE/Pages/curriculum-facilitator-development.aspx#curriculum_overviews will take you to the accordion where the information can be found.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public citizen representative, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Public Notice: Provider rate increase effective July 1, 2020
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/30/20 3:52 PM

(Salem, Ore.) — Public notice is provided by the Oregon Department of Human Services, Office of Developmental Disabilities Services (ODDS), on a rate change.

The Oregon Legislature provided ODDS with $30 million General Fund (approximately $92 million total funds) to help bring direct support professionals’ wages as close as possible to $15 per hour by the end of the 2019-21 biennium and implement new rate models over the course of the biennium.

Per legislative direction in Senate Bill 5026 and the related Budget Note ODDS implemented selected rate increases in 2019.

Following the 2019 rate increases, approximately $10 million remained available for implementing new rate models. Due to an unexpected data issue and COVID-19, transition to the new rate models has been postponed. However, ODDS did get approval to use the remainder of the funds for 5% rate increases to help bring up wages on July 1, 2020.

Starting July 1, 2020, the rates for the following services will increase by 5%:

  • Day Support Activities
  • Job Coaching
  • Small Group Employment
  • Employment Path
  • Attendant Care Support
  • Discovery
  • Supported Living
  • Kids Foster Care
  • Adult 24-hour (The temporary 10% rate increase granted to this group of providers to address COVID-19 ends on June 30, 2020. This 5% increase is not in addition to the temporary 10% increase.)

Two provider categories will receive increases for wages based on the collective bargaining agreement between SEIU and the state of Oregon:

  • Adult Foster Care, at 7.15%
  • Personal Support Workers, at $0.77 per hour

Details about the increases are included in the updated Expenditures Guidelines

About ODDS:  The Oregon Department of Human Services’ Office of Developmental Disabilities Services provides leadership to support persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities to live as full participants in their communities. Oregon is recognized nationally as an innovative leader in developing community-based services for individuals with I/DD. Oregon’s system has the benefit of a strong advocacy community, one that has a long history and firm commitment to supporting people with I/DD to live as independently as possible in their communities.

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Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 06/30/20 3:16 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wed., July 1, 2020 at 1:00 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on unemployment claims processing on Wed., July 1 at 1:00 p.m. PT. Gerstenfeld will provide an update on claims processing progress, both for regular unemployment claims and the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference; Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12:00 p.m. PT on Wed., July 1. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for week day updates. A recording of the video conference will be sent out shortly after the media briefing concludes. 

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-06/930/135715/7.1._Media_Availability.pdf

Oregon reports 181 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/30/20 2:22 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 207, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

The Oregon Health Authority reported 181 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 8,656.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (19), Coos (1), Deschutes (10), Jackson (5), Jefferson (12), Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lake (2), Lane (7), Lincoln (3), Linn (4), Malheur (7), Marion (25), Multnomah (38), Polk (2), Umatilla (9), Union (10), Wasco (1), Washington (18), and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 205th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on June 18 and died on June 29, in his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 206th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on June 19 and died on June 29, at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.  

Oregon’s 207th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on June 12 and died on June 27, at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Practice fireworks safety this Fourth of July (Photo)
Grants Pass Dept. of Public Safety - 06/30/20 1:52 PM
2020-06/6530/135712/Wildfire_Hazard_Zones_-_South_.jpg
2020-06/6530/135712/Wildfire_Hazard_Zones_-_South_.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-06/6530/135712/thumb_Wildfire_Hazard_Zones_-_South_.jpg

What do you get when you mix fireworks with tinder dry vegetation?  A disaster that’s just waiting to happen.  After a two year reprieve, we have returned to a hot and dry summer. These conditions help set the stage for the possibility of a small fire to get out of hand.

The use of fireworks inside of the City Limits is prohibited.  However, on July 4th if allowed by the City Fire Marshal, between the hours of 6:00pm and 11:00pm, residents may use fireworks, except in all City parks, schools and the Urban/Wildland Interface areas.  The Urban/Wildland Interface areas are: (also see maps attached)

1.            The area west of Highland Ave. and Dimmick St., North of the railroad tracks

2.            The area north of Interstate 5

3.            Panoramic Loop Area

4.            Overland Drive Area

5.            Haviland Drive Area between Cloverlawn and Linden

6.            All City parks

7.            Any area posted: “NO FIREWORKS ALLOWED”

BE PREPARED before lighting fireworks!

-              Use only Oregon legal fireworks

-              Make sure fireworks are allowed in your neighborhood.

-              Store fireworks out of children’s reach.

-              Always read and follow label directions.

-              Place pets indoors; they are easily frightened by fireworks.

-              Always have water handy (a garden hose or bucket of water).

 

BE SAFE when lighting fireworks.

-              An adult should always light fireworks.

-              Keep matches and lighters away from children.

-              Use fireworks outdoors only.

-              Light one firework at a time.

-              Keep children and pets away from fireworks.

-              Do not throw fireworks or hold in your hand.

BE RESPONSIBLE after lighting fireworks.

-              Soak used fireworks thoroughly in a bucket of water.

-              Dispose of used fireworks and debris properly.

-              Never re-light a “dud” firework (wait 15 to 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water).




Attached Media Files: 2020-06/6530/135712/Wildfire_Hazard_Zones_-_South_.jpg , 2020-06/6530/135712/Wildfire_Hazard_Zones_-_North.jpg

Reminder -- Oregon Health Plan online application system getting an upgrade July 2-5 (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/30/20 1:22 PM
2020-06/973/135535/ONE_systemtimeline.png
2020-06/973/135535/ONE_systemtimeline.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-06/973/135535/thumb_ONE_systemtimeline.png

Salem, OR–The Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Health Authority are upgrading the eligibility system Oregonians use to apply for health coverage.

The upgrade is the first milestone in a larger project to make it easier for Oregonians to apply for health and human services benefits.

As we transition from the old system to the new one, there are two important considerations to be aware of:

  1. The online application will be unavailable from July 2-5 while the upgrade is in progress.
  2. Online applications that are not submitted by 4:00 p.m. PDT on July 2, 2020, cannot be transferred to the new system during the upgrade and will have to be restarted.

For Oregonians applying for Oregon Health Plan benefits online, it is important to complete those applications by July 2 or wait to start the application after July 6. Paper applications and applications completed over the phone are not impacted.

Oregonians can contact customer service at 1-800-699-9075 (TTY 711) to apply over the phone or request that an application be mailed to them. They can also download, print and mail a paper application. Both options are available in multiple languages.

After July 6, Oregonians can apply for the Oregon Health Plan online.

The Oregon ONE system will continue to be upgraded, in phases, through February 2021. Once the system is fully updated, all Oregonians will be able to use a single online application to apply for cash, childcare, food and medical benefits. They will also have the option to apply for any of these programs over the phone or in person at any local Aging and People with Disabilities, Area Agency on Aging or Self-Sufficiency Programs office that provides those benefits.

“This upgrade is just the first step in improving the way the state delivers health and human services benefits to Oregonians and their families,” said DHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht.

Please visit the DHS Benefits and Assistance page to learn more about the programs available to qualifying Oregonians.

Social media cards are attached.

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Attached Media Files: 2020-06/973/135535/ONE_systemtimeline.png , 2020-06/973/135535/ONE_systemclosed2.png , 2020-06/973/135535/ONE_systemclosed.png

Update on Habitat Conservation Plan process for western Oregon State Forests set for July 13
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/30/20 10:00 AM

The Oregon Department of Forestry will host a webinar meeting open to the public on Monday, July 13 to provide an update and solicit feedback on the Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Planning process.

This meeting will focus on aquatic and terrestrial conservation strategies developed to protect covered threatened and endangered species on state forest lands over the lifetime of the HCP. RSVP is requested. This effort focuses on a potential HCP on state forestlands west of the Cascades and is primarily intended for those with an interest in management of Oregon’s forests.

Date: Monday, July 13
Time: 1–3:30 p.m. meeting, followed by informal discussion period to discuss issues of most interest to participants from 3:30-4:30 p.m.
RSVP: Please RSVP by clicking here
Where: Please see webinar and call-in information below.

  • To view and participate in the webinar from your computer go to https://odf.zoom.us/j/94494505473.
  • For quality audio, please call in from your phone using the following call-in information:
    • Dial: 253-215-8782
    • Meeting ID: 944 9450 5473
  • A post-meeting recording will be posted on the ODF YouTube channel.

For more information on the Western Oregon State Forest HCP project, please visit https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/HCP-initiative.aspx.


Oregon Cannabis Commission Governance and Frame Working Subcommittee conference call July 15
Oregon Health Authority - 06/30/20 9:50 AM

June 30, 2020

What: A conference call for the Governance and Frame Working Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: July 15, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting Announcement
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/30/20 9:04 AM

Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting 

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board will hold a WebEx meeting on Wednesday July 8, 2020 at 9:30 a.m. in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Linsay Hale at (503) 378-2427 or via email at linsay.hale@state.or.us

Teleconference Information:

Dial-In: 888-273-3658

Participant Code: 4711910

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Agenda

 

  1. January 23, 2020 -  Approve minutes (requires vote)
  2. Malcus Williams (DPSST #33171) – Ashland Police Department; Supplemental Application for Discretionary PSMF Benefits (requires vote)  Presented by Linsay Hale
  3. Next meeting – TBD

 

# # Background # #

Established by the Legislature in 1999, the Oregon Public Safety Memorial Fund is administered and staffed by DPSST, in conjunction with a Governor-appointed PSMF Board of public safety constituents. The fund provides financial assistance to public safety officers who are permanently and totally disabled as a result of a line of duty injury, and to family members of the public safety officers who have been killed or permanently and totally disabled in the line of duty. For more information please go to https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/BD/MFB/Pages/default.aspx


Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Fake COVID-19 Antibody Testing Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/30/20 9:00 AM
TT - C-19 Antibody Tests - GRAPHIC - June 20, 2020
TT - C-19 Antibody Tests - GRAPHIC - June 20, 2020
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-06/3585/135651/thumb_TT_-_C-19_Antibody_Tests_-_GRAPHIC_-_June_30_2020.png

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: fraud related to COVID-19 antibody testing.  

Scammers are marketing fraudulent or unapproved COVID-19 antibody tests, potentially leading consumers to receive false results. In addition, fraudsters are trying to gain access to victims’ personal information, including names, dates of birth, and Social Security numbers. They are also seeking personal health data, including Medicare and private health insurance information, which can be used in future insurance or identity theft schemes.

Researchers are trying to develop testing methods that can quickly and easily test large numbers of people for COVID-19 antibodies. However, the FDA has not approved all COVID-19 antibody tests nor has it determined the efficacy of all tests. 

Here are some indicators of fraudulent activity:

  • Claims of FDA approval for antibody testing that you can’t verify
  • Ads for antibody testing through social media platforms, email, telephone calls, online, or from unsolicited or unknown sources
  • Marketers offering “free” COVID-19 antibody tests or providers offering incentives – including cash – if you undergo testing
  • Individuals contacting you in person or by phone or email to tell you the government or government officials require you to take a COVID-19 antibody test

Here’s what you can do to protect yourself:

  • Check the FDA’s website (fda.gov) for an updated list of approved antibody tests and testing companies
  • Consult your primary care physician before undergoing any at-home antibody tests
  • Use a known laboratory approved by your health insurance company to provide the antibody testing
  • Don’t share your personal or health information with anyone other than known and trusted medical professionals
  • Check your medical bills and the “explanation of benefits” (EOBs) that your insurance company sends you for any suspicious claims and promptly report any errors to your insurance provider
  • Follow guidance and recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other trusted medical professionals

If you believe you have been the victim of a COVID-19 fraud, report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3.gov) at www.IC3.gov or call your local FBI office.

###




Attached Media Files: TT - C19 Antibody Tests - AUDIO - June 30, 2020 , TT - C-19 Antibody Tests - GRAPHIC - June 20, 2020

Mon. 06/29/20
Fatal Crash on Hwy 26 - Wasco County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/29/20 5:59 PM
2020-06/1002/135689/20200629_131455.jpg
2020-06/1002/135689/20200629_131455.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-06/1002/135689/thumb_20200629_131455.jpg

On Monday, June 29, 2020 at approximately 11:40 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle collision on Hwy 26 near milepost 85.

Preliminary investigation showed that a white Mercedes Benz SUV, operated by Kathy Rayborn (73) of Welches, OR. was traveling eastbound when it crossed into the westbound lanes and collided with a motor home operated by Richard Rydman (76) of Vancouver, WA. 

Rydman and his passenger, Janice Rydman (73) of Vancouver, WA. were transported to St. Charles Hospital in Madras.

Rayborn sustained fatal injuries as was pronounced deceased. 

OSP was assisted by the Warm Springs Police Department, Warm Springs Fire and Rescue, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2020-06/1002/135689/20200629_131455.jpg

BPA offers rate relief to customers hit economically by pandemic
Bonneville Power Administration - 06/29/20 3:39 PM

Portland, Oregon The Bonneville Power Administration issued today a decision to suspend its financial reserves surcharge through September 2021.

“This decision is the result of a strong collaborative partnership with our customers,” said BPA Administrator and CEO Elliot Mainzer. “The steps we have taken in recent years to sustain BPA’s financial health make it possible for us to provide some measure of relief to our power customers as they work to address the economic consequences of the pandemic.”

The suspension of the surcharge, once approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, is expected to provide relief to BPA’s power customers totaling about $3 million per month for the remainder of FY 2020, and $30 million over FY 2021. The relief could come as early as July 1 if FERC issues an immediate interim rate approval.

BPA uses financial reserves as a tool to maintain financial health and mitigate financial risk, as it allows BPA to continue to meet all payment obligations when its sales revenues fall short of forecast. Financial reserves, which are defined as cash on hand, short-term investments and deferred borrowing, also plays a role in how agencies determine BPA’s credit rating.

“Maintaining reserves is a staple of financial strength,” said Michelle Manary, BPA Chief Financial Officer. “But given the significant challenges customers are facing, we agree this is not the time to be building up cash reserves.”

This is not the only relief measure BPA is offering its customers. BPA also is streamlining the process for customers to request payment extensions if they are facing financial hardship due to COVID-19 and are unable to pay their bills. This is available to all power and transmission customers on a case-by-case basis. This is not a waiver of the bill, but extends the payment out, with interest, for up to three years. BPA Power Services also has the Flexible Priority Firm Rate Option through the end of FY 2020, which is available to Regional Dialogue customers interested in shaping a portion of their FY 2020 bills into FY 2021.

“We offer these measures to our customers to be a responsive business partner,” said BPA Chief Operating Officer John Hairston. “We believe we have found a range of options that help customers without harming our bottom line in the long term.”

BPA established the financial reserves policy surcharge in its BP-20 rate proceeding as a way to build up cash reserves when they fall below a certain threshold. The surcharge triggered for BPA power customers for FY 2020 and was expected to trigger again in FY 2021.  The surcharge did not trigger for BPA’s transmission customers in FY 2020 and was not expected to trigger for FY 2021. BPA’s 2018-2023 Strategic Plan and its Financial Plan provide a framework for how the agency maintains and strengthens financial health, which is foundational to its long-term commercial success.

The suspension of the surcharge occurred through an expedited rate proceeding, which concluded today with the publication of the Administrator’s Final Record of Decision.

 About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

                                                                                       ###


Oregon Farm Bureau offers video, brochure on sharing the road safely with slow-moving farm equipment (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 06/29/20 3:35 PM
Watch a video and download a brochure with information for both motorists and farmers about rural road safety at https://OregonFB.org/safety
Watch a video and download a brochure with information for both motorists and farmers about rural road safety at https://OregonFB.org/safety
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-06/5507/135682/thumb_ruralroadsafetymeme.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 


Oregon Farm Bureau offers video, brochure on sharing the road safely with slow-moving farm equipment

June 29, 2020, SALEM, OREGON: For many Oregon farmers who are #StillFarming, July 4 signifies the busiest time of year. Harvest of major crops like grass seed, berries, tree fruits, clover, and wheat is in full swing, and it’s not unusual for a farmer to spend 15-hour days working in the field.

Summer harvest also means that sometimes farmers must drive their large equipment, such as tractors, swathers, combines, and trucks, out onto public roads to move between fields. Farmers do their best to avoid moving equipment during high-traffic times, but during peak harvest, when the fruit is ripe or the hay is at the optimum level of dryness, they often have no choice.

“While driving a slow-moving tractor on a highway is legal and often a necessary part of harvest, it can pose a safety risk without caution, courtesy, and patience,” said Kristie Glaser, vice chair of the OFB Health & Safety Committee. “We’re reminding drivers to slow down, be patient, and use caution when encountering a tractor on the road.”

To help drivers share the road safely with farm equipment, the Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) Health & Safety Committee offers a one-minute video and a free brochure with important tips for both motorists and farmers.

According to the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), in 2017 there were a total of 42 crashes statewide involving farm equipment, resulting in one fatality and 32 non-fatal injuries. This is a significant increase from 2013 when there was a total of 26 crashes involving farm equipment, with no fatalities and 11 non-fatal injuries.

“It’s heartbreaking to hear about injuries or deaths involving tractors that could’ve been avoided if drivers had simply slowed down, or farmers had taken a few simple steps,” said Glaser.

And as driving apps become the norm, more motorists than ever before are using rural roads for everyday travel.

“Our rural roads are no longer being used just for getting agricultural products to market. They’re now being used as backroad commuting highways,” said Glaser. “Too many people underestimate how dangerous it is when you don’t slow down or try to pass a tractor recklessly, or even illegally over a double line or on a curve.”

Most farm equipment is designed to travel at speeds of no more than 25 miles per hour (mph), and must display a reflective, triangular, orange-and-red, slow-moving-vehicle sign if going out on public roads.

It can be surprising just how slow 25 mph is on the highway. A tractor that looks far on the horizon can be directly in front of a fast-moving car within seconds.

“If you’re driving 55 mph on a highway and come upon a tractor that’s moving at 25 mph, it can take only 8 seconds to close a gap the length of a football field. You’ll be right behind that heavy piece of equipment very quickly,” said Glaser.


Safety tips for drivers include:

• If you decide to pass farm equipment on the road, please do so with caution.

• Be watchful of vehicles behind you that may also try to pass.

• If you must enter the oncoming lane of traffic, do not proceed unless you can see clearly ahead of both your vehicle and the vehicle you will pass.

• If there are any curves or hills ahead that may block your view or the view of oncoming vehicles, do not pass.

• Do not pass if you are in a designated “No Passing Zone” or within 100 feet of any intersection, railroad grade crossing, bridge, elevation structure, or tunnel.

• Do not assume that a farm vehicle that pulls to the right side of the road is going to turn right or is letting you pass. Due to the size of some farm implements, the farmer must make wide left-hand turns. If you are unsure, check the operator’s hand signals and look at the left side of the road for gates, driveways, or a place the vehicle might turn.


Safety tips for farmers include:

• Oregon law requires a slow-moving vehicle reflector on any machine that travels the road slower than 25 mph. Always point the triangle up, keep the SMV emblem clean to maximize reflectivity, and replace the emblem when it fades, normally every two to three years.

• Mark the edges of tractors and machines with reflective tape and reflectors. Consider installing retrofit lighting to increase visibility.

• Turn on your lights, but turn off rear spotlights when going onto the road. From a distance, spotlights can be mistaken for headlights.

• Be aware of heavy traffic patterns.

• Consider installing mirrors on equipment so you can see motorists around you. Be careful where the mirrors are placed.

• When moving multiple farm implements down the highway, leave enough space between each vehicle for cars to pass.


Request a copy of the printed OFB Rural Road Safety Brochure by calling 503.399.1701 or emailing a request to ie@oregonfb.org">annemarie@oregonfb.org.

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barb Iverson comes from a multigenerational family farm from Woodburn, raising industrial hemp, grass seed, squash, vetch seed, hazelnuts, wine and table grapes, and operating the Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival, which attracts over 160,000 visitors each year. Iverson is OFB’s 17th president.




Attached Media Files: Watch a video and download a brochure with information for both motorists and farmers about rural road safety at https://OregonFB.org/safety

Additional funds and no in-person interviews for SNAP extend into July
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/29/20 3:33 PM

The Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) has received approval by the Food and Nutrition Service to provide an additional $30 million to eligible Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients in July 2020.

“Oregonians continue to face economic instability and food insecurity,” said Self-Sufficiency Programs Director Dan Haun. “Providing another month of emergency assistance will help address ongoing food needs.”

With the additional funds, all eligible Oregon SNAP households will receive the maximum benefit amount in July. They will receive the extra allotment in the same way they receive their current benefits. For most customers this is an EBT card. The additional benefit amount will be disbursed on the schedule below to all eligible SNAP households. Households that already receive the maximum allotment will not receive an emergency allotment.
 

Month

Day

Description of household receiving emergency allotment

July

11

Current SNAP households not receiving the SNAP maximum allotment

31

New SNAP customers who did not receive the July 11 allotment and are not receiving the maximum benefit

No additional action is needed from Oregonians already enrolled in SNAP.

The table below shows the maximum SNAP benefits based on the number of eligible people in the household.

Household size

Max SNAP benefit

1

$194

2

$355

3

$509

4

$646

5

$768

Each additional person

+$146

This allotment will not permanently change a household’s monthly benefit amount. It is a temporary supplement to help during the current health crisis. DHS will not be sending individual notices to households about the emergency allotments.

In addition to continuing the emergency allotment, Oregon DHS will continue to do telephone interviews for new SNAP applications and recertifications. The health and safety of the community is a priority and getting people the benefits they need without them having to visit a local branch office maintains physical distancing efforts.

All new SNAP applicants and current SNAP recipients who need to recertify July 1 or after must complete an application and interview. Current SNAP recipients were mailed a notice and application to their address on file.

Questions?

Learn how to apply for SNAP and other benefits online or by phone at https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/COVID-19/Pages/Home.aspx.

SNAP customers can contact their local DHS SSP or AAA office for more information. Find a local office at: oregon.gov/DHS/Offices/Pages/index.aspx

For other ways to connect with DHS, contact 211info:

  • By calling 2-1-1 from any phone
  • Text your zip code to 898211
  • By email at help@211info.org
  • 211info.org

Find other food resources at https://oregonhunger.org/covid-19/.




Attached Media Files: 2020-06/973/135681/Additional_funds_and_no_in_person_interviews_for_SNAP_extend_into_July-062920.pdf

Be Safe While Celebrating: Oregon's Office of Emergency Management offers ways to manage risk over the July 4 holiday
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/29/20 2:32 PM

Celebrating Independence Day may look a little different this year. Although annual festivals and summer activities have been canceled or restricted due to COVID-19, there are still ways to enjoy summertime celebrations while managing your risks and keeping Oregonians safe.

As we are all aware, COVID-19 is present and on the rise in our communities. Simple actions such as keeping a 6 ft. distance from others, regular hand washing and wearing a face covering are all ways to manage the risk of spreading COVID to others.

Consider other ways to celebrate – with family and in small groups. If fireworks are a tradition you must maintain, keep a bucket of water or hose nearby, and maintain a safe distance from people, pets and buildings. Always purchase legal fireworks and use them only in areas where they are allowed. Remember, all fireworks are prohibited on Oregon State beaches, parks, campgrounds, and state and federal forest lands; check your local jurisdiction for restrictions.

Multiple areas in Oregon are abnormally dry with much of the state experiencing severe drought. This makes for elevated wildfire conditions and increased risk. Help manage the risk of human-caused wildfire by practicing basic wildfire safety at home, at work, and when you are out and about – hiking, camping and enjoying Oregon scenic areas. If you do travel for the holiday weekend, plan to stay close to home.

“Show your independence this 4th of July and make choices to keep you, your family and your community safe,” says Andrew Phelps, director of Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management. “Stay informed about fireworks safety to mitigate fire danger; maintain physical distancing and wear face coverings when socializing during holiday celebrations. It’s up to each of us to make the small changes that make a big difference.”

# # #


Supreme Court Protects Access to Abortion in Louisiana -- for Now
Planned Parenthood of SW Oregon - 06/29/20 2:10 PM

Today, the Supreme Court struck down a medically unnecessary Louisiana abortion restriction in a 5-4 decision in June Medical Services v. Russo. This means access to safe, legal abortion in Louisiana is protected for now, but attacks on our reproductive rights continue. The court ruled that Louisiana’s abortion restriction, which is identical to one it struck down four years ago in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, cannot stand under that precedent — it is unconstitutional to impose medically unnecessary laws that burden a person’s right to safe, legal abortion.

Though today’s ruling is a victory for access to abortion in Louisiana, the onslaught of attacks on our healthcare access are far from over. Sixteen other cases on abortion access are still one step away from the Supreme Court — and any one of them opens the door to restrict or nullify Roe v. Wade altogether. For Black people in particular, there can be no reproductive freedom until there is freedom to live without fear of persecution or violence. Had the court allowed the state’s restriction to stand, more than 850,000 women of reproductive age in Louisiana — a quarter of whom are Black women — would find abortion virtually inaccessible. 

“Today’s decision reinforces that abortion is essential and that reproductive health care is essential,” says Lisa Gardner, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon. “It’s a matter of having control over our bodies, our lives and our futures. All of us deserve to have access to reproductive health care — including abortion.”  

The Louisiana law would have required abortion providers to have the ability to admit patients at local hospitals. The court struck this law down because these requirements are medically unnecessary and will force abortion clinics to shutter, rendering abortion inaccessible throughout Louisiana.

Though we have a victory in this one case, the onslaught of attacks on our access to health care is far from over. Far too many people — particularly people of color and people with low incomes — already live in a world where access to abortion is nearly impossible. And, even in a public health crisis, politicians are still fighting at the Supreme Court to restrict access to birth control and to eliminate protections for people with pre-existing conditions.

“We are in the middle of a public health crisis, and people need more access to health care, not less,” says Anne Udall, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette. “We’ve already seen the devastating consequences when states used the COVID-19 crisis to restrict access to abortion, even temporarily. Restrictions to abortion forced people to drive unthinkable distances and put themselves at risk, if they were able to access health care at all.”

### 

Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon (PPSO) has been dedicated to providing expert reproductive health care and sexuality education in Southwestern Oregon for over 54 years.  PPSO provides more than 30,000 patient visits each year at five health centers.  PPSO is also the region’s most respected provider of medically accurate sexuality education for young people and adults, as well as training programs for professionals who work with youth and families.  Education and training programs make over 8,000 contacts each year, transforming the lives of young people in southwestern Oregon.  PPSO’s essential health services include breast and cervical cancer screenings, well-woman annual exams, birth control, abortion care, STI prevention, testing and treatment, pregnancy testing, PrEP (Pre-exposure prophylaxis), HPV vaccinations and vasectomies. For more information, visit www.ppsworegon.org. 

 


Oregon Hospitals Support Governor's Statewide Face Covering Requirement
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 06/29/20 2:07 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Dave Northfield, (503) 329- 1989, thfield@oahhs.org">dnorthfield@oahhs.org

 

Oregon Hospitals Support Governor’s Statewide Face Covering Requirement

With a rapid rise in COVID-19 cases, OAHHS urges Oregonians to wear face coverings to fight the spread  

Lake Oswego, Ore. -- June 29, 2020 -- Becky Hultberg, President and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, released the following statement in support of Governor Kate Brown’s statewide public face covering requirement.

“The Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems stands in support of Governor Kate Brown’s statewide public face covering requirement. We know that when we all make the choice to wear a face covering in public, we are doing our part to prevent the spread of COVID-19. With cases on the rise rapidly across the state, it is now more important than ever to take this step to protect our loved ones, our neighbors, and our communities. Further, if we are to coexist alongside the disease, wide adoption of public face coverings is an essential factor in keeping our businesses and public spaces open. OAHHS urges all Oregonians to wear a face covering in public, and to help reinforce this critical message by talking to your friends and family about the importance of wearing a face covering in public.”

                                                                                             ###

 

About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-06/1635/135673/Statewide_Masking_Media_Advisory_06_29_2020_FINAL.docx

Oregon reports 146 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/29/20 2:07 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 204, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 146 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 8,485.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (18), Deschutes (2), Douglas (2), Jackson (3), Jefferson (3), Josephine (1), Klamath (5), Lake (2), Lane (6), Malheur (5), Marion (14), Multnomah (29), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (15), Union (5), Wasco (6), Washington (27), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 203rd COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on June 18 and died on June 27. Her place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 204th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on June 17 and died on June 27. His place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying medical conditions.

Note: Starting today and moving forward, epidemiologists are using a new method for reporting daily cases. The new method assigns a date to each case when the case is first known to the state or to local health department as confirmed or presumptive. This is a better representation of the number of cases reported on any given day. 

Previously, the method was to subtract today’s case counts from the previous day’s count.

Today only, the daily numbers from the weekend press releases will not add-up. Weekend numbers were calculated using the previous method. Moving forward, every day will use the date each case is first known to the state or to local health departments.

OHA releases weekly testing summary

Today, OHA is releasing its Weekly Testing Summary, showing that 33,624 tests were reported through June 27. Oregon’s cumulative positive testing rate is 4.3 percent of tests conducted, which is considerably lower than the national average of 9 percent.

The number of tests performed has been steadily increasing, but the number of positive cases and the test positivity rate have increased significantly over the past two weeks.

This suggests increasing numbers of individuals with COVID-19, which is expected now that all counties are in Phase 1 or Phase 2 of reopening. Recent large outbreaks around the state also have contributed to these increases.

OHA will continue to monitor these trends. Additionally, as of early June, Oregon has reached the threshold of testing 2 percent of the Oregon population each month, a national benchmark set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Weekly Testing Summary was delayed Friday due to a technical glitch. As a result, today’s Weekly Testing Summary covers an 8-day period. OHA will continue to publish the report weekly.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Department of Revenue reminds taxpayers of July's filing and payment deadlines
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 06/29/20 12:01 PM

Salem, OR—The Oregon Department of Revenue is reminding taxpayers that July 15 is the deadline for filing a tax return and paying tax due. Oregon extended the deadline when the IRS extended the deadline to file and pay federal taxes due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

For personal income taxpayers:
• The Oregon return filing due date for tax year 2019 is July 15, 2020.
• The Oregon tax payment deadline for payments due with the 2019 tax year is July 15, 2020.
• The tax year 2019 six-month extension to file until October 15, 2020, if requested, extends only to the filing (not payment) deadline.
If you have questions about your personal income tax, contact questions.dor@oregon.gov.

For corporate income/excise taxpayers:
• The Oregon return filing due date for tax year 2019 is July 15, 2020.
• The Oregon tax payment deadline for payments for the 2019 return, normally May 15, 2020, is now July 15, 2020.
• Fiscal year returns and related payments due after July 15, 2020 are not extended at this time.
Interest and penalties:
• Because of the extension of the due dates for filing returns and making payments, any interest and penalties with respect to Oregon tax filings and payments begin accruing on July 16, 2020.
• No automatic extension is provided for the payment or deposit of any other type of Oregon tax or for the filing of Oregon information returns.

Kicker reminder
If your 2018 return is amended or adjusted after you file your 2019 return, we will automatically adjust your kicker amount.

Department of Revenue offices
All Revenue offices remain closed to drop-in visitors. If you need to speak to one of our representatives in person, you must make an appointment. Go to www.oregon.gov/dor and click on Contact Us to schedule an appointment.

Electronic filing continues to be the easiest and fastest way for taxpayers to file and pay any taxes due. You can also make payments on Revenue Online.

You can find resources, such as forms and publications, information regarding filing as an individual or business, and helpful tools like Where’s My Refund and What’s My Kicker, on the Department of Revenue webpage. Also, keep up to date with the latest developments and news surrounding impacts of COVID-19 to your taxes.

You can visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get forms, check the status of your refund, or make payments. You can call 503-378-4988 or 800-356-4222 (toll-free) or email questions.dor@oregon.gov for additional assistance. For TTY for hearing- or speech-impaired, call 800-886-7204.


Reuniones de los subcomités del Plan Estatal de Mejoramiento de la Salud 2020-2024
Oregon Health Authority - 06/29/20 9:51 AM

29 de junio de 2020

Reuniones de los subcomités del Plan Estatal de Mejoramiento de la Salud 2020-2024

Qué: Los subcomités del Plan Estatal para el Mejoramiento de la Salud 2020-2024 (State Health Improvement Plan o SHIP, por sus siglas en inglés), se encargan de identificar estrategias y medidas, y desarrollar planes de trabajo para implementar el SHIP. Cada uno de los cinco subcomités se centra en una de las siguientes áreas prioritarias:

  • Acceso a atención de la salud preventiva equitativa.
  • Adversidad, trauma y estrés tóxico.
  • Salud del comportamiento
  • Impulsores económicos de la salud.
  • Parcialidad institucional.

Agenda: Finalizar actividades y medidas, y proporcionar recomendaciones para la implementación.

Dónde: Las reuniones están disponibles de forma remota. Para conocer las opciones de asistencia a reuniones remotas, visite la página de reunión del subcomité:

Cuándo:

  • Subcomité de Adversidad, Trauma y Estrés Tóxico: martes 15 de julio, de 2-4 p.m.
  • Subcomité de parcialidad institucional: miércoles 15 de julio, 10 a.m. al mediodía.
  • Subcomité de salud del comportamiento: miércoles 15 de julio, 2-4 p.m.
  • Subcomité de Acceso a Atención Médica Preventiva Equitativa: lunes 29 de julio, 1-3 p.m.
  • Subcomité de Impulsores Económicos de la Salud: jueves 30 de julio, 2-4 p.m.

Las reuniones están abiertas al público. Habrá un período de comentarios públicos de cinco minutos cerca del final de cada reunión. Los comentarios están limitados a un minuto.

Antecedentes: el SHIP de Oregón identifica intervenciones y estrategias para abordar las prioridades relacionadas con la salud en el estado. El SHIP sirve como base para tomar medidas colectivas con socios intersectoriales para mejorar la salud de las personas en Oregón. El SHIP se basa en los resultados de la Evaluación de Salud del Estado.

Contacto del programa: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us

# # #

Todos tienen derecho a conocer y utilizar los programas y servicios de Oregon Health Authority (OHA, por sus siglas en inglés). OHA brinda ayuda gratuita. Algunos ejemplos de la ayuda gratuita que puede proporcionar la OHA son:

  • Intérpretes de lenguaje de señas y lenguaje hablado

•   Materiales escritos en otros idiomas.

•   Braille

•   Letra grande

•   Audio y otros formatos

Si necesita ayuda o tiene preguntas, comuníquese con Catherine Moyer al 971-673-1132, ine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us">Catherine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us, al menos 48 horas antes de la reunión.

 


2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan subcommittee meetings
Oregon Health Authority - 06/29/20 9:51 AM

June 29, 2020

What: Subcommittees of the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) are tasked with identifying strategies and measures, and developing work plans for implementing the SHIP. Each of the five subcommittees is focused on one of the following priority areas.

  • Access to equitable preventive health care.
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress.
  • Behavioral health (including mental health and substance use).
  • Economic drivers of health (including issues related to housing, living wage, food security and transportation).
  • Institutional bias.

Agenda: Subcommittees will finalize activities and measures, and provide recommendations for implementation.

 

Where: Meetings are being held remotely. For remote meeting attendance information, visit the subcommittee page links in the following section.

When:

All meetings are open to the public. A five-minute public comment period will be held near the end of each meeting; comments are limited to one minute each.

Background: Oregon’s SHIP identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in the state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath of people in Oregon. The SHIP is based off findings of the State Health Assessment.

Program contact: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Catherine Moyer at 971-673-1132, ine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us">catherine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Oregon Parks and Recreation Department awards $615,000 to preserve historic theaters throughout the state
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/29/20 9:42 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), which includes the Oregon Main Street Network and the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), has awarded $615,000 in federal grant funding for the preservation of historic theaters.  

 

Eight theater projects were selected in a competitive grant process.

 

  • Dallas Downtown Association, for roof, masonry, and other repairs on the Dallas Cinema in Dallas.

 

  • Egyptian Theatre Preservation Association, for roof repair on the theater in Coos Bay.

 

  • Lakeview Community Partnership, for electrical and lighting repair, fire door replacement, and curtain and rigging work at the Alger Theatre in Lakeview.

 

  • Little Theater on the Bay, to replace the roof and missing Moorish roof domes on the Liberty Theater in North Bend.

 

  • Newberg Downtown Coalition, to update seats and acoustical drapes in the auditorium and repair exterior lighting on the Cameo Theatre in Newberg.

 

  • OK Theatre, to restore façade and store fronts, update the concessions area, and add a bar service area to the theater in Enterprise.

 

  • Rex Theater, to restore the marquee neon and reader board, paint the exterior, repair the roof and ceiling, and install HVAC in the Theater in Vale.

 

  • The Dalles Main Street Program, to install new fire doors, HVAC, and awnings on the Granada Theatre in The Dalles.

 

The grants were funded through a grant to OPRD from the National Park Service. It was one of nine awarded nationally through the Historic Revitalization Subgrant Program. Funding also covers the cost for the preparation of National Register of Historic Places nominations for four of the theaters not currently listed. These include the Dallas Cinema, Liberty Theatre, Rex Theatre, and Alger Theatre.

 

“These projects will significantly impact the local communities,” said Chrissy Curran, Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer. “We are pleased to have been awarded this funding so that we can support local theaters and foster our vibrant rural communities in Oregon.”

 

Restore Oregon, a statewide nonprofit, was also funded to help promote the program and assist theaters in the application process.

 

To learn more about the grant, contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

 

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Attached Media Files: Award list